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conservation chatter corner

with ron schroder

************************************************

YOUR IN ON THE OUTDOORS FOR WESTERN NEW YORK
www.huntfishnyoutdoors.com

 

4 – 20 – 18

 

Welcome to this week’s Conservation Chatter Corner – little bits of happenings concerning our outdoors and you, the sportspeople who enjoy being part of that outdoors.

 

PUBLIC INFORMATION SESSION ON HABITAT MANAGEMENT PLANS FOR CONESUS INLET AND HONEOYE CREEK WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT AREAS – APRIL 24: The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) is hosting a public information session to provide information and answer questions about recently completed habitat management plans for Conesus Inlet Wildlife Management Area (WMA), in the town of Conesus, Livingston County, and Honeoye Creek WMA, in the town of Richmond, Ontario County.

The session will take place on Tuesday, April 24, from 6:30 to 8 p.m. in the conference room at the DEC Region 8 Headquarters, 6274 East Avon-Lima Road, Avon. An open house is scheduled for 6:30 - 7 p.m., followed by a formal presentation. The DEC Region 8 Headquarters conference room is wheelchair accessible. Please contact DEC Biologist Michael Palermo at (585) 226-5383 with any specific requests for accommodations.

Conesus Inlet WMA is directly south of Conesus Lake, and consists of 1,142 acres that are primarily wetland. Wetland habitats on the WMA are extensive and diverse, composed of emergent marsh, scrub-shrub swamp, and forested wetlands.
Honeoye Creek WMA consists of 749 acres and habitats are primarily upland, composed of grassland and agricultural fields interspersed with hedgerows and fragmented patches of shrubland and forest. Approximately 100 acres of wetland also occur on Honeoye Creek WMA.

Habitat management goals for the two WMAs are to maintain a diversity of wetland and upland habitats that benefit a wide range of resident and migrating wildlife species, including several rare and declining species. DEC will continue to actively manage these WMAs to benefit wildlife using best management practices. Planned management activities include: (1) timber harvests to improve forest health; (2) maintenance of wetland impoundments; (3) mowing and replanting grassland fields; and (4) controlling invasive plant species.

The meeting will include a presentation about the history of management on these WMAs, specific activities and locations for planned management actions, a brief overview of DEC's Young Forest Initiative, and a question and answer period.

The habitat management plan for Conesus Inlet WMA can be found on DEC's website. The habitat management plan for Honeoye Creek WMA can be found on DEC's website. For more information about this event please call (585) 226-5383.

 

OPENING OF SPRING TURKEY SEASON ON MAY 1 / YOUTH TURKEY HUNT WEEKEND APRIL 21-22: Spring turkey season opens May 1 in all of upstate New York north of the Bronx-Westchester County boundary and the annual youth turkey hunting weekend is scheduled for this weekend (April 21-22). The youth turkey hunt for junior hunters ages 12-15 is open in all of upstate New York and Suffolk County. With reproductive success below the long-term average in 2016 and 2017, coupled with harsh winter conditions this year, it is anticipated that the spring harvest will be down from last year. However, good hunting opportunities can be found throughout the state, particularly in regions with good nesting and poult success the last two years (reports from DEC's Summer Turkey Sighting Survey can be viewed on DEC's webpage).

Almost 6,000 junior hunters harvested an estimated 1,600 birds during the two-day youth-only hunt in 2017. The estimated turkey harvest for spring 2017 was about 17,500 birds.

Important Details for the Spring Turkey Season, May 1 through 31, 2018:

>Hunting is permitted in most areas of the state, except for New York City and Long Island.

>Hunters must have a turkey hunting permit in addition to their hunting license.

>Shooting hours are from one-half hour before sunrise to noon each day

>Hunters may take two bearded turkeys during the spring season, but only one bird per day.

>Hunters may not use rifles or handguns firing a bullet. Hunters may hunt with a shotgun or handgun loaded with shot sizes no larger than No. 2 or smaller than No. 8, or with a bow or crossbow.

>Successful hunters must fill out the tag that comes with their turkey permit and immediately attach it to any turkey harvested.

>Successful hunters must report their harvest within seven days of taking a bird. Call 1-866-426-3778 (1-866 GAMERPT) or report harvest online on DEC's website.

For more information about turkey hunting in New York, see the 2017-18 Hunting and Trapping Regulations Guide or visit the "Turkey Hunting" pages of DEC's website.

New York has an extremely safety-conscious generation of hunters, largely due to the annual efforts of more than 3,000 dedicated volunteer hunter education instructors. DEC suggests hunters follow the cardinal rules of hunting safety: assume every gun is loaded; control the muzzle; keep your finger off the trigger until ready to shoot; be absolutely sure of your target and what may be beyond it; and don't stalk. DEC recommends that hunters are set up with their backs against a large tree and call birds. To find a hunter education class in your area, visit DEC's website or call 1-888-HUNT-ED2 (1-888-486-8332).

Citizen Science Opportunities:
DEC Seeks Turkey Hunters for Ruffed Grouse Drumming Survey - Turkey hunters in pursuit of that wary gobbler in the spring are ideally suited for monitoring ruffed grouse during the breeding season. Turkey hunters can record the number of grouse they hear drumming while afield to help DEC track the distribution and abundance of this game bird. To get a Ruffed Grouse Drumming Survey form, visit DEC's website or call (518) 402-8883.

To participate in DEC's Summer Wild Turkey Sighting Survey or other wildlife surveys, visit the "Citizen Science" page of the DEC website.

 

PUBLIC COMMENT WANTED ON DRAFT LOWER SALMON RIVER RESTORATION AND RECREATION ENHANCEMENT PLAN: The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) announced the release of the Draft Lower Salmon River Restoration and Recreation Enhancement Plan to guide management of the newly designated Lower Salmon River State Forest, part of the acquisition of more than 6,000 acres of protected land in Oswego County.

The Salmon River in northern Oswego County is home to one of New York's premier sportfishing destinations for trophy-sized trout and salmon. DEC recently acquired approximately 1,700 acres of land adjacent to the lower Salmon River as part of a settlement agreement with National Grid (formerly Niagara Mohawk) to strengthen protection of vital natural resources and expand opportunities for public access to the fisheries.

DEC dedicated $500,000 from the Lake Ontario Sportfishing Restoration Natural Resource Damages settlement to river restoration and trail enhancement and development projects along the lower Salmon River. DEC, with U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service partners, is proposing to restore habitat for fish and other aquatic organisms, stabilize eroding river banks by building in-stream restoration structures, and improve the trail system to protect, conserve, and enhance this incredible fishery for current and future generations of anglers.

The draft Lower Salmon River Restoration and Recreation Enhancement Plan is currently available on DEC's website. DEC will accept comments until May 10, 2018 and staff will be available to answer questions and explain the plan during an open house on Thursday, April 26, 2018. The public is welcome to stop by any time from 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. at DEC's Salmon River Fish Hatchery, 2133 County Route 22, Altmar, NY 13302.

DEC also encourages the public to comment on the draft Salmon River Fisheries Management Plan, available on DEC's website. Comments on this draft plan will be accepted until April 23, 2018.

To comment on the plans, send an email with the appropriate subject line, either "Lower Salmon River Restoration Plan" or "Salmon River Fisheries Plan," to fwfish7@dec.ny.gov Written comments may also be sent via U.S. Mail to: David Lemon, Regional Fisheries Manager, NYSDEC Region 7, 1285 Fisher Road,Cortland, New York 13045.  

 

KUDOS:  New York teen, Alex Gould of Tonawanda, is among 64 high school anglers from across the country named to the 2018 Bassmaster High School All State Fishing Team. Alex was the lone New York angler selected for the team. Students were selected for the honor based on their success in bass tournament competition, academic achievement and leadership in conservation and community service.

 

LAKE STURGEON RECOVERY PLAN WILL HELP GUIDE RECOVERY EFFORTS OVER NEXT DECADE: Lake Sturgeon have been listed as a threatened species in New York since 1983, and this plan will provide DEC and partners with a clear blueprint to achieve recovery of this ancient fish within our waters. This report is the culmination of dedicated work by DEC staff and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, U.S. Geological Survey, Cornell University, St. Regis Mohawk Tribe, and others, including the New York Power Authority, since recovery activities began in 1992.

The purpose of this recovery plan is to ensure perpetuation of the species in the state, restore self-sustaining populations, and remove the species from the threatened species list in New York. The plan sets clear metrics to demonstrated recovery in six of the seven management units across the species' range in the state. DEC anticipates the agency will gather enough evidence of recovery of lake sturgeon to initiate removal from the list of threatened species in New York no later than 2024.

A summary of comments is included in the final Lake Sturgeon Recovery Plan, and are available on DEC's website.

Lake sturgeon were once abundant in New York, but commercial fishing, dam building, and habitat loss decimated populations. Today the fish can still be found in Lake Erie, the Niagara River, Lake Ontario, the St. Lawrence River, Grasse River, Oswegatchie River, and Black Lake, as well as Lake Champlain, Cayuga Lake, Oneida Lake, Seneca River, and the Cayuga Canal. While sturgeon numbers have improved, their populations are still low compared to historical levels both in New York and the rest of the Great Lakes states. It is estimated that fishing removed 80 percent of the sturgeon from Lake Erie by 1900. Sturgeon were once prized for their meat and caviar and constituted an important industry in the state.

Lake Sturgeon are native to the Mississippi River Basin, Great Lakes Basin, and Hudson Bay region of North America. They are the largest fish native to the Great Lakes, growing up to seven or more feet in length and achieving weights of up to 300 pounds. A specimen that was 7 ft. 4 in. long and weighed 240 pounds was found in Lake Erie in 1998.

Lake sturgeon from New York's inland waters are smaller on average and may grow to three to five feet in length and about 80 pounds as adults. Male sturgeon become sexually mature between eight and 12 years of age and may live as long as 55 years. Females become sexually mature between 14 and 33 years of age and live as long as 80 to 150 years. The slow rate of maturity and reproduction make the fish particularly vulnerable to overfishing.

For more information on lake sturgeon visit these pages:

Lake Sturgeon Fact Sheet

Lake Sturgeon Restoration

Great Lakes Lake Sturgeon Collaboration (leaves DEC's webpage)

 

THE GOOD GUYS AT WORK:

Illegal Waterfowl Shooting - Wyoming County
On March 31, ECO RJ Ward responded to a complaint in the town of Gainesville that someone had shot and killed a hooded merganser in a small farm pond across the road from the caller's residence. The caller spotted a vehicle pull onto a farm road adjacent to the pond; the passenger in the vehicle fired several rounds. Both occupants then exited the vehicle and fired an additional round at the merganser. The subjects left the area before the complainant obtained any information other than a description of the vehicle. ECO Ward responded to the scene, collected the merganser, and located several .223 shotgun casings. While the officer was interviewing nearby residents, he observed a vehicle matching the description drive by and attempt to flee. ECO Ward gave chase, stopped the vehicle, and interviewed the occupants. The subjects admitted to firing several rounds at Canada Geese from the passenger seat, and when the geese flew away, only the merganser remained and they used the shotgun to dispatch it. The officer collected a shotgun between the front seats, a rifle in the back seat, and another loaded rifle in the back of the truck. The subjects were charged with possessing a loaded firearm in a motor vehicle, taking wildlife with the aid of a motor vehicle, hunting with an autoloader capable of holding more than six rounds, hunting waterfowl during the closed season, hunting waterfowl without a duck stamp, failure to hunt waterfowl with non-toxic projectiles, and wanton waste.

ECO standing by an ECO police truck
ECO Ward with the illegally killed merganser

 

THIS WEEK’S EVENTS: (For complete future listings go to the Calendar Page - http://www.huntfishnyoutdoors.com/events.php)

APRIL 2018

20 - National Wild Turkey Federation – Genesee Local Chapter Dinner at the Quality Inn & Suites, 8250 Park Road, Batavia, NY. (6:00 pm) The NWTF banquets are where you can buy exclusive merchandise and have a great time with friends. All the while, you will be raising vital funds for wild turkey conservation and important programs that introduce the outdoors to women, children and the disabled. (For more information contact Terry Young  585-343-8350  tyoung14143@gmail.com)  

20 - Whitney Point Sportsman Association Coonhound Event at the club on NY Route 206, Whitney Point, NY (7:30 pm - Coonhound Bench Show-Poor Boy - $12.00/8:00 pm Coonhound Event Nite Hunt-Poor Boy - $15.00) (For information call Ralph Canniff at 607-240-1129)

20 - Wyoming County Houndsmen and Conservation Club Coonhound Event at their clubhouse Sage Road, Warsaw, NY (6:00 pm - Coonhound Bench Show - $15.00/8:00 pm - Coonhound Nite Hunt - $20.00) (For information contact Nick Jennings  585-993-0145  moc.oohay@12sgninnej.kcin

21 - Cattaraugus County Houndsmen and Conservation Club Inc. Coonhound Event at their clubhouse at 10491 Route 240, West Valley, NY (6:00 pm - Coonhound Bench Show - $15.00/8:00 pm - Coonhound Event Nite Hunt - $20.00) (For information call Chris Deperro  716-570-6798  moc.oohay@orrepedsirhc

21 - Steuben County Coon Hunters, Inc. Coonhound Event at their clubhouse at 4082 Depot Street, Cameron, NY (5:30 pm - Coonhound Bench Show - $15.00/8:00 pm - Coonhound Event Nite Hunt - $20.00) (For information call Roger Barney at 607-695-9024  ten.sehguh@yenrab_jr)

21 - First Annual Lake Erie Outdoor & Fishing Show at the Clarion Hotel Marina & Conference Center, 30 Lake Shore Dr E, Dunkirk, NY (10:00 am – 4:00 pm) (For information call 716-366-3000 ext. 420 or email mpatton@observertoday.com.)

21 - Southtowns Walleye Club Fundraiser at the Club, 5895 Southwestern Blvd., Hamburg, NY. (4:00 – 6:00 pm) This event is for the benefit the New York State Conservation Council. (For information and tickets contact Dan at 716-655-0975.)

21 - Bison City Rod & Gun Flea Market at the Club, 511 Ohio St, Buffalo, NY (8:00 am – 1:30 pm) Admission free, Tables are free on a first come basis, Setup will begin at 7 AM. Bring your old, used or new sporting equipment to sell. Due to NY Safe Act, no guns may be displayed or sold. Loading equipment and components may be sold (powder, shot, primers, brass and bullets), live ammo may be sold: shotgun, pistol and rifle. (For information call: Fred Langdon or Willie Sieber at 716- 260-3240)

21 - Pruning Shrubs and Trees with Confidence HB172 at the Discovery Center of the Southern Tier, 60 Morgan Road, Binghamton, NY (9:00 am – 12:30 pm) No need to fear the shear! Ever wonder if your pruning has encouraged or discouraged the flowering or growth of your favorite shrub? This training offers classroom and hands-on instruction on making proper pruning cuts, technique development, proper equipment selections, and practical applications for pruning three different types of woody shrubs: tree form shrubs, spreading shrubs, and conifers for your gardening goals. Participants will practice what they have learned by pruning specimen plants in the Story Garden under the supervision of the instructor. Participants will also take home a variety of woody stems that can be forced for indoor bloom and have the option to buy a quality hand pruner. Come dressed for the weather. (Cost: $50.00) (For information/register call 607-778-5012.)

21 - Boating Safety Course by U.S. Coast Guard Flotilla 3-1 at the Fort Niagara Officer’s Club, Youngstown, NY (9:00 am – 5:00 pm) This is a required class for anyone born after May 1, 1996 if you want to operate a boat or jet ski. (For information/register call Martin Laufer at 390-7727 or mdl29@msn.com)

21 - Whitetails Unlimited – Stonybrook Chapter Hunters Night Out at the Dansville Fire Department, 11 Franklin Street, Dansville, NY Deadline for ticket sales 4–17-18. (Cost: Adult - $45.00/Spouse - $25.00/Youth - $25.00) Through our Grassroots Program, WTU provides grants to local projects and activities that advance our mission. Proceeds from this event will benefit youth conservation and training event. (For information call Shannon Griese at 585-739-1779 or go to http://www.whitetailsunlimited.com/events/banquets/)

21 - 22nd Annual Niagara Frontier Friends of the NRA Banquet at Salvatore’s Italian Gardens, 6461 Transit Road, Depew, NY (5:00 pm) (Cost: $50.00) Half of the proceeds raised comes back into the area for grant programs involved with the shooting sports. (For information call Georgina Grosofsky at 716-866-7656 or email friendsofnrageorgina@gmail.com)

21 - National Wild Turkey Federation – Tri-County Chapter Hunting Heritage Banquet at the Ramada Inn, 2310 N. Triphammer Road, Ithaca, NY (5:00 pm) The NWTF banquets are where you can buy exclusive merchandise and have a great time with friends. All the while, you will be raising vital funds for wild turkey conservation and important programs that introduce the outdoors to women, children and the disabled. (For more information contact Scott Wilcox at 607-533-4707)

21 – Earth Day Celebration at Baltimore Woods Nature Center, 4007 Bishop Hill Road, Marcellus, NY (1:00 – 4:00 pm) It’s Earth Day! Come celebrate at a fun and educational event, including info booths on home energy, recycling, crafts, guided nature walks, live animal shows, and a special live performance of Dr. Seuss’ The Lorax. Program for ages 3 and up. Free to the public. (For information call 315- 673-1350 or email info@baltimorewoods.org)

21 - Woods Walk: Spring Wildflowers at the Reinstein Woods Environmental Education Center, 93 Honorine Drive, Depew, NY (Town of Cheektowaga) (11:00 am) Join a guided nature walk to search for the early wildflowers of spring. (For information call 716-683-5959 or email reinsteinwoods@dec.ny.gov)

21 - Birding 101: Class #4 at the Reinstein Woods Environmental Education Center, 93 Honorine Drive, Depew, NY (Town of Cheektowaga) (2:30 pm) Who’s in the pond? And who’s hiding in the reeds? Learn about local ducks and wetland birds. For adults and children ages 8 and older. (For information and register call 716-683-5959 or email reinsteinwoods@dec.ny.gov)

21-22 – Spring Youth Turkey Hunt (Details page 46 17-18 Hunting & Trapping Guide)

21-22 - New York State Arms Collectors Syracuse Gun Show, New York State Fairgrounds Expo Center, 581 State Fair Blvd, Syracuse. (9:00 am-5:00 pm Saturday/ 9:00 am-3:00 pm Sunday) (For information call 607-748-1010 or go to http://www.syracusegunshow.com/)

23 - National Wild Turkey Federation – Chautauqua Chapter Dinner at the Lakewood Rod & Gun, 433 E. Terrace Avenue, Lakewood, NY. The NWTF banquets are where you can buy exclusive merchandise and have a great time with friends. All the while, you will be raising vital funds for wild turkey conservation and important programs that introduce the outdoors to women, children and the disabled.   (For more information contact Patrick Hoover 716-489-6933)

24 - A public information session to provide information on the completed habitat management plans for Conesus Inlet Wildlife Management Area (WMA), in the Town of Conesus, Livingston County, and Honeoye Creek WMA, in the Town of Richmond, Ontario County at the DEC Region 8 Headquarters, 6274 East Avon-Lima Road, Avon, NY. (6:30 – 8:00 pm) The habitat management plan for Conesus Inlet WMA can be found on DEC's website. The habitat management plan for Honeoye Creek WMA can be found on DEC's website. (For more information about this event please call 585-226-5383.)

25 - CNY Wildfowlers Assoc. Banquet at Traditions at the Links, Syracuse, NY. (6:00 pm) (For information call Ron Falkowski 315-440-8201.)

27 - National Wild Turkey Federation – Oswego River Chapter Dinner at the Oasis at Thunder Island, Route 48. Fulton, NY. A great time to help raise vital funds for wild turkey conservation and important programs that introduce the outdoors to women, children and the disabled.  (For more information contact Bruce Bailey   315-695-5113   dinlepuss@hotmail.com)

27 – ARBOR DAY in New York State

27 - Concealed Carry Class - Legal Heat at Cabela’s Cheektowaga Store, 2003 Walden Avenue, Cheektowaga, NY (9:00 am - 1:00 pm) Cabela’s has partnered with Legal Heat, the Nation’s Leading Firearms Training Firm to provide concealed carry classes to meet the qualifying requirements and documentation to obtain the Utah and Arizona concealed carry permits in a fun, informative, non-intimidating class. These permits will allow combined carry reciprocity in approximately 37+ states. Legal Heat's concealed carry class covers firearms safety, handling, transportation, storage, ammunition, self-defense and firearms laws, concealed carry techniques and much more. Legal Heat’s firearm training instructors are all NRA and Utah BCI certified, insured and among the most highly experienced in the industry and can answer your CCW questions. This course typically runs approximately 4 hours. This Legal Heat course does not have a test€or range requirement. The Utah and Arizona permits are open to residents of any state and can be applied for by mail. You do NOT have to reside in the state of UT or AZ to qualify to apply for their concealed carry permits. Register TODAY for this fun and informative class. Seating may be limited. (For information go to  https://mylegalheat.com/cabelasor call 877-252-1055 ) (This class may qualify you for the NY permit in several NY counties but has not been formally approved by any NY counties yet.) (DO NOT BRING FIREARMS OR AMMUNITON INTO THE CLASSROOM.)

27 - Home School Nature Series:  Who’s Hiding Under those Logs?  at the Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savannah, NY (10:00 am – 12:00 pm) Who’s hiding under that log?  Why are vernal pools important for reptiles and amphibians?  Homeschooled children ages 5-12 will find answers to these questions while exploring our wetland woods to see who lives in this unique habitat. Plan on getting dirty, so long pants and muck boots are recommended.  (Fee: $8/child.) (For information call 315-365-3588 or e-mail montezuma@audubon.org)

28 - Derby Hill Hawk Watch Trip, meet at the Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savannah, NY (10:00 am – 4:00 pm) Visit Lake Ontario for the spectacular spring raptor migration and leave the driving to us. Travel in the Montezuma Audubon Center van to witness thousands of broad-winged hawks, red-tailed hawks, bald eagles and many more! If weather conditions do not cooperate, the program will be moved to Friday, April 25. This program is offered in cooperation with the Onondaga Audubon Society. Pack a lunch. (Fee: $18.00/child, $25.00/adult) Space is limited for all programs and pre-paid registration is required. (For information/register call 315-365-3588 or e-mail montezuma@audubon.org)

28 - Girl Scout Outdoor Art Maker at the Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savannah, NY (10:00 am – 12:00 pm) Daisy Scouts will explore the outdoors and use natural objects to make different kinds of art projects. From a blue sky to a bird’s song, nature can give you lots of ideas for art. Please be prepared to go outside and dress for the weather.  All scouts must be accompanied by a parent, leader, or chaperone. (Fee: $7/Scout) (For information call 315-365-3588 or e-mail montezuma@audubon.org)

28 - NY BASS Nation - Take a Soldier Fishing at Oneida Shores Park 9400 Bartell Road • Brewerton, NY (8:30 am – 1:00 pm) The event provides a soldier assigned to the 10th Mountain Division (Light Infantry) at Fort Drum an opportunity to enjoy a day of free fishing on Oneida Lake. Over 100 boat captains volunteer to take out 170 soldiers on the water annually. The soldiers will be paired two to a boat with the volunteer captains for a half day of fishing. When they will return to Oneida Shores for the official weigh-in. After the weigh-in, all participants will be treated to a free, BBQ-style luncheon, followed by awards and prizes for the biggest fish caught in several categories: bowfin, carp, catfish, drum and panfish (perch, bluegill and rock bass). (For information call 315-408-7622)

28 - Rod & Gun Auction at Hessney Auction Center, 2741 Lyons Road (Route 14N), Geneva, NY (9:30 am) Shotguns, rifles, handguns, military, decoys, knives, mounts, fishing, ammo and swords. (For more information call 315-789-9349 or 585-734-6082 or go to www.hessney.com)

28 - National Wild Turkey Federation – Drumlins Chapter Dinner at Donselaars, Route 31-10257, Clyde, NY. (5:00 pm)The NWTF banquets are where you can buy exclusive merchandise and have a great time with friends. All the while, you will be raising vital funds for wild turkey conservation and important programs that introduce the outdoors to women, children and the disabled. (For more information contact Mark Salerno  315-879-8960   msalerno@marshallfarms.com)

28 - Outdoor Skills Workshop For Women at the Dewitt Fish and Game Club, Woodchuck Hill Road, Dewitt, NY  Introductory classes include archery, rifle, shotgun, fishing, camping, map and compass and many more. This is a free event but pre-registration is required as space is limited and it fills quickly. Offered by Women in Nature (WIN), and the Onondaga County Federation of Sportsmen’s Clubs. (For more information or to register, go to http://www.federationofsportsmen.com/wp/)

28 - Pompey Rod & Gun Club Show at the Club, Swift Road, Pompey, NY (9:00 am – 3:00 pm) (For more info call Robert Fallert 315-656-8810.)

28 - Western New York Chapter of the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation Banquet at the Bartlett Country Club, Olean, NY. (4:00 pm) (For information contact Calvin J. Clark at 585-567-8991.)

28 - Cabela’s Ladies’ Day Out at Cabela’s Cheektowaga Store, 2003 Walden Avenue, Cheektowaga, NY. (11:00 am – 3:00 pm) - ** The Perfect Bow - Stop by the Archery Range to find a new bow with a perfect fit. Plus, test your archery skills in the range for a chance to win a cool prize! ** Handgun Basics - Maybe you're on the fence about owning a handgun, or perhaps you're weighing your options and looking for the perfect fit. We'll break down the basics and help you find your perfect match. ** Work Sharp Demo - Having a sharp knife saves you time. We'll show you how to properly sharpen a knife, whether it's a serrated or a regular blade, a hunting knife or one of your kitchen knives. Pick up on common sharpening practices along with other maintenance tips. Plus, thanks to our friends at Work Sharp, join us for a chance to win a new Work Sharp sharpener. ** Casting Perfection - Our professional Outfitters will show you everything you need to know from equipment to the proper techniques to get you casting in no time. (For information call 716-608-4770)

28 - Whitetails Unlimited – Broome County Chapter Hunters Night Out at the Knights of Columbus, 136 Park Avenue, Binghamton, NY. Deadline for ticket sales 4–25-18. (Cost: Adult - $50.00/Spouse - $30.00/Youth - $30.00) Through our Grassroots Program, WTU provides grants to local projects and activities that advance our mission. Proceeds from this event will benefit youth conservation and training event. (For information call Adam 607-279-0227 or go to http://www.whitetailsunlimited.com/events/banquets/)

28 - Spring Wild Edibles: The Hunt for the Wild Leek at Baltimore Woods Nature Center, 4007 Bishop Hill Road, Marcellus, NY (10:30 am – 12:30 pm) Join us as we celebrate spring by foraging for and cooking with early, wild, edible plants. Learn how to identify, ethically harvest, and prepare a wild treat with campfire cooking. Meet in the lower parking lot. Program for ages 10 and up. (Cost: $6 for members; $9 for public.) (For information call 315- 673-1350 or email info@baltimorewoods.org)

28-29 - Niagara Frontier - Hamburg Gun Show at the Hamburg Fairgrounds, 5820 S Park Avenue, Hamburg, New York ((9:00 am – 4:00 pm/9:00 am - 3:00pm) 300 tables. NICS background checks available.  (Cost: $7.00/children under 12 free when accompanied by a paid adult) (90 Tables) (For information call 716-542-9929 or email  nfgshows@aol.com)

29-30 - Greater Wellsville Trout Derby, Genesee River. (For information/register go online to www.Trout-Derby.com.)

 

Until our next meeting in the Corner, have a great time in the outdoors. This is Ron Schroder for – “Your In on The Outdoors for Western New York.”

What Do You Think? Have something for other sportspeople? Let us know HERE.

 

 

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4 – 13 – 18

 

Welcome to this week’s Conservation Chatter Corner – little bits of happenings concerning our outdoors and you, the sportspeople who enjoy being part of that outdoors.

 

YOUTH TURKEY HUNT WEEKEND APRIL 21-22: The youth turkey hunt for junior hunters ages 12-15 is open in all of upstate New York and Suffolk County. Almost 6,000 junior hunters harvested an estimated 1,600 birds during the two-day youth-only hunt in 2017. Important Details for the Youth Turkey Hunt on April 21 and 22:

>Hunters 12-15 years of age are eligible and must hold a hunting license and a turkey permit.

>Youth 12-13 years of age must be accompanied by a parent, legal guardian or adult over 21 years of age with written permission from their parent or legal guardian.

>Youth 14-15 years of age must be accompanied by a parent, legal guardian or adult over 18 years of age with written permission from their parent or legal guardian.

>The accompanying adult must have a current hunting license and turkey permit. The adult may assist the youth hunter, including calling, but may not carry a firearm, bow, or crossbow, or kill or attempt to kill a wild turkey during the youth hunt.

>Shooting hours are from one-half hour before sunrise to noon each day

>The bag limit for the youth weekend is one bearded bird. This bird becomes part of the youth's regular spring season bag limit of two bearded birds. A second bird may be taken only in upstate New York, north of the Bronx-Westchester County boundary, beginning May 1.

>Crossbows may only be used by hunters age 14 or older.

>All other wild turkey hunting regulations remain in effect.

 

2017 DEER HARVEST RESULTS: Hunters in New York State enjoyed another successful year, harvesting an estimated 203,427 deer during the 2017-18 hunting seasons. The 2017 estimated deer take included 95,623 antlerless deer and 107,804 antlered bucks, an estimated five percent fewer deer than the previous year. Statewide, this represents a 10-percent decline in antlerless harvest and a buck harvest nearly identical to 2016. Hunters in the Northern Zone took 25,351 deer, including 18,074 adult bucks. In the Southern Zone, hunters took 178,076 deer, including 89,730 adult bucks.

The decline in antlerless harvest occurred despite DEC issuing more antlerless permits last season. DEC wildlife biologists have noted two important and encouraging items that emerged from the 2017 deer harvest. First, with 53.3 percent of the adult buck harvest averaging 2.5 years or older, hunters took an estimated 57,494 older bucks, setting a record in total number and greatest percentage of older bucks in the harvest. Second, the portion of successful hunters who reported their harvest as required by state law increased from 44 percent in recent years to 50 percent in 2017. Along with our Take It · Tag It · Report It campaign, DEC has made the process of harvest reporting substantially easier for hunters, providing phone, internet, and mobile app options. Harvest reports are critically important for accurate monitoring of deer harvests, and DEC encourages hunters to continue to contribute to the management process by complying with the reporting requirements.

DEC's 2017 Deer Harvest Summary report (PDF, 6.31 MB) provides a suite of tables, charts, and maps detailing the deer harvest around the state. Past deer harvest summaries are available on DEC's website.

2017 Deer Harvest Summary & Comparison

                                          2017            2016            Change             Previous 5 Year Average

Total Take                       203,427     213,061       -4.5%                   228,246

Adult Male                       107,804     107,006       +0.7%                  109,778

Adult5 Female                 67,702          78,288        -13.5                    83,809  

Antlerless                        95,623        106,055      -9.8%                   118,468

DMPs Issued                  617,839      588,430      +5.0%                  628,436

DMP Take                      74,421        81,507        -8.7%                   90,426

DMAP Take                    8,962          9,134          -1.9%                   11,078

Muzzleloader*                 15,288        15,369        -0.5%                   14,617

Bow Hunting*                  43,708        46,735        -6.5%                   38,541

Crossbow                        11,758         9,439         +24.6                   NA

Youth Hunt                      935                1,162         -19.5%                 1,250

Harvest Reporting Rate  50.3%      43.5%                                   43.7%

% Bucks 2.5 or Older      53.3%      50.6%                                   49.4%

* Values for Muzzleloader and Bow Season Take include deer taken on Bow/Muzz tags and DMPs. Prior to 2016, the Muzzleloader and Bow values only reflected take on Bow/Muzz tags.

Notable Numbers

14.5 and 0.5 --- number of deer taken per square mile in the unit with the highest (WMU 8N) and lowest (WMU 5F) harvest density.

46.7 percent --- portion of the adult buck harvest that were yearlings (1.5 years old), the lowest in New York history and down from 62 percent a decade ago and 70 percent in the 1990s. Excluding units with mandatory antler restrictions, 50.9 percent of the adult buck harvest were yearlings, still the lowest percentage on record.

65 percent --- portion of eligible junior hunters that participated in the 2016 Youth Deer Hunt.

14,372 --- number of hunter harvested deer checked by DEC staff in 2017.

2,402 --- deer tested for Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) in 2017-18; none tested positive. DEC has tested more than 50,000 deer for CWD since 2002.

Deer harvest data are gathered from two main sources: harvest reports required of all successful hunters and DEC's examination of more than 14,000 harvested deer at check stations and meat processors. Statewide harvest estimates are made by cross-referencing these two data sources and calculating the total harvest from the reporting rate for each zone and tag type. A full report of the 2017-18 deer harvest, as well as past deer and bear harvest summaries, is available at Deer and Bear Harvests.

 

FISH DIE-OFF IN LOCAL WATERBODIES: Large numbers of dead and dying fish have been observed in area waters including Irondequoit Bay and the Erie Canal in Newark, New York. Inspections by DEC Aquatic Biologists indicate that nearly all of the dead and dying fish observed are gizzard shad, a medium-sized member of the herring family.

Mortality of gizzard shad in late winter and early spring is common. The species is very sensitive to cold water temperatures and their inability to acclimate causes mortality at low temperatures. Gizzard shad are living near the northern edge of their range in the Great Lakes, making them especially susceptible to cold temperatures.

On March 27, DEC collected and submitted a sample of gizzard shad from Irondequoit Bay and sent them to Cornell University's pathology laboratory for disease screening. No viable samples were available from the Erie Canal. Results indicate the fish had a low level infection of viral hemorrhagic septicemia (VHS). VHS has been the cause of a disease issue in the Great Lakes region of the United States and Canada. VHS virus is a rhabdovirus (rod shaped virus) that affects fish of all size and age ranges. VHS can cause hemorrhaging of fish tissue. Once a fish is infected with VHS, there is no known cure. Not all infected fish develop the disease, but they can carry and spread the disease to other fish. VHS does not pose any threat to human health. Additional information about VHS is available on DEC's website at https://www.dec.ny.gov/animals/25328.html.

Gizzard shad live near the northern edge of their range in the Great Lakes, making them especially susceptible to cold temperatures. Mild winters may have allowed their population to increase the last two years. Because the gizzard shad mortality is widespread and primarily affects one species of fish, their die-off is not considered an indicator of an environmental problem such as pollution. Mortality of a single species of fish suggests that the die-off is the result of a disease, parasite or species-specific stressor. In this particular case, late winter cold stress is the suspected cause.
Additional information about gizzard shad, including images, is available on DEC's website at https://www.dec.ny.gov/animals/7031.html#gizzardshad.

 

ADIRONDACK ADDITION: There’s now even more to explore and enjoy in the Adirondacks!

Thanks to Governor Andrew M. Cuomo and the Adirondack Park Agency, the classification of the largest Forest Preserve addition in the history of the Adirondack Park has been approved. The classification of 11,412 acres of the Boreas Ponds tract as wilderness creates a wilderness area in the heart of the Adirondack Park that rivals Rocky Mountain, Mount Rainier and Zion National Parks. New state lands will ensure that over 20,000 acres of pristine wilderness are forever protected.

Visit our website for details about the Historic Boreas Ponds Tract and recreational information

The Boreas Ponds action completes the State's unprecedented, multi-year land deal with The Nature Conservancy. Under the leadership of Governor Cuomo, 65,000 acres of globally significant forests were acquired for inclusion into the Adirondack Forest Preserve. This marked the largest Forest Preserve addition in the history of the Adirondack Park. 

The new classification separates the Boreas Ponds tract into 11,412 acres of wilderness, 9,118 acres of wild forest, 11 acres of primitive and 2 acres of state administrative land – striking the right balance between preservation and access. These lands will offer new remote paddling experiences, ample hunting, trapping and fishing, as well as a new southern access point into the High Peaks Wilderness Area.

DEC is amending the Unit Management Plans (UMPs) for the High Peaks Wilderness Complex and the Vanderwhacker Mountain Wild Forest to address more than 95,872 acres of classified Forest Preserve lands.

DEC held the first public meeting on the amendments on April 3rd in Newcomb, NY. The meeting provided an opportunity for the public to meet with DEC staff and share their thoughts, concerns, and suggestions regarding management of these lands. 

Written comments will be accepted until April 20, 2018, and can be mailed to Forester Robert Ripp, NYSDEC, 232 Golf Course Rd., Warrensburg, NY 12885, or emailed to R5.UMP@dec.ny.gov.

 

THE GOOD GUYS AT WORK:

Wildland Fire: Town of Corning, Steuben County: On March 26 at approximately 4 p.m., two Forest Rangers responded along with multiple fire department personnel from Steuben, Schuyler and Chemung counties to a report of a wildland fire on private property. The fire had burned over 13 acres and was contained by the multi-agency crew by the next day. Forest Rangers determined the blaze had been caused by a downed power line. No structural damage or injuries were reported.
Search:
Town of Truxton, Cortland County: On March 31 at approximately 6:30 p.m., Ranger Chet Lunt was dispatched to Spruce Pond in Morgan Hill State Forest to aid a couple from Cortland who had become disoriented while on a hike at Tinkers Falls. Ranger Lunt spoke with the subjects via cell phone and advised them to stay in their location. Ranger Lunt located the pair and safely returned them to their vehicle by 7:30 p.m.

You Can't Fence Me In - Ontario County: On March 15, a man in the village of Victor called DEC's Avon Office about a deer that was stuck in a backyard fence. The deer's right hind leg had gotten stuck in the chain links as it attempted to jump the fence. ECO Keith Levanway arrived on scene and saw that the deer was suspended off the ground. He quickly used a pair of wire cutters while trying to steady the deer that desperately wanted to get away. After a few clips, the deer limped off, slightly favoring his right leg. The deer was spotted a short time later in good health and bounding off into the woods.


Stuck on a Snowmobile Trail - Schuyler County: On March 21, ECO Travis McNamara was on patrol when he heard radio traffic from Schuyler County Dispatch advising of a stranded motorist in Sugar Hill State Forest with a possible medical condition. ECO McNamara patrolled to the closest accessible location where he found a Tyrone Fire Department volunteer and the friend of the stranded motorist. The friend stated that he received a text message at approximately 11 a.m. that morning stating, "Good knowing you" from the motorist. ECO McNamara and the volunteer fireman set out on foot, locating the stranded motorist approximately half-mile down the snowmobile trail. The motorist explained that he was on his way to a medical appointment the previous day when he attempted to take the "shortcut" down the seasonal road and ended up getting stuck. The motorist had been there since noon the day before and had been stranded all night. Fortunately, the motorist had blankets and winter clothes in the vehicle and was able to periodically run the vehicle to stay warm throughout the night. Beaver Dams and Tyrone volunteer fire department UTV's arrived on scene a short time later and with the aid of the firemen, the motorist was transported to the plowed roadway, where he was assessed by the Schuyler Volunteer Ambulance and found to have not sustained any injuries.

Illegal Coyote Hunting - Niagara County: On March 25, ECOs Kevin Holzle, George Scheer, and Shea Mathis responded to a report of hunters trespassing in the town of Porter. While en route, the officers stopped two vehicles matching the description of the vehicles involved. Niagara County Sheriff's Deputies secured the scene while the ECOs interviewed the subjects. A nearby landowner had observed the hunters pull over on the road and shoot at a coyote running across his field. This account of the incident led ECOs to a spot where they found the casing from a recently discharged .223 caliber rifle round. The suspect eventually admitted to shooting at the coyote and was issued tickets for discharging a firearm within 500 feet of a dwelling and attempting to take protected wildlife unlawfully. He is scheduled to appear in the Town of Porter Court to answer the charges.

 

AVOID PROBLEMS WITH BEARS:  Nearly all negative bear encounters in New York are the result of hungry bears being attracted to human food sources. The simplest way to avoid a nuisance encounter is to remove potential food sources, which usually results in the bear moving on.

New York's black bears emerge from the winter denning period and need to replenish their nutrients and body fat. To do so, they may travel long distances to preferred habitats that vary from season to season. Bears must often cross roads or pass through developed areas to find these different habitat types, and they often find human food readily accessible if homeowners do not take necessary precautions. Not every bear that passes through a developed area is a problem bear, but readily available human food sources can quickly turn them into one. Bears can obtain all of the food they need from the forest but they are intelligent and opportunistic animals that will find and consume whatever food they can find most easily. Bird feeders, garbage cans, dumpsters, barbeque grills, unsecured out-buildings or vehicles containing food or waste all are potential attractants to bears. Once a bear learns to obtain food from people or certain structures, it is very difficult to change the animal's behavior. These bears are more vulnerable to motor vehicle collisions in populated areas, more likely to be illegally killed, or may become a threat to public safety.

In some cases, DEC is asked to relocate these bears. However, bear relocations are rarely effective at solving the problem and can be dangerous Relocated bears often return to their original capture site, or may simply continue their bad habits at a new location. Additionally, if the circumstances that led to the original problem are not corrected, other bears may be attracted to the site and the human/bear conflicts will persist.

It is dangerous and illegal to intentionally feed bears. The incidental, indirect feeding of black bears, such as with bird feeders or garbage, is also unlawful after a written warning has been issued by DEC.

Occasionally, a bear becomes so habituated to human environments and conditioned to human foods that its behavior creates a clear threat to public safety and property. It is in the best interest of both bears and people for bears to get their food solely from wild sources.

To reduce the chance of negative black bear encounters around your home, DEC recommends these simple precautions:

>Never feed bears! It is illegal, dangerous and detrimental to bears.

If you believe bears are being fed in your area, or suspect a nuisance bear situation, report it to DEC immediately.

>Take down bird feeders after April 1. Birds do not need supplemental food in the spring and summer, when natural foods are most abundant (even if you believe your birdfeeder to be inaccessible to bears, the birds will drop seed on the ground, which attracts bears to your yard).

>Clean off barbeque grills before night fall (don't forget the grease trap), and if possible, store grills inside when not in use.

>Store garbage in a secure building or location, secure can lids with ropes/bungees/chains, never over-fill cans, and dispose of garbage as frequently as possible. If you live in an area where bears may occur, put garbage containers out by the curb just before the scheduled pick-up - never the night before. If you live in a densely populated bear area, consider using a certified bear-resistant garbage container.

>Clean garbage cans frequently with ammonia products.

>Do not burn garbage: it is illegal and can attract bears.

>Do not add meat scraps, bones or melon rinds to your compost pile.

>Feed pets indoors and store pet food indoors. If pets must be fed outside, immediately remove all uneaten food and dishes.

It is important to appreciate and respect black bears as wild animals, from a distance.

To learn more about New York's black bears, visit the DEC website or look for the DEC's DVD: 'Living with New York Black Bears' available at most local public libraries in New York.

For more information about bears in your area or to report a problem with black bears, contact the nearest regional DEC office. For listings of Regional DEC Offices, visit DEC's website.

 

 

EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES ON BLACK BEARS AVAILABLE FOR TEACHERS: DEC has partnered with Untamed Science and state wildlife agencies in New Jersey, Arkansas, and Florida to produce the "Understanding Black Bears" curriculum and black bear education website. The goal of these resources is to teach New Yorkers about the biology of black bears, human-bear encounters and conflicts, and black bear management. It contains 29 lessons for students in kindergarten through 8th grade. The self-contained computer program is full of puzzles, computer games, special bear movies, quizzes, and interactive learning activities. The material is easy to understand and fun to learn!

All classroom teachers, home-school groups, and other educators in New York may take advantage of this engaging resource to teach students to appreciate wild black bears and to be safe in bear country. Please encourage your students and their families to observe and appreciate black bears, while keeping their backyards safe, and the bears wild!

                                Photo by John Adamski

 

THIS WEEK’S EVENTS: (For complete future listings go to the Calendar Page - http://www.huntfishnyoutdoors.com/events.php)

APRIL 2018

13 - National Wild Turkey Federation – Oak Orchard River Chapter Dinner at the Carlton Fire Department Rec Hall, Route 98, Albion , NY. (5:30 pm)The NWTF banquets are where you can buy exclusive merchandise and have a great time with friends. All the while, you will be raising vital funds for wild turkey conservation and important programs that introduce the outdoors to women, children and the disabled.  (For more information contact Robert St John  585-682-4495   st.johnphilosophy@yahoo.com)  

14 - National Wild Turkey Federation – Springville Strutters Chapter Dinner at the St. Aloysius Church Hall, 186 Franklin Street, Springville, NY. (5:00 pm)The NWTF banquets are where you can buy exclusive merchandise and have a great time with friends. All the while, you will be raising vital funds for wild turkey conservation and important programs that introduce the outdoors to women, children and the disabled.  (For more information contact Richard Gerlach  716-857-0586   r905g@yahoo.com)  

14 - Southern Tier Cha Inc. Coonhound Event at the clubhouse at 7359 Rood Road, Sinclairville NY (3:00 pm – Coonhound Event Bench Show - $15.00/5:00 pm – Coonhound Event Field Trial - $10.00/5:00 pm –Coonhound Event Water Race - $10.00/8:00 pm - Coonhound Event Nite Hunt - $20.00) (For information call Kevin Noody at  716-679-8783 or email moc.oohay@ydoonnivek)

14 - Cabela’s Cooking Event at Cabela’s Cheektowaga Store, 2003 Walden Avenue, Cheektowaga, NY. (11:00 am – 3:00 pm) - Grills Are All the Rage - From standard grilling to slow smoking and from breakfast to dinner, grills are extremely versatile for backyard cooking and create amazing dishes. Come see our grills in action and let the kids decorate their own pancakes. Smoker Madness - There's nothing like the incredible aroma that comes from a smoker. Come see some of the best smokers available, try some kielbasa, and learn just how easy it is to create mouthwatering dishes that will have your friends and family begging for more. Fryers - Fryers are a great, easy-to-use addition to everyone's cooking tools. Come see how easy it is to make great-tasting French fries using a fryer and try some of our great seasonings. (For information call 716-608-4770)

14 - Bucks, Beards, & BBQ! at First Baptist Church, 16 Church Street, Maine, NY (5:30 – 8:00 pm) This is a pork bbq dinner with dessert followed by a hunting story with a positive message about faith. Door prizes will be given away with the Grand Prize being a $300 gift certificate to Lock N Load in Owego. Tickets are a $12 donation per person. You can buy them online or at the door the night of the event.

14 - Citizen Science Training: Project Budburst at the Reinstein Woods Environmental Education Center, 93 Honorine Drive, Depew, NY (Town of Cheektowaga) (10:00 am – 1:00 pm) Become a volunteer and learn how phenology (a plant’s natural life cycle) affects wildlife and is affected by climate change. For adults and children ages 10 and older. (For information and register call 716-683-5959 or email reinsteinwoods@dec.ny.gov)

14 - Oswego County Federation of Sportsmen’s Clubs Annual Banquet at the Greenville Country Club, West Monroe, NY (4:30 pm) (For more info and tickets contact Don Fenske at 315-806-2223 or at donfenske2@gmail.com.)

14-15 - Little Valley Volunteer Fire Dept. Sportsmen’s Show at the Cattaraugus County Fairgrounds. (9:00 am – 4:00 pm) (For information call Jim Miller 716-938-6928.)

15 – End of Dog Training Season

15 – End of Snow Goose Hunting Season in Western New York

15 - Finger Lakes Friends of NRA Banquet at the Harbor Hotel, 16 N Franklin Street, Watkins Glen , NY (3:30 pm) (Cost: $50.00) (For information contact Toni Dragotta  607-738-9509   tmdra@yahoo.com)

19 - National Wild Turkey Federation – Hardwood Strutters Chapter Dinner at Club 86, Avenue E, Geneva, NY. (5:30 pm)The NWTF banquets are where you can buy exclusive merchandise and have a great time with friends. All the while, you will be raising vital funds for wild turkey conservation and important programs that introduce the outdoors to women, children and the disabled.  (For more information contact Scott Mackenzie  315-521-2937  scott.mackenzie30@hotmail.com) 

19 - Southern Tier Friends of NRA Event at the Kalurah Temple, 625 Dickson Street, Endicott NY (5:30 pm) (Cost: $35.00) (For information call Jay W. Langton at 607-862-4692 or email: jwlangton@stny.rr.com)

19 - Derby Hill Field Trip at Baltimore Woods Nature Center, 4007 Bishop Hill Road, Marcellus, NY (10:00 am – 12:00 pm) Spring hawk migration peaks in April, and the Derby Hill Bird Observatory is the best place around to catch it. Hundreds of raptors fly overhead each day on their way north around Lake Ontario, surely a sight to see! Meet at Baltimore Woods at 9am to carpool, or meet the group at 10am at Derby Hill. Dress warmly and bring binoculars. Program for adults. (Cost: $6 for members; $9 for public.) (For information call 315- 673-1350 or email info@baltimorewoods.org)

19 - Phragmites Strike Team Training at the Reinstein Woods Environmental Education Center, 93 Honorine Drive, Depew, NY (Town of Cheektowaga) (5:30 pm) Volunteers are needed to help control Phragmites australis

(common reed), an invasive plant. Team members will learn monitoring protocols and removal techniques, and assist in the spring and summer. (For information and register call 716-683-5959 or email reinsteinwoods@dec.ny.gov)

20 - National Wild Turkey Federation – Genesee Local Chapter Dinner at the Quality Inn & Suites, 8250 Park Road, Batavia, NY. (6:00 pm) The NWTF banquets are where you can buy exclusive merchandise and have a great time with friends. All the while, you will be raising vital funds for wild turkey conservation and important programs that introduce the outdoors to women, children and the disabled. (For more information contact Terry Young  585-343-8350  tyoung14143@gmail.com)  

20 - Whitney Point Sportsman Association Coonhound Event at the club on NY Route 206, Whitney Point, NY (7:30 pm - Coonhound Bench Show-Poor Boy - $12.00/8:00 pm Coonhound Event Nite Hunt-Poor Boy - $15.00) (For information call Ralph Canniff at 607-240-1129)

20 - Wyoming County Houndsmen and Conservation Club Coonhound Event at their clubhouse Sage Road, Warsaw, NY (6:00 pm - Coonhound Bench Show - $15.00/8:00 pm - Coonhound Nite Hunt - $20.00) (For information contact Nick Jennings  585-993-0145  moc.oohay@12sgninnej.kcin

21 - Cattaraugus County Houndsmen and Conservation Club Inc. Coonhound Event at their clubhouse at 10491 Route 240, West Valley, NY (6:00 pm - Coonhound Bench Show - $15.00/8:00 pm - Coonhound Event Nite Hunt - $20.00) (For information call Chris Deperro  716-570-6798  moc.oohay@orrepedsirhc

21 - Steuben County Coon Hunters, Inc. Coonhound Event at their clubhouse at 4082 Depot Street, Cameron, NY (5:30 pm - Coonhound Bench Show - $15.00/8:00 pm - Coonhound Event Nite Hunt - $20.00) (For information call Roger Barney at 607-695-9024  ten.sehguh@yenrab_jr)

21 - First Annual Lake Erie Outdoor & Fishing Show at the Clarion Hotel Marina & Conference Center, 30 Lake Shore Dr E, Dunkirk, NY (10:00 am – 4:00 pm) (For information call 716-366-3000 ext. 420 or email mpatton@observertoday.com.)

21 - Southtowns Walleye Club Fundraiser at the Club, 5895 Southwestern Blvd., Hamburg, NY. (4:00 – 6:00 pm) This event is for the benefit the New York State Conservation Council. (For information and tickets contact Dan at 716-655-0975.)

21 - Bison City Rod & Gun Flea Market at the Club, 511 Ohio St, Buffalo, NY (8:00 am – 1:30 pm) Admission free, Tables are free on a first come basis, Setup will begin at 7 AM. Bring your old, used or new sporting equipment to sell. Due to NY Safe Act, no guns may be displayed or sold. Loading equipment and components may be sold (powder, shot, primers, brass and bullets), live ammo may be sold: shotgun, pistol and rifle. (For information call: Fred Langdon or Willie Sieber at 716- 260-3240)

21 - Pruning Shrubs and Trees with Confidence HB172 at the Discovery Center of the Southern Tier, 60 Morgan Road, Binghamton, NY (9:00 am – 12:30 pm) No need to fear the shear! Ever wonder if your pruning has encouraged or discouraged the flowering or growth of your favorite shrub? This training offers classroom and hands-on instruction on making proper pruning cuts, technique development, proper equipment selections, and practical applications for pruning three different types of woody shrubs: tree form shrubs, spreading shrubs, and conifers for your gardening goals. Participants will practice what they have learned by pruning specimen plants in the Story Garden under the supervision of the instructor. Participants will also take home a variety of woody stems that can be forced for indoor bloom and have the option to buy a quality hand pruner. Come dressed for the weather. (Cost: $50.00) (For information/register call 607-778-5012.)

21 - Boating Safety Course by U.S. Coast Guard Flotilla 3-1 at the Fort Niagara Officer’s Club, Youngstown, NY (9:00 am – 5:00 pm) This is a required class for anyone born after May 1, 1996 if you want to operate a boat or jet ski. (For information/register call Martin Laufer at 390-7727 or mdl29@msn.com)

21 - Whitetails Unlimited – Stonybrook Chapter Hunters Night Out at the Dansville Fire Department, 11 Franklin Street, Dansville, NY Deadline for ticket sales 4–17-18. (Cost: Adult - $45.00/Spouse - $25.00/Youth - $25.00) Through our Grassroots Program, WTU provides grants to local projects and activities that advance our mission. Proceeds from this event will benefit youth conservation and training event. (For information call Shannon Griese at 585-739-1779 or go to http://www.whitetailsunlimited.com/events/banquets/)

21 - 22nd Annual Niagara Frontier Friends of the NRA Banquet at Salvatore’s Italian Gardens, 6461 Transit Road, Depew, NY (5:00 pm) (Cost: $50.00) Half of the proceeds raised comes back into the area for grant programs involved with the shooting sports. (For information call Georgina Grosofsky at 716-866-7656 or email friendsofnrageorgina@gmail.com)

21 - National Wild Turkey Federation – Tri-County Chapter Hunting Heritage Banquet at the Ramada Inn, 2310 N. Triphammer Road, Ithaca, NY (5:00 pm) The NWTF banquets are where you can buy exclusive merchandise and have a great time with friends. All the while, you will be raising vital funds for wild turkey conservation and important programs that introduce the outdoors to women, children and the disabled. (For more information contact Scott Wilcox at 607-533-4707)

21 – Earth Day Celebration at Baltimore Woods Nature Center, 4007 Bishop Hill Road, Marcellus, NY (1:00 – 4:00 pm) It’s Earth Day! Come celebrate at a fun and educational event, including info booths on home energy, recycling, crafts, guided nature walks, live animal shows, and a special live performance of Dr. Seuss’ The Lorax. Program for ages 3 and up. Free to the public. (For information call 315- 673-1350 or email info@baltimorewoods.org)

21 - Woods Walk: Spring Wildflowers at the Reinstein Woods Environmental Education Center, 93 Honorine Drive, Depew, NY (Town of Cheektowaga) (11:00 am) Join a guided nature walk to search for the early wildflowers of spring. (For information call 716-683-5959 or email reinsteinwoods@dec.ny.gov)

21 - Birding 101: Class #4 at the Reinstein Woods Environmental Education Center, 93 Honorine Drive, Depew, NY (Town of Cheektowaga) (2:30 pm) Who’s in the pond? And who’s hiding in the reeds? Learn about local ducks and wetland birds. For adults and children ages 8 and older. (For information and register call 716-683-5959 or email reinsteinwoods@dec.ny.gov)

21-22 – Spring Youth Turkey Hunt (Details page 46 17-18 Hunting & Trapping Guide)

21-22 - New York State Arms Collectors Syracuse Gun Show, New York State Fairgrounds Expo Center, 581 State Fair Blvd, Syracuse. (9:00 am-5:00 pm Saturday/ 9:00 am-3:00 pm Sunday) (For information call 607-748-1010 or go to http://www.syracusegunshow.com/)

 

Until our next meeting in the Corner, have a great time in the outdoors. This is Ron Schroder for – “Your In on The Outdoors for Western New York.”

What Do You Think? Have something for other sportspeople? Let us know HERE.

 

 

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4 – 6 – 18

 

Welcome to this week’s Conservation Chatter Corner – little bits of happenings concerning our outdoors and you, the sportspeople who enjoy being part of that outdoors.

 

RECALL ON BLACK POWDER RIFLES AND PISTOLS: Lyman Products has voluntarily announced a product safety warning and recall notice on their black powder rifles and pistols due to the potential of separation in the breech plug. Lyman maintains a safety-first approach, so despite finding only a few firearms affected and no reported injuries, Lyman is offering a recall program to have the issue corrected. Lyman regrets the inconvenience but remains committed to the safety of their customers.

The recall includes black powder rifles and pistols regardless of caliber including the following brands manufactured between March 1, 2017 to Dec. 22, 2017. Barrels with the serial number in the range of A595960 – A599025 are subject to this recall:

>Deerstalker

>Great Plains

>Great Plains Hunter

>Trade Rifle

>Plains Pistol

>Black Powder Kits and replacement barrels

This recall excludes Percussion Left-Hand Great Plains and Left-Hand Great Plains Hunter models. If a customer finds his/her product falls within the recall range, a customer service representative is standing by Monday through Friday from 9 am to 4:15 pm EST at 800-225-9626. Upon receipt of the serial number, and either the part number or model, Lyman will provide further instructions and packaging to ship the product to Lyman for replacement at NO COST to the customer. Lyman will provide a replacement barrel and tang with instructions or will replace the barrel and tang at Lyman and return the firearm. Please follow all Lyman recall instructions to ensure timely processing and return.

Visit Lyman at https://www.lymanproducts.com/recall/ for more information on the Black Powder Rifles and Pistols Recall program.

 

PUBLIC INPUT WANTED ON DEVELOPMENT OF DRAFT MANAGEMENT PLAN FOR ERIE AND CATTARAUGUS STATE LANDS: An opportunity for the public to comment on the development of a Draft Niagara Frontier Unit Management Plan (UMP) for state lands in Erie and Cattaraugus counties is available today. The public is invited to submit comments before the draft plan is developed that will guide future management of these unique state forest lands in Erie and Cattaraugus counties and provide for healthy, sustainable, and biologically diverse forest ecosystems.

The Niagara Frontier Unit includes approximately 4,500 acres of forest land in the towns of Newstead, Collins, Persia, Otto, and East Otto. Onondaga Escarpment Unique Area, East Otto State Forest and Zoar Valley Multiple Use and Unique Area are included in the Niagara Frontier Unit.

The pre-draft meeting will be held on Thursday, April 12, at the Gowanda Fire Hall at 230 Aldrich St.; Gowanda, NY 14070 from 6:00 - 7:30 p.m. This meeting is designed to help establish short and long-range goals and objectives for management of these lands. In addition to the meeting, public comments can be submitted by email and mail to: Ricky Silvestro, NYS DEC, 182 E. Union Suite 3, Allegany, NY 14706 or emailed to r9.ump@dec.ny.gov

All comments must be received by Thursday, May 24, 2018. There will be another opportunity for public comment, when the draft plan is presented to the public.

 

TROUT SEASON IS HERE!: After what seemed like an endless winter the April 1 opener of trout and salmon season has finally arrived. Early season stream flows should provide for fishable conditions in most of the state as long as precipitation levels remain normal. Snow and ice cover will limit access to waters In the north country and higher elevations until temperatures remain consistently above freezing and significant melting occurs. Anglers looking for early season fishing in these areas should contact the DEC Regional Office covering the area they intend to fish for  early season fishing recommendations.

DEC has a number of resources to help plan your next coldwater fishing adventure, including trout stocking lists and a brand new tip strip describing a very effective technique for early season trout angling using synthetic bait. The 2018 Coldwater Fishing Forecast will also prove helpful to those seeking trout and salmon this year.

Steelhead are one of the best targets for early season trout anglers and DEC has produced a new brochure on fishing for these strong, acrobatic fighters in the Great Lakes tributaries they inhabit. Download your copy now.

Rainbow Trout

  

2018 FRESHWATER FISHING REGULATIONS GUIDE: Anglers are reminded to obtain a copy of the new 2018 Freshwater Fishing Regulations Guide from any of the over 1250 sporting license agents in New York State. The 2018 guide highlights some of the top fishing waters in New York State. The guide can also be viewed or downloaded online.

 

RENEW YOUR FISHING LICENSE: Now that your annual fishing license is good for 365 days from the date of purchase, it is very easy to forget when it expires. Be sure to check the expiration date before heading out. Anglers desiring to receive an e-mail reminder to renew their fishing license each year should be sure to add their e-mail address to their DECALS profile. This can be done online or by calling the DEC Call Center at 1-866-933-2257 (M-F 8:30 AM to 4:30 PM).

 

TAKE STEPS TO AVOID CONFLICTS WITH COYOTES: It’s that time of year again when many of New York's resident coyotes are setting up dens for pups that will arrive this spring. Coyotes are well adapted to suburban and even some urban environments, and for the most part they will avoid contact with people. However, conflicts with people and pets may result as coyotes tend to be territorial around den sites during the spring through mid-summer. They need to search almost constantly to provide food for their young.

 

Coyotes are found throughout the state. Incidents with people or pets are rare, but it is important to be aware of the presence of coyotes so steps can be taken to reduce the chance that a negative interaction occurs. While coyotes that reside in suburban environments are tolerant of people, it is important to take steps to maintain coyotes’ natural wariness of people. This can include removing sources of food, not allowing coyotes to approach people or pets, and not letting pets roam freely and unsupervised. Contact your local police department and DEC regional office for assistance if coyotes are exhibiting "bold" behaviors and have little or no fear of people.

 

KUDOS: The Branchport Rod and Gun Club board is proud to honor Judson Peck as a Life Member. Jud has over 60 plus years in the shooting sports, 10 plus years as a NYS Police firearms instructor, 30 plus years as a NYS hunter training instructor and 6 years as the trainer of firearms at NYSDEC's camp Rushford for the youth attending same. Jud was the first to check eye dominance and the fit of shotguns prior to shooting clay birds. Jud was the line safety officer for years at law enforcement officers’ qualifications. When the NYS Environmental Conservation Forest Rangers became police officers and started carrying handguns (S&W

model 19), senior NYS police (troopers) firearms instructor Bruce Styles and Jud trained all 90 Rangers both in the class room and range firing.

Jud has been a member of the Branchport Rod and Gun Club for many years and opens the club frequently. He is also active with the Penn Yan High School Trap Team!

Congratulations and thank you for your dedication to conservation and youth shooting sports!

 

ANNUAL SALAMANDER AND FROG MIGRATION: the annual breeding migrations of salamanders and frogs are underway. Visit the DEC website for more information about this annual event https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dHRbsAsnQi8.

Typically, after the ground starts to thaw in late winter and early spring, species such as spotted salamander and wood frog emerge from underground winter shelters in the forest and walk overland to woodland pools for breeding. In New York, this migration usually occurs on rainy nights in late March and early April, when the night air temperature is above 40F When these conditions align just so, there can be explosive, "big night" migrations, with hundreds of amphibians on the move, many having to cross roads.

Recently, suitable migration conditions have returned. On March 29, in many parts of the Hudson Valley, volunteers moved hundreds of amphibians, including spotted salamander, four-toed salamander, northern redback salamander, eastern newt, wood frog, American toad, and spring peeper. DEC expects the migration will continue and expand to northern parts and higher elevations of the state in the coming weeks.

Drivers on New York roads are encouraged to proceed with caution or avoid travel on the first warm, rainy evenings of the season. Amphibians come out after nightfall and are slow moving; mortality can be high even on low-traffic roads.

For more information, visit Amphibian Migrations and Road Crossings on DEC's website or contact woodlandpool@dec.ny.gov. Project volunteers are encouraged to use the hashtag #amphibianmigrationhv in their photos and posts on social media.

 

KUDOS: These fundraising events are the backbone of DU’s habitat conservation efforts and the volunteers who make up these chapters are the force making a difference for North American waterfowl populations. It takes a great deal of effort to achieve these levels, and these chapters deserve to be congratulated by every person who enjoys the outdoors. The chapters honored this year earned their spots on the nationally recognized lists out of more than 2,400 DU chapters nationwide that hosted more than 4,050 fundraising events. Ducks Unlimited recently announced the top volunteer chapters across the nation. The President's Roll of Honor designation is reserved for the chapters that raise between between $65,000 and $99,999 in grassroots income for DU's conservation mission. On the list from Western/Central New York are the Genesee County Chapter out of Batavia and the Watkins Glen Chapter out of Watkins Glen.

 

THIS WEEK’S EVENTS: (For complete future listings go to the Calendar Page - http://www.huntfishnyoutdoors.com/events.php)

APRIL 2018

6 - Whitetails Unlimited – Cortland County Chapter Hunters Night Out at the Elks Lodge 748, 9 Groton Street, Cortland, NY Deadline for ticket sales 4–3-18. (Cost: Adult - $45.00/Spouse - $30.00/Youth - $30.00) Through our Grassroots Program, WTU provides grants to local projects and activities that advance our mission. Proceeds from this event will benefit youth conservation and training event. (For information call Bill Bailey 413-244-2304 or go to http://www.whitetailsunlimited.com/events/banquets/)

6-8 - Fifth Annual Niagara County Bullhead Tournament sponsored by the Wilson Conservation Club. (4/6 5:00 pm – 14/8 1:00 pm) The contest is simple. Best two bullheads based on total weight will win the top prizes. Tiebreaker is total length for those two fish. You may only fish in Niagara County waters. The weigh-in will take place at the club, located at 2934 Wilson Cambria Road, Wilson, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Sunday, April 8 with awards to follow. Register at CMC Auto Repair in Wilson or the Slippery Sinker in Olcott. You can also register through PayPal. (For more information contact Eric at 716-628-6078.)

7 - End of Trapping Season for Beaver in Central and southeast portions of New York

7 - National Wild Turkey Federation – Tri County Chapter Dinner at the Lake Watch, 1642 East Shore Drive, Ithaca, NY. (5:00 pm) The NWTF banquets are where you can buy exclusive merchandise and have a great time with friends. All the while, you will be raising vital funds for wild turkey conservation and important programs that introduce the outdoors to women, children and the disabled.  (For more information contact Scott Wilcox  607-533-4707)

7 - Fly Fishing Academy offered in Campbell, NY by the Twin Tiers -- Five Rivers Chapter of International Federation of Fly Fishers. (8:00 am – 5:00 pm) One-day comprehensive introduction to fly casting and fly-fishing for ages 11-adult. Topics will include: Fly Fishing Introduction –what is a fly; Fish Food & Fishing Flies; Leaders; Fly Fishing Knots; Nymphing, Dry Flies; Modern Streamer Fishing; Reading the Water; Local Trout Streams; Equipment; Beyond Trout – Panfish, Bass & Carp. Class size is limited. (for information/pre-register contact Matt Towner at 607-542-0285 Mtowner23@gmail.com, or Kirk Klingensmith at 607-346-7189    kklingensmi@stny.rr.com.)

7 - Cabela’s Dog Days Family Event at Cabela’s Cheektowaga Store, 2003 Walden Avenue, Cheektowaga, NY. 11:00 am – 3:00 pm) Cabela's is celebrating the dog days of April with our inaugural Dog Days Family Event. Bring your furry friends to our Dog Days Event beginning at 11 a.m. We'll have free photo downloads with your dog, demonstrations and a Best Dog Trick contest (1:00 - 2:00 pm). The first 100 pups, with their owners, will receive a free pet-friendly gift. While you're here, check out fur-baby supplies including beds, toys, collars and leashes. Dog Days are sure to get tails wagging. (For information call 716-608-4770)

7 - Rochester DU Sportsmen's Extravaganza at the Conservation Club of Brockport, 291 Ladue Road, Brockport, NY (5:00 pm) (Cost: $65.00; $35.00 – Greenwing) (For information contact Ed McCaffery 585-259-2589  Tededmcc@rochester.rr.com)

7 - Orleans County Houndsmen And Conservation Club Coonhound Event at their clubhouse on Phipps Road, Albion, NY (6:00 pm - Coonhound Bench Show-Poor Boy - $15.00/8:00 pm Coonhound Event Nite Hunt-Poor Boy - $20.00) (For information call Ed Roggen at 585-948-9483)

7 - Busy Beavers at the Reinstein Woods Environmental Education Center, 93 Honorine Drive, Depew, NY (Town of Cheektowaga) (10:30 am) Celebrate International Beaver Day by taking a guided walk to learn about

these amazing rodents, who are also our New York State mammal. (For information and register call 716-683-5959 or email reinsteinwoods@dec.ny.gov)

7 – 34th Annual Genesee Valley Woodcarvers Show at the Rochester Museum & Science Center, 657 East Avenue, Rochester, NY. (10:00 am – 4:30 pm) Bird, General, Special, and Working Decoy Divisions. (Free) (For information email webmaster@gvwoodcarvers.com or go to www.gvwoodcarvers.com.)

7-8 – 49th Annual Gun & Hunting Show at the Brockport Elks Lodge, 4400 Sweden Walker Road, (Route 260, off Route 31), Brockport, NY. Presented by the 108th New York Volunteer Infantry. (Cost; $5.00/Kids free) (For information call 585-259-4867.)

8 - National Wild Turkey Federation – Niagara County Gobblers Chapter Dinner at the Youngstown Vounteer Fire Company, 625 Third Street, Youngstown, NY (3:30 pm) The NWTF banquets are where you can buy exclusive merchandise and have a great time with friends. All the while, you will be raising vital funds for wild turkey conservation and important programs that introduce the outdoors to women, children and the disabled.  (For more information contact Pamela Lederhouse  716-791-3151   plederhous@aol.com) 

8 - Niagara Frontier – Mattydale Gun Show at the Veterans of Foreign Wars, 2000 Lemoyne Avenue,
Mattydale, NY. (For information call 716-542-9929 or email http://nfgshows.com)

10 - Medicinal Herb Walk at the Reinstein Woods Environmental Education Center, 93 Honorine Drive, Depew, NY (Town of Cheektowaga) (11:00 am) Learn the medicinal values of wild herbs growing along the trail. For adults and children ages 12 and older. (For information and register call 716-683-5959 or email reinsteinwoods@dec.ny.gov)

12 - Pre-Draft Meeting on Development of a Draft Niagara Frontier Unit Management Plan (UMP) at the Gowanda Fire Hall, 230 Aldrich Street, Gowanda, NY. (6:00 – 7:30 pm) The public is invited to submit comments before the draft plan is developed that will guide future management of these unique state forest lands in Erie and Cattaraugus counties and provide for healthy, sustainable, and biologically diverse forest ecosystems. The Niagara Frontier Unit includes approximately 4,500 acres of forest land in the towns of Newstead, Collins, Persia, Otto, and East Otto. Onondaga Escarpment Unique Area, East Otto State Forest and Zoar Valley Multiple Use and Unique Area are included in the Niagara Frontier Unit. In addition to the meeting, public comments can be submitted by email and mail to: Ricky Silvestro, NYS DEC, 182 E. Union Suite 3, Allegany, NY 14706 or email: r9.ump@dec.ny.gov. All comments must be received by Thursday, May 24, 2018. There will be another opportunity for public comment, when the draft plan is presented to the public.

13 - National Wild Turkey Federation – Oak Orchard River Chapter Dinner at the Carlton Fire Department Rec Hall, Route 98, Albion , NY. (5:30 pm)The NWTF banquets are where you can buy exclusive merchandise and have a great time with friends. All the while, you will be raising vital funds for wild turkey conservation and important programs that introduce the outdoors to women, children and the disabled.  (For more information contact Robert St John  585-682-4495   st.johnphilosophy@yahoo.com)  

14 - National Wild Turkey Federation – Springville Strutters Chapter Dinner at the St. Aloysius Church Hall, 186 Franklin Street, Springville, NY. (5:00 pm)The NWTF banquets are where you can buy exclusive merchandise and have a great time with friends. All the while, you will be raising vital funds for wild turkey conservation and important programs that introduce the outdoors to women, children and the disabled.  (For more information contact Richard Gerlach  716-857-0586   r905g@yahoo.com)  

14 - Southern Tier Cha Inc. Coonhound Event at the clubhouse at 7359 Rood Road, Sinclairville NY (3:00 pm – Coonhound Event Bench Show - $15.00/5:00 pm – Coonhound Event Field Trial - $10.00/5:00 pm –Coonhound Event Water Race - $10.00/8:00 pm - Coonhound Event Nite Hunt - $20.00) (For information call Kevin Noody at  716-679-8783 or email moc.oohay@ydoonnivek)

14 - Cabela’s Cooking Event at Cabela’s Cheektowaga Store, 2003 Walden Avenue, Cheektowaga, NY. (11:00 am – 3:00 pm) - Grills Are All the Rage - From standard grilling to slow smoking and from breakfast to dinner, grills are extremely versatile for backyard cooking and create amazing dishes. Come see our grills in action and let the kids decorate their own pancakes. Smoker Madness - There's nothing like the incredible aroma that comes from a smoker. Come see some of the best smokers available, try some kielbasa, and learn just how easy it is to create mouthwatering dishes that will have your friends and family begging for more. Fryers - Fryers are a great, easy-to-use addition to everyone's cooking tools. Come see how easy it is to make great-tasting French fries using a fryer and try some of our great seasonings. (For information call 716-608-4770)

14 - Citizen Science Training: Project Budburst at the Reinstein Woods Environmental Education Center, 93 Honorine Drive, Depew, NY (Town of Cheektowaga) (10:00 am – 1:00 pm) Become a volunteer and learn how phenology (a plant’s natural life cycle) affects wildlife and is affected by climate change. For adults and children ages 10 and older. (For information and register call 716-683-5959 or email reinsteinwoods@dec.ny.gov)

15 – End of Dog Training

15 – End of Snow Goose Hunting Season in Western New York

15 - Friends of NRA Banquet at the Harbor Hotel, 16 N Franklin Street, Watkins Glen , NY (3:30 pm) (Cost: $50.00) (For information contact Toni Dragotta  607-738-9509   tmdra@yahoo.com)

 

Until our next meeting in the Corner, have a great time in the outdoors. This is Ron Schroder for – “Your In on The Outdoors for Western New York.”

What Do You Think? Have something for other sportspeople? Let us know HERE.

 

 

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3 - 30 - 18

Welcome to this week’s Conservation Chatter Corner – little bits of happenings concerning our outdoors and you, the sportspeople who enjoy being part of that outdoors.

 

YOUTH FISHING ESSAY CONTEST: The Chautauqua County Sports Fishery Advisory Board announced its 26th Annual Fishing Essay Contest for students in Chautauqua County. The contest officially opened on March 13 and all entries must be submitted by April 13.

Last year 335 students from 10 different schools participated in the contest and the Sports Fishery Advisory Board is eager to see how many students will participate this year.

The contest is open to all Chautauqua County students in third through sixth grade who attend public, private or home schools. Essays must follow this year’s topic, “Describe your first fishing adventure or what you would like your first fishing adventure to be; who you went with, where you went, and what you caught.”

Entries must be 250 words or less and can be submitted singly or together by class. Each entry must include the student’s name, grade, teacher, and school. Teachers are also encouraged to submit their email addresses with their students’ essays to allow for quick and easy communication during the school day about contest results. Entries will be judged on originality and teachers are encouraged to work with students by incorporating the essay into a teaching activity.

“In the past we have received some very creative entries such as essays with drawings and pictures, and one year we even received an essay inside of a shoebox,” said Zen Olow, Chairman of the Sports Fishery Advisory Board. “It is great to see kids excited about fishing and the outdoors.”

All entries must be submitted to: Chautauqua County Sports Fishery Advisory Board, Office of the County Executive, Gerace Office Building, 3 North Erie Street, Mayville, NY 14757.

All participants will receive a certificate and at least eight winners from each grade will receive a spin cast fishing pole kit. Among the winners, two grand prize winners will be selected to go on a fishing trip with Chautauqua County Executive George Borrello this summer. Winners will be announced in early May and the two grand prize winners will be recognized at the May 23 Chautauqua County Legislature Meeting. All teachers and principals whose students submit essays will also receive a gift made by Kids on the Fly.

“We are very fortunate in Chautauqua County to have hundreds of places to fish, whether fishing from a boat, a pier, or wading into a creek or stream,” said Borrello. “We want to keep our children engaged in the refreshing outdoor activity of fishing and this essay contest is a great way to get our youth excited about the upcoming spring and summer fishing seasons.”

The Sports Fishery Advisory Board hopes the essay contest can be an interesting educational experience for students and helpful to teachers. It is intended to promote an awareness of Chautauqua County’s ecology, the factors that affect it, and the role each student plays in maintaining its quality in the future.

The contest is sponsored by the County Executive’s Office, County Legislature, and a majority of the prizes are funded through donations from the community and sportsmen’s clubs.

For more information, please contact the County Executive’s Office at 753-4211 or Olow at 640-2776.

http://www.observertoday.com/sports/local-sports/2018/03/fishing-essay-contest-now-underway/

 

PUBLIC COMMENT WANTED ON DRAFT SALMON RIVER FISHERIES MANAGEMENT PLAN: DEC recently announced the release of the Draft Salmon River Fisheries Management Plan to guide the agency's continuing efforts to sustain and improve one of New York's premier sportfishing destinations. The Salmon River is renowned for its world class trout and salmon fishing. Anglers from across North America and beyond come to the Salmon River for the opportunity to land trophy-size fish. This plan, which was developed in close consultation with anglers and representatives of the business community, will enhance the Salmon River's status as New York's premier, year-round angling destination for lake-run trout and salmon.

DEC's goal is to manage the Salmon River and its tributaries as a year-round sport fishery that provides anglers with the opportunity to catch an array of trophy-sized salmonids. DEC proposes a variety of strategies to achieve this goal, including improvements to its Salmon River Fish Hatchery, improved and increased angler access, efforts to promote ethical angling, protection and enhancement of critical fish habitats, and utilizing science and adaptive management to measure and achieve success.

DEC is encouraging the public to comment on the plan, which covers the period from 2018 to 2033 and focuses on lake-run trout and salmon (salmonids) in the 17-mile Salmon River corridor and the river's major tributaries below the Lighthouse Hill Reservoir in the town of Orwell.

The Salmon River Fisheries Management Plan is available on DEC's website.

DEC will accept public comments on the draft plan until April 23, 2018. To comment on the plan, send an email with the subject line "Salmon River Plan" to fwfish7@dec.ny.gov or send written comments via U.S. Mail to: David Lemon, Regional Fisheries Manager, NYSDEC Region 7, 1285 Fisher Road, Cortland, New York 13045.

 

THE GOOD GUYS AT WORK:

ECO Honored by Erie County Federation of Sportsmen's Clubs - Erie County: The Erie County Federation of Sportsmen's Clubs held its 75th Annual Awards ceremony and banquet on March 3 in West Seneca. The federation, which consists of 46 outdoor sporting clubs, presented ECO Mark Mazurkiewicz with the "Public Servant Award" at this year's gathering. Mazurkiewicz has been an ECO for 29 years, 25 of which have been in Erie County. The ceremony was attended by more than 200 people. After receiving the award, ECO Mazurkiewicz thanked attendees for their support, remarking that ECOs do their best work when supported by the sporting public. Among those on hand to see Mark receive this high honor were his daughter Jennifer and Region 9's acting Captain, Robert O'Connor.

 ECO Mark Mazurkiewicz with Public Servant Award
ECO Mark Mazurkiewicz and Frank Miskey Sr.

Goose Hunter's Tip Leads to Charges - Tioga County: On March 4, ECO Brent Wilson was on patrol checking goose hunters looking to fill their bag limits late in the season. Passing a corn field in the town of Tioga, ECO Wilson observed a group hunting over a flooded field. ECO Wilson checked the hunter's licenses, guns, and geese harvested. One of the hunters provided a tip to the ECO concerning the shooting of a swan earlier in the day. ECO Wilson contacted ECO Stan Winnick to see if he could assist with evidence collection. The two officers then canvassed the area. A resident told the officers his son-in-law was hunting with a friend that morning and that they had shot a snow goose. He provided the name and address. ECOs Wilson and Winnick then carefully walked the field and collected a spent shotgun shell. With this information and evidence, the officers tracked down the man, who admitted that he "had made a mistake." The subject told the ECOs he thought the bird was a snow goose, but when he got home and did some research, he realized it was a tundra swan. The man disposed of the carcass down a dirt road. Also known as a whistling swan, the tundra swan is a protected species for which there is no hunting season. The birds nest in the artic and are only found in New York during the winter periods of migration. ECOs Wilson and Winnick issued the hunter three summonses for taking a migratory bird out of season, illegally taking a protected species, and unlawful disposal of solid waste.


ECO Wilson with the discarded tundra swan carcass
ECO Wilson with the discarded tundra swan carcass

Dog Mistaken for Coyote - Tompkins County: On Feb. 26, ECO Jeffrey Krueger concluded an investigation by charging two coyote hunters with several ECL violations after New York State Police contacted ECO Krueger regarding a family dog shot by coyote hunters after dark on Feb. 21. The two hunters had been traveling to a hunting location in the town of Groton when one hunter saw what he believed to be the eyes of a coyote in a field and asked the driver to stop. The passenger loaded his rifle with one round, walked to a gated fence, and shot into the field. The driver then went to look for the coyote and pulled into a nearby driveway, where he discovered they had actually shot the resident's dog. A State Trooper responded, conducted initial interviews, and turned the case over to ECO Krueger, who found evidence indicating that shots had been fired within 500 feet of the complainant's home and that the area was posted property. After determining that the dog, transported to Cornell Animal Hospital the night of the incident, was expected to recover, the ECO contacted the hunters and had them meet him at State Police Barracks in Dryden. Both hunters were cooperative and provided written statements. The driver, a Cortland resident, was charged with operating an artificial light with an unsecured gun in a motor vehicle. The shooter, also from Cortland, was charged with operating an artificial light with an unsecured gun in a motor vehicle, shooting within 500 feet of a dwelling, and trespassing on posted property. Both will be answering charges in the Town of Dryden Court.

Illegal Sale of Wildlife - Erie County: On March 9, ECO Mark Mazurkiewicz investigated a report that an adult eastern spiny softshell turtle was being offered for sale for $49.99 in a pet store in the city of Buffalo. This type of turtle is protected in New York as a species of special concern and may not be possessed or sold without a permit. ECO Mazurkiewicz confirmed that there were no permits on file in Erie County. The animal was seized and will be given to an educational facility. The store was cited for possession of the turtle without a permit and for the unlawful commercialization of wildlife and faces fines up to $650.

 

 

NAPLES CREEK REPORT FROM DEC: We had a great turnout today for the annual rainbow trout sampling at Naples Creek in Ontario County. Each spring adult rainbow trout leave Canandaigua Lake and swim up streams such as Naples Creek to reproduce. This is referred to as the spring spawning run. Female rainbow trout bury their eggs in the gravelly stream bottom while male rainbow trout fertilize the eggs. These eggs will later hatch and young rainbow trout will spend over a year in Naples Creek before they head out to Canandaigua Lake. When rainbow trout reach the lake, they can grow much larger over a few years’ time and will eventually return to the stream where they were born to reproduce.

The spring spawning run is a great opportunity for DEC Biologists to sample the rainbow trout population. DEC has been sampling Naples Creek each spring since the 1950’s using a technique called electrofishing. This sampling effort helps us track growth rates and overall condition of the rainbow trout population. It also helps anglers determine where they may want to try fishing on April 1st, the opening day of trout season.

Today, DEC Region 8 Fisheries staff found a mix of female rainbow trout that had started to spawn and some that had not spawned yet. This is a good sign for anglers since it is likely that there will still be adult rainbow trout in Naples Creek on April 1st.

Image may contain: 1 person, child, outdoor and waterImage may contain: one or more people, tree, outdoor, water and nature

 

RESULTS OF NATIONAL ARCHERY IN NEW YORK STATE SCHOOLS TOURNAMENT: The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) recently announced the results from the 10th annual New York National Archery in the Schools (NASP) state tournament, hosted by DEC on March 9, at SUNY Polytechnic Institute in Utica, NY. The event included 485 students from 25 school districts and is the third NASP state tournament where all of the participating archers were together on the same day.

NASP teachers lining up to shoot arrows

The NASP program is a great way to introduce young people to archery, and by extension, outdoor activities, which will strengthen their connection to nature. The dedication and commitment of the teachers and students who participate in the program are integral to its success.

NASP is designed to engage students in the educational process and improve participation in outdoor activities by students of all athletic abilities. DEC is involved in the program to introduce young people to archery, a common way to become interested in hunting and the outdoors.

Each competitor in the state tournament could achieve a maximum score of 300 points. There are three divisions: High School, grades 9-12; Middle School, grades 6-8; and Elementary School, grades 4-5. With a score of 291, the overall top female archer in the tournament was Victoria Yuknek of St. Joseph by The Sea High School in Richmond County. With a score of 289, the top male archer in the tournament was Daniel Hoffman of Holland Central School in Erie County. Both Victoria and Daniel received a trophy, a Genesis bow, NASP bow case, and a FeraDyne target. Awards were also given out in each of the three divisions for first through fifth places.

The first-place team in the high school division was St. Joseph by the Sea High School in Richmond County. The first-place team in the middle school division was Hinsdale Middle/High School in Cattaraugus County. The first-place team in the elementary division was Schroon Lake Central School in Essex County. Trophies were also awarded in each of the three divisions for first, second, and third places.

Individuals that placed in the top 10 in their division, and teams that placed first in each of the three divisions, qualify to compete and represent New York State at the national NASP tournament held in Louisville, Kentucky, May 10 - 12.

NASP continues to grow at the national level with more than 2.3 million students participating in the program during the 2016-17 school year. More than 13,000 schools in 47 states, Washington D.C., Canada, South Africa, New Zealand, and Australia have adopted the program. In New York, 333 schools from 178 school districts participate in the program and more than 34,000 students participated during the 2016-17 school year.

The New York State NASP Tournament is offered only to students who participated in the NASP archery program during in-school classes taught by certified NASP teachers. For more information on how schools can become involved in NASP and to view DEC's photo gallery, visit DEC's website. To learn more about the National Archery in the Schools Program, visit webpage.

 

KUDOS: NEW YORK STATE OUTDOORSMEN HALL OF FAME HONORS 11: The New York State Outdoorsmen Hall of Fame proudly announces that it has inducted 11 new members, including one posthumously in the Pioneer Category.  These inductees represent all areas of the state and many fields of endeavor. The NYSOHOF is an organization dedicated to honoring those individuals who have spent many years preserving our outdoor heritage, working for conservation, or enhancing our outdoor sports for future generations. Inductees from Central/Western New York include:

Doug Higgins from Piffard in Livingston County was recently honored for 30 years of service to Sportsman’s Education having taught classes in hunter safety, trapper education, and bowhunter education. He was instrumental in resurrecting the local Letchworth Chapter of the National Wild Turkey Federation and served as banquet chair for 13 very successful years in addition to mentoring many turkey hunters and the Youth Turkey Hunt.

Neil Newton of Albion in Orleans County has been past president and a member of the Finger Lakes Conservation Council for 35 years and Orleans County Federation of Sportsmen for 63 years in addition to being a hunter safety instructor for many years. Newton was a co-founder of the DEC Walleye Cooperator rearing project and was involved with rearing and stocking the walleye fingerlings.

Everett “Bud” Teague of Onondaga County spent over 35 years volunteering and teaching youngsters how to fish. He was a Board Member of the Friends of Carpenters Brook Fish Hatchery, maintained the fishing equipment, cared for the fishing pond, and taught kids how to fish at all events such as Sportsman’s Day or Family Fishing Days

Lloyd Weigel of Kirkville in Onondaga County is best known for his selfless efforts in helping others enjoy the outdoors through his organization, Advanced Strategy Adventures, that provides hunting and fishing events for the physically disabled and youth. The activities include providing access, opportunity, and guiding the physically challenged on hunts for pheasants, deer, geese, and fishing and ice fishing at no cost to the participants.

Others being inducted are: Charlie Ellsworth from Deerfield in Oneida County; Charlie Mead of Queensbury in Washington County; Ron Meeks from Norwich in Chenango County; Dr. William Muller from Smithtown in Suffolk County; Matt Webber from Cazenovia in Madison County; Norm Webber from Cazenovia in Madison County; Greene Smith from Peterboro in Madison County; and Mike Kochanowski from Oneida County.

The new inductees will be honored at the annual banquet and will have their plaques displayed at the NYSOHOF Museum in Vail Mills, NY.  These inductees will be formally inducted at the annual banquet on Saturday, April 28, 2018 at Theodores Restaurant (formerly the Rusty Rail) in Canastota, NY. 

 

THIS WEEK’S EVENTS: (For complete future listings go to the Calendar Page - http://www.huntfishnyoutdoors.com/events.php)

MARCH 2018

31 - Close of Catch and Release (Artificial Lures Only) Season for Trout in Salmon Creek (Cayuga County), Salmon Creek Above Ludlow Falls & West Branch Owego Creek (Tompkins County), Spring Creek on Caledonia State Fish Hatchery Property (8:00 am B 4:00 pm) (Livingston County), Oatka Creek from Bowerman Road Upstream to Union Street and from the Wheatland Center Road Upstream to the Mouth of Spring Creek, and Spring Creek (Monroe County), East Koy & Wiscoy Creeks (Allegany County), Clear Creek, Lime Lake Outlet, McKinstry Creek, Elm Creek, Elton Creek, Mansfield Creek and Cattaraugus Creek Upstream of Springville Dam (Cattaraugus County), Hosmer Brook and Cattaraugus Creek Upstream of Springville Dam (Erie County), Wiscoy Creek (Minus Section 2 mile Each Side of East Hillside Road Bridge), East Koy Creek, Cattaraugus Creek Upstream of Springville Dam and Clear Creek from Mouth to County Line (Wyoming County)

31 - Falconry Season Closes

31 – Close of Crow Hunting Season

31 - Rochester Ducks Unlimited 80th Annual Dinner & Auction at the Conservation Club of Brockport, 291 Ladue Road, Brockport, NY. (5:00 pm) This event will feature a live and silent auction as well as other raffles throughout the evening. (Ticket cost: Single - $65/Greenwing - $35) (For information call Edward McCaffery 585-594-8825 or David Isaac 585-303-3331)

31 - National Wild Turkey Federation – Between-the-Lakes Chapter Dinner at the South Seneca Sportsman’s Club, 6894 Yamell Road, Ovid, NY. (5:00 pm) The NWTF banquets are where you can buy exclusive merchandise and have a great time with friends. All the while, you will be raising vital funds for wild turkey conservation and important programs that introduce the outdoors to women, children and the disabled.  (For more information contact Shane Hayward  607-351-8830  shanehayward9@gmail.com) 

31 - Chemung County Coon Hunters Association Inc Coonhound Event at their clubhouse on Rumsey Hill Road, Van Etten, NY. (3:00pm – Coonhound Event Field Trial - $15.00/5:00pm – Coonhound Bench Show – $15.00/8:00pm Coonhound Event Nite Hunt - $15.00) (For information call Herschel Burt at 570-596-2149 or email moc.oohay@owthsreh)

31 - Boy Scout Merit Badge– Bird Study at the Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savannah, NY (12:00 – 3:00 pm) Boy Scouts are invited to complete the requirements for the Fish and Wildlife Management Merit Badge during our fun and interactive program. As always, please be prepared to go outside. All scouts must be accompanied by a parent, leader, or chaperone. (Fee: $8/scout) (For information or register call 315-365-3588 or e-mail montezuma@audubon.org)

31 - Cabela’s Sportsman’s Seminars at Cabela’s Cheektowaga Store, 2003 Walden Avenue, Cheektowaga, NY. 11:00 am – 6:00 pm Free Photos with the Easter Bunny - Families are invited to celebrate Easter at Cabela's by enjoying free photos with the Easter Bunny, and many other activities during the season. Everyone's favorite Easter Bunny character will be in-store during select times from Saturday, March 24, through Easter Sunday, April 1, for a free, fun, spring-themed collectible photo. 1:00 – 3:00 pm - Hunting for Eggs at Cabela’s - Come on down for our in-store Easter egg hunt. Registration for the kids begins at 1:30 p.m. and the big hunt will begin at 2 p.m.  Collect five eggs and return to the registration table for your goodies. Supplies are limited. 1:00 – 4:00 pm - Let’s Create a Bunny Box - Stop by our craft station with the kids and let their imaginations go wild as they create a bunny box to store all of their treasures. Enjoy this fun activity with your family, and as always, crafts are free. While supplies last. (For information call 716-608-4770)

31 - Otisco Lake Rod & Gun Club Traders Day at the club, Route 174, Marietta, NY (9:00 am – 3:00 pm) Cost: $2.00. (For information call Don Flanagan, 315-469-2859.)

31 - Red Wiggler Worm Composting: Class #1 at the Reinstein Woods Environmental Education Center, 93 Honorine Drive, Depew, NY (Town of Cheektowaga) (10:30 am) Learn the initial set up of worm composting for indoors and/or outdoors. (Starter kit is $4, Friends of Reinstein Woods $2.00) (Class #2 = May 12, Class #3 = June 30) (For information and register call 716-683-5959 or email reinsteinwoods@dec.ny.gov)

APRIL 2018

1 - Start of Statewide Fishing Seasons for Brook, Brown & Rainbow Trout, Hybrids of these Species and Splake, Lake Trout, Landlocked/Atlantic Salmon and Kokanee (>10/15)

1 - Start of Trout Season in Green Lake (Onondaga County), Rushford Lake (Allegany County) (>11/30)

1 - 57th Annual Naples Creek Rainbow Trout Derby. Entry is by pre-registration only - registration sites are Sutton’s Sporting Goods, Main St., Naples (During business hours) and the Derby Headquarters -Naples Fire Hall, Vine St (3/31/14- 5 pm to 10 pm, 4/01/14- 4 am to sunrise) (Entry Fees - $8 Ages 16-64, $5 under 16, $5 ages 65 and over)(For additional information contact Joyce Doran 585-374-2782)

2 - 15th Annual Riedman Foundation Opening Day Trout Derby at the Fish Hatchery at Powder Mills Park, 115 Park Road,  Pittsford, NY (Register at Powder Horn Lodge – 6:30 am/Fishing 7:00 am – Noon) All ages are welcome to join in the fun at the Opening Day Trout Derby to benefit the Fish Hatchery at Powder Mills Park. Again this year, the contestant weighing in the largest brown trout will be recognized with the Bank of America Angler Award, a $500 prize. There will also be "largest catch" prizes awarded in three age categories. Entry is only $5 per angler age eight and older. Fishing will take place in designated areas of Irondequoit Creek within the boundaries of Powder Mills Park. The derby weigh station is at Powder Horn Lodge. Prizes will be awarded at noon. Entry forms can be downloaded at www.fishpowdermill.org. (For information call 585-586-1670.)

5 - National Wild Turkey Federation – Lake Plains Chapter Dinner at the Webster Golf Club, 440 Salt Road, Webster, NY. (6:00 pm) The NWTF banquets are where you can buy exclusive merchandise and have a great time with friends. All the while, you will be raising vital funds for wild turkey conservation and important programs that introduce the outdoors to women, children and the disabled. (For more information contact Richard Vendel  585-872-4565) 

5 - Ducks Unlimited – SUNY Environmental Science & Forestry Cocktail Party at the Gateway Building- SUNY ESF Main Campus, Syracuse, NY (5:30 – 9:00 pm) Online ticket sales end on 4/4/2018. (Cost: $25.00 Student/$50.00 Non-Students) (For information call Will Chamberlin  508-386-7025)

5 - Signs of Spring at Baltimore Woods Nature Center, 4007 Bishop Hill Road, Marcellus, NY (10:00 – 11:30 am) Spring has sprung, which is a big deal for frogs and salamanders! How did they survive the winter? Where did they all suddenly come from? We’ll answer these questions and more as we explore a most mysterious and astounding natural phenomenon: the great amphibian awakening. This program will include an easy hike on fairly flat trails. Program for adults. (Cost: $6 for members; $9 for public.) (For information call 315- 673-1350 or email info@baltimorewoods.org)

6 - Whitetails Unlimited – Cortland County Chapter Hunters Night Out at the Elks Lodge 748, 9 Groton Street, Cortland, NY Deadline for ticket sales 4–3-18. (Cost: Adult - $45.00/Spouse - $30.00/Youth - $30.00) Through our Grassroots Program, WTU provides grants to local projects and activities that advance our mission. Proceeds from this event will benefit youth conservation and training event. (For information call Bill Bailey 413-244-2304 or go to http://www.whitetailsunlimited.com/events/banquets/)

6-8 - Fifth Annual Niagara County Bullhead Tournament sponsored by the Wilson Conservation Club. (4/6 5:00 pm – 14/8 1:00 pm) The contest is simple. Best two bullheads based on total weight will win the top prizes. Tiebreaker is total length for those two fish. You may only fish in Niagara County waters. The weigh-in will take place at the club, located at 2934 Wilson Cambria Road, Wilson, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Sunday, April 8 with awards to follow. Register at CMC Auto Repair in Wilson or the Slippery Sinker in Olcott. You can also register through PayPal. (For more information contact Eric at 716-628-6078.)

7 - End of Trapping Season for Beaver in Central and southeast portions of New York

7 - National Wild Turkey Federation – Tri County Chapter Dinner at the Lake Watch, 1642 East Shore Drive, Ithaca, NY. (5:00 pm) The NWTF banquets are where you can buy exclusive merchandise and have a great time with friends. All the while, you will be raising vital funds for wild turkey conservation and important programs that introduce the outdoors to women, children and the disabled.  (For more information contact Scott Wilcox  607-533-4707)

7 - Fly Fishing Academy offered in Campbell, NY by the Twin Tiers -- Five Rivers Chapter of International Federation of Fly Fishers. (8:00 am – 5:00 pm) One-day comprehensive introduction to fly casting and fly-fishing for ages 11-adult. Topics will include: Fly Fishing Introduction –what is a fly; Fish Food & Fishing Flies; Leaders; Fly Fishing Knots; Nymphing, Dry Flies; Modern Streamer Fishing; Reading the Water; Local Trout Streams; Equipment; Beyond Trout – Panfish, Bass & Carp. Class size is limited. (for information/pre-register contact Matt Towner at 607-542-0285 Mtowner23@gmail.com, or Kirk Klingensmith at 607-346-7189    kklingensmi@stny.rr.com.)

7 - Cabela’s Dog Days Family Event at Cabela’s Cheektowaga Store, 2003 Walden Avenue, Cheektowaga, NY. 11:00 am – 3:00 pm) Cabela's is celebrating the dog days of April with our inaugural Dog Days Family Event. Bring your furry friends to our Dog Days Event beginning at 11 a.m. We'll have free photo downloads with your dog, demonstrations and a Best Dog Trick contest (1:00 - 2:00 pm). The first 100 pups, with their owners, will receive a free pet-friendly gift. While you're here, check out fur-baby supplies including beds, toys, collars and leashes. Dog Days are sure to get tails wagging. (For information call 716-608-4770)

7 - Rochester DU Sportsmen's Extravaganza at the Conservation Club of Brockport, 291 Ladue Road, Brockport, NY (5:00 pm) (Cost: $65.00; $35.00 – Greenwing) (For information contact Ed McCaffery 585-259-2589  Tededmcc@rochester.rr.com)

7 - Orleans County Houndsmen And Conservation Club Coonhound Event at their clubhouse on Phipps Road, Albion, NY (6:00 pm - Coonhound Bench Show-Poor Boy - $15.00/8:00 pm Coonhound Event Nite Hunt-Poor Boy - $20.00) (For information call Ed Roggen at 585-948-9483)

7 - Busy Beavers at the Reinstein Woods Environmental Education Center, 93 Honorine Drive, Depew, NY (Town of Cheektowaga) (10:30 am) Celebrate International Beaver Day by taking a guided walk to learn about

these amazing rodents, who are also our New York State mammal. (For information and register call 716-683-5959 or email reinsteinwoods@dec.ny.gov)

7 – 34th Annual Genesee Valley Woodcarvers Show at the Rochester Museum & Science Center, 657 East Avenue, Rochester, NY. (10:00 am – 4:30 pm) Bird, General, Special, and Working Decoy Divisions. (Free) (For information email webmaster@gvwoodcarvers.com or go to www.gvwoodcarvers.com.)

7-8 – 49th Annual Gun & Hunting Show at the Brockport Elks Lodge, 4400 Sweden Walker Road, (Route 260, off Route 31), Brockport, NY. Presented by the 108th New York Volunteer Infantry. (Cost; $5.00/Kids free) (For information call 585-259-4867.)

8 - National Wild Turkey Federation – Niagara County Gobblers Chapter Dinner at the Youngstown Vounteer Fire Company, 625 Third Street, Youngstown, NY (3:30 pm) The NWTF banquets are where you can buy exclusive merchandise and have a great time with friends. All the while, you will be raising vital funds for wild turkey conservation and important programs that introduce the outdoors to women, children and the disabled.  (For more information contact Pamela Lederhouse  716-791-3151   plederhous@aol.com) 

8 - Niagara Frontier – Mattydale Gun Show at the Veterans of Foreign Wars, 2000 Lemoyne Avenue, Mattydale, NY. (For information call 716-542-9929 or email http://nfgshows.com)

 

Until our next meeting in the Corner, have a great time in the outdoors. This is Ron Schroder for – “Your In on The Outdoors for Western New York.”

What Do You Think? Have something for other sportspeople? Let us know HERE.

 

 

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3 - 23 - 18

Welcome to this week’s Conservation Chatter Corner – little bits of happenings concerning our outdoors and you, the sportspeople who enjoy being part of that outdoors.

 

REQUEST FOR ASSISTANCE WITH COHO SALMON HEAD COLLECTION: The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) and Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry (OMNRF) requests your help with recovering heads from Coho Salmon caught in Lake Ontario beginning in 2018. Each year, NYSDEC stocks Coho Salmon as fall fingerlings at six sites along the New York shoreline and as spring yearlings at the Salmon River; and Metro East Anglers in cooperation with OMNRF, stock Coho fall fingerlings at the Credit River. As part of a continuing effort to evaluate the effectiveness of stocking programs, we are comparing Coho Salmon stocking strategies by mass marking and/or tagging all stocked Coho Salmon in 2016-2018. Tags are 1 mm long pieces of coded wire inserted into the snouts of fish prior to stocking. Tags are invisible to the naked eye, and undetectable without specialized equipment; therefore we need to collect the heads to retrieve the tags. Some portion of the Coho Salmon caught in Lake Ontario may also come from natural reproduction instead of hatcheries. Although some streams are known to produce wild Coho smolts, the relative contribution of wild and hatchery Coho Salmon to the Lake Ontario fishery is unknown. This information is important for fisheries managers to understand trends in Coho Salmon catch rates. To determine the proportion of wild Coho Salmon in the Lake Ontario fishery, the adipose fin of all Coho Salmon stocked by NYSDEC and OMNRF will be clipped in 2016-2018, including the fall fingerlings stocked by Metro East Anglers at the Credit River. Anglers can help by noting whether their Coho is clipped or not and include that data with the head along with noting collection date, location, and fish length on a label. See attached instructions. Recovery of mark and tag data is ongoing until 2021.

We are asking volunteers to collect heads and data from Coho Salmon harvested in Lake Ontario and tributaries and place them in freezers located at sites from the Niagara River to Oswego (see below). Bags and labels will be available at freezer locations, and instructions for collections are provided below. We would like your help. Please be on the lookout for Coho Salmon when fishing. For all harvested Coho Salmon, please cut off its head, toss it in a bag, label, and put it in a freezer. If you are willing to collect Coho Salmon heads and store them in your personal freezer, we will happily come pick them up. Arrangements can be made by emailing fwfishlo@dec.ny.gov.

Each year, NYSDEC and OMNRF relies on the cooperation of anglers like you for collecting valuable data used to inform fisheries management and science in Lake Ontario. If you have any questions regarding collection instructions or the mass marking program, please contact Michael Connerton at 315-654-2147 or fwfishlo@dec.ny.gov by email.

Freezer Locations for Depositing Coho Salmon Heads (starting April 1, 2018)

*Fort Niagara State Park Cleaning Station

*Wilson Tuscarora State Park Cleaning Station (near bathroom)

*Wilson Boat Yard (Freezer available only in April/May at this location)

**Town of Newfane Marina Cleaning Station, Olcott

**Lake Breeze Marina near launch, Point Breeze

*Shumway Marina Gas Dock, Rochester

**Bayside Marina Cleaning Station, Fairhaven

**Wrights Landing Cleaning Station, Oswego 

**Access to double starred locations pending

Instructions for Coho Salmon Sample Collection

Cut the whole head off and place it in a bag. Note capture location, date, whether it has an adipose clip (Yes/No), fish length and the collector's name on the bag label. Note: If you did not note the presence of a clip or its length at capture, please leave that data blank. Use pencil if possible.

Diagram showing coho salmon and amount of the head that needs to be donated

Quick Coho Salmon Identification Tips

A downloadable Salmon and Trout visual identification guide (link leaves DEC's website) is available at the New York Sea Grant website.

Illustrations provided by New York Sea Grant, Artwork by Peter Thompson

Coho Salmon ID, Illustration by Peter Thompson


NEW PROCESS FOR GATHERING PUBLIC INPUT ON DESIRED DEER POPULATIONS:

DEC and researchers at the Human Dimensions Research Unit at Cornell University are implementing a survey-based process for gathering information on citizens' preferences on desired deer populations that will help DEC biologists set deer population objectives across the state. Understanding how citizens are benefiting from or being harmed by deer and what their values and priorities are with respect to deer management are important parts of fulfilling that responsibility. This survey is crucial to achieve our goals and we are urging all New Yorkers to share their thoughts on this survey.

The survey is being phased in across the state and is currently being mailed to citizens in one third of the state. The rest of the state will be surveyed in 2019. The survey asks respondents about their deer-related interests and concerns, how they would like to see the deer population in their area change over the next several years, and how important deer management issues are to them. Survey results, in combination with data on deer impacts on forest regeneration, will be used to guide deer population management decisions. Because deer can have profound and long-lasting negative impacts on forest ecosystems and personal property, keeping these impacts at a sustainable level is a top priority for DEC deer managers.

New York's 92 Wildlife Management Units (WMUs) have been grouped into 23 WMU areas for the purposes of collecting and analyzing data relevant for deer population management. These selected areas were defined based on similarities in ecological conditions and human and deer population characteristics. The priorities of people who reside in each area in combination with local forest conditions, will determine the desired direction of deer population change (up, down, or no change) for the subsequent five years. DEC will issue Deer Management Permit (DMP) quotas designed to achieve the desired change. The WMUs will be re-surveyed periodically and management directions will be adapted as necessary based on new data.

Previously, DEC used Citizen Task Forces to involve state residents in the process of determining appropriate deer population sizes. Each task force was composed of a small group of citizens chosen to represent a range of interests (farmers, hunters, landowners, motorists, etc.) concerned with deer population size in an individual WMU.

In 2015, DEC began collaborating with Cornell to design an improved method for gathering public input. A pilot project that combined a mail survey of the public with a group of citizens similar to a Citizen Task Force highlighted the difficulty of adequately representing the spectrum of public interests and values in a small group. Accordingly, DEC decided to adopt a survey-based process. More information on Public Input on Deer Population Size is available on DEC's website.

 

PRE-SEASON DISCOUNT! GET YOUR 2018 EMPIRE PASS FOR JUST $65: The Empire Pass is your key to all-season enjoyment at New York State Parks. It provides unlimited day-use vehicle entry to most facilities operated by NY State Parks and the State Dept. of Environmental Conservation including forests, beaches, trails and more. Learn where the Empire Pass is accepted.

2018 Annual Empire Pass Card

Purchase your Empire Pass Card for $65 (regular price $80) now through March 31st. This new wallet-sized Empire Pass Card can be shared among household members, caregivers and more. It is not assigned to a specific vehicle-- no more decals!

 

RECORD HIGH CHINOOK SALMON FISHING ON LAKE ONTARIO IN 2017: Boat Angler Survey Finds 2017 Chinook Salmon Catch Rates Highest in More Than 30 Years. The New York State waters of Lake Ontario provide a world famous recreational fishery for trout and salmon, and numbers show that fishing success is as good as it's been in decades. Lake Ontario consistently ranks as the most heavily fished water in the state and provides some of the best angling opportunities in North America.

As part of the State's fisheries management efforts, DEC has surveyed Lake Ontario boat anglers to estimate fishing quality and fish harvest annually since 1985. Chinook salmon fishing has been exceptional since 2003, and survey results reveal that anglers experienced the highest catch rate ever recorded during the 2017 fishing season. DEC estimates that Lake Ontario boat anglers caught 96,226 and harvested 53,871 Chinook salmon in 2017.

Chinook or "king" salmon are the largest and most sought-after Pacific salmon in the Great Lakes and are an excellent fighting fish. Lake Ontario produces some of the largest Chinook salmon in the Great Lakes, with many fish exceeding 30 pounds or more. The fishery is currently supported by both stocked and naturally reproduced fish.

Excellent Chinook salmon fishing in Lake Ontario is expected to continue to in 2018, and anglers are encouraged to head out on the water for a chance to catch the "king" of the Great Lakes.

Lake Ontario and its embayments and tributaries support thriving populations of fish, including a variety of salmon, trout, bass, walleye, yellow perch, and panfish. New York's Lake Ontario waters comprise more than 2.7 million acres. A recent statewide angler survey estimated more than 26 million angler days were spent on Lake Ontario and major tributaries. The estimated value of these fisheries exceeded $112 million annually to local economies.

Additional information on fishing Lake Ontario can be found at DEC's Great Lakes/Niagara River/St. Lawrence River Fishing webpage, which contains a link to the I FISH NY Great Lake Fishing Brochure. You can also send an email to fwfish@dec.ny.gov with your name and address to order the brochure.

 

2017 TREE STAND SAFETY: Tree stand incidents are becoming a major cause of hunting-related injuries across the country. In New York, tree stand safety has become a regular part of the hunter education course required of first time hunters and it is stressed hunters follow specific tree stand rules to avoid life-threatening injuries.

Investigations revealed that in 75 percent of the incidents, hunters were not wearing any kind of full-body harness to secure them in their stand. Used correctly, a harness keeps the hunter connected from the time they leave the ground to the moment they get back down.

Statistics:

Total Incidents                                                                                12

Fatal – no full-body harness                                                            5

Fatal – with unattached harness*                                                   1

Fatal – with attached harness                                                         0

Non-fatal – no full body harness                                                     3

Non-fatal – with unattached harness                                              3

Non-fatal – with attached harness                                                  0

Type of Stand:

Climbing tree stand                                                                         2

Hang-on tree stand                                                                          4

Ladder stand                                                                                    2

Tower/tri-pod stand                                                                          0

*Unattached/attached harness includes keeping connected from the time one leaves the ground to the time you get back down.

2017 Figures are completed from preliminary reports and may not capture all tree stand incidents that occurred statewide in New York.

New York is among several other states that have drastically reduced deaths during firearms seasons due to a hunter safety curriculum that stresses firearm safety. Recently however, deaths from tree stand falls have begun to increase. Following are descriptions of recorded falls.

Incident Descriptions: Date (mm/dd) - followed by County and a brief description based on initial report.

10/20 - Oswego. Fatality. No harness. Hang-on tree stand. Hunter fell from stand when ratchet strap securing stand to tree broke. Stand condition poor.

10/27 - Monroe. Fatality. No harness. Hang-on tree stand. Hunter was entering or exiting stand. Age 35.

11/8 - Monroe. No harness. Ladder Stand. While sitting in stand, one of the nylon straps for the suspended seat failed, causing the individual to list to one side and fall approximately 20 feet to the ground. Age 58.

11/17 - Delaware. No harness. Home-made tree stand. Victim was in stand when the entire stand broke away from the tree and collapsed. Age 68.

11/17 - Schoharie. Harness used. Hang-on tree stand. Victim lost his balance and fell from stand, possibly while trying to attach his safety harness. Age 53.

11/18 - Cayuga. Fatality. No harness. Climbing stand. Hunter was climbing tree when top tree loop broke at 16 feet. Stand was old and rusted. Age 54.

11/20 – Washington. Fatality. Harness used. Homemade tree stand. Hunter was attempting to attach his safety harness when the wooden platform collapsed. Age 73.

11/25 – Broome. Harness used. Ladder stand. Hunter was climbing down from his stand when he slipped and fell. He was wearing his harness while in the stand. Age 45.

11/29 – Niagara. Fatality. No harness. Homemade tree stand. Hunter was found at base of stand. Coroner reported heart attack and fell from stand. Age 69.

12/3 – Orleans. Fatality. No harness. Homemade tree stand. Coroner reported heart attack and fell from stand. Age 80.

12/3 – Cortland. No harness. Climbing tree stand. Victim fell from 15-20 feet while climbing with his tree stand due to an unsecured safety latch pin and lack of an attached safety harness. Age 42.

12/3 – Oneida. Harness used. Victim fell out of his stand when the hanging strap holding the platform broke and he fell approximately 14 feet. Age 32.

Many, if not all incidents could be prevented if hunters follow a few basic tips:

*Use and properly adjust a full-body harness

*Use a safety belt or lifeline when climbing

*Check your stand every year and replace any worn parts

*Have a plan and let others know where you will be hunting

*Use a haul line to raise and lower your equipment (unloaded firearm, bow, or crossbow)

For more information, including the 2017 Hunting Safety Statistics and the 2017 Tree Stand Safety Statistics, visit the DEC Hunter Educ ati on Program page.

 

KUDOS TO NIAGARA COUNTY SPORTSMEN AWARD WINNERS: Every year, the Niagara County Federation of Conservation Clubs pays tribute to conservation leaders around the WNY area and around the state with a focus on Niagara County and this year is no different. In an effort to generate more interest in the annual awards banquet, set for April 14th at the Terry’s Corners Fire Hall in Gasport, the Federation no longer keeps the winners a secret. In fact, some winners could be reading this right now and finding out for the first time.

In abbreviated form, this year’s slate of  winners are: Oliver Jones Sportsperson of the year - Dale Dunkelberger of Lockport; Leroy Winn Club of the Year - Pheasants Forever WNY Chapter No. 29; Carl Lass Youth of the Year - Braxton Schafer of Lockport; the Pinky Robinson Award for dedication to Great Lakes Fisheries goes to Capt. Vince Pierleoni of Newfane; the James Reed/Don Meyer award for hunter safety education for firearms is Richard Evans of Lockport and for archery (Steve Fountain/Archie Lowery Award) goes to Randall Galyen of Wilson.

Also, the Ken Berner Award for person, family or group dedicated to conservation goes to Chuck Booker of Amherst; John Daly Award for Legislator of the Year for an elected official goes to Joseph Jastrzemski, Niagara County Clerk; the Victor Fitchlee Lifetime Achievement Award goes to Stan Culverwell of Wilson and the John Long, Sr. Memorial Award for top conservation business went to Maki Plastics and Scott Brauer of Gasport. The dinner will provide a better understanding of their accomplishments. Contact Dave Whitt at 716-754-2133 for tickets  by April 6.

 

THIS WEEK’S EVENTS: (For complete future listings go to the Calendar Page - http://www.huntfishnyoutdoors.com/events.php)

MARCH 2018

23 - National Wild Turkey Federation – Chemung Valley Ridgerunners Chapter Dinner at the Elmira Holiday Inn Riverview, 760 E. Water Street, Elmira, NY. (6:00 pm) The NWTF banquets are where you can buy exclusive merchandise and have a great time with friends. All the while, you will be raising vital funds for wild turkey conservation and important programs that introduce the outdoors to women, children and the disabled.  (For more information contact Chad McDonald  607-738-2050  cltcmcdolald24@yahoo.com) 

23 - Clymer Coonhunters Club Coonhound Event at their clubhouse on Ravlin Hill Road, Panama, NY (7:00 pm - Coonhound Event Bench Show - $10.00/8:00 pm – Coonhound Nite Hunt - $20.00) (For information call Chester Bricker at 716-355-6442)

24 - National Wild Turkey Federation – CrossRoads Limbhangers Chapter Dinner at the Lima Country Club,7470 Chase Road, Lima, NY. (5:00 pm)The NWTF banquets are where you can buy exclusive merchandise and have a great time with friends. All the while, you will be raising vital funds for wild turkey conservation and important programs that introduce the outdoors to women, children and the disabled.  (For more information contact Brian Gottfried  571-334-1496   camomanbg@gmail.com)

24 - The Importance of Native Plants for Future Sustainability at the Pfeiffer Nature Center, 1974 Lillibridge Road, Portville NY. (For informatio/register call 716-933-0187 or email naturalist@pfeiffernaturecenter.org)

24 - Genesee Valley Pheasants Forever Chapter 654 Annual Banquet at Sweet Briar Lodge (formerly Lodge on the Green), Rochester, NY (5:00 pm) (For information call Kevin Long at 585-334-5054.)

24 - Seventh Annual Fishermen’s Paradise Flea Market/Swap Meet at the Alexander Firemen’s Rec Hall, 10708 Route 98, Alexander, NY (9:00 am – 2:00 pm) There will be a wide variety of fishing gear, from new and used rods and reels to custom baits and plastics. (Costs: $2.00/Kids 12 and under Free) (For information call Joe Kugel 716-440-0004 or Jim Thompson 585-591-0168)

24 - Boating and Jet Ski Safety Class by U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary Flotilla 3-2 in the Community Room at the McKinley Mall. (8:00 am – 5:00 pm) There is a new age-related State Law for boaters that went into effect in 2015. To receive more information about the new law, or to register for this class, contact Eileen Reiner at 716-725-9669 or at reiner7@verizon.net. Visit the website at www.wnyboatsafe.org for a list of additional classes.

24 - 29th Annual Antique Fishing Tackle Show at the Elks Lodge No. 41, 6791 North Canal Road,  Lockport, NY (10:30 am – 2:00 pm) This is the longest-running event of its kind in the state, giving you a trip down memory lane as it relates to the fishing industry. This is a great chance to get an appraisal on some old fishing tackle that may be laying around your basement or in your garage.  (Cost: $5.00/Kids 16 and under Free) (For more information contact Dan Bedford at 716-713-9410 or email wdanfran@aol.com.)

24 – Elmira Beagle Club Beagle Hunt at their clubhouse at 1485 Breesport-N Chemung Rd, Lowman, NY (8:00 am regular/10:00 am Champion and Grand Champion classes – Beagle Hunt - $20.00) (For information call Timothy Hall 607-331-1660) 

24 - Early Gun & Military Auction at Hessney Auction Center, 2741 Route 14N, Geneva, NY (9:15 am) Pre-1900 guns, shotguns, rifles, handguns, over 150 civil war letters, pre-1900 military guns & memorabilia, swords, knives, bayonets, books, photos, paper, Military Includes Spanish-American War, Indian Wars, Civil War, War of 1812 (For more information call 315-789-9349 or 585-734-6082 or go to www.hessney.com)

24 - Birding 101: Class #3 at the Reinstein Woods Environmental Education Center, 93 Honorine Drive, Depew, NY (Town of Cheektowaga) (2:30 pm) What bird am I? Come learn the general types of birds found in Reinstein Woods. For adults and children ages 8 and older. (For information and register call 716-683-5959 or email reinsteinwoods@dec.ny.gov)

24 - Cabela’s Sportsman’s Seminars at Cabela’s Cheektowaga Store, 2003 Walden Avenue, Cheektowaga, NY. 11:00 am – 12:00 pm – Fish Fry – We all fry it and you get to try it! Join our expert fish fryers and learn how to prepare the best-tasting fried fish you’ve ever experienced. Sample different seasonings and learn some new frying techniques. 11:00 am -1:00 pm – BB-Gun Range - Bring your kids out to try their aim in our safe BB-gun range. Settle who the best shot in your family is once for all.  First-time shooters and seasoned alike are welcome. Weather permitting. 11:00 am – 6:00 pm - Free Photos with the Easter Bunny - Families are invited to celebrate Easter at Cabela's by enjoying free photos with the Easter Bunny, and many other activities during the season. Everyone's favorite Easter Bunny character will be in-store during select times from Saturday, March 24, through Easter Sunday, April 1, for a free, fun, spring-themed collectible photo. 1:00 – 4:00 pm - Let’s Make an Easter Placemat - Stop by our craft station with the kids and let their imaginations go wild as they decorate an Easter-themed placemat. Enjoy this fun activity with your family, and as always, crafts are free. While supplies last. (For information call 716-608-4770)

24-25 - Andover Fire Dept Gun Show at the Andover Fire Hall, 60 South Main Street, Andover, NY (Sat 9:00 am – 4:00 pm/Sun 9:00 am – 3:00 pm) (Admission - $5.00/12 and under – Free) This event is hosted by the Andover Fire Department. All federal, state and local firearm ordinances and laws must be obeyed. The Allegany County Pistol Clerks on site both days. (For information contact Dennis Givens 607-478-5005 Email: dennis.givens@frontier.com or Matt Green 607-478-5327 Email: andoverfire@frontier.net)

24-25 - 40th Annual Maple Sugaring at the Cumming Nature Center, 6472 Gulick Road, Naples, NY. (Breakfast 9:00 am-1:00 pm/Trail Demonstrations 10:00 am – 2:00 pm) Explore the science and lore of maple syrup production with volunteer guides along the CNC Pioneer Trail and also enjoy a pancake breakfast. On the trail, participants learn how a tree makes sap and discover the different processing techniques while enjoying the outdoors. Other highlights include a 100 percent pure maple syrup tasting in the sugarhouse, and a pancake meal in the visitors center. All meals include pure maple syrup and a choice of beverage. Maple Sugaring is the CNC’s major annual fundraising event and helps maintain CNC operations. (Meal Cost: Adult - $10.00/Kids - $8.00) (For information call 585-374-6160)24-25 - Girl Scouts Camp-In at the Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savannah, NY (Sat 10:00 am – Sun 12:00 pm) Girl Scouts of all ages are invited to a Montezuma camp-in and complete various badge requirements such as nature exploring, hiking, and bird-watching. Afterwards, Girl Scouts will have access to the Center’s grounds for other Girl Scout activities. On Sunday morning, Scouts will enjoy a guided sunrise nature hike. This camp-in program is ideal for smaller packs that aren’t ready to camp outside.  Pre-paid registration is required. Please pack camping meals.  All scouts must be accompanied by a parent, leader, or chaperone. (Fee: $30/Scout.) (For information or register call 315-365-3588 or e-mail montezuma@audubon.org)

25 - End of Hunting Season for Coyotes

25 - Finger Lakes Trollers Fishing Tackle, Outdoor Show and Flea Market at the Community Center at Clute Park, Watkins Glen, NY (9:00 am – 2:00 pm) New, used and antique fishing tackle,fishing charters,archery, turkery hunting stuff,etc. There will be about 70 tables set up. (Tables are sold out). (Admission is $2.00 with kids under 10 free. Parking is free.) (For information call Mike Burt  607-765-9866)

28 - Derby Hill Hawk Watch Trip meeting at the Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savannah, NY (9:00 am – 4:00 pm) Visit Lake Ontario for the spectacular spring raptor migration and leave the driving to us. Travel with other birders in our van to view thousands of Bald Eagles, Red-tailed Hawks, Sharp-shinned Hawks, Turkey Vultures and more! If weather conditions are poor on the 30h, the program will be moved to Thursday, April 1st. This program is sponsored by the Onondaga Audubon Society. Please pack a lunch. (Fee: $18.00/child, $25.00/adult.) (For information or register call 315-365-3588 or e-mail montezuma@audubon.org)

31 - Close of Catch and Release (Artificial Lures Only) Season for Trout in Salmon Creek (Cayuga County), Salmon Creek Above Ludlow Falls & West Branch Owego Creek (Tompkins County), Spring Creek on Caledonia State Fish Hatchery Property (8:00 am B 4:00 pm) (Livingston County), Oatka Creek from Bowerman Road Upstream to Union Street and from the Wheatland Center Road Upstream to the Mouth of Spring Creek, and Spring Creek (Monroe County), East Koy & Wiscoy Creeks (Allegany County), Clear Creek, Lime Lake Outlet, McKinstry Creek, Elm Creek, Elton Creek, Mansfield Creek and Cattaraugus Creek Upstream of Springville Dam (Cattaraugus County), Hosmer Brook and Cattaraugus Creek Upstream of Springville Dam (Erie County), Wiscoy Creek (Minus Section 2 mile Each Side of East Hillside Road Bridge), East Koy Creek, Cattaraugus Creek Upstream of Springville Dam and Clear Creek from Mouth to County Line (Wyoming County)

31 - Falconry Season Closes

31 – Close of Crow Hunting Season

31 - Rochester Ducks Unlimited 80th Annual Dinner & Auction at the Conservation Club of Brockport, 291 Ladue Road, Brockport, NY. (5:00 pm) This event will feature a live and silent auction as well as other raffles throughout the evening. (Ticket cost: Single - $65/Greenwing - $35) (For information call Edward McCaffery 585-594-8825 or David Isaac 585-303-3331)

31 - National Wild Turkey Federation – Between-the-Lakes Chapter Dinner at the South Seneca Sportsman’s Club, 6894 Yamell Road, Ovid, NY. (5:00 pm) The NWTF banquets are where you can buy exclusive merchandise and have a great time with friends. All the while, you will be raising vital funds for wild turkey conservation and important programs that introduce the outdoors to women, children and the disabled.  (For more information contact Shane Hayward  607-351-8830  shanehayward9@gmail.com) 

31 - Chemung County Coon Hunters Association Inc Coonhound Event at their clubhouse on Rumsey Hill Road, Van Etten, NY. (3:00pm – Coonhound Event Field Trial - $15.00/5:00pm – Coonhound Bench Show – $15.00/8:00pm Coonhound Event Nite Hunt - $15.00) (For information call Herschel Burt at 570-596-2149 or email moc.oohay@owthsreh)

31 - Boy Scout Merit Badge– Bird Study at the Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savannah, NY (12:00 – 3:00 pm) Boy Scouts are invited to complete the requirements for the Fish and Wildlife Management Merit Badge during our fun and interactive program. As always, please be prepared to go outside. All scouts must be accompanied by a parent, leader, or chaperone. (Fee: $8/scout) (For information or register call 315-365-3588 or e-mail montezuma@audubon.org)

31 - Cabela’s Sportsman’s Seminars at Cabela’s Cheektowaga Store, 2003 Walden Avenue, Cheektowaga, NY. 11:00 am – 6:00 pm Free Photos with the Easter Bunny - Families are invited to celebrate Easter at Cabela's by enjoying free photos with the Easter Bunny, and many other activities during the season. Everyone's favorite Easter Bunny character will be in-store during select times from Saturday, March 24, through Easter Sunday, April 1, for a free, fun, spring-themed collectible photo. 1:00 – 3:00 pm - Hunting for Eggs at Cabela’s - Come on down for our in-store Easter egg hunt. Registration for the kids begins at 1:30 p.m. and the big hunt will begin at 2 p.m.  Collect five eggs and return to the registration table for your goodies. Supplies are limited. 1:00 – 4:00 pm - Let’s Create a Bunny Box - Stop by our craft station with the kids and let their imaginations go wild as they create a bunny box to store all of their treasures. Enjoy this fun activity with your family, and as always, crafts are free. While supplies last. (For information call 716-608-4770)

31 - Otisco Lake Rod & Gun Club Traders Day at the club, Route 174, Marietta, NY (9:00 am – 3:00 pm) Cost: $2.00. (For information call Don Flanagan, 315-469-2859.)

31 - Red Wiggler Worm Composting: Class #1 at the Reinstein Woods Environmental Education Center, 93 Honorine Drive, Depew, NY (Town of Cheektowaga) (10:30 am) Learn the initial set up of worm composting for indoors and/or outdoors. (Starter kit is $4, Friends of Reinstein Woods $2.00) (Class #2 = May 12, Class #3 = June 30) (For information and register call 716-683-5959 or email reinsteinwoods@dec.ny.gov)

APRIL 2018

1 - 57th Annual Naples Creek Rainbow Trout Derby. Entry is by pre-registration only - registration sites are Sutton’s Sporting Goods, Main St., Naples (During business hours) and the Derby Headquarters -Naples Fire Hall, Vine St (3/31/14- 5 pm to 10 pm, 4/01/14- 4 am to sunrise) (Entry Fees - $8 Ages 16-64, $5 under 16, $5 ages 65 and over)(For additional information contact Joyce Doran 585-374-2782)

2 - 15th Annual Riedman Foundation Opening Day Trout Derby at the Fish Hatchery at Powder Mills Park, 115 Park Road,  Pittsford, NY (Register at Powder Horn Lodge – 6:30 am/Fishing 7:00 am – Noon) All ages are welcome to join in the fun at the Opening Day Trout Derby to benefit the Fish Hatchery at Powder Mills Park. Again this year, the contestant weighing in the largest brown trout will be recognized with the Bank of America Angler Award, a $500 prize. There will also be "largest catch" prizes awarded in three age categories. Entry is only $5 per angler age eight and older. Fishing will take place in designated areas of Irondequoit Creek within the boundaries of Powder Mills Park. The derby weigh station is at Powder Horn Lodge. Prizes will be awarded at noon. Entry forms can be downloaded at www.fishpowdermill.org. (For information call 585-586-1670.)

 

Until our next meeting in the Corner, have a great time in the outdoors. This is Ron Schroder for – “Your In on The Outdoors for Western New York.”

What Do You Think? Have something for other sportspeople? Let us know HERE.

 

 

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3 - 16 - 18

Welcome to this week’s Conservation Chatter Corner – little bits of happenings concerning our outdoors and you, the sportspeople who enjoy being part of that outdoors.

DEC ANNOUNCES RAINBOW TROUT SAMPLING DATES FOR NAPLES AND COLD BROOK: This year, sampling is scheduled for:

Thursday, March 22, 9 a.m., at Naples Creek, just north of the Village of Naples, Ontario County, at the Route 245 bridge

Friday, March 23, 10 a.m., at Cold Brook (Keuka Inlet) in the hamlet of Pleasant Valley, Steuben County.

Electrofishing 1975

DEC is conducting the sampling to aid in the ongoing assessment of Finger Lakes fisheries management practices and to provide up-to-date information for the opening day fishing forecast.

During sampling, data taken on each fish, including length, weight, sex, and spawning condition. A scale is used to determine age and growth rate. Sampling results will be available to the public at the DEC Region 8 fisheries office prior to the April 1 opening of the "inland" trout fishing season. Anglers wanting to fish for trout before April 1 are reminded that trout fishing is open year-round in the main bodies of the Finger Lakes.

Directions to Naples Creek:
Sampling will start at the Route 245 bridge, just north of the Village of Naples. Route 245 joins Route 21 just north of the village. The Route 245 bridge is approximately 0.2 to 0.3 miles from the junction with Route 21.

Directions to Cold Brook:
From the Avon DEC office, take I-390 south, continue on Southern Tier Expressway (Route 17/ Interstate 86) south to Exit #38 in Bath. Turn left off Exit # 38 onto Washington Street (Route 54) and continue straight through the intersection of Rt. 415, turn left (north) at next light following Route 54 (Liberty Street). Continue on Route 54, approximately six miles to Pleasant Valley. Turn left onto Hammondsport-Pleasant Valley Road (County Route 88). Sampling site is at stream crossing, approximately 1/2 mile.

 

HUNTING SAFETY STATISTICS FOR 2017: The 2017 hunting seasons in New York saw the second-lowest number of hunting-related shooting incidents (HRSIs) on record, 19. Also in 2017, DEC started tracking tree stand injuries for the first time. DEC recorded 12 incidents statewide for the season. (More on the treestand incidents next week.) The tradition of hunting is enjoyed by more than 500,000 New Yorkers each year, and the declining number of incidents show that today's generation of hunters may be the most safety conscious. Thanks to the efforts of 2,600 DEC staff and volunteer hunter education program instructors that teach nearly 50,000 students each year, New York's hunting safety statistics continue to improve.

Of the 19 HRSIs that occurred last year, 14 were two-party firearm incidents, five were self-inflicted, and one resulted in a fatality that DEC believes could have been prevented if hunting laws and common sense were followed.

Of the two-party HRSIs, 11 of the victims (79 percent) were not wearing hunter orange. Incidents involving two or more individuals stress the importance of identifying the target and what lies beyond, a major tenet of DEC's hunter safety courses.

In 11 of the 19 incidents (59 percent), a violation of hunting laws or regulations occurred. The hunting incident rate (incidents per 100,000 hunters) continues to decline. Since the 1960s, the incident rate has plunged more than 70 percent. The current five-year average is 3.2 incidents per 100,000 hunters, compared to 19 per 100,000 in the 1960s.

Trained volunteer instructors certified by DEC teach safe, responsible, and ethical hunting and trapping practices and the important role of hunters and trappers in wildlife conservation. New York has an extremely safety-conscious generation of hunters and trappers, thanks largely to more than 60 years of dedicated efforts of volunteer Hunter Education Program instructors. All first-time hunters, bowhunters, and trappers must successfully complete a hunter or trapper safety course and pass the final exam before being eligible to purchase a hunting or trapping license. All courses are offered free of charge.

While hunting is safer than ever, DEC encourages hunters to remember that every hunting-related shooting incident is preventable. Many, if not all of these incidents could have been prevented if the people involved had followed the primary rules of hunter safety:

*Treat every firearm as if it were loaded

*Control the muzzle, keep it pointed in a safe direction

*Identify your target and what lies beyond

*Keep your finger off the trigger until ready to fire

*Wear hunter orange

For more information, including the 2017 Hunting Safety Statistics and the 2017 Tree Stand Safety Statistics, visit the DEC Hunter Education Program page.

Incident Breakdown:

                                                        2017                    5-year Average

Total Incidents                               19                        19.2

              Fatal                                  1                          1.6

              Non-fatal                         18                        17.6

              Self-Inflected                  5                          8.8

              Two-Party                       14                        9.8

Species Hunted:

              Bear                                  0                          0.2

              Deer                                  6                          9

              Turkey – Spring              3                          1.2

              Turkey – Fall                   0                          0.4

              Rabbits                            1                          0.4

              Squirrels                          1                          2.2

              Raccoon                         0                          0.6

              Fox & Coyote                  2                          0.8

              Waterfowl                        3                          2

There was one fatality in 2017. 2017 figures are compiled from preliminary reports and are NOT final. Final investigation reports may take months in some cases. Please note that in some of the incidents reported the shooter was participating in an illegal act.

Incident Summaries:

The most common story: Remember that 99.9% of the people who hunt have safe and enjoyable experiences. Over half a million-people hunted in New York this year, and for every incident listed, there are thousands of other hunting stories of people who safely and responsibly took game. Just as important, even more passed up shots for the sake of safety, conservation, and respect for wildlife.

Many, if not all of these incidents could have been prevented, if only the parties involved had followed the primary rules of Hunter Safety:

Format For 2017 Descriptions: Date (mm/dd) - followed by County and a brief description based on initial report. Summaries with an * were incidents that violations were noted. Age of violator is noted at the end of the summary.

Small Game & Nongame

2/20 - Monroe. While coyote hunting the shooter observed movement and discharged one round. The victim was struck in the abdomen. Age 42. *

3/6 - Fulton. Self-inflicted. The victim was attempting to shoot a nuisance squirrel and discharged a round into her foot. Age 34. *

10/1 - Orange. Shooter discharged one round at a pheasant that was flushed by his dog. Several pellets struck the victim in the thighs, abdomen and face at 30 yards. Age 56. *

10/7 - Essex. Shooter discharged one round at a pheasant on the ground. One pellet ricocheted off a rock and struck the victim in the elbow. Age 59.

11/16 - Onondaga. Self-inflicted. Victim had set his gun down, leaning it against a tree. Shortly after, the gun fell over and discharged one round, 3 pellets struck him in the calf. Age 24.

12/7 - Madison. Self-inflicted. Victim leaned his rifle against his body while stomping brush for a place to sit. A branch caught in the trigger guard and discharged one round giving him a minor wound in the forearm. Age 18.

Waterfowl Hunting

9/1 - Erie. The victim was struck in the forehead by a single BB that most likely ricocheted off the water. Age 42.

10/7 - St. Lawrence. A low-flying duck flew between a group of waterfowlers and the victim 50 yards away. While shooting at the duck, the shooter struck the victim in the head and chest with several pellets. Age 24. *

10/29 - Cattaraugus. Victim was struck in the back and head by approximately 12 pellets, one which broke the skin. Shooter was approximately 200 feet away. Age 26. *

Turkey Hunting

5/1 - Chautauqua. The victim was struck by pellets in the back and left arm while turkey hunting. Age 22.

5/7 - Columbia. While stalking turkeys, the shooter discharged one round at the victims’ decoys from 60 yards. Two pellets struck the victims hand but did not break the skin. Age 57. *

5/13 - Steuben. Self-inflicted. The victim discharged one round into his left foot while attempting to shoot a turkey. Age 61.

Big Game Hunting

10/1 - Orange. Shooter discharged an arrow at movement and struck his friend in the abdomen at 15 yards. Age 35. *

11/22 - Chautauqua. Fatal. Shooter discharged one round with a pistol from approximately 200 yards away. The victim was fatally struck in the leg/upper thigh and succumbed to her injuries at the hospital. Age 34 *

11/23 - Otsego. Self-inflicted. Using farm equipment as a rest, shooter discharged 2 rounds. The 1st hit metal approximately 6 inches in front of the muzzle and bullet fragments came back and imbedded in his head and ear. Age 45.

11/23 – Oneida. Shooter and victim were part of a deer drive. A deer ran between the shooter and victim. Shooter fired one round and struck victim in the ear/scalp. Age 50. *

11/24 – Rensselaer. Shooter discharged one round at what he thought was a deer approximately 100 yards across field and struck the victim in the leg. Age 39. *

12/14 – Essex. Shooter discharged one round at what he thought was a deer approximately 40 yards away and struck the victim in the right arm and back. Age 27. *

Game Unknown

11/25 – Washington. Victim was struck in the hand with one round from approximately 100 yards away. Age unknown.

Preliminary descriptions of incidents as of 1/22/18. Many of the incidents reported here are still under investigation by NYS DEC Division of Law Enforcement.

 

THE GOOD GUYS AT WORK:

Quick Fix - Niagara County: On Feb. 20, ECO Josh Wolgast responded to a call regarding a fuel spill in North Tonawanda with the DEC Spills unit, North Tonawanda Police Department, North Tonawanda Fire and Niagara County's HAZMAT personnel. The group found the source of the spill, which had spread through several properties around Belling Place. The investigation revealed that a subject had punctured and emptied a home heating oil tank that was being removed from a residence on Belling Place. The subject admitted to emptying the fuel into five-gallon buckets before hauling the buckets across the street and dumping approximately 50 gallons of fuel onto the ground behind a garage. Crews worked to contain the fuel, no impacts to water sources were noted, and the defendant was issued several tickets returnable to the City of North Tonawanda Court on March 1.

Too Much Mud - Broome County: On Feb. 26, Lt. Ric Warner and ECO Eric Templeton investigated a complaint that a local logging company was allowing mud and silt to enter a stream in the town of Colesville. It had been reported that the stream, a tributary to the Susquehanna River, was being muddied by the loggers as they ran log skidders across the streambed during operations. In discussion with the two officers, the owners of the logging company stated they had established mats to bridge the stream crossing, but with warmer weather, the mats had slipped into the stream bed. With only a couple of days left before completion of the job, the loggers made the unfortunate decision to continue work as usual and, as a result, turned the stream into a thick, muddy mess. ECO Templeton and Lt. Warner ordered the project stopped until appropriate, effective siltation controls could be installed. The loggers stated they would install the siltation control measures immediately and re-bridge the crossing the following day. The loggers will be charged with contravention of water quality standards and, if appropriate actions are taken to correct the deficiencies at the job site, will settle the issue administratively through a Consent Order with DEC.



Muddy stream crossing on a logging job site

 

Dog Mistaken for Coyote - Tompkins County: On Feb. 26, ECO Jeffrey Krueger concluded an investigation by charging two coyote hunters with several ECL violations after New York State Police contacted ECO Krueger regarding a family dog shot by coyote hunters after dark on Feb. 21. The two hunters had been traveling to a hunting location in the town of Groton when one hunter saw what he believed to be the eyes of a coyote in a field and asked the driver to stop. The passenger loaded his rifle with one round, walked to a gated fence, and shot into the field. The driver then went to look for the coyote and pulled into a nearby driveway, where he discovered they had actually shot the resident's dog. A State Trooper responded, conducted initial interviews, and turned the case over to ECO Krueger, who found evidence indicating that shots had been fired within 500 feet of the complainant's home and that the area was posted property. After determining that the dog, transported to Cornell Animal Hospital the night of the incident, was expected to recover, the ECO contacted the hunters and had them meet him at State Police Barracks in Dryden. Both hunters were cooperative and provided written statements. The driver, a Cortland resident, was charged with operating an artificial light with an unsecured gun in a motor vehicle. The shooter, also from Cortland, was charged with operating an artificial light with an unsecured gun in a motor vehicle, shooting within 500 feet of a dwelling, and trespassing on posted property. Both will be answering charges in the Town of Dryden Court.

 

 

2017 BEAR HARVEST RESULTS: New York State bear hunters took 1,420 black bears during the 2017 hunting seasons.

New York has excellent bear habitat and vast, accessible public lands that offer exciting opportunities for bear hunting. With abundant natural food sources this past year, bears were in great condition, and several hunters took bears weighing in excess of 500 pounds.

Hunters took an estimated 1,037 black bears in New York's Southern Zone, nearly the same number as in 2016, but slightly more than the recent five-year average. Bowhunters took 330 bears, on par with the recent average, but less than the 537 bears taken during the regular season. The early season, which DEC initiated in 2014 to reduce bear populations in a handful of management units in the Catskill region, resulted in 150 bears.

In the Northern Zone, hunters took an estimated 383 bears, about 25 percent fewer than 2016 and below the historical average. Bear take in the Northern Zone tends to alternate between strong harvests during the early season one year, followed by strong harvests during the regular season the next year, based primarily on cycles of food availability. This year, the early season accounted for 82 bears, similar to the early seasons of 2011 and 2013. However, hunters fared much better during the regular season, taking 242 bears.

For the second year, junior hunters were allowed to take black bears during the Youth Firearms Big Game Hunt over Columbus Day weekend. That hunt overlapped with the early bear season in most of the Northern Zone, but one junior hunter in the Northern Zone and eight in the Southern Zone took advantage of the opportunity to harvest a bear.

Black Bear Harvest & Recent Trend Comparison:

              Area                                  2017      2016      Past 5-year Ave.           1991-2000 Ave.

              Northern Zone                 383        514        520                                    515

              Southern Zone              1,037     1,025     995                                    207

              Statewide                        1,420     1,539     1,515                                 722

Notable Numbers:

*1 bear per 4.2 square miles - by DEC Wildlife Management Unit (WMU), the greatest bear harvest density occurred in WMU 3C, which is predominantly in Ulster County but includes slivers of Sullivan and Greene counties However, the town of Olive in Ulster County (WMUs 3A and 3C) yielded one bear for every 2.4 square miles.

*163 - the greatest number of bears reported taken on any one day, Nov 18, the opening day of the regular firearms season in the Southern Zone

*550 pounds - the heaviest dressed weight bear reported to DEC in 2017, taken in the town of Lexington, Greene County. A 520-pound dressed weight bear was reported taken in Wayland in Steuben County, and seven bears were reported with dressed weights between 400-500 pounds. Scaled weights of dressed bears were submitted for 23 percent of bears taken in 2017.

*15 - the number of tagged bears reported in the 2017 harvest. These included three bears originally tagged in Pennsylvania and one from New Jersey. The remainder were originally tagged in New York for a variety of reasons, including research, nuisance response, relocated urban bears, or released rehabilitated bears.

*872 - the number of hunter-killed bears from which DEC collected teeth for age analysis in 2017. Hunters who reported their harvest and submitted a tooth for age analysis will receive a 2017 Black Bear Management Cooperator Patch. Results of the age analysis should be available by September 2018.

*11 percent - the proportion of bears taken by non-resident hunters. Successful non-resident bear hunters hailed from 13 states, the farthest being Florida, Louisiana, and California.

2017 Bear Take Summary Report
A complete summary of the 2017 bear harvest with results and maps by county, town, and WMU is available on DEC's website.
            

 

DIY TRAIL CAMERA MOUNT: Assembly - To assemble your new camera mount take your 1-inch bolt and slide one washer onto it. Place the eyebolt on the 1-inch bolt then put another washer on. Next put the screw eye on the 1-inch bolt and then add another washer. Then put the lock washer on and put the nut on the 1-inch bolt and tighten to desired tension using two wrenches. Finally put the wing nut on the eyebolt and spray paint the mount with whatever color you wish to help reduce the shine.

 

(https://www.qdma.com/build-diy-trail-camera-mount/)

 

THIS WEEK’S EVENTS: (For complete future listings go to the Calendar Page - http://www.huntfishnyoutdoors.com/events.php)

MARCH 2018

15 - Close of Statewide Fishing Seasons for Northern Pike, Pickerel, Tiger Muskellunge and Walleye

15 - Close of Fishing Season for Muskellunge in the Susquehanna River (Tioga County) & the Chemung River and Tributaries (Chemung County)

15 - Close of Finger Lakes Bass Season.

16 - Start of Catch and Release (Artificial Lures Only) Season for Black Bass in all Finger Lakes except Cayuga, Otisco, Owasco and Skaneateles Lakes. (>6/19/16)

16 - Fishing Ban (No Fishing) on Otselic River from mouth to Whitney Point Reservoir Dam, Susquehanna River in Binghamton between Rock Bottom Dam and Exchange Street Bridge, Susquehanna River in the towns of Union and Vestal from the Erie-Lackawanna Railroad bridge downstream to Murphy's Island, Tioughnioga River from New York Route 26 bridge to US Route 11 bridge, Little Choconut Creek from mouth to Goudey Station Building (Broome County), Dutch Hollow Brook from Owasco Lake upstream to the Route 38A bridge (Cayuga County), Scriba Creek from mouth upstream to Fish Hatchery Dam (Oswego County) (>5/5)

16 - Application Deadline for examination for individuals seeking a falconry apprentice, wildlife rehabilitator or leasked tracking dog license. The test is scheduled for Friday, April 13, from 10 a.m. to noon at DEC Regional offices across the state. Applications for these written examinations are available from DEC. To apply for any of these exams, visit the NYSDEC Special Licenses Unit webpage and fill out an exam registration form. You can mail, fax or email the completed form to: NYS DEC Special Licenses Unit, 625 Broadway, Albany, NY 12233-4752 Phone: 518-402-8985, Fax: 518-402-8925, Email: SpecialLicenses@dec.ny.gov.

16 - National Wild Turkey Federation – Finger Lakes Bucks N’ Beards Chapter Dinner at the Pulteney Fire House, 8891 Brown Road, Pulteney, NY. The NWTF banquets are where you can buy exclusive merchandise and have a great time with friends. All the while, you will be raising vital funds for wild turkey conservation and important programs that introduce the outdoors to women, children and the disabled.   (For more information contact Steve Calderwood   607-522-7991eot_tradingpost.yahoo.com)

16-17 – 2018 Ducks Unlimited New York State Convention at the Ramada Inn Lakefront, Geneva, NY. A celebration of the achievements during 2017.

16-18 -CANCELLED - Runnings Sportsman’s Classic at the Del Lago Resort and Casino, Waterloo, NY. Attendees will be able to visit with outfitters, charters and retailers along with the entire crew from Rush Outdoors TV. (For  information contact John Lenox, Vice President, at arrowflinger80@yahoo.com)

17 - National Wild Turkey Federation – Canisteo Valley Chapter Dinner at the K of C, Main Street, Hornell, NY. (5:00 pm)The NWTF banquets are where you can buy exclusive merchandise and have a great time with friends. All the while, you will be raising vital funds for wild turkey conservation and important programs that introduce the outdoors to women, children and the disabled.  (For more information contact Sean Smith  607-324-6664) 

17 - Southwestern NY Friends of NRA Banquet at the Seneca Allegany Resort & Casino, 777 Seneca Allegany Blvd., Salamanca, NY (4:30 pm) (Cost: $50.00) (For information contact Ray Patchkofsky 716-807-8170
or email: raymondpatchkofsky@yahoo.com)

17-18 – Cub Scouts Camp-In at the Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savannah, NY (Sat 10:00 am – Sun 12:00 pm) Cub Scouts of all ages are invited to a Montezuma camp-in and complete various badge requirements such as nature exploring, hiking, and bird-watching. Afterwards, Cub Scouts will have access to the Center’s grounds for other Cub Scout activities. On Sunday morning, Cub Scouts will enjoy a guided sunrise nature hike. This camp-in program is ideal for smaller packs that aren’t ready to camp outside.  Pre-paid registration is required. Please pack camping meals.  All scouts must be accompanied by a parent, leader, or chaperone. (Fee: $30/Scout.) (For information or register call 315-365-3588 or e-mail montezuma@audubon.org)

17-18 - 40th Annual Maple Sugaring at the Cumming Nature Center, 6472 Gulick Road, Naples, NY. (Breakfast 9:00 am-1:00 pm/Trail Demonstrations 10:00 am – 2:00 pm) Explore the science and lore of maple syrup production with volunteer guides along the CNC Pioneer Trail and also enjoy a pancake breakfast. On the trail, participants learn how a tree makes sap and discover the different processing techniques while enjoying the outdoors. Other highlights include a 100 percent pure maple syrup tasting in the sugarhouse, and a pancake meal in the visitors center. All meals include pure maple syrup and a choice of beverage. Maple Sugaring is the CNC’s major annual fundraising event and helps maintain CNC operations. (Meal Cost: Adult - $10.00/Kids - $8.00) (For information call 585-374-6160)

18 - Genesee Valley Trappers Association Fur Auction at the Clubhouse, 4462 County Road 32 (3 miles east of Honeoye, south of 20A), Honeoye, NY (6:30 am fur checkin/10:00 am auction) ($10.00 charge for non-members) (For information call Tom Miller, 585-229-4759)

19 - Searching for Spring at Knox Farm State Park, 437 Buffalo Road, East Aurora, NY. (11:00 am - 1:30 pm) Head out the day before the spring equinox to search for signs of spring as we prepare for warmer days ahead. (For information/registration call 716-282-5154.)

22 – Proposed Otisco Lake Boat Launch Public Meeting at the Borodino Grange Hall, 1861 E. Lake Road, Skaneateles, NY (6:00 – 8:00 pm) Sponsored by the DEC and the Town of Spafford, this meeting will feature a presentation about the planned Otisco Lake Boat Launch, including how comments and suggestions from a previous meeting were addressed, as well as final site design details and project schedule. DEC will be available to answer questions after the presentation. Otisco is the only Finger Lake currently without a public boat launch. (For information call 607-753-3095 ext. 213.)

23 - National Wild Turkey Federation – Chemung Valley Ridgerunners Chapter Dinner at the Elmira Holiday Inn Riverview, 760 E. Water Street, Elmira, NY. (6:00 pm) The NWTF banquets are where you can buy exclusive merchandise and have a great time with friends. All the while, you will be raising vital funds for wild turkey conservation and important programs that introduce the outdoors to women, children and the disabled.  (For more information contact Chad McDonald  607-738-2050  cltcmcdolald24@yahoo.com) 

23 - Clymer Coonhunters Club Coonhound Event at their clubhouse on Ravlin Hill Road, Panama, NY (7:00 pm - Coonhound Event Bench Show - $10.00/8:00 pm – Coonhound Nite Hunt - $20.00) (For information call Chester Bricker at 716-355-6442)

24 - National Wild Turkey Federation – CrossRoads Limbhangers Chapter Dinner at the Lima Country Club,7470 Chase Road, Lima, NY. (5:00 pm)The NWTF banquets are where you can buy exclusive merchandise and have a great time with friends. All the while, you will be raising vital funds for wild turkey conservation and important programs that introduce the outdoors to women, children and the disabled.  (For more information contact Brian Gottfried  571-334-1496   camomanbg@gmail.com)

24 - The Importance of Native Plants for Future Sustainability at the Pfeiffer Nature Center, 1974 Lillibridge Road, Portville NY. (For informatio/register call 716-933-0187 or email naturalist@pfeiffernaturecenter.org)

24 - Genesee Valley Pheasants Forever Chapter 654 Annual Banquet at Sweet Briar Lodge (formerly Lodge on the Green), Rochester, NY (5:00 pm) (For information call Kevin Long at 585-334-5054.)

24 - Seventh Annual Fishermen’s Paradise Flea Market/Swap Meet at the Alexander Firemen’s Rec Hall, 10708 Route 98, Alexander, NY (9:00 am – 2:00 pm) There will be a wide variety of fishing gear, from new and used rods and reels to custom baits and plastics. (Costs: $2.00/Kids 12 and under Free) (For information call Joe Kugel 716-440-0004 or Jim Thompson 585-591-0168)

24 - Boating and Jet Ski Safety Class by U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary Flotilla 3-2 in the Community Room at the McKinley Mall. (8:00 am – 5:00 pm) There is a new age-related State Law for boaters that went into effect in 2015. To receive more information about the new law, or to register for this class, contact Eileen Reiner at 716-725-9669 or at reiner7@verizon.net. Visit the website at www.wnyboatsafe.org for a list of additional classes.

24 - 29th Annual Antique Fishing Tackle Show at the Elks Lodge No. 41, 6791 North Canal Road,  Lockport, NY (10:30 am – 2:00 pm) This is the longest-running event of its kind in the state, giving you a trip down memory lane as it relates to the fishing industry. This is a great chance to get an appraisal on some old fishing tackle that may be laying around your basement or in your garage.  (Cost: $5.00/Kids 16 and under Free) (For more information contact Dan Bedford at 716-713-9410 or email wdanfran@aol.com.)

24 – Elmira Beagle Club Beagle Hunt at their clubhouse at 1485 Breesport-N Chemung Rd, Lowman, NY (8:00 am regular/10:00 am Champion and Grand Champion classes – Beagle Hunt - $20.00) (For information call Timothy Hall 607-331-1660) 

24 - Early Gun & Military Auction at Hessney Auction Center, 2741 Route 14N, Geneva, NY (9:15 am) Pre-1900 guns, shotguns, rifles, handguns, over 150 civil war letters, pre-1900 military guns & memorabilia, swords, knives, bayonets, books, photos, paper, Military Includes Spanish-American War, Indian Wars, Civil War, War of 1812 (For more information call 315-789-9349 or 585-734-6082 or go to www.hessney.com)

24 - Birding 101: Class #3 at the Reinstein Woods Environmental Education Center, 93 Honorine Drive, Depew, NY (Town of Cheektowaga) (2:30 pm) What bird am I? Come learn the general types of birds found in Reinstein Woods. For adults and children ages 8 and older. (For information and register call 716-683-5959 or email reinsteinwoods@dec.ny.gov)

24 - Cabela’s Sportsman’s Seminars at Cabela’s Cheektowaga Store, 2003 Walden Avenue, Cheektowaga, NY. 11:00 am – 12:00 pm – Fish Fry – We all fry it and you get to try it! Join our expert fish fryers and learn how to prepare the best-tasting fried fish you’ve ever experienced. Sample different seasonings and learn some new frying techniques. 11:00 am -1:00 pm – BB-Gun Range - Bring your kids out to try their aim in our safe BB-gun range. Settle who the best shot in your family is once for all.  First-time shooters and seasoned alike are welcome. Weather permitting. 11:00 am – 6:00 pm - Free Photos with the Easter Bunny - Families are invited to celebrate Easter at Cabela's by enjoying free photos with the Easter Bunny, and many other activities during the season. Everyone's favorite Easter Bunny character will be in-store during select times from Saturday, March 24, through Easter Sunday, April 1, for a free, fun, spring-themed collectible photo. 1:00 – 4:00 pm - Let’s Make an Easter Placemat - Stop by our craft station with the kids and let their imaginations go wild as they decorate an Easter-themed placemat. Enjoy this fun activity with your family, and as always, crafts are free. While supplies last. (For information call 716-608-4770)

24-25 - Andover Fire Dept Gun Show at the Andover Fire Hall, 60 South Main Street, Andover, NY (Sat 9:00 am – 4:00 pm/Sun 9:00 am – 3:00 pm) (Admission - $5.00/12 and under – Free) This event is hosted by the Andover Fire Department. All federal, state and local firearm ordinances and laws must be obeyed. The Allegany County Pistol Clerks on site both days. (For information contact Dennis Givens 607-478-5005 Email: dennis.givens@frontier.com or Matt Green 607-478-5327 Email: andoverfire@frontier.net)

24-25 - 40th Annual Maple Sugaring at the Cumming Nature Center, 6472 Gulick Road, Naples, NY. (Breakfast 9:00 am-1:00 pm/Trail Demonstrations 10:00 am – 2:00 pm) Explore the science and lore of maple syrup production with volunteer guides along the CNC Pioneer Trail and also enjoy a pancake breakfast. On the trail, participants learn how a tree makes sap and discover the different processing techniques while enjoying the outdoors. Other highlights include a 100 percent pure maple syrup tasting in the sugarhouse, and a pancake meal in the visitors center. All meals include pure maple syrup and a choice of beverage. Maple Sugaring is the CNC’s major annual fundraising event and helps maintain CNC operations. (Meal Cost: Adult - $10.00/Kids - $8.00) (For information call 585-374-6160)

24-25 - Girl Scouts Camp-In at the Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savannah, NY (Sat 10:00 am – Sun 12:00 pm) Girl Scouts of all ages are invited to a Montezuma camp-in and complete various badge requirements such as nature exploring, hiking, and bird-watching. Afterwards, Girl Scouts will have access to the Center’s grounds for other Girl Scout activities. On Sunday morning, Scouts will enjoy a guided sunrise nature hike. This camp-in program is ideal for smaller packs that aren’t ready to camp outside.  Pre-paid registration is required. Please pack camping meals.  All scouts must be accompanied by a parent, leader, or chaperone. (Fee: $30/Scout.) (For information or register call 315-365-3588 or e-mail montezuma@audubon.org)

25 - End of Hunting Season for Coyotes

25 - Finger Lakes Trollers Fishing Tackle, Outdoor Show and Flea Market at the Community Center at Clute Park, Watkins Glen, NY (9:00 am – 2:00 pm) New, used and antique fishing tackle,fishing charters,archery, turkery hunting stuff,etc. There will be about 70 tables set up. (Tables are sold out). (Admission is $2.00 with kids under 10 free. Parking is free.) (For information call Mike Burt  607-765-9866)

 

Until our next meeting in the Corner, have a great time in the outdoors. This is Ron Schroder for – “Your In on The Outdoors for Western New York.”

What Do You Think? Have something for other sportspeople? Let us know HERE.

 

 

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3 - 9 - 18

Welcome to this week’s Conservation Chatter Corner – little bits of happenings concerning our outdoors and you, the sportspeople who enjoy being part of that outdoors.

DEC ANNOUNCES RAINBOW TROUT SAMPLING DATES FOR NAPLES AND COLD BROOK: This year, sampling is scheduled for:

Thursday, March 22, 9 a.m., at Naples Creek, just north of the Village of Naples, Ontario County, at the Route 245 bridge

Friday, March 23, 10 a.m., at Cold Brook (Keuka Inlet) in the hamlet of Pleasant Valley, Steuben County.

DEC is conducting the sampling to aid in the ongoing assessment of Finger Lakes fisheries management practices and to provide up-to-date information for the opening day fishing forecast.

During sampling, data taken on each fish, including length, weight, sex, and spawning condition. A scale is used to determine age and growth rate. Sampling results will be available to the public at the DEC Region 8 fisheries office prior to the April 1 opening of the "inland" trout fishing season. Anglers wanting to fish for trout before April 1 are reminded that trout fishing is open year-round in the main bodies of the Finger Lakes.

Directions to Naples Creek:
Sampling will start at the Route 245 bridge, just north of the Village of Naples. Route 245 joins Route 21 just north of the village. The Route 245 bridge is approximately 0.2 to 0.3 miles from the junction with Route 21.

Directions to Cold Brook:
From the Avon DEC office, take I-390 south, continue on Southern Tier Expressway (Route 17/ Interstate 86) south to Exit #38 in Bath. Turn left off Exit # 38 onto Washington Street (Route 54) and continue straight through the intersection of Rt. 415, turn left (north) at next light following Route 54 (Liberty Street). Continue on Route 54, approximately six miles to Pleasant Valley. Turn left onto Hammondsport-Pleasant Valley Road (County Route 88). Sampling site is at stream crossing, approximately 1/2 mile.

 

REGISTER FOR MONTEZUMA AUDUBON CENTER’S SUMMER CAMPS: The Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savannah, NY has published its summer camp schedule. Spaces fill quickly, so early registration is encouraged. The Camps being offered this summer are:

Hunter Safety / Waterfowl ID Camp   July 9 - July 13   Fee: $150

Youth will earn their hunter safety and waterfowl ID certificates while learning how to be a safe, ethical, and responsible sportsman during hands-on learning and outdoor experiences! Waterfowl ID is required to hunt waterfowl at the Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge. This camp will be taught as a home study course to maximize our time in the field. Campers will be given the course manual and workbook prior to camp. Ages: 11-15

Bow Safety / Trapper Safety Camp   July 16 - July 20   Fee: $150

Campers will learn the necessary safety techniques and responsibilities when using a bow and arrow to pursue deer and as a trapper when setting traps to catch wild game. This camp will be taught as a home study course to maximize our time in the field. Campers will be given the course manual and workbook prior to camp. Ages: 11-15

Fisheries Camp   July 23 - July 27   Fee: $150

Young anglers will learn safe fishing practices and how to catch “the big one” from wildlife biologists while casting for trout, panfish, salmon, bass, carp and more around Montezuma and the Finger Lakes Region. Ages: 11-15

Wildlife Exploration Camp   July 30 - August 3   Fee: $150

Campers will explore the Montezuma Wetlands Complex’s habitats and mammals, birds, reptiles and amphibians during hiking, canoeing, wildlife management, and other outdoor activities. Ages: 11-15

Montezuma Paddling Camp   August 6 – 10   Fee: $150    

Paddlers of all skill levels will create their own adventures with the help of our trained educators to discover Montezuma’s rivers, streams and wetlands while learning to paddle canoes and kayaks. Ages: 11-15

Junior Nature Camp   August 20 – 24   Fee: $150

Young naturalists will explore the wonders of nature through a variety of outdoor games, fun crafts and unique activities. Campers will catch frogs in the pond, search for signs of mammal activity in the forest, and discover the birds, butterflies and dragonflies in the grassland and wetland. Ages: 6-10

The days will run from 9:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. daily.

For information and/or obtain regristration forms call (315) 365-3588, email montezuma@audubon.org, or visit http://ny.audubon.org/montezuma.

Summer campers enjoying a leisurely paddle along the Seneca River.

 

ARE YOU READY FOR THE SPRING SNOW GOOSE MIGRATION?

snow geese flying

                                                                                                                         Photo: NYSDEC

Under New York’s regulations, any person with 2017-18 migratory game bird hunting privileges is allowed to take snow geese and Ross' geese (a smaller but nearly identical species) in the Western, Northeastern, Southeastern, and Lake Champlain Waterfowl Hunting Zones from January 16 through April 15, in addition to the regular snow goose hunting seasons in each zone. A special season is not held on Long Island, because relatively few snow geese occur in huntable areas there during the spring.

All migratory game bird hunting regulations and requirements apply to the taking of snow geese during this spring harvest period, except hunters may use recorded or electrically amplified calls or sounds and use of shotguns capable of holding more than three shells. Shooting hours are ½ hour before sunrise to ½ hour after sunset when all other waterfowl hunting seasons are closed; shooting hours end at sunset if waterfowl seasons are open. A daily bag limit of 25 birds (no possession limit) is in effect to be consistent with regular snow goose hunting seasons.

ATTENTION SNOW GOOSE HUNTERS: RESEARCHERS AT SUNY ESF NEED YOUR HELP!

snow goose head collection area mapResearchers at the SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry are currently searching for hunters to donate snow goose heads from the Albany, Lake Champlain, and St. Lawrence regions during this spring migration. These samples will be used in a research project to study the migration patterns of Greater and Lesser Snow Geese in New York State.

If you have any questions on how to donate samples, please email Stephen Sliwinski, M.P.S. candidate.

  

GRANTS TO STATE PARKS, FORESTS AND HISTORIC SITE PARTNER ORGANIZATIONS: New York State and Parks & Trails New York announced $450,000 in state grants to 21 organizations dedicated to the stewardship and promotion of New York State parks, historic sites and public lands. These dedicated groups raise private funds for capital projects, perform maintenance tasks, provide educational programming, and promote public use through hosting special events.

The Park and Trail Partnership Program grants, funded through the Environmental Protection Fund, will be matched by almost $200,000 in private and local funding, which will support projects. The Park and Trail Partnership Program grants are designed to:

*Enhance the preservation, stewardship, interpretation, maintenance and promotion of New York State parks, trails, historic sites and public lands;

*Increase the sustainability, effectiveness, productivity, volunteerism and fundraising capabilities of not-for-profit organizations that promote, maintain and support New York State parks, trails and state historic sites; and

*Promote the tourism and economic development benefits of outdoor recreation through the growth and expansion of a connected statewide network of parks, trails and greenways.

The grants are administered by the State Office of Parks, Recreation, and Historic Preservation, and Parks & Trails New York, a statewide non-profit group. This year for the first time, grant awardees include Department of Environmental Conservation Friends groups.

The Western/Central New York awardees are:

Finger Lakes
Friends of Ganondagan:
$50,000 to fund the restoration and replacement of the Seneca Bark Longhouse roof using new, "flexbark/Elm Bark" roofing panels. The exiting roof is leaking and the new roof is necessary and critical to ensure the viability of the Seneca Bark Longhouse structure, and safety of the artifacts, reproductions, and interpretive materials housed within.

Friends of Hamlin Beach State Park: $15,740 to enhance the self-guided interpretive tour to educate visitors about the role Hamlin Beach State Park CCC/POW Camp played during the Depression and World War II. The enhancements will include a stone dust path to follow the interpretive sign tour, five new interpretive signs, and new locator signs within the park directing patrons to the CCC/POW site.

Friends of Letchworth State Park: $12,530 to fund a planning document along with two architectural project reports that will allow the Friends group to more effectively manage and fund projects that will move forward the ongoing effort to preserve the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) legacy in Letchworth State Park.

Sonnenberg Gardens and Mansion State Historic Park: $18,688 for the restoration of the Vinery Greenhouse. The scope of the restoration project includes repairs to masonry, skeletal framework, sashes, roof, glass and gutters.

Western New York
Friends of Allegany State Park:
$4,250 for the construction of approximately two miles of new, narrow tread trail, as part of the park's master plan. Funds will cover the materials for the trail, new signage, and informational kiosks and maps. The trail will be created in collaboration with a mountain biking group to attract bikers, a new user group, to the park.

Friends of Reinstein Nature Preserve: $47,411 to hire a Development Manager to cultivate a sustainable donor base and expand the organization's funding sources in the areas of corporate giving, foundation giving, and planned giving. These actions will increase the long-term viability of Friends of Reinstein Woods, and foster improvements to the educational and stewardship programs supported by Reinstein Woods.

The Parks and Trail Partnership Program is funded by the Environmental Protection Fund. In the 2018-19 Executive Budget, Governor Cuomo maintained EPF funding at $300 million -- the highest level of funding in the Environmental Protection Fund's 25-year history. These major investments continue New York's national environmental leadership, and advance essential projects to protect the state's water, air, and natural resources and help communities capitalize on the economic returns of environmental funding.

Parks & Trails New York is the leading statewide advocate for parks and trails, dedicated since 1985 to improving the health and quality of life of all New Yorkers by working with community organizations and municipalities to envision, create, promote, and protect a growing network of parks, greenways and trails throughout the state for all to use and enjoy.

 

ADIRONDACK MOOSE VIDEO: Canoeists in New York captured some unbelievable shots of a rare Adirondack moose in its natural environment. http://www.wideopenspaces.com/stunning-footage-captures-rare-adirondack-moose-video/?bt_alias=eyJ1c2VySWQiOiAiMTIyZjIyZjYtMzk5OS00M2JjLTgyNDUtNjViNGM3Y2U5ZmQwIn0%3D

&utm_source=Boomtrain&utm_medium=manual&utm_campaign=20180307

 

BACKLASH ON DELTA: Georgia lawmakers excluded Delta — the state’s largest private employer — from a tax bill that passed Thursday because the airline cut business ties to the National Rifle Association.

In the bill, Delta would have received a $50 million tax exemption on jet fuel, but pro-gun Republicans opted to kill the measure because the company said it would no longer offer discounts to NRA members in the wake of Florida’s school shooting.

Lt. Gov. Casey Cagle, a Republican, had warned Delta if it did not reverse its decision and reinstate the discount that he would kill the tax break that would effectively eliminate the tax on jet fuel entirely. The state senate voted to remove the measure after the bill advanced in the state house.

Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam and New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo, both Democrats, invited the carrier to relocate their headquarters to their respective states.

http://patriotgunnews.com/2018/03/02/georgia-lawmakers-punish-delta-over-nra-position/

 

MORE BACKLASH: A 20-year-old in Oregon is dragging DICK’S Sporting Goods and Walmart into court after both major sporting goods stores refused to sell him a rifle due to his age.

The plaintiff, Tyler Watson, is claiming “Unlawful Age Discrimination,” and his case might actually hold water.

According to Willamette Week, Oregon law says as long as an individual is an adult, they cannot be refused something based on age that’s readily available to other adults.

A retired judge in Oregon, Jim Hargreaves, breaks it down further:

They [sellers] can’t set their own age limit because the statute has already done that. They don’t have any authority because the statute specifically says you can’t as a merchant discriminate against either young people or old people. If you’re selling something you have to sell it to anyone who is entitled to buy it by law.

The lawsuit claims Mr. Watson attempted to purchase a .22 caliber Ruger rifle from Field & Stream in Medford, Oregon, but was refused. Watson then traveled to a Walmart in Grants Pass, Oregon, a few days later to buy the gun, but again was turned away.

This is believed to be the first piece of legal litigation filed over the new gun restrictions enacted February 28.

(https://www.outdoorhub.com/news/2018/03/06/20-year-old-files-age-discrimination-lawsuit-major-sporting-goods-stores-refusing-sell-22-rifle/)

 

 

THIS WEEK’S EVENTS: (For complete future listings go to the Calendar Page - http://www.huntfishnyoutdoors.com/events.php)

MARCH 2018

8-11 - WNY Sport & Travel Expo at the Erie County Fairgrounds Event Center, 5820 South Park Avenue, Hamburg, NY. (Thu & Fri Noon-9:00pm/Sat 10:00 am – 8:00 pm/Sun 11:00 am – 5:00 pm) WNY Sport & Travel Expo will be dedicated to the outdoor enthusiast. Special guests include Greg Miller from the hit show In Pursuit Bwana Jim and his Wildlife Show, Jim Beverly Retriever Training, and Clint Taylor. WNY Sport & Travel Expo will showcase excellent entertainment and seminars on hunting, fishing and other outdoor activities for all age group. There will be very large display of goods and services related to sport and travel. Interactive games will make it more entertaining for the participants. (Cost: $9.00/Children 10 and under free/Scouts in uniform free/Free Parking) (For information go to http://10times.com/wny-sport-travel)

9 - National Wild Turkey Federation – Lake Ridge Gobbler Chapter Dinner at the Brockport Elks Club #2100, 4400 Sweden Walker Road, Brockport, NY. (6:00 pm)The NWTF banquets are where you can buy exclusive merchandise and have a great time with friends. All the while, you will be raising vital funds for wild turkey conservation and important programs that introduce the outdoors to women, children and the disabled. (For more information contact Vickie Sweet 585-739-6976 vsweet1@rochester.rr.com)

9 - Home School Nature Series: Montezuma Van Tour at the Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savannah, NY (10:00 am - 12:00 pm) Spring migration is underway and our marshes, ponds, fields and lakes are teeming with waterfowl. Homeschoolers ages 5-12 will ride in the MAC van and tour the Montezuma Wetlands Complex. Students will improve their bird identification skills while viewing massive flocks of Snow Geese, Tundra Swans and other birds during their long journey. (Fee: $8/student.) (For information or register call 315-365-3588 or e-mail montezuma@audubon.org)

10 - Close of Canada Goose Hunting Season – Part 4 – in the South Zone

10 - National Wild Turkey Federation – Letchworth Chapter Dinner at the J W Jones Hall, 54 Leicester Rd. (Route 36), Caledonia, NY. The NWTF banquets are where you can buy exclusive merchandise and have a great time with friends. All the while, you will be raising vital funds for wild turkey conservation and important programs that introduce the outdoors to women, children and the disabled.   (For more information contact David Fanaro   585-202-6794  lakeviewconstruction@hotmail.com)

10 - National Wild Turkey Federation – Cortland Limbhangers Chapter Dinner at the Cortland County Music Park, 1824 State Route 13, Cortland, NY. (5:00 pm) The NWTF banquets are where you can buy exclusive merchandise and have a great time with friends. All the while, you will be raising vital funds for wild turkey conservation and important programs that introduce the outdoors to women, children and the disabled.  (For more information contact Bret Eccleston  607-842-6260   rollingridges@frontiernet.net)

10 - Whitetails Unlimited - Western New York Deer Camp at the Carousel Banquet Facility, Hamburg Fairgrounds, 5600 McKinley Parkway, Hamburg, NY. (5:00 pmThe deadline ticket date is March 5, 2018. Tickets may be ordered online at www.whitetailsunlimited.com or by phone - 1-800-274-5471. (Cost $45.00/$30.00 youth.) Everyone goes home with a Deer Camp Tour 2018 Shirt! (For information contact Bill Bailey  413-244-2304)

10 - Crown City Bassmasters Hunting & Fishing Extravaganza, Cortland, NY (9:00 am – 2:00 pm) (For information call Jeff 607-659-7654.)

10 - Catherine Creek Chapter of Trout Unlimited 31st Annual Fundraiser Banquet, Horseheads Elk Club, Horseheads, NY (5:00 pm) (For information call Jim Palmer at 607-425-6136 or email jpalmer8@stny.rr.com.)

10 - Ice Masters Elite Tournament Trail Event out of Silver Lake State Boat Launch on Silver Lake. (Registration 5:30 a.m. to 6:30 a.m. Weigh in at 2 p.m. (you must be off the ice by then). Several species categories. (Entry fee is $60 for a team ($30 per person). (For information contact Mark Dusablon at 607-742-0343.)

10 – North Tonawanda Owl Prowl at the North Tonawanda Audubon Preserve, 141 Goundry Street, North Tonawanda, NY. Sponsored by with Buffalo Audubon. (Cost: $7.00) (For information/pre-registration (required) call 585-457-3228.)

10 – Boating Safety Class sponsored by the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary at the Fort Niagara Officer’s Club, Youngstown, NY (9:00 am – 5:00 pm) (For information contact Martin Laufer at 716-390-7727.)

10 - Nature of Montezuma Lecture Series – Bird Banding with Dr. Bruce Gilman at the Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savannah, NY (10:00 am – 12:00 pm) Dr. Gilman, a Professor of Environmental Conservation at Finger Lakes Community College, will walk us through the glacial history of the Finger Lakes Region. Learn about how glacial ice is formed, how drumlins, eskers and Finger Lakes formed, and the megafauna animals that used to call NY home about 10,000 years ago. Dr. Gilman will lead a 1-mile hike around our forest and grassland to showcase the area’s glacial features. (Fee: $5/child, $8/adult, $25/family. *Free for Friends of the Montezuma Wetlands Complex.) (For information or register call 315-365-3588 or e-mail montezuma@audubon.org)

10 – Who’s Awake? - at the Reinstein Woods Environmental Education Center, 93 Honorine Drive, Depew, NY (Town of Cheektowaga) (10:00 am) On this guided walk we will search for early risers and migrants.  (For information and register call 716-683-5959 or email reinsteinwoods@dec.ny.gov)

10 - Cabela’s Sportsman’s Seminars at Cabela’s Cheektowaga Store, 2003 Walden Avenue, Cheektowaga, NY. 11:00 am – 12:00 pm - Mount Your Turkey Fan - Mounting your turkey's fan isn't as difficult as you might think. Join us as we demonstrate this simple process that requires just a few common household items. Learn how to mount your fan so you have a reminder of your successful hunt for years to come. 11:00 am – 1:00 pm – Archery Fun - Bring the family to try their skills at our inflatable archery range. Weather permitting. 11:00 am – 1:00 pm - Cooking Demos and Free Samples – We are dusting off our grills and smokers and getting ready for spring. Stop by for our demonstrations and stick around for tasty, free samples. Weather permitting. 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm - Calling all Toms and Jakes! - Bring your kids to our turkey-calling clinic and let them learn some tips from our experienced pros. Stick around and watch them try their gobbles and clucks with a Flextone call during our turkey calling contest. The first 25 kids will receive a Flextone call to take home. (For information call 716-608-4770)

10-11 - Niagara Frontier Cheektowaga Gun Show at the Knights of Columbus, 2735 Union Road, Cheektowaga, NY (Sat 9:00 am – 4:00 pm/Sun 9:00 am – 3:00 pm) 90 tables. (Admission: $5.00/children 12 and under free) (For information call 716-542-9929 or email  guns@nfgshows.com)

11 - The Eastern Lake Ontario Salmon And Trout Association Fleamarket will be held at the Brewerton Fire Hall (on RT11), Brewerton, NY.  (For information call 315 515 8778 and leave a message.)

12 - Annual State of Lake Ontario Public Meeting at the Carlson Auditorium, in the Chester F. Carlson Center for Imaging Science building (76-1125) on the Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT) Campus, Jefferson Road, Henrietta, NY (Monroe County). (6:30 – 9:00 pm) The meeting is co-hosted by RIT and the Monroe County Fishery Advisory Board. DEC, United States Geological Survey, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources biologists will make a number of presentations, including updates on the status of trout and salmon fisheries, forage fish, stocking programs, and fisheries management plans. Ample time will be provided at the end of the scheduled program for the audience to interact with the presenters. Information summaries for a host of Lake Ontario fisheries assessment programs will be posted at: http://www.dec.ny.gov/outdoor/27068.html prior to the public meetings. (For information contact Christopher Legard, Cape Vincent Fisheries Research Station 315-654-2147)

14 - Annual State of Lake Ontario Public Meeting at the Cornell Cooperative Extension Building, 4487 Lake Avenue, Lockport, NY (Niagara County). (6:30 – 9:00 pm) The meeting is co-hosted by Niagara County Cooperative Extension and the Niagara County Sportfishery Development Board.DEC, United States Geological Survey, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources biologists will make a number of presentations, including updates on the status of trout and salmon fisheries, forage fish, stocking programs, and fisheries management plans. Ample time will be provided at the end of the scheduled program for the audience to interact with the presenters. Information summaries for a host of Lake Ontario fisheries assessment programs will be posted at: http://www.dec.ny.gov/outdoor/27068.html prior to the public meetings. (For information contact Christopher Legard, Cape Vincent Fisheries Research Station 315-654-2147)

14 - Educator Workshop: Project Budburst at the Reinstein Woods Environmental Education Center, 93 Honorine Drive, Depew, NY (Town of Cheektowaga) (4:00 – 6:00 pm) Engage your students in hands-on citizen science as you monitor plants as the seasons change. 2 CTLE hours provided. For educators of students in grades K-12. (For information and register call 716-683-5959 or email reinsteinwoods@dec.ny.gov)

15 - Annual State of Lake Ontario Public Meeting at the Pulaski High School Auditorium, 4624 Salina Street, Pulaski, NY (Oswego County). (6:30 – 9:00 pm) The meeting is co-hosted by the Eastern Lake Ontario Salmon and Trout Association. DEC, United States Geological Survey, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources biologists will make a number of presentations, including updates on the status of trout and salmon fisheries, forage fish, stocking programs, and fisheries management plans. Ample time will be provided at the end of the scheduled program for the audience to interact with the presenters. In the event of heavy lake-effect snow, the meeting will be held at the same time and location on March 9. Information summaries for a host of Lake Ontario fisheries assessment programs will be posted at: http://www.dec.ny.gov/outdoor/27068.html prior to the public meetings. In the event of heavy lake-effect snow, the meeting will be held at the same time and location on March 14. (For information contact Christopher Legard, Cape Vincent Fisheries Research Station 315-654-2147)

15 - Deadline for removing Ice Shanties from all waters.

15 - Close of Statewide Fishing Seasons for Northern Pike, Pickerel, Tiger Muskellunge and Walleye

15 - Close of Fishing Season for Muskellunge in the Susquehanna River (Tioga County) & the Chemung River and Tributaries (Chemung County)

15 - Close of Finger Lakes Bass Season.

15 - End of Trapping Season for Beaver in West portion of Southern Tier

15 - Tioga County Trappers Association Fur Sale at the  Tioga County Sportsman's Association, 1141 Carmichael Road, Owego, NY.  (9:00 am to 12:00 pm.) (For information contact Bill Swagler at 607-222-8554 or Mark Machaler at 607-207-7958.) 

15 - Montezuma’s Bird Migration Van Tour from the Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savannah, NY (2:00 – 5:00 pm) Raptors have invaded the Montezuma Wetlands Complex and now is a great time to see them! Hop in the Montezuma Audubon Center van for an excursion to Montezuma’s premier birding locations to encounter snowy owls, short-eared owls, bald eagles, rough-legged hawks and more! Participants are encouraged to bring their camera. Binoculars and field guides will be provided.  (Fee: $8/child; $15.00/adult) (For information or register call 315-365-3588 or e-mail montezuma@audubon.org)

16 - Start of Catch and Release (Artificial Lures Only) Season for Black Bass in all Finger Lakes except Cayuga, Otisco, Owasco and Skaneateles Lakes. (>6/19/16)

16 - Fishing Ban (No Fishing) on Otselic River from mouth to Whitney Point Reservoir Dam, Susquehanna River in Binghamton between Rock Bottom Dam and Exchange Street Bridge, Susquehanna River in the towns of Union and Vestal from the Erie-Lackawanna Railroad bridge downstream to Murphy's Island, Tioughnioga River from New York Route 26 bridge to US Route 11 bridge, Little Choconut Creek from mouth to Goudey Station Building (Broome County), Dutch Hollow Brook from Owasco Lake upstream to the Route 38A bridge (Cayuga County), Scriba Creek from mouth upstream to Fish Hatchery Dam (Oswego County) (>5/5)

16 - Application Deadline for examination for individuals seeking a falconry apprentice, wildlife rehabilitator or leasked tracking dog license. The test is scheduled for Friday, April 13, from 10 a.m. to noon at DEC Regional offices across the state. Applications for these written examinations are available from DEC. To apply for any of these exams, visit the NYSDEC Special Licenses Unit webpage and fill out an exam registration form. You can mail, fax or email the completed form to: NYS DEC Special Licenses Unit, 625 Broadway, Albany, NY 12233-4752 Phone: 518-402-8985, Fax: 518-402-8925, Email: SpecialLicenses@dec.ny.gov.

16 - National Wild Turkey Federation – Finger Lakes Bucks N’ Beards Chapter Dinner at the Pulteney Fire House, 8891 Brown Road, Pulteney, NY. The NWTF banquets are where you can buy exclusive merchandise and have a great