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conservation chatter corner

with ron schroder

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YOUR IN ON THE OUTDOORS FOR WESTERN NEW YORK
www.huntfishnyoutdoors.com

 

1 - 19 - 18

Welcome to this week’s Conservation Chatter Corner – little bits of happenings concerning our outdoors and you, the sportspeople who enjoy being part of that outdoors.

 

GREATER NIAGARA FISHING & OUTDOOR EXPO JAN. 19-21: This “pure” fishing show is designed to be an “event” where attendees can spend a long weekend enjoying and learning about your favorite pastime versus the normal one or two hour “walk through” shows that many are used to attending. Now in our 5th year, the show continues to grow toward becoming one of the best “fishing” shows in all of the Great Lakes. With over 200 fishing exhibitor booths and over 3,000 hours of “fishing” education provided to attendees at our January 2017 show, we are the largest freshwater “fishing” show in New York State and among the largest fishing shows anywhere in the Great Lakes. 

The Show Facility – the Conference and Event Center Niagara Falls – provides a unique blend of a spacious Exhibitor Event Center, multiple additional side rooms and a multitude of conference/seminar rooms all utilizing “State of the Art” technology. The core of the show is built around providing sportfishing education to all attendees. The core belief of our show is that education is the most important thing we can do to continue to grow the sport of fishing. We believe that by providing a significant amount of education, we will recruit new anglers including the next generation to the sport as well as the knowledge for existing anglers to increase their enjoyment for the time they spend on the water by being more successful. 
Education offerings are targeted at novice, casual and diehard fishermen and women by some of the best in the business who call the nearby lakes, rivers and streams their home. From bass and walleye to salmon and trout; from perch to piers, stream casters to trolling nuts; from fly fishing to ice fishing – there is a little bit if everything for every type of angler and level of expertise.
We feel that education is something that is desired by every angler – from the most experienced to those novices just starting out. The “passing on” of fishing knowledge is one of our ways of giving back to the fishery and the area. The highlight of this education is the Western New York Fishing Academy that offers anglers the opportunity to attend over 120 free one-hour seminar classes taught by over 70 qualified instructors. Click for List of Seminars
In addition to the Academy, the show also has a number of more intense Clinics for those experienced Anglers looking for more of a “Deep Dive” into a subject area. These will be taught by Experts in the particular area, will typically go for two hours, will require a ticket to attend them that may or may not require an additional $20 fee. Click for list of Clinics

Both large and small Fishing related Manufacturers and Retailers have booths at the show. It’s a great opportunity for attendees to talk with the experts and check out the actual products in order in order to make informed decision on what will work best for you. It is also a great opportunity to save some money as you stock up for the Fishing season at “show special” pricing. Whether it’s a major purchase like a Boat/Motor/Marine Electronics/Boat Outfitting or smaller purchases like Rods/Reels/Line or Lures; significant savings can be had at the show. Click here for the list of Show Exhibitors

In support of our effort to introduce future generations of anglers to the sport of fishing, all children age 12 and under who attend the Expo with a paying adult will receive free admission (limit two children per paying adult). We will offer a variety of kid friendly activities and events that will strive to instill an appreciation for the outdoors. Through appreciation comes conservation of our precious environment.

 

DEC ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR PHEASANT RELEASE PROGRAM: The opening of the application period for the cooperative Day-Old Pheasant Chick Program to enhance opportunities for pheasant hunting in New York has begun. The program provides pheasant hunting opportunities through a partnership among DEC, hunters, 4-H youth groups, and landowners interested in rearing and releasing pheasants. Applications are due by March 25, 2018.

 

                                Photo from NYSDEC

 

The Day-Old Pheasant Chick Program began in the early 1900s and is funded through the State Conservation Fund, which is supported by license fees paid by hunters, trappers, and anglers.

Pheasant eggs and chicks were distributed to farmers and rural youth in the program's early days. Today, day-old chicks are available at no cost to participants that are able to provide a brooding facility, a covered outdoor rearing pen, and an adequate release site. Approved applicants will receive the day-old chicks in April, May, or June. No chicks obtained through the Day-Old Pheasant Chick Program can be released on private shooting preserves, and all release sites must be approved in advance by DEC and must be open for public pheasant hunting opportunities.

Daily care is necessary to monitor the health of the birds and to ensure there is adequate feed and water for the rapidly growing chicks. The pheasants may be released beginning when they are eight weeks old and no later than Dec. 1. Individuals interested in these programs should contact their nearest DEC regional office (please refer to offices listed below) for applications and additional information.

In 2017, DEC distributed more than 34,500 day-old pheasant chicks to qualified 4-H and sportsmen and sportswomen applicants. Applications must be filed with a DEC regional wildlife manager by March 25, 2018 (see contact information below). A "Pheasant Rearing Guide" and applications are available on DEC's website.

R7 - Broome, Cayuga, Chenango, Cortland, Madison, Onondaga, Oswego, Tioga and Tompkins counties:
1285 Fisher Ave. Cortland, NY 13045
(607) 753-3095 x 247

R8 - Chemung, Genesee, Livingston, Monroe, Ontario, Orleans, Schuyler, Seneca, Steuben, Wayne and Yates counties:
6274 East Avon-Lima Rd.
Avon, NY 14414
(585) 226-5380

R9 - Allegany, Chautauqua, Cattaraugus, Erie, Niagara and Wyoming counties:
182 East Union, Suite 3
Allegany, NY 14706-1328
(716) 372-0645

 

ONONDAGA LAKE WETLAND AND SHORELINE RESTORATION NEARLY COMPLETE:

Healthy wetland and shoreline habitats are important for birds, fish, and other wildlife, especially near a city like Syracuse. To remove pollution from Onondaga Lake, several important wetland communities, including shoreline vegetation, had to be removed or disturbed. DEC biologists helped design and carry out the clean-up and restoration of the lake. Key to the success of wetland restoration is the return of clean soil; appropriate water conditions; and healthy, strong vegetation. The initial restoration was completed in the fall of 2017, so now the recovery of the disturbed habitats can begin. It will take several years for much of the vegetation to mature. However, as the photo demonstrates, vegetation has taken hold in many locations and will continue to recover. This will lead to improved habitats, fishing, and wildlife watching around the lake

 

BOW MAP, COMPASS, AND GPS TRAINING CLASSES: Becoming an Outdoors-Woman (BOW) instructors Sheila Young and Lynn Malerba are offering map, compass, and GPS training classes for women. The classes, called Nav 202, are a 2.5-day, women-only, introductory, hands-on course focusing on navigation techniques using a GPS, USGS map, orienteering compass, and Garmin BaseCamp digital mapping program. The best part is you can take all the classes being offered (the Complete Bundle) or choose from several other options if you just want instruction in one or two classes. 

All classes take place February 23-25, 2018 in Tupper Lake, NY (Adirondacks).

Per-person options include:

Complete BUNDLE (map and compass & GPS & BaseCamp Mapping Program) $275

Mini BUNDLE 1 (map and compass & GPS) $185

Mini BUNDLE 2 (GPS w/ BaseCamp Mapping Program) $200

SOLO 1 (map and compass) $85

SOLO 2 (GPS) $110

Register at http://adirondackconnections.com/gps.html

Or contact adkconnections@spamarrest.com or adkfoothillsgs@gmail.com for more details.

BUNDLE and SOLO courses open to men and women will be offered on April 6-8, 2018 and June 8-10, 2018.

 

COAST GUARD RESCUES 5 FROM LAKE ERIE ICE FLOE:

                                                           Photo from US Coast Guard

DETROIT — Sector Detroit's Command Center coordinated with U.S. Coast Guard Air Station Detroit?, Monroe County (Michigan) Sheriff's Department and other local rescue responders to save five fishermen from Lake Erie after they were stranded on an ice floe last Friday. 

Sector Detroit’s Command Center received a distress call after five people stranded on an ice floe were able to use their flashlights to signal someone ashore who called it in to Monroe County Dispatch, triggering rescue response efforts.

"It would have been difficult to find them if they didn't have flashlights; it enabled them to signal for help and, ultimately, for us to locate them," said Air Station Detroit Aircraft Commander, Lt. Adam Morehouse.  "I'd also like to share with the ice-fishing community what we saw out there in regard to open water. There is a lot of it. The water is completely open in some near shore areas."

The Coast Guard warns ice sport enthusiasts that the ice is very dangerous after the increase in temperatures over the past week.  The recent warm weather has caused ice to melt, brought in heavy fog and caused multiple ice rescue cases with one life lost in just the past week.

The Coast Guard encourages ice fishermen and ice sport enthusiasts to check the weather before heading out and extend the forecast check to 24 hours to prevent being caught in bad conditions.  Bring signaling and communication equipment such as a flashlight, flares, VHF radio and a personal locator beacon, as well as a compass or pocket GPS. Cell phones are good to bring with you but are unreliable as a primary communication source because signals are not strong off shore and batteries lose power in cold weather.

 

NEW INFORMATION ON BAT FUNGUS IMPROVES DETECTION OF DEADLY DISEASES: The fungus that causes white-nose syndrome, a deadly disease of hibernating bats, spreads rapidly by way of bats, then establishes and persists in soil and on walls of underground hibernation sites, according to a study published today.

                                                                            Photo by John Adamski

Findings from the new study, conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey and EcoHealth Alliance, can help scientists and managers in North America better detect and understand the Pseudogymnoascus destructans (Pd) fungus that causes white-nose syndrome, or WNS. Scientists can use the results to determine what, where and when to sample for the fungus as they survey areas for Pd. The results can also help managers assess the effectiveness of disease mitigation efforts.

“First discovered in New York state in 2006, white-nose syndrome has killed millions of agriculturally and environmentally valuable bats, threatening some species with extinction,” said lead author Michelle Verant, who conducted the research while working at the USGS National Wildlife Health Center. Verant now works for the National Park Service. “Our study helps explain natural dynamics of this devastating disease, which is important for effective disease control.”

Hibernacula are dark and cold underground environments, such as caves and mines, in which bats hibernate. For this study, scientists investigated six hibernacula in New York, Kentucky, Tennessee and Wisconsin that represented different stages of WNS progression. They found that bats were the primary means by which Pd was introduced into hibernacula, and that the risk of spread by soil from hibernacula increased over time. They also found a higher probability of detecting Pd on the species known as little brown bats compared to other bat species using the same hibernacula.

Together, these findings can help scientists determine where and how to collect the most useful samples for efficient and early detection of Pd.

“Our results suggest that targeting little brown bats for sampling is the most effective way to detect Pd in a population,” Verant said. “It can take up to a year after Pd is found on bats for the fungus to be accurately and consistently identified in environmental samples from their hibernacula, such as cave sediment or wall surfaces.”

When bats can’t be sampled, however, cave soil is the next best alternative. The scientists found a higher likelihood of detecting Pd in the soil of hibernacula than on cave walls.

"Something else we specifically tested was if temperature differences within a cave influenced the amount of Pd,” said Dr. Kevin Olival, a coauthor from EcoHealth Alliance. “We found that temperature variation did not make a big difference, and that there are unlikely areas of a cave which are Pd-free and thus protective for bats.”

The USGS and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service provided funding for this work. The new study is published in the Journal of Applied Ecology.

WNS is not known to affect people, pets or livestock. For more information about WNS, please visit the USGS National Wildlife Health Center, the EcoHealth Alliance and the international coordinated response to WNS websites.

(http://www.theoutdoorwire.com/story/e4cd7c18-7b94-4338-b8ce-1661b5d19a24)

 

 

 

THIS WEEK’S EVENTS: (For complete future listings go to the Calendar Page - http://www.huntfishnyoutdoors.com/events.php)

JANUARY 2018

1-2/28 – NYS Winter Classic Fishing Tournament through Feb. 28. Seven species categories. Open water or through the ice. (For information go to www.nyswinterclassic.com.)

2-3/15 – Capt. Bob’s Outdoors Winter Fishing Derby (Entry fee is $20) 8 species divisions. (For information call 716-407-3021)

19-21 - The 5th Annual Greater Niagara Fishing and Outdoor Expo at the Conference and Event Center, Niagara Falls, NY. (For information go to niagarafishingexpo.com.) Some 70 speakers will be dishing out over 120 seminars and the Main Event hall is sold out with top quality fishing and fishing related exhibitors. Three days of education covering a wide spectrum of angling knowledge. Rick Hajecki, Greg Amiel, Dan Keating, Mark McClutchey, Jake Romanack, Jason Coslow, Frank Campbell, Dan Colville, Tim Thomas, Matt Yablonsky, Lance Valentine … the list is a long one. (Check it all out at www.niagarafishingexpo.com.) You won’t want to miss this one. Bring a friend 

20 - LOTSA Salmon School at the Conference and Event Center Niagara Falls, NY. (For information and sign up go to www.lotsa1.org.)

20 - National Wild Turkey Federation – Lakeshore Longbeards Chapter Dinner at The Kosciuszko Club, 252 Nevins Street, Dunkirk, NY. (5:00 pm) The NWTF banquets are where you can buy exclusive merchandise and have a great time with friends. All the while, you will be raising vital funds for wild turkey conservation and important programs that introduce the outdoors to women, children and the disabled.  (For more information contact Scott Dibble  716-595-3897   svdibble@yahoo.com )

20 – Cattaraugus County Trappers Association Fur Auction at the Hinsdale Volunteer Fire Department, Hinsdale, NY (For information call Brian Davis at 716-945-4223.)

20 - Woods Walk: Winter Tree ID at the Reinstein Woods Environmental Education Center, 93 Honorine Drive, Depew, NY (Town of Cheektowaga) (1:00 pm) Learn how to identify local trees after they lose their leaves. No registration required.  (For information and register call 716-683-5959 or email reinsteinwoods@dec.ny.gov)

20 - Birding 101: Class #1 at the Reinstein Woods Environmental Education Center, 93 Honorine Drive, Depew, NY (Town of Cheektowaga) (2:30 pm) Join us for a bird identification adventure! Learn to identify common birds and how to properly use binoculars. For adults and children ages 8 and older. (For information and register call 716-683-5959 or email reinsteinwoods@dec.ny.gov)

20 - Educator Workshop: Project Wet at the Reinstein Woods Environmental Education Center, 93 Honorine Drive, Depew, NY (Town of Cheektowaga) (9:00 am – 12:30 pm) Project WET (Water Education for Teachers) helps teachers use water to teach English language arts, science, math and more! Participants receive a standards-based interdisciplinary curriculum guide that includes

lessons covering water’s physical and chemical properties, cultural connections to water and water resource management. For formal and

non-formal educators of students in grades K to 12. (For information and register call 716-683-5959 or email reinsteinwoods@dec.ny.gov)

20 - Owl Prowl at the Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savannah, NY (3:30 – 5:30 pm) Get up close to live owls during an indoor presentation by KrittrKris! You’ll find out what adaptations these birds have that allow them to survive during the winter season and be successful hunters of the night. Then, join the Montezuma Audubon Center staff to search for Snowy Owls and the endangered Short-eared Owls in the grasslands around Montezuma. It will be a real hoot! (Fee: $6/child, $8/adult, $25/family.) (For information or register call 315-365-3588 or e-mail montezuma@audubon.org)

20 – Big Game Appetizers at Cabela’s Cheektowaga Store, 2003 Walden Avenue, Cheektowaga, NY. (11:00 am – 2:00 pm) Come check out some great big game appetizers with Cabela's.  We'll show you how to prepare and serve some great ideas that will have your football party food tasting better than ever! (For information call 716-608-4770)

20-21 - Niagara Frontier - Akron Gun Show at the Newstead Fire Hall, 5691 Cummings Road, Akron, NY (Sat 9:00 am – 4:00 pm /Sun 9:00 am - 3:00pm) 85 tables. (Cost: $5.00/children under 12 free when accompanied by a paid adult) (For information call 716-542-9929 or email  guns@nfgshows.com)

20-21– Greater Olean Area Outdoor & Recreational Sports Show at the Good Times of Olean Center, 800 East State Street, Olean, NY (Sat 10:00 am – 5:00 pm/Sun 10:00 am – 3:00 pm) Hosted by the Greater Olean Chamber of Commerce. 60 booths. (Admission: $3.00/Seniors $2.00/Children 12 and under free) (For information call 716-372-4433 or email meme@oleanny.com or go to http://www.oleanny.com)

21 - Genesee Valley Trappers Association Fur Auction at the Clubhouse, 4462 County Road 32 (3 miles east of Honeoye, south of 20A), Honeoye, NY (6:30 am fur checkin/10:00 am auction) ($10.00 charge for non-members) (For information call Tom Miller, 585-229-4759)

24 – The Start Of Online Registration For The DEC's 2018 Summer Camps Program. (10:00 am) Applications should be submitted through the online registration program available through a link from the Summer Camps website. Parents and guardians are encouraged to register early since some of the weeks fill up quickly. (For more information visit the DEC's website at www.dec.ny.gov, or call 518-402-8014.)

26-28 – Runnings New York Sportsman’s Expo in the Horticulture Building at the New York State Fairgrounds, 581 State Fair Blvd., Syracuse, NY (Fri - Noon to 7:00 pm/Sat – 9:00 am to 7:00 pm/Sun – 9:00 am to 5:00 pm) This year's show will include more than 40 new exhibits, including outfitters from across the globe  . The schedule also includes seminars, a kids' trout pond and more. (Admission: $10 ages 13-64; $5 for children 6 – 12; 5 and under no charge. Seniors are $7 and Military/Fire and Police are $7 with ID) (For information go to http://www.newyorksportsmansexpo.com/)

26-28 - Bark at the Moon Coyote Club – Foxpro’s New York State Predator Hunt, Check in Carey Lake Restaurant & Party House, 959 Penfield Rd (Rt 441) Macedon, NY. Contest starts at Dusk on Friday night. All hunters must be registered before event starts. Entry form w/ payment must be received on or prior to Wednesday January 24, 2018. Entry fee money will be used to provide raffle prizes in addition to what our sponsors provide. The top four place winners will received trophies and cash prizes. Check-in time is 1:00 - 2:00 PM on the 25th. (Entry fees: one man team = $ 20.00 fee/two man team = $ 30.00 fee/father/youth (<16) Division = $ 30.00 - extra youth = $ 5.00 each) Big Dog Bounty = $ 5.00 extra PER TEAM. Total purse goes to heaviest coyote. (For information call Andrew Lewand  585-223-5324)

27 - Whitetails Unlimited - Canandaigua, NY/Wine Country Chapter Banquet Deer Camp at the Kings Banquet Center, 4031 Routes 5 & 20, Canandaigua, NY. (5:00 pm) The deadline ticket date is January 15, 2018. Tickets may be ordered online at www.whitetailsunlimited.com or by phone - 1-800-274-5471. (Cost $45.00/$30.00 youth.) Everyone goes home with a Deer Camp Tour 2018 Shirt! (For information contact Bill Bailey  413-244-2304)

27 - National Wild Turkey Federation – Wyoming County Gobblers Chapter Dinner at the Alexander Recreation Hall, 10505 Main Street, Alexander, NY. (5:00 pm) The NWTF banquets are where you can buy exclusive merchandise and have a great time with friends. All the while, you will be raising vital funds for wild turkey conservation and important programs that introduce the outdoors to women, children and the disabled. (For more information contact Marc Kern  585-815-9549  marckern@twc.com) (585) 815-9549

27 - Wild Game for the Big Game at the Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savannah, NY (9:00 am – 2:00 pm) Have you heard of “living off the land”, “sustainable living” or the “locavore movement”?  Growing, raising, and hunting your own food is not only cost effective, but leads to a healthier life.  Do you want to get involved but not sure how? Join us for this new program that will be led by Montezuma’s wildlife biologists and NYSDEC environmental conservation officers. The morning session will highlight the proper way to harvest and store wild game. The afternoon session will showcase the proper cooking techniques to ensure the tastiest meals. This program will provide new and seasoned wild game chefs with fun recipes to serve at your Super Bowl party to score a touchdown!  Lunch will be a locavore potluck, so please bring a small dish to pass.  Space is limited. PRE-PAID RESERVATIONS REQUIRED.  (Fee: $15/child, $20/adult.) (For information or register call 315-365-3588 or e-mail montezuma@audubon.org)

27-28 - IAC Wheatfield Gun Show at the  Frontier Fire Hall, Niagara Falls, NY ((Sat 9:00 am – 4:00 pm/Sun 9:00 am – 3:00 pm) The IAC Wheatfield Gun Show will be held on Jan 27th-28th, 2018 in Niagara Falls, NY. This Niagara Falls gun show is held and hosted by Iroquois Arms Collectors. All federal, state and local firearm ordinances and laws must be obeyed. Plenty of parking food available from ladies auxiliary. NICS background checks and Niagara County pistol permit will be on sight to help transaction go smoothly. (Admission: $5.00) (For information call John Scozzafava  716-694-7443 or email janscozz12@gmail.com)

27-28 – Powersports Open House at Cabela’s Cheektowaga Store, 2003 Walden Avenue, Cheektowaga, NY. (11:00 am – 2:00 pm) Visit our Powersports Open House in the Boat Showroom!  Our full service team and Powersports staff will be available to show you the brand new 2018 models, the best gear to upgrade your boat, answer any questions you may have and more! Make sure you enter to win the drawing for this weekend's grand prize giveaway including 2 Yeti Ramblers, a Cabela's Boundary Waters Roll-Top Dry Bag and an Ecoxgear Sol Jam Waterproof Bluetooth Speaker!  (Entry box located in the Boat Showroom during this Sat & Sun weekend during store hours). (For information call 716-608-4770)

28 - Learn To Cross-Country Ski at the Reinstein Woods Environmental Education Center, 93 Honorine Drive, Depew, NY (Town of Cheektowaga) (10:00 am) Learn the basics of cross-country skiing before going on a short guided ski tour. Ski rental $8.00/person; Friends of Reinstein members $5.00/person. (For information and register call 716-683-5959 or email reinsteinwoods@dec.ny.gov)

 

Until our next meeting in the Corner, have a great time in the outdoors. This is Ron Schroder for – “Your In on The Outdoors for Western New York.”

What Do You Think? Have something for other sportspeople? Let us know HERE.

 

 

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1 - 12 - 18

Welcome to this week’s Conservation Chatter Corner – little bits of happenings concerning our outdoors and you, the sportspeople who enjoy being part of that outdoors.

 

DEC TO HOST THREE WEEKENDS OF SANTANONI WINTER OPEN HOUSES:  A Rare Opportunity to See Inside of Historic Camp Buildings During Winter Months. Three Winter Weekend events will be held for the fifth consecutive year at Camp Santanoni in the Adirondacks.

The events will take place during the Martin Luther King holiday weekend, Jan. 13 to 15; President's Day holiday weekend, Feb. 17 to 19; and the weekend of March 10 and 11. Cross-country skiers and snowshoers will have access to the historic camp properties located in the town of Newcomb in Essex County to rest, tour the buildings, and view interpretative displays.

Cross-country skiers and snowshoers will be able to visit both the Gate Lodge and Main Lodge of Camp Santanoni, view displays about the great camp and take interpretive tours with Adirondack Architectural Heritage (AARCH) staff. The wood stove-heated Artist's Studio, a log and stone building near the main lodge on the shores of Newcomb Lake, will be open as a warming hut. Bring your own cup to enjoy free coffee, tea or hot chocolate. The Adirondack Interpretive Center will provide snowshoes at the Gate Lodge for any visitors without their own.

The three Winter Weekend events are being hosted by DEC, AARCH, the town of Newcomb and SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry's (ESF) Adirondack Interpretive Center.

The Winter Weekend events continue to grow in popularity each year, with more than 400 people attending last year. A 9.8-mile round trip cross-country ski or snowshoe excursion traverses from Camp Santanoni's Gate Lodge complex to the remote lakeside main lodge complex. The trip provides moderate physical activity and a great opportunity to enjoy the outdoors.

The event in January will once again coincide with Newcomb's 2018 Winterfest, which will be held Jan. 13 and 14. Visit the town of Newcomb's website (www.newcombny.com/) for more information, including links to the schedule of events.

Staff from SUNY ESF's Adirondack Interpretive Center will be hosting a Wildlife Animal Tracking program at the Farm Complex from 1 to 2 p.m. on Saturday, Jan. 13, as part of Newcomb's Winterfest. This is a fun learning experience for families and children of every age.

Cross-country skiers and snowshoers are also encouraged to take the half mile-trail that connects Camp Santanoni to the nearby Adirondack Interpretive Center's 3.6-mile trail system. The Center's buildings will be open 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. during all of the Winter Weekend Events.

"This partnership between DEC, Newcomb, AARCH and SUNY-ESF continues to be a powerful, creative, and fun model for promoting Adirondack communities and our unique cultural and natural resources" said Paul Hai of SUNY ESF's Northern Forest Institute, which manages the Adirondack Interpretive Center. "Newcomb is a fantastic town, rich with history, recreational and educational opportunities. Collaborations like these winter weekends provide new experiences for those who know us, while introducing Newcomb to the next generation with many activities for youth and families. We love expanding visitors' and residents' appreciation and understanding of the Adirondacks."

While people may visit Camp Santanoni 365 days a year, the buildings are not typically open to the public during the winter months. Additional open house weekends may be considered based on the popularity and success of these three weekend events.

"We are delighted to be part of these winter open house weekends again and look forward to welcoming skiers and snowshoers at this very special historic site during a very beautiful and peaceful time of year," said Steven Engelhart, Executive Director of AARCH. "This will be the sixth year we have offered these opportunities to visit Santanoni and, last year, over eight days, more than 300 people made the ten-mile round-trip outing into the Main Lodge. We thoroughly enjoyed providing a place to warm up and interpreting the camp's rich history and architecture to them."

Construction of Camp Santanoni began in 1892 by Robert and Anna Pruyn and eventually consisted of more than four dozen buildings on 12,900 acres including a working farm, the Gate Lodge complex, and a huge rustic Main Lodge and other buildings situated on Newcomb Lake. Camp Santanoni was in private ownership until 1972. Over the last several decades of state ownership, the camp has gradually been restored through a partnership between DEC, AARCH and the town of Newcomb. Santanoni is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and is a National Historic Landmark. Camp Santanoni is considered by many to be the classic Adirondack Great Camp.

Reservations are not required. Contact AARCH at (518) 834-9328 for more information on the Winter Weekends events. More information about Camp Santanoni, the Adirondack Interpretive Center and the Newcomb area may be found at DEC Camp Santanoni webpage.

 

THE GOOD GUYS AT WORK:

Alan the Facebook Gator - Wayne County: During the summer of 2017, ECO Kevin Thomas received an anonymous complaint about a Facebook post showing an American alligator with the caption, "Just Bought an Alligator!" After multiple attempts to locate the individual responsible for the post, ECO Thomas discovered the man was incarcerated for unrelated activities. A family member stated the suspect had never actually bought the animal, but was just bragging about it. Further investigation led ECO Thomas to an address in a subdivision in the town of Macedon, a large residential neighborhood. On Dec. 27, ECO Thomas interviewed a new suspect, who at first denied ownership of the alligator. After further questioning, the subject voluntarily led ECO Thomas inside his house to show him the alligator. ECO Thomas found the 3.5-foot-long alligator in a large glass tank in a bedroom in the house. The owner stated that the animal was friendly and that he fed it out of his hand, often walking it around the house even though two large dogs live at the residence The subjects named the alligator "Alan." However, the owner knew that the alligator was getting too big for the tank and the house. As it is illegal in New York to possess any crocodilian family without permits, the animal was confiscated. The Seneca Park Zoo agreed to house the animal temporarily until it can be relocated to a permitted facility. The owner was issued a ticket for possession of an alligator, returnable to Macedon Town Court.

ECO Thomas and Senica Park Zoo Staff holding Alan the Alligator
ECO Thomas, "Alan the Alligator" and Seneca Park Zoo staff


Illegal Deer Leads to Arrests - Cayuga County: On Dec. 22, ECOs Mark Colesante and Scott Sincebaugh arrested a North Syracuse man for criminal possession of a weapon in the 4th degree, two counts of taking an illegal deer, and two counts of failure to tag deer as required after an incident earlier in the week. The investigation stemmed from a Dec. 17 incident, when the New York State Police responded to a hunting camp in the town of Ira and noticed two untagged deer. The State Police notified ECO Colesante, who was familiar with the camp and the individual involved. When ECOs Colesante and Sincebaugh met with the suspect at the camp, the two deer were hanging in the barn and were tagged. The hunter admitted to shooting both deer on the morning of Dec. 16 with his muzzleloading firearm. However, because the subject is a convicted felon, he is not allowed to possess a firearm. The subject was arrested, processed at the State Police North Syracuse Barracks, and issued appearance tickets returnable to the Town of Ira Court. The two deer and muzzleloader were seized as evidence.

ECO Mark Colesante with the illegally taken deer seized in the Town of Ira
ECO Mark Colesante with the illegally taken
deer seized in the Town of Ira

Three Bucks is Too Many - Onondaga County

Late in the evening of Dec. 22, ECO Don Damrath wrapped up an illegal hunting investigation in the town of Dewitt. The investigation started after three Facebook posts where a man boasted about killing two 8-point bucks during the archery season. As ECO Damrath was attempting to locate the subject, the man posted a photo of a third buck, the biggest of the three. Officer Damrath finally caught up with the subject at his home late in the evening, and the man produced three 8-point racks to go along with a poorly concocted story about how and where he killed the deer. ECO Damrath determined two of the three deer were killed over bait in the backyard of the man's house in a nearby suburban neighborhood. One of the bucks was taken with a crossbow during the archery-only season, and one of the bucks was never tagged. None of the deer were reported. Officer Damrath seized all three sets of antlers and charged the subject with a total of 11 offenses under the Environmental Conservation Law, including five misdemeanors. The subject faces fines of up to $11,500, loss of hunting privileges, and an additional misdemeanor charge for signing a false statement.

ECO Damrath with the illegally taken trophy racks
ECO Damrath with the illegally taken trophy racks

 

FROM THE INTERNET: POT FARMING KILLS OWLS: A new study says rat poison from pot farms in California forests appears to be poisoning endangered Northern spotted owls.

Scientists for the University of California at Davis and the California Academy of Sciences published the study Thursday in the journal Avian Conservation and Ecology. Researchers found that seven out of 10 endangered Northern spotted owls found dead in Northern California's pot-growing region tested positive for rat poison. Forty-percent of another species, called barred owls, also tested positive for the rat poison. Pot farms use rat poison to keep rodents away from their irrigation systems and crops.

Study lead author Mourad Gabriel says he's concerned that the poisoning of wildlife will increase now that California has legalized recreational marijuana.

(http://www.newcanaannewsonline.com/news/article/Study-blames-pot-farms-for-poisonings-of-12490878.php)

 

BUFFALO EVENT FEATURES OUTDOOR WINTER FUN: New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC), in partnership with Friends of Reinstein Woods, invites the public to celebrate "Winter Wonderland in the Woods" on Saturday, Feb. 10, from 12 p.m. to 4 p.m. at Reinstein Woods Nature Preserve in the town of Cheektowaga, Erie County.

Visitors can discover a variety of outdoor activities during the event Ice-fishing demonstrations will take place throughout the afternoon and visitors will be able to try snowshoes and cross-county skis in a demonstration area, weather permitting. Snowshoe rentals will also be available for those who wish to explore the trails of the preserve.
Children can celebrate winter with snowshoeing and a snowball target toss regardless of the weather. Families will enjoy new activities such as strolling a Story-Boardwalk and transforming into human birdfeeders for an intimate experience with local birds. Kids can express their creative side in the snow art area and make crafts indoors.

The Niagara Frontier Search and Rescue Team will be on hand to will be on hand to talk about winter rescue and DEC Forest Rangers will demonstrate flat ice rescue techniques on a frozen lake at 1 p.m. The Erie County Department of Parks, Recreation and Forestry will offer brief winter nature walks throughout the day. Visitors can learn about the late-winter activity of maple sugaring with Buffalo Niagara Heritage Village.

After enjoying outdoor activities, families can warm up inside the education center with hot drinks and snacks sold by Friends of Reinstein Woods. The SPCA Wildlife Department will present informative talks on wild animal rehabilitation at 1:30 p.m. and 3 p.m. Visitors are encouraged to bring used alkaline batteries to be recycled in a hands-on demonstration by The Coalition of Positively Charged People. There will also be door prizes, costumed characters, exhibits and more.

The event will take place regardless of snow conditions, and additional activities featuring nature experiences will be added in case of warm weather.

Registration is not required for this event. There is no entry fee, but donations to Friends of Reinstein Woods are always welcome. Reinstein Woods Nature Preserve is located at 93 Honorine Drive, off of Como Park Boulevard in Cheektowaga. For more information, contact Reinstein Woods at (716) 683-5959, or visit www.reinsteinwoods.org and search for "Winter Wonderland."

 

THIS WEEK’S EVENTS: (For complete future listings go to the Calendar Page - http://www.huntfishnyoutdoors.com/events.php)

JANUARY 2018

12 - Medicinal Herb Walk at the Reinstein Woods Environmental Education Center, 93 Honorine Drive, Depew, NY (Town of Cheektowaga) (11:00 am) Learn the medicinal values of the wild herbs that grow in Reinstein Woods. For adults and children ages 12 and older. (For information and register call 716-683-5959 or email reinsteinwoods@dec.ny.gov)

12 - Home School Nature Series– Wonder of Trees, Leaves, and Bark at the Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savannah, NY (10:00 am - 12:00 pm) Homeschoolers ages 5-12 will learn what our trees are up to during the winter and how important they are to our wetlands.  Homeschoolers will learn how to identify trees without their foliage. If there is snow, we will strap on snowshoes and explore Montezuma’s forests so be prepared to spend part of the program outside. Winter hats, gloves, scarves, jackets, and snow pants are a must! (Fee with snowshoe rental: $10/student, $5/adult. Fee without snowshoe rental: $8/student.) (For information or register call 315-365-3588 or e-mail montezuma@audubon.org)

13 - National Wild Turkey Federation B New York State Awards Dinner at the Holiday Inn, 2468 Route 414, Waterloo, NY (For more information contact Bruce Bailey  315-695-5113  dinklepuss@hotmail.com)

13 - A Brief Natural History of the Niagara River and Niagara Falls at the Portville Free Library, 1 North Main Street, Portville, New York (10:30 am) Tim Baird shares his knowledge of the “new” 8th wonder of the world. This program looks into the geology of the Niagara River region and the formation of the Niagara Gorge and Niagara Falls. Details in the presentation may be new to the casual visitor to Niagara Falls and will aid in the appreciation of this truly unique region. (Fee: Free for members, $5 for non-members and free for children 13 and under. Minors must be accompanied by an adult.) (Register by 4 PM, Thursday, January 11th, 2018.) (For information/register go to www.pfeiffernaturecenter.org or call 716-933-0187.)

13 - Antique & Gun Military Auction at Hessney Auction Center, 2741 Route 14N, Geneva, NY (9:15 am) Pre-1900 guns, shotguns, rifles, handguns, over 150 civil war letters, pre-1900 military guns & memorabilia, swords, knives, bayonets, books, photos, paper, Military Includes Spanish-American War, Indian Wars, Civil War, War of 1812. (From the Collection of the late Donald O'Bryan.) (For more information call 315-789-9349 or 585-734-6082 or go to www.hessney.com)

13 – Outfitter Fair at the Southtowns Walleye Club, 5895 Southwestern Blvd., Hamburg, NY (10:00 am – 2:00 pm) New and used fishing and hunting equipment. (For information call 716-465-6100.)

13-14 - Rochester Gun Show at the Roc Dome at the Roc Dome Arena, 2695 E Henrietta Road, Henrietta, NY (Sat 9:00 am – 4:00 pm/Sun 9:00 am – 3:00 pm) The Rochester Gun Show is hosted by Empire State Arms Collectors. All federal, state and local firearm ordinances and laws must be obeyed. (Admission: $8.00) (For information call 585-226-6211 or go to http://www.esaca.us)

14 – End of Canada Goose Hunting Seasons – Part 3 – in the West Central Area and South Area

14 - End of Hunting Seasons for Ducks, Coots and Mergansers – Part 2 - in Western Zone

14 - Tioga County Trappers Association Fur Sale at the Tioga County Sportsman's Association, 1141 Carmichael Road, Owego, NY.  (9:00 am to 12:00 pm.) (For information contact Bill Swagler at 607-222-8554 or Mark Machaler at 607-207-7958.) 

18 - Cayuga Lake Birding Van Tour meeting at the Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savannah, NY (2:00 – 5:00 pm) Cayuga Lake is an Audubon designated Important Bird Area because of the incredible number of waterfowl that use the lake during winter and migration seasons. Hop in the Montezuma Audubon Center van for an excursion to the northern part of the lake where up to 30 species of ducks, geese and swans can be seen. Bald Eagles and Snowy Owls are a possibility too! Participants are encouraged to bring their camera. Binoculars and bird guides will be provided. (Fee: $8/child, $15.00/adult.) (For information or register call 315-365-3588 or e-mail montezuma@audubon.org)

19-21 - The 5th Annual Greater Niagara Fishing and Outdoor Expo at the Conference and Event Center, Niagara Falls, NY. (For information go to niagarafishingexpo.com.) Some 70 speakers will be dishing out over 120 seminars and the Main Event hall is sold out with top quality fishing and fishing related exhibitors. Three days of education covering a wide spectrum of angling knowledge. Rick Hajecki, Greg Amiel, Dan Keating, Mark McClutchey, Jake Romanack, Jason Coslow, Frank Campbell, Dan Colville, Tim Thomas, Matt Yablonsky, Lance Valentine … the list is a long one. (Check it all out at www.niagarafishingexpo.com.) You won’t want to miss this one. Bring a friend 

20 - LOTSA Salmon School at the Conference and Event Center Niagara Falls, NY. (For information and sign up go to www.lotsa1.org.)

20 - National Wild Turkey Federation – Lakeshore Longbeards Chapter Dinner at The Kosciuszko Club, 252 Nevins Street, Dunkirk, NY. (5:00 pm) The NWTF banquets are where you can buy exclusive merchandise and have a great time with friends. All the while, you will be raising vital funds for wild turkey conservation and important programs that introduce the outdoors to women, children and the disabled.  (For more information contact Scott Dibble  716-595-3897   svdibble@yahoo.com )

20 – Cattaraugus County Trappers Association Fur Auction at the Hinsdale Volunteer Fire Department, Hinsdale, NY (For information call Brian Davis at 716-945-4223.)

20 - Woods Walk: Winter Tree ID at the Reinstein Woods Environmental Education Center, 93 Honorine Drive, Depew, NY (Town of Cheektowaga) (1:00 pm) Learn how to identify local trees after they lose their leaves. No registration required.  (For information and register call 716-683-5959 or email reinsteinwoods@dec.ny.gov)

20 - Birding 101: Class #1 at the Reinstein Woods Environmental Education Center, 93 Honorine Drive, Depew, NY (Town of Cheektowaga) (2:30 pm) Join us for a bird identification adventure! Learn to identify common birds and how to properly use binoculars. For adults and children ages 8 and older. (For information and register call 716-683-5959 or email reinsteinwoods@dec.ny.gov)

20 - Educator Workshop: Project Wet at the Reinstein Woods Environmental Education Center, 93 Honorine Drive, Depew, NY (Town of Cheektowaga) (9:00 am – 12:30 pm) Project WET (Water Education for Teachers) helps teachers use water to teach English language arts, science, math and more! Participants receive a standards-based interdisciplinary curriculum guide that includes

lessons covering water’s physical and chemical properties, cultural connections to water and water resource management. For formal and

non-formal educators of students in grades K to 12. (For information and register call 716-683-5959 or email reinsteinwoods@dec.ny.gov)

20 - Owl Prowl at the Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savannah, NY (3:30 – 5:30 pm) Get up close to live owls during an indoor presentation by KrittrKris! You’ll find out what adaptations these birds have that allow them to survive during the winter season and be successful hunters of the night. Then, join the Montezuma Audubon Center staff to search for Snowy Owls and the endangered Short-eared Owls in the grasslands around Montezuma. It will be a real hoot! (Fee: $6/child, $8/adult, $25/family.) (For information or register call 315-365-3588 or e-mail montezuma@audubon.org)

20 – Big Game Appetizers at Cabela’s Cheektowaga Store, 2003 Walden Avenue, Cheektowaga, NY. (11:00 am – 2:00 pm) Come check out some great big game appetizers with Cabela's.  We'll show you how to prepare and serve some great ideas that will have your football party food tasting better than ever! (For information call 716-608-4770)

20-21 - Niagara Frontier - Akron Gun Show at the Newstead Fire Hall, 5691 Cummings Road, Akron, NY (Sat 9:00 am – 4:00 pm /Sun 9:00 am - 3:00pm) 85 tables. (Cost: $5.00/children under 12 free when accompanied by a paid adult) (For information call 716-542-9929 or email  guns@nfgshows.com)

20-21– Greater Olean Area Outdoor & Recreational Sports Show at the Good Times of Olean Center, 800 East State Street, Olean, NY (Sat 10:00 am – 5:00 pm/Sun 10:00 am – 3:00 pm) Hosted by the Greater Olean Chamber of Commerce. 60 booths. (Admission: $3.00/Seniors $2.00/Children 12 and under free) (For information call 716-372-4433 or email meme@oleanny.com or go to http://www.oleanny.com)

21 - Genesee Valley Trappers Association Fur Auction at the Clubhouse, 4462 County Road 32 (3 miles east of Honeoye, south of 20A), Honeoye, NY (6:30 am fur checkin/10:00 am auction) ($10.00 charge for non-members) (For information call Tom Miller, 585-229-4759)

 

Until our next meeting in the Corner, have a great time in the outdoors. This is Ron Schroder for – “Your In on The Outdoors for Western New York.”

What Do You Think? Have something for other sportspeople? Let us know HERE.

 

 

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1 - 5 - 18

Welcome to this week’s Conservation Chatter Corner – little bits of happenings concerning our outdoors and you, the sportspeople who enjoy being part of that outdoors.

 

HAPPY NEW YEAR!!

HAPPY NEW YEAR!!!: Now, it’s a new year and time once again to think about resolutions. Hopefully you will make one to be a better sportsperson. This should not only include improving hunting, trapping and/or fishing skills, but more importantly behaving better, helping to create a finer image of your Sport. You might also, consider helping a young person get started - someone who might not have an adult around to teach them about the outdoors. If you do have this desire but no youngster to teach contact your DEC Regional Office and ask about being a mentor hunter or trapper. If fishing is your specialty check with your county 4-H office and ask about working with a club or two, or maybe starting a fishing club. If you want a more formal program check into becoming a certified sportsmen education instructor with DEC’s hunting, archery, trapping and/or waterfowl identification programs.

 

NATIONAL ARCHERY IN THE SCHOOLS PROGRAM - NEW YORK IS ON TARGET!: School districts around New York State have a great opportunity to offer an in-school archery program for their students. The National Archery in the Schools Program (NASP) is a cooperative effort between DEC and New York schools to develop and foster youth participation in the lifelong sport of archery. Since its inception in New York State in 2008, NASP has reached over 300 schools and 300,000 students.

New York NASP provides quality archery instruction within physical education curricula for grades 4-12. The program trains teachers to deliver a minimum of two weeks of instruction in international-style target archery to NASP students. The core content covers archery history, safety, technique, equipment, mental concentration, and self-improvement.

The culminating event in New York is a live state tournament held every March. Competitors have the possibility of moving on to compete at the national level. The 2018 live state tournament for participating schools is set for March 9, 2018, at SUNY Polytechnic Institute in Utica, New York.

Please visit our NASP web page. If you would like more information about the program or to look into implementing NASP in your school please email DEC NYNASP Coordinator Jillian Trunko, or call 518-402-8967.

 

SAD NEWS CHARLES J. ALSHEIMER DIES: It may have been a church game dinner, an outdoor show, a magazine dealing with deer and deer hunting info or just great photos of deer that brought us in contact with Charlie. Charles J. Alsheimer, 70, of Avoca, New York, passed away Saturday, December 30, 2017.

Charlie's favorite subject, both as a photographer and writer, was the whitetail deer. He was a preeminent expert on deer behavior and collaborated on groundbreaking research on the moon's impact on whitetail breeding patterns. Charlie authored seven best-selling books and hundreds of magazine articles on the whitetail. He served as field editor of Deer & Deer Hunting magazine for nearly 38 years and as host of Deer & Deer Hunting TV, which aired on the Outdoor Channel.

In 2000, a national survey sponsored by Deer and Deer Hunting magazine named him one of deer hunting's top five inspirational leaders of the twentieth century, along with bowhunting legend Fred Bear, conservationist Aldo Leopold, President Theodore Roosevelt, and camouflage pioneer Bill Jordan.

He will be missed.

                                            Photo by John Adamski

 

DEC SUMMER CAMPS: Online registration for the DEC 2018 Summer Camps program will open Wednesday, January 24, 2018, at 10:00 a.m. Applications should be submitted through the online registration program available through a link from the Summer Camps website. Parents and guardians are encouraged to register early since some of the weeks fill up quickly.

Now in its 71st year, the Summer Camps program offers week-long adventures in conservation education for children ages 11-17. DEC operates four residential camps for children: Camp Colby in Saranac Lake (Franklin County); Camp DeBruce in Livingston Manor (Sullivan County); Camp Rushford in Caneadea (Allegany County), and Pack Forest in Warrensburg (Warren County).

New this year, camps Colby and DeBruce will offer two weeks of programing for children aged 14-17 as "returnee weeks" and offer programming for ages 11-13 the rest of the summer. Camp Pack Forest will continue to host children aged 14-17 for six weeks and ages 11-13 for two weeks. Camp Rushford will continue to offer two weeks of programming for children aged 14-17 and five weeks of programming for ages 11-13. The complete schedule of camp weeks and ages is available on the Summer Camps website.

Campers will have the opportunity to participate in a wide variety of outdoor adventures and are encouraged to try new things. Activities may include fishing, bird watching, fly-tying, archery, canoeing, hiking, camping, orienteering, and hunter safety education. One hunter education program for either gun, bow, or trapping is offered at each camp each week. Class size is limited for hunter education programs and campers must sign up for it during registration and complete the homework in advance.

Along with adventure experiences, DEC campers engage in fun, hands-on activities, and outdoor exploration focused on field, forest, stream, and pond ecological principles. Campers might collect insects in a field, use nets in a stream, investigate soil composition, measure tree sizes, or practice taking field notes, and writing in journals. Trips to nearby state lands might include kettle bogs, state parks, fish hatcheries, or nature museums.

Also new this year, Camp Pack Forest will offer "Outdoor Adventure Week 2.0" during Week 5 (July 22-27). DEC encourages teens ages 14 to 17 who love being outdoors to sign up for this redesign of the Outdoor Adventure Week that will help deepen their enjoyment and widen their horizons while exploring environmental careers at Camp Pack Forest. During this week, campers will develop hands-on outdoor skills that go above and beyond the traditional camp week. Alongside canoeing, fishing, and games campers will engage in forestry, citizen science, conservation science, and more. Guest DEC, higher education, and natural resource professionals will provide opportunities to consider career paths.

All four camps will operate for seven one-week sessions (Sunday to Friday) beginning June 24, 2018; Pack Forest operates for eight weeks. Drop-off time is 3:00 p.m. on Sunday, and the closing ceremony and pick-up time is Friday at 4:30 p.m. One week of camp remains $350 per child for the 2018 year, and includes meals, trips, and a camp t-shirt.

In addition to inviting parents to register their children to participate in the DEC environmental education Summer Camps program, sporting clubs, civic groups, and environmental organizations are encouraged to sponsor one or more children for a week at camp. Groups that deposit funds to sponsor six (6) paid campers in one transaction will receive a scholarship to send a seventh child to camp for free. The seventh camper will use a sponsorship code generated by the Albany Camps administrative. Information about becoming a sponsor and managing sponsor accounts is available on DEC's website.

For more information please visit the DEC's website at www.dec.ny.gov, call 518-402-8014, visit "NYS DEC Summer Camps" on Facebook or write to DEC Camps, 3rd Floor, 625 Broadway, Albany, New York 12233-5256.

yourh campers sitting in a semi-circle by a lake, around a counselor

 

WINTER & WILDLIFE:  I hope white is your color. It’s beautiful from inside, and beautiful outside, if you like winter and know how to dress warmly. On the part of wildlife - I’m sure all the critters would like to see the snow and ice gone.

Winter is a great time of the year to be outdoors. If you are a wildlife enthusiast, it’s especially nice because you can track animals fair distances and get a feel for their lives. The only precautions are to think about where you are traveling and what impact that travel will have on the local wildlife. This is particularly important for people going out on snowshoes, cross country skies or snowmobiles. This is the most stressful time of the year for deer and other wildlife. If you travel thru wildlife concentration areas or try to approach animals for a closer look, you cause them to use stored body energy reserves. This can prove fatal to the animal if this winter continues like it is. In addition, the trails you leave, especially from snowmobiles, make perfect travel ways for dogs and other predators. Concentrated travel in old weed fields, also impacts on wildlife by knocking down seed plants providing food for winter birds.

When you go out - think about what you are doing, stay out of heavy wildlife use areas and observe from a distance.

And while we are talking about winter and wildlife let’s not forget about our best friends – dogs. Dog owners, who allow their pets to roam the country side, could be subject to a fine for violation of state law, prohibiting dogs from running free on lands inhabited by deer and also, in many areas, local leash laws and dog quarantine laws. If we get additional snow and crusting on top of that, it will make compliance with these laws very important. Dogs can run on the crust.  The deer’s sharp hooves break through. The result, not a pretty site, as domestic dogs pull apart a deer piece by piece.             

 

BE PREPARED FOR WINTER: Do you know what the greatest threat to outdoorsmen is? I'll give you a couple hints. It doesn't involve firearms or falling from an elevated position. The leading cause of death among hunters and fishermen is hypothermia - exposure. If you're headed out to hunt or fish this winter you should be prepared.
Dress in layers - You can always remove clothes you don't need but can't put them on if you don't have them. Start with a base layer, and socks, made of a synthetic material that draws moisture away from your body. A wet body loses heat faster than a dry one. Add an insulating layer of fleece or wool in the middle and a protecting layer of waterproof/windproof breathable laminate on top.
Protect Your Extremities - If you're riding, you should already have at least ankle-high boots and gloves. Insulated ones are a better choice for wet and cold conditions. If you don't have a full face helmet and face shield, wear a face mask or light balaclava under your helmet.

Carry a Survival Kit - At the very least, include a compass - for finding your way if lost; waterproof matches - to start a fire; high energy food items, a knife and a whistle to signal for help. Other items to consider are some type of shelter (a space blanket), a length of cord, a flashlight and first aid supplies. You should also bring water, or some means of water purification. Dehydration can accelerate hypothermia. If you're riding on an ATV space is less of an issue so bring along anything else you might need should you get lost or injured and need to stay out overnight.
Have a Plan - Plan your route for the day. Stick to it and leave a map or description of where you are going and when you will return with someone else at home.
Cold, wet conditions may be intimidating to hunters and fishermen, but game often moves more and fish bite better with the falling barometer. Don't let bad weather keep you inside, but be prepared before you head out.

Yamaha Outdoors Tips – by Bob Humphrey

 

THIS WEEK’S EVENTS: (For complete future listings go to the Calendar Page - http://www.huntfishnyoutdoors.com/events.php)

JANUARY 2018

1- Start of Fishing Season on Lake Ontario, the Lower Niagara River and Tributaries for Lake Trout (>9/30)

1 - Walleye regulations change on the lower Niagara River from three to one fish for a daily limit. (> 3/15)

1 – Start of Hunting Season for Varying Hare (Snowshoe Rabbit) in the Southern Tier portion of Western New York (>1/31)

1-2/28 – NYS Winter Classic Fishing Tournament through Feb. 28. Seven species categories. Open water or through the ice. (For information go to www.nyswinterclassic.com.)

2-3/15 – Capt. Bob’s Outdoors Winter Fishing Derby (Entry fee is $20) 8 species divisions. (For information call 716-407-3021)

6 - Christmas Bird Count For Kids at the Reinstein Woods Environmental Education Center, 93 Honorine Drive, Depew, NY (Town of Cheektowaga) (9:00 am) A great way to introduce kids to birding and escape the post-Christmas blahs! Teams of kids compete to see who can find the most birds on 90-minute hikes at Reinstein Woods and other nearby sites. Binocular instruction and refreshments provided. (For information and register call 716-683-5959 or email reinsteinwoods@dec.ny.gov)

6 - Woods Walk: Winter Weeds at the Reinstein Woods Environmental Education Center, 93 Honorine Drive, Depew, NY (Town of Cheektowaga) (1:00 pm) Explore the world of winter plants and see where the summer wildflowers will bloom. (For information and register call 716-683-5959 or email reinsteinwoods@dec.ny.gov)

6-7 - Niagara Frontier - Hamburg Gun Show at the Event Building, Hamburg Fairgrounds, 5820 S Park Avenue, Hamburg, New York ((9:00 am – 4:00 pm/9:00 am - 3:00pm) 300 tables. NICS background checks available.  (Cost: $7.00/children under 12 free when accompanied by a paid adult) (90 Tables) (For information call 716-542-9929 or email  nfgshows@aol.com)

8 - Tioga County Trappers Association Fur Sale at the Tioga County Sportsman's Association, 1141 Carmichael Road, Owego, NY.  (9:00 am to 12:00 pm.) (For information contact Bill Swagler at 607-222-8554.) 

9 - Introduction To Leatherworking at the Reinstein Woods Environmental Education Center, 93 Honorine Drive, Depew, NY (Town of Cheektowaga) (6:00 pm) Make a leather sheath, hair barrette, bracelet or other small leather project. Learn how to tool, dye and hand sew leather. (Material fee $10.00/per person.) Adults only. (For information and register call 716-683-5959 or email reinsteinwoods@dec.ny.gov)

12 - Medicinal Herb Walk at the Reinstein Woods Environmental Education Center, 93 Honorine Drive, Depew, NY (Town of Cheektowaga) (11:00 am) Learn the medicinal values of the wild herbs that grow in Reinstein Woods. For adults and children ages 12 and older. (For information and register call 716-683-5959 or email reinsteinwoods@dec.ny.gov)

12 - Home School Nature Series– Wonder of Trees, Leaves, and Bark at the Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savannah, NY (10:00 am - 12:00 pm) Homeschoolers ages 5-12 will learn what our trees are up to during the winter and how important they are to our wetlands.  Homeschoolers will learn how to identify trees without their foliage. If there is snow, we will strap on snowshoes and explore Montezuma’s forests so be prepared to spend part of the program outside. Winter hats, gloves, scarves, jackets, and snow pants are a must! (Fee with snowshoe rental: $10/student, $5/adult. Fee without snowshoe rental: $8/student.) (For information or register call 315-365-3588 or e-mail montezuma@audubon.org)

13 - National Wild Turkey Federation B New York State Awards Dinner at the Holiday Inn, 2468 Route 414, Waterloo, NY (For more information contact Bruce Bailey  315-695-5113  dinklepuss@hotmail.com)

13 - A Brief Natural History of the Niagara River and Niagara Falls at the Portville Free Library, 1 North Main Street, Portville, New York (10:30 am) Tim Baird shares his knowledge of the “new” 8th wonder of the world. This program looks into the geology of the Niagara River region and the formation of the Niagara Gorge and Niagara Falls. Details in the presentation may be new to the casual visitor to Niagara Falls and will aid in the appreciation of this truly unique region. (Fee: Free for members, $5 for non-members and free for children 13 and under. Minors must be accompanied by an adult.) (Register by 4 PM, Thursday, January 11th, 2018.) (For information/register go to www.pfeiffernaturecenter.org or call 716-933-0187.)

13 - Antique & Gun Military Auction at Hessney Auction Center, 2741 Route 14N, Geneva, NY (9:15 am) Pre-1900 guns, shotguns, rifles, handguns, over 150 civil war letters, pre-1900 military guns & memorabilia, swords, knives, bayonets, books, photos, paper, Military Includes Spanish-American War, Indian Wars, Civil War, War of 1812. (From the Collection of the late Donald O'Bryan.) (For more information call 315-789-9349 or 585-734-6082 or go to www.hessney.com)

13 – Outfitter Fair at the Southtowns Walleye Club, 5895 Southwestern Blvd., Hamburg, NY (10:00 am – 2:00 pm) New and used fishing and hunting equipment. (For information call 716-465-6100.)

13-14 - Rochester Gun Show at the Roc Dome at the Roc Dome Arena, 2695 E Henrietta Road, Henrietta, NY (Sat 9:00 am – 4:00 pm/Sun 9:00 am – 3:00 pm) The Rochester Gun Show is hosted by Empire State Arms Collectors. All federal, state and local firearm ordinances and laws must be obeyed. (Admission: $8.00) (For information call 585-226-6211 or go to http://www.esaca.us)

14 – End of Canada Goose Hunting Seasons – Part 3 – in the West Central Area and South Area

14 - End of Hunting Seasons for Ducks, Coots and Mergansers – Part 2 - in Western Zone

14 - Tioga County Trappers Association Fur Sale at the Tioga County Sportsman's Association, 1141 Carmichael Road, Owego, NY.  (9:00 am to 12:00 pm.) (For information contact Bill Swagler at 607-222-8554 or Mark Machaler at 607-207-7958.) 

 

Until our next meeting in the Corner, have a great time in the outdoors. This is Ron Schroder for – “Your In on The Outdoors for Western New York.”

 

What Do You Think? Have something for other sportspeople? Let us know HERE.

 

 

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 12 - 29 - 17

Welcome to this week’s Conservation Chatter Corner – little bits of happenings concerning our outdoors and you, the sportspeople who enjoy being part of that outdoors.

 

HANDGUN RECERTIFICATION: If your current permit was issued before January 15, 2013, the deadline to submit your recertification is January 31, 2018 and every five years thereafter. If your permit was issued on or after January 15, 2013, the deadline to recertify is five years after the date the permit was issued and every five years thereafter. As a permit holder, it is your responsibility to recertify your permit whether you receive a notification letter or not.

 

 

It is estimated that approximately only 10/12% of the permit holders in New York have completed the re-certification mandate.

 

THE GOOD GUYS AT WORK:

Illegal Deer Leads to Several Arrests - Cayuga County: On Dec. 8, ECO Mark Colesante responded to a complaint of subjects hunting from the road in the town of Brutus. When the officer arrived, he found the complainant keeping the alleged offenders at the scene. ECO Colesante found a loaded .22-caliber rifle and a three-year-old child in the back of the minivan operated by two suspects. According to the complainant, the pair had just shot a doe from the road with a .20 gauge, single-shot shotgun. The deer had been dragged to the edge of the field and tagged, but with the wrong tag. Assisted by ECO Scott Angotti, the two hunters provided written statements, which were later determined to be false. Upon obtaining criminal histories for the pair, one of the hunters was found to be a convicted felon. The two men were taken into custody and charged with making false statements. The convicted felon was charged with criminal possession of a weapon 4th degree. The hunters were also charged with taking a doe deer without a permit, shooting from a public highway, possession of a loaded firearm in a motor vehicle, taking an illegal deer, and taking wildlife from a public highway. Both subjects were processed at the New York State Police Barracks in Auburn, and arraigned at the Town of Brutus Court, where one subject was released on his own recognizance and the other was remanded to the Cayuga County Jail in lieu of $500 bail.

Right Place, Wrong Time - Broome County: On Dec. 9, ECOs Andy McCormick and Anthony Rigoli and Lt. Ric Warner conducted a deer decoy detail in response to complaints of active road-hunting in the town of Colesville. At approximately 4:20 p.m., a slowly moving pickup truck passed ECO McCormick's location. However, the truck turned down a road away from the decoy's location. About 20 seconds after the truck passed, a gunshot was heard from the truck's direction of travel. Realizing a real deer may have been shot, the three ECOs rushed to the scene and found the truck parked in the middle of the road with two individuals inside. Much to the officers' surprise, the driver was recognized as having been arrested for shooting the decoy from a vehicle several years prior less than a mile away. The pickup driver admitted to shooting at a deer from the window of his truck. After a brief search, officers found the dead doe. A total of six tickets were issued, including possessing a loaded firearm in a motor vehicle, discharging a firearm from a public highway, and illegal taking of a deer. The charges are pending in the Town of Colesville Court.

Odd Time to Scout for Deer - Niagara County: On Dec.18, the second-to-last day of the southern zone muzzleloader season for deer, ECO George Scheer was conducting hunting checks in the town of Lewiston. While waiting for hunters to return to their vehicles, ECO Scheer observed an ATV cross the roadway and drive away. A nearby truck parked by the road had ATV ramps, and, shortly after sunset, ECO Scheer observed the ATV driving along the roadway toward the truck. When the operator observed the ECO, he quickly left the roadway and drove down a trail away from the truck. The Officer finished checking other hunters in the area, and waited for the ATV to return. Within 30 minutes, the ECO observed the interior lights of the truck turn on although the ATV had not returned ECO Scheer found the man who had been operating the ATV in the truck. When asked about the ATV, the man claimed he had not been driving it, and his brother must have operated the vehicle. The subject added that he did not know his brother's location. Upon further questioning, the subject admitted to driving the ATV, but claimed he was not hunting and was only scouting for deer. ECO Scheer told the man that it was an odd time to be scouting for deer as most hunters do so before the season, not on the second-to-last day of the season. The man asked if he could go get the ATV and bring it back to the truck, so ECO Scheer went with him to retrieve the ATV. During the walk to the ATV, the man advised ECO Scheer that he is a convicted felon but does not hunt with a firearm. When they arrived at the ATV, ECO Scheer located a tube of gunpowder and footprints that led away from the ATV to the wood line. Faced with this evidence, the man admitted to hunting with a muzzleloader and hiding it in the woods. The subject was charged with operating an unregistered ATV, operating an ATV without a helmet, operating an ATV on a highway, two counts of possessing tags of another, and criminal possession of a weapon, 4th degree. All of the charges are returnable to Town of Lewiston Court.

Persistence Pays Off - Chemung County: During the 2016 big game season, ECO John Lifrieri investigated a baiting complaint in the town of Ashland. At that time, a mineral block and other bait were being used at several tree stands on a property. After several unsuccessful attempts to find the subject hunting over the bait, ECO Lifrieri decided to wait until the 2017 seasons. Just prior to the 2017 bow season, the Officer checked the hunter's ground blind and tree stand again with no luck. Later, ECO Lifrieri carefully scouted the surrounding vicinity and discovered a mineral block tucked down behind a tree near a tree stand and a somewhat fresh gut pile. The hunter had reported an 8-point buck harvested on Nov. 20, 2017. ECO Lifrieri documented the information, took photos, and left the scene. On Dec. 8, the ECO finally caught the perpetrator hunting in the tree stand. The man admitted to hunting the area several times since the 2016 season, and that he knew baiting deer and using a mineral block were illegal. The subject also confirmed that he had shot the 8-point buck in the baited area. The hunter was charged with hunting deer with the aid of bait, unlawful feeding of deer, placing a mineral block on lands inhabited by deer, and a misdemeanor for taking an illegal deer. The hunter's case will be heard on Jan.16, 2018, in the Town of Ashland Court. Several pounds of processed venison were seized and confiscated from the subject's residence and donated to the Wellsburg Food Cupboard food pantry.

 

Statewide Survey of Freshwater Anglers: The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) announced that anglers who purchased a freshwater fishing license between Jan. 1 and Dec. 31, 2017, may be asked to participate in a survey designed to learn more about their angling behaviors, preferences, and opinions on fisheries management issues.

Last conducted in 2007, the statewide freshwater angler survey is designed to help DEC fisheries managers better understand where anglers are fishing, what they are fishing for, how many days they spend on the water, and what they spend their money on. It also provides managers with insight into anglers' preferences, satisfaction, and opinions on management topics. Expenditure information provided by anglers will also help DEC better quantify the benefits of freshwater fisheries with respect to the New York State economy.

Unlike past surveys that have been conducted using a questionnaire delivered through the U.S. Postal Service, this survey will primarily utilize emails sent to a sample of license buyers, directing the recipients to an online survey questionnaire. Survey questionnaires will also be mailed to a smaller group of anglers to allow for comparison of the two survey methods.

Emails inviting anglers to participate and mailed survey questionnaires will be distributed during January 2018, and anglers are strongly encouraged to participate in the survey. Results of the survey will be provided in spring 2019.

For information on DEC's 2007 angler survey, visit DEC's website.

http://www.dec.ny.gov/press/press.html

 

LATE SEASON DEER HUNTING OPPORTUNITIES: From January 13-31, 2018, there will be an antlerless deer season open in the Deer Management Focus Area (DMFA) in Tompkins County. To participate, hunters must register with the DMFA Program and download a permit, carcass tags and a hunting activity log from the DMFA web page. Registered hunters may take up to two antlerless deer per day using any hunting implement that is legal during any other deer season at the site where they are hunting.

The 60,000-acre DMFA was created in 2012 to help communities in the Ithaca area address problems caused by deer overabundance. It allows harvest of up to two antlerless deer per day throughout all the general deer hunting seasons, in addition to the January DMFA season.  Hunters must carry a DMFA permit and DMFA carcass tags while they are hunting during the January season. They must also record their DMFA deer hunting activity and harvests on their hunting activity log and submit it to DEC by February 7. Additional information, including DMFA boundary descriptions and a printable map, is available on the DEC website.

 

LETCHWORTH STATE PARK PRODUCES THREE BEARS: Hunters harvested three black bears this year, during the newly opened park bear season, according to park GM Roland Beck. The biggest was 3 – 400 pounds killed by Matt Sphar of North Java. He got the bear not far from the Mount Morris Dam. The bear rolled down to the river bottom after being shot and had to be caped and quartered at the bottom and packed out.

image.png

Photo by Becky Sphar

 

 

THIS WEEK’S EVENTS: (For complete future listings go to the Calendar Page - http://www.huntfishnyoutdoors.com/events.php)

29 - Concealed Carry Class presented by Legal Heat at the Cabela’s Cheektowaga Store, 2003 Walden Avenue, Cheektowaga, NY (5:00 am -9:00 pm) This course is designed to meet the qualifying requirements and documentation to obtain the Utah and Arizona concealed carry permits in a fun, informative, non-intimidating class. These permits will allow combined carry reciprocity in approximately 30+ states. Legal Heat's concealed carry class covers firearms safety, handling, transportation, storage, ammunition, self-defense and firearms laws, concealed carry techniques and much more. Legal Heat's firearm training instructors are all NRA and Utah BCI certified, insured and among the most highly experienced in the industry and can answer your CCW questions. This course typically runs approximately 4 hours. This Legal Heat course does not have a 'test' or range requirement. The Utah and Arizona permits are open to residents of any state and can be applied for by mail. You do NOT have to reside in the state of UT or AZ to qualify to apply for their concealed carry permits. Register TODAY for this fun and informative class. Seating may be limited.This class may qualify you for the NY permit in several NY counties but has not been formally approved by any NY counties yet. (Reservations can be made at www.MyLegalHeat.com or by calling 877-252-1055.)

30  – Fur Handling Seminar by the Erie County Trappers Association at the Collins Conservation Club, 2633 Conger Road, Collins, NY (9:00 am to 1:00 pm) (For information call Patti at 716-337-2556.) Free to attend. 

31 - Close of Fishing Season for Trout in the Finger Lakes Tributaries

31 - End of Pheasant Hunting Season in Lake Plains Portion of Western New York

JANUARY 2018

1- Start of Fishing Season on Lake Ontario, the Lower Niagara River and Tributaries for Lake Trout (>9/30)

1 - Walleye regulations change on the lower Niagara River from three to one fish for a daily limit. (> 3/15)

1 – Start of Hunting Season for Varying Hare (Snowshoe Rabbit) in the Southern Tier portion of Western New York (>1/31)

1-2/28 – NYS Winter Classic Fishing Tournament through Feb. 28. Seven species categories. Open water or through the ice. (For information go to www.nyswinterclassic.com.)

2-3/15 – Capt. Bob’s Outdoors Winter Fishing Derby (Entry fee is $20) 8 species divisions. (For information call 716-407-3021)

4 – Digiscoping Birds at the Portville Free Library, 1 North Main Street, Portville, New York (1:00 -2:30 pm) Tom Kerr, Buffalo Audubon, teaches how to take pictures with your smart phone through binoculars or spotting scope. (Cost: $5.00)(For information/register call  585-457-3228.)

6 - Christmas Bird Count For Kids at the Reinstein Woods Environmental Education Center, 93 Honorine Drive, Depew, NY (Town of Cheektowaga) (9:00 am) A great way to introduce kids to birding and escape the post-Christmas blahs! Teams of kids compete to see who can find the most birds on 90-minute hikes at Reinstein Woods and other nearby sites. Binocular instruction and refreshments provided. (For information and register call 716-683-5959 or email reinsteinwoods@dec.ny.gov)

6 - Woods Walk: Winter Weeds at the Reinstein Woods Environmental Education Center, 93 Honorine Drive, Depew, NY (Town of Cheektowaga) (1:00 pm) Explore the world of winter plants and see where the summer wildflowers will bloom. (For information and register call 716-683-5959 or email reinsteinwoods@dec.ny.gov)

6-7 - Niagara Frontier - Hamburg Gun Show at the Event Building, Hamburg Fairgrounds, 5820 S Park Avenue, Hamburg, New York ((9:00 am – 4:00 pm/9:00 am - 3:00pm) 300 tables. NICS background checks available.  (Cost: $7.00/children under 12 free when accompanied by a paid adult) (90 Tables) (For information call 716-542-9929 or email  nfgshows@aol.com)

 

Until our next meeting in the Corner, have a great time in the outdoors. This is Ron Schroder for – “Your In on The Outdoors for Western New York.”

What Do You Think? Have something for other sportspeople? Let us know HERE.

 

 

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12 - 22 - 17

Welcome to this week’s Conservation Chatter Corner – little bits of happenings concerning our outdoors and you, the sportspeople who enjoy being part of that outdoors.

 

MERRY CHRISTMAS

Hope you get all those outdoor goodies you’ve been dreaming about and don’t forget to report those flying reindeer.

 

 

OPERATION S.A.N.T.A. : Reviving a study dropped by the New Your State Department of Environmental Conservation in 2003, because of personnel cuts, Hunt Fish NY Outdoors will once again take on Operation Santa. Formerly Wildlife biologists across the world made attempts to gather more information on flying deer seen about this time each year. Now after many years of no success, Hunt Fish NY Outdoors is enlisting your aid, especially that of you younger people, who tend to stay awake later on the key observation night, December 24th. People are being urged to focus their video cameras and camcorders on the rooftops of the world, especially those with chimneys. The few reliable reports gathered by the DEC indicate the deer are under the control of a chubby fellow with a white beard and dressed in a red suit. File checks, even with our new computer links, have failed to produce any permits issued for possession of flying deer. The reason for the alert is a worry that the flying phenomenon may spread. Unverified reports gathered in past years include: hunters talking about deer flying by them; a guy outside a local tavern reporting flying elephants; some kids saying they saw a cow jump over the moon and a guy telling police that his grandmother got run over by some reindeer -- in this case it's believed Grandma was the one flying high. Who knows what might happen should elephants and cows really start flying.

Anyone sighting these flying creatures are urged to note: location, time, number, direction of travel, size of antlers and other special observations such as nose color, and send them to: Operation SANTA (Study of Animal Night Translocation Aerodynamics), at www.huntfishnyutdoors.com.  

 

WHERE DID THE BADGER COME FROM? Daniel Sinack of Phelps, NY got quite a surprise recently. The day after Thanksgiving he was checking his trapline, and he discovered a really strange animal in one of his traps. He had caught a badger. The trouble with that catch is that NY does not have any (known) badgers roaming anywhere in the state. Daniel was completely perplexed about what to do, so he did the obvious. Since there was no mention of these critters in the trapping section of the hunting guide or the DEC’s website, he called the DEC to obtain their guidance on this situation. But that resulted in another problem. The DEC officer he contacted didn’t know what to do either.

I will interrupt this tale to ask some questions. First, where did this badger come from? There are several possibilities. The most obvious is that someone obtained it as a pet, probably as a “pup”, and then released it when its adult “nasty” nature began to display itself. It then spent some time (possibly several years) living on its own in the wilds around Phelps before its run-in with Daniel.

How could it live without its natural food source, which is prairie dogs? Well, what is the difference between prairie dogs and woodchucks other than a slight difference (five to eight pounds difference, that is) in size? Believe me when I say that a badger would not have any trouble killing a chuck, such is its vicious adult nature. It is a natural killer of any (relatively) small animals.

Another possibility, although remote at best, is that it walked from the Dakotas to New York. Since badgers are not known as travelers in their wild habitat, I would personally rule that possibility out.

And there is also the even more remote possibility that it could have hitched a ride on the underside of a truck or car. But that is so remote that I’d rate it well below walking to NY. And the bottom line of this mystery is, ‘who knows?’

Anyway, back to this tale. After several hours of waiting for the DEC to make a decision, Daniel was told to dispatch the animal and a biologist would pick it up and take it to Avon for some research. It was returned later to the trapper in good condition.

There is a happy ending to this situation for just about everyone concerned (everyone but the badger, that is). Biologists determined (to the best of their limited ability) that it was a wild critter. Daniel was allowed to keep the pelt. The DEC got the carcass for some additional testing.

(By Len Lizenbee)

 

THE GOOD GUYS AT WORK:

Hawk Rescue - Cayuga County: On Dec. 3, ECO Scott Sincebaugh responded to a report of an injured hawk stuck in a tree off State Rt. 34 in the town of Cato. ECO Sincebaugh arrived to find a red-tailed hawk in the tree with a trap firmly clamped to its leg. The chain on the trap had become tangled on a tree branch, leaving the bird dangling helplessly from the tree. After assessing the situation, ECO Sincebaugh coordinated with Weedsport Fire Department personnel to respond with a ladder truck in order to free the bird. Once the bird was out of the tree, the ECO removed the trap from the bird's leg. The trap had no tag identifying the owner as required by law, making it impossible to determine where the hawk had encountered the trap. The hawk was not seriously injured and was transported to a wildlife rehabilitator for evaluation and future release.

Weedsport Fire Department working to free trapped hawk - image 2
Weedsport Fire Department working to free trapped hawk

U.S.S. Little Rock in Buffalo Harbor - Erie County: On Dec. 4, ECOs Michael Phelps, Jamie Powers, and Adam Muchow took part in security patrols for the soon-to-be-commissioned U.S.S. Little Rock. The ECOs worked alongside members of the U.S. Coast Guard, U.S. Customs and Border Protection, U.S. Border Patrol, the Erie County Sheriff's Department, and the cities of Buffalo and Tonawanda police departments. The mission was to keep all vessels outside of the established safety zone around the Navy vessel, a Freedom-class littoral combat ship. Tours of the new ship will be held throughout her stay in Buffalo, concluding with the commissioning of the ship on Dec. 16. The security patrol will continue through Dec. 18, when the U.S.S. Little Rock will leave for her new home at Naval Station Mayport in Jacksonville, Florida.

Too Dark to Hunt - Niagara County: On Dec. 7, ECO George Scheer was following up on a tip he received a few days earlier regarding hunting over bait in the hamlet of Burt. ECO Scheer set up to watch an area where the complainant advised a baited tree stand was located. A hunter was observed in the deer stand, where a considerable pile of pumpkins, corn cobs, and squash was also spotted. The sun started to set and the ECO made contact with the hunter. After a short interview, the hunter admitted that he did not know what time legal sunset was that day. When asked about the bait pile, the hunter claimed he hadn't placed it there ECO Scheer charged the hunter with hunting deer with the aid of bait and hunting big game after sunset. The charges will be answered in the Town of Newfane Court. DEC reminds hunters that legal hunting hours are from official sunrise to official sunset.

"Shop with a Cop" - Steuben County: On Dec. 9, Lt. Matt Lochner and ECO Matt Baker participated in the 3rd Annual Steuben County "Shop with a Cop" event coordinated by the Steuben County Sheriff's Department. The officers joined forces with members of the SCSD, New York State Police, and the Bath Police Department to sponsor children from a local shelter. The officers took the kids shopping at the Bath Village Kmart for needed family items and Christmas gifts that they may otherwise would've gone without. The police officers and children returned to the Steuben Sheriff's Department to enjoy a hearty lunch and wrap the presents This great event was made possible in part by generous donations from participating police benevolent associations, the New York State Conservation Officers Association, Bath Village Kmart, and citizens in and around the village of Bath.

ECO Matt Baker with Santa Claus
ECO Matt Baker with Santa Claus

 

LATE SEASON DEER HUNTING OPPORTUNITIES: From January 13-31, 2018, there will be an antlerless deer season open in the Deer Management Focus Area (DMFA) in Tompkins County. To participate, hunters must register with the DMFA Program and download a permit, carcass tags and a hunting activity log from the DMFA web page. Registered hunters may take up to two antlerless deer per day using any hunting implement that is legal during any other deer season at the site where they are hunting.

The 60,000-acre DMFA was created in 2012 to help communities in the Ithaca area address problems caused by deer overabundance. It allows harvest of up to two antlerless deer per day throughout all the general deer hunting seasons, in addition to the January DMFA season.  Hunters must carry a DMFA permit and DMFA carcass tags while they are hunting during the January season. They must also record their DMFA deer hunting activity and harvests on their hunting activity log and submit it to DEC by February 7. Additional information, including DMFA boundary descriptions and a printable map, is available on the DEC website.

 

SALMON RIVER HATCHERY SHOWS OFF EXCITING UPDATES: With completion of the first phase of renovations, the Salmon River Fish Hatchery has begun showing off its dazzling improvements to the public. The hatchery is one of DEC’s most popular tourist destinations, attracting tens of thousands of visitors annually.

The hatchery’s fish culturists raise millions of trout and salmon for release into the Great Lakes. They also serve as educational ambassadors to visitors of all ages and from places near and far. Eye-popping features have been added to enhance the visitors’ experience, with improved interpretive displays and fish tanks. The renovations will continue through 2018.

Watch a video about the Salmon River Fish Hatchery.

 

PURPLE - SOMETHING FOR NEW YORK?: There are 10 different states in the U.S., including Texas, that use the color purple as a warning to trespassers. Purple shows well in the outdoors. In fact, it’s one of the only colors that colorblind people can easily identify. Having said that, just seeing it on a fence post or painted on a tree as you go by might only garner a quick glance and an odd look.

It started in Arkansas in 1989 and by 1997, Texas had adopted the “purple paint rule” as an act of legal legislation. The reason to keep landowners from constantly having to replace signs.

Originally landowners were required to have a “no trespassing” or other sign posted to explain the purple paint, but only one year later that rule was rescinded. The law states that the paint must be marked in vertical lines a minimum of eight inches long and at least one inch wide.

The marked posts or even trees must have clearly visible paint and that paint must be placed between three and five feet from the ground. Other states with purple paint rules include Kansas, Arizona, Montana, Arkansas, Idaho, Florida, Maine, North Carolina, Missouri, and Illinois.

No matter what state you are in “posted” and other no trespassing signs can be a headache for landowners to constantly replace. Sometimes they just wear out and sometimes trespassers use them for target practice.

Now we just need more states to get in on the purple paint rule. The only thing left to be done is to share what the meaning of the purple paint rule, so everyone knows!

(http://www.wideopenspaces.com/know-use-purple-paint-posts-trees-texas/?utm_campaign=20171214&utm_medium=manual&utm_source=Boomtrain&bt_alias=eyJ1c2VySWQiOiAiMTIyZjIyZjYtMzk5OS00M2JjLTgy

NDUtNjViNGM3Y2U5ZmQwIn0%3D)

 

THIS WEEK’S EVENTS: (For complete future listings go to the Calendar Page - http://www.huntfishnyoutdoors.com/events.php)

23 – Home for the Holidays Sporting Clays Shoot at North Forest Rod and Gun Club, 6257 Old Niagara Road, Lockport. Registration at 8:30 a.m. Shooting  9 a.m.-2 p.m. (last squad). This will be a 50-bird sporting clays shoot, European start. $15 fee for 50 birds, $20 for Lewis option. (Call Bryan Meahl for information/register at 716-628-6238.) 

23 – 118th Annual Christmas Bird Count  Beaver Meadow Nature Center at 1610 Welch Road, North Java, NY. Birders of all ages and experience levels are welcome. (Call 585-457-3228 to register/information.)

26 - Start of Canada Goose Hunting Seasons – Part 3 – in the West Central Area (>1/14/18)and South Area (>1/14/18)

26 - Start of Hunting Seasons for Ducks, Coots and Mergansers – Part 2 - in Western Zone (>1/15/14)

27 -  Frozen Forest Snowshoe Walk at the Reinstein Woods Environmental Education Center, 93 Honorine Drive, Depew, NY (Town of Cheektowaga) (10:30 am) Explore the beauty of winter woods and learn how to identify local trees on this guided walk. (Snowshoe rental $5/person; Friends of Reinstein Woods members $2/person.) (For information and register call 716-683-5959 or email reinsteinwoods@dec.ny.gov)

28 - Under The Ice at the Reinstein Woods Environmental Education Center, 93 Honorine Drive, Depew, NY (Town of Cheektowaga) (10:30 am) Join us as we explore the winter world of our ponds. Children will participate in hands-on activities and games to discover how turtles, frogs, beavers and more survive under the ice. For children in grades K through 5. (For information and register call 716-683-5959 or email reinsteinwoods@dec.ny.gov)

29 - Concealed Carry Class presented by Legal Heat at the Cabela’s Cheektowaga Store, 2003 Walden Avenue, Cheektowaga, NY (5:00 am -9:00 pm) This course is designed to meet the qualifying requirements and documentation to obtain the Utah and Arizona concealed carry permits in a fun, informative, non-intimidating class. These permits will allow combined carry reciprocity in approximately 30+ states. Legal Heat's concealed carry class covers firearms safety, handling, transportation, storage, ammunition, self-defense and firearms laws, concealed carry techniques and much more. Legal Heat's firearm training instructors are all NRA and Utah BCI certified, insured and among the most highly experienced in the industry and can answer your CCW questions. This course typically runs approximately 4 hours. This Legal Heat course does not have a 'test' or range requirement. The Utah and Arizona permits are open to residents of any state and can be applied for by mail. You do NOT have to reside in the state of UT or AZ to qualify to apply for their concealed carry permits. Register TODAY for this fun and informative class. Seating may be limited.This class may qualify you for the NY permit in several NY counties but has not been formally approved by any NY counties yet. (Reservations can be made at www.MyLegalHeat.com or by calling 877-252-1055.)

30  – Fur Handling Seminar by the Erie County Trappers Association at the Collins Conservation Club, 2633 Conger Road, Collins, NY (9:00 am to 1:00 pm) (For information call Patti at 716-337-2556.) Free to attend. 

31 - Close of Fishing Season for Trout in the Finger Lakes Tributaries

31 - End of Pheasant Hunting Season in Lake Plains Portion of Western New York

 

Until our next meeting in the Corner, have a great time in the outdoors. This is Ron Schroder for – “Your In on The Outdoors for Western New York.”

What Do You Think? Have something for other sportspeople? Let us know HERE.

 

 

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12 - 15 - 17

Welcome to this week’s Conservation Chatter Corner – little bits of happenings concerning our outdoors and you, the sportspeople who enjoy being part of that outdoors.

 

HUNTERS REPORT MORE DEER IN 2017 THAN 2016: New York State hunters have been more successful in 2017 than last year through the first several weeks of big game seasons. Early reports from New York hunters through December 3rd, show that hunters reported taking approximately 18 percent more deer in the Northern Zone and 14 percent more deer in the Southern Zone compared to the same period in 2016.

 

A final tally of the seasons' deer and bear harvests will be compiled and released early in 2018.

Through the third weekend of the Southern Zone regular big game season, hunters reported 69,550 deer in 2017, compared to 61,184 through the same period in 2016. Similarly for the Northern Zone, hunters have reported11,349 deer in 2017, compared to 9,417 deer in 2016.

For bears, hunters have reported taking 814 bears so far in the Southern Zone, compared to 775 taken at this point in 2016, but harvest is lagging in the Northern Zone with only 291 bears reported in 2017, compared to 450 bears at this point in 2016.

DEC also observed a slight increase in reporting via the web and wildlife app in 2017 compared to 2016.

Hunters in the Southern Zone still have several more days. The late bow and muzzleloading season for deer and bear in the Southern Zone runs from December 11th to the 19th and in the special Deer Management Focus Area in central Tompkins County from Jan. 13 to 31.

Several hunters have died or injured this year as a result of a fall from a tree stand. When hunting in tree stands use a safety harness and a climbing belt, as most tree stand accidents occur when hunters are climbing in and out of the stand. Also, never climb in or out of a tree stand with a loaded rifle. See our new Tree Stand Safety Video (link leaves DEC's website) for more tips on avoiding accidents.

Always be prepared for winter conditions when venturing in the woods, inform a friend or relative of your whereabouts, and pack emergency supplies.

For more information on these and other important hunting safety tips, please visit DEC's website.

 

THE GOOD GUYS AT WORK:

Please Pass ... On The Salt - Cortland County:

image of dead deer

On Nov. 18, ECO Matthew Burdick was patrolling Route 120 in the town of Virgil when he observed two hunters dragging two deer to a parked pick-up truck. ECO Burdick stopped and found that both deer were untagged, although the hunters claimed they were going to tag them once they got back to the truck. ECO Burdick asked the hunters to show him where the deer had been taken. The hunters led ECO Burdick into the adjacent valley and showed him a deer blind, where there was a half-eaten salt block nearby. ECO Burdick issued tickets to the two men for placing a salt block for non-agricultural purposes, hunting with the aid of pre-established bait, illegal taking of deer, and failure to fill out a carcass tag immediately upon harvest. All tickets are returnable to Town of Virgil Justice Court.

The K-9 Nose Knows - Cortland County: On Nov. 19, ECO Matthew Burdick responded to a Cortland County 911 radio call of shots fired from a roadway in the town of Cincinnatus. Cortland County Sheriff's Deputies stopped the truck in question and found a dead deer in the bed of it. When questioned, the driver of the truck stated he had shot the deer in a totally different location than the complaint they were investigating. ECO Burdick arrived and contacted ECO Brett Armstrong and K-9 Phoenix to help search for evidence. K-9 Phoenix quickly located four spent shotgun shells along the gravel roadside. Armed with new evidence, the two ECOs questioned the driver once again and asked to see the firearm used to shoot the deer. A quick check determined the gun was loaded with shells matching those found on the roadway. Faced with the inevitable, the driver admitted to shooting the deer from the road. The suspect was issued tickets for taking wildlife from a public roadway, possessing a loaded firearm in a motor vehicle, discharging a firearm over a public highway, and the illegal taking of deer. All of the charges are returnable to the Town of Cincinnatus Justice Court. The 8-point buck was seized and donated to NYS Venison Donation Coalition program.

 

CHRISTMAS GIFT IDEA - THE CONSERVATIONIST MAGAZINE:

December 2015 cover of Conservationist

Don't miss the next Conservationist magazine! Published six times a year, Conservationist is a New York State-focused magazine that is packed with informative and entertaining articles, first-rate photography and stunning artwork. Articles cover a broad range of environmental and natural history related topics, including fishing, hiking, recreation, travel, hunting, and nature studies. Highlights of the December issue: Discover the spruce grouse; Celebrate the new visitor center at Five Rivers; Learn about lichens; Explore Pharsalia Wildlife Management Area;

Marvel at the seasonal beauty of the Adirondacks; Plan a First Day Hike; An much more!

Subscribe online or call 1-800-678-6399. The beauty of this idea is, come next year you don’t have to think of another gift – just renew!

 

ICE FISHING - A FUN ACTIVITY FOR THE WHOLE FAMILY: If you're looking for something fun to do with your family this winter, the nearest ice-covered water might be the answer. Ice fishing is easy to learn, it doesn't take much equipment, and anyone — including kids — can catch lots of fish.
Warm clothes and basic equipment are all you need to start making memories with your kids.
On your first trip, your kids might enjoy sliding across the ice and tossing snowballs as much as they enjoy fishing. That's great and is one of the reasons ice fishing is so fun. But wait until they reel their first fish in and you see their eyes light up. That's when the fun really starts.
Staying safe and warm
Wait until the ice is at least four inches thick, and it should be safe to walk on. To stay warm and comfortable, dress in layers. Dressing in layers allows you to remove or add clothes as the temperature gets warmer or colder. Wearing boots that are waterproof is another good idea. As the day warms up, some water will start to form on top of the ice. Wearing waterproof boots will keep your feet dry and warm."
Basic equipment
A short ice fishing rod and reel, some hooks and sinkers, wax worms or meal worms, an ice auger, and a large spoon or something you can use to scoop ice chunks that form in the hole you're fishing, are all you need to get started. With the exception of worms and an occasional hook, you only need to buy the equipment once. After you do, you can enjoy it for years to come. Also, buy some small jigs, ice flies or small jigging spoons. Chartreuse and red are two colors that usually produce well but buy a variety of colors. That way, you'll have the color the fish want on the day you're fishing.
Because fish bite softly in the winter, buying items that will help you detect subtle bites is a great idea. Spring bobbers (a wire extension that attaches to the end or the top of your fishing rod) and various floats (also called bobbers) are among the items that will help you know a fish is on the end of your line.
A simple technique
Once you have your gear, and you've drilled a hole in the ice, it's time to fish. Here's a simple method that can put fish on the ice:
Tie a small jig to the end of your line, and thread a meal worm or a wax worm on the jig's hook. After threading the worm, open the bail on your spinning reel, and lower the jig and worm until it touches the bottom of the water you're fishing. (When your line goes slack, you'll know it's reached the bottom.) After the lure touches bottom, close the bail, and reel the lure until it's just a few inches off the bottom. Then, let it sit still and watch your bobber closely. It's also a good idea to occasionally "twitch" the rod, to make the jig move. If a fish is in the area, there's a good chance it will swim in and take the jig. If your bobber starts to twitch, raise your rod, set the hook and reel your fish in. If you've waited a few minutes and a fish hasn't taken your jig, reel it up a few inches, stop and start watching your bobber again. Keep doing that until you find the depth at which the fish are holding. If you don't get any bites, pick up and move to a different location.

CLEAN BIRD FEEDERS HELP KEEP BIRDS HEALTHY:  Some advice about bird feeder cleanliness before you run out and buy that first twenty dollar bag of seed. Cleaning bird feeders on a regular basis is an important and often overlooked component of feeding birds so they don't become sick.
Feeding birds in the winter is a source of great enjoyment for bird enthusiasts, but it can also cause diseases to spread quickly among wild birds. It is critical to clean those birdfeeders at least once a month in order to prevent a buildup of harmful pathogens.
Bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites can cause diseases such as aspergillosis, salmonella, avian pox, trichomoniasis, and conjunctivitis. Species commonly affected by bird feeder diseases are redpolls, pine siskins, goldfinches, sparrows, and cardinals.
It’s recommended using a solution of one part bleach to nine parts hot water to kill bacteria. Hot water with unscented dish detergent also does an excellent job. Wear rubber gloves to avoid any contamination. Be sure to clean inside and outside surfaces. Bottle brushes work well in tube feeders.
Be sure to thoroughly rinse your feeders to prevent residual chlorine from being ingested by birds. Then, dry the feeders well before filling them again. Any remaining moisture could lead to mold and mildew that can cause rotten, unhealthy seed.
Also, take time to remove seed and droppings in nearby areas where birds congregate. Birds can spill seed and leave debris several feet away from feeders.
Clean birdfeeders and feeding areas will attract more birds and keep them healthier for birders to enjoy.
Additional information about diseases at bird feeders can be found at:
http://www.nwhc.usgs.gov/publications/fact_sheets/coping_with_diseases_at_birdfeeders.jsp

 

OUTDOOR TIPS: Winter in New York offers a lot of opportunities to get outside and explore your area in a new way. Knowing where you are going and how to get there is an important part of heading out into an unknown area. But you also have to be prepared to deal with health issues that can occur when enjoying the outdoors, especially in winter. Sporting goods stores carry reference guides to first aid that will fit easily in your backpack. Dehydration—Dehydration occurs when you don't replace the fluid that your body loses through participating in outdoor activities or exercise. Make sure to drink water before you start an activity and continue to drink it at intervals while active. Hypothermia— Hypothermia occurs when the body loses heat faster than it can produce it. Hypothermia isn't just a concern in the winter. A cool, breezy spring or summer day can be more dangerous than a calm, dry winter day because wind and moisture draw heat away from the body quickly. Dress in layers, and wear a hat to avoid this life-threatening condition. Layered Clothing—In cool weather, your clothing provides insulation to keep you from losing body heat. Sweating can be dangerous when the temperature drops, so you must layer your clothing. The first layer of clothing should be able to "wick" away moisture. Cotton isn't a good choice because it traps the moisture close to your skin and makes you chilly. Polypropylene is a better choice for the first layer. The second layer can be a blend of cotton and synthetic fabric. Finally, a layer of wool provides warmth even when wet. Add a waterproof/windproof jacket if the weather calls for it. Wear two pairs of socks-poly liners covered by wool socks.

 

THIS WEEK’S EVENTS: (For complete future listings go to the Calendar Page - http://www.huntfishnyoutdoors.com/events.php)

1–3/7–10/14–17/21–23/28–31 - White Deer Tours: Seneca White Deer, Inc. recently announced that it will start tours of the former Seneca Army Depot. Participants will see the world’s largest herd of white, white-tailed deer in the world, other wildlife, and the relics of 60 years of secret weapons storage. We will visit one of the 519 earth-covered concrete igloos that stored everything from pistol cartridges to tactical missiles, from conventional bombs to nuclear warheads. We can never guarantee where the mystical white deer will be, but our tour guides know the best locations and will stop for pictures as deer and wildlife appear. Tour routes will vary according to the weather and season. This is your opportunity to see the hidden world and experience the magic of the white deer yourself. Our 25 passenger, air-conditioned and heated tour buses give all our visitors a comfortable seat for a 90-minute, narrated trip behind the fences of the former Seneca Army Depot. (Cost: Adults - $30.00/Military and Seniors – $27.00/Children 5–17 - $15.00/Children under 5 – Free) (For information go to https://www.senecawhitedeer.org/.)

4 - Start of Northern Zone Late Deer and Bear Bowhunting, Crossbow and Muzzleloading Seasons (>12/10)

11 - Start of Hunting Season for Varying Hare (Snowshoe Rabbit) in Central and Eastern New York (>2/28/18)

11 - Start of Southern Zone Late Deer and Bear Bowhunting, Crossbow and Muzzleloading Seasons (>12/19)

13 - Teachers In Nature: Professional Development Series – Growing Up WILD at the Reinstein Woods Environmental Education Center, 93 Honorine Drive, Depew, NY (Town of Cheektowaga) (4:00 – 7:00 pm) Learn how to connect your students to nature! CTLE credit hours may be available for select programs. (For information and register call 716-683-5959 or email reinsteinwoods@dec.ny.gov)

15 - Close of Lake Ontario and Tributaries Muskellunge and Tiger Muskellunge Fishing Season

16 - Montezuma’s Raptor and Riesling Tour meet at the Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savannah, NY (1:00 – 4:00 pm) The holiday season is here and so are our wintering raptors. Join Montezuma Audubon Center education staff to tour Montezuma’s birding hotspots in our van to search for the elusive Short-eared Owls, Northern Harriers, Bald Eagles, and Snowy Owls!  During the tour, we’ll stop at the Montezuma Winery for wine tastings and to learn how vineyards can provide important bird habitat. Must be 21+. (Fee $20/adult, includes tasting fee.) (For information or register call 315-365-3588 or e-mail montezuma@audubon.org)  

16 - Independent Fur Harvesters Fur Auction at the Pompey Rod and Gun Club, Swift Road off NY Rte. 80, Fabius, NY.  Sign in starts at 8 a.m.  (For information contact Rich Palmer at 315-720-5227.)

17 - End of Canada Goose Season in the South Zone of Western New York

17 – Winter Wonder Photography Walk at Niagara Falls State Park Niagara Falls, NY (11:30 am-12:45 pm) (For information/register call 716-282-5154.)

18 - Montezuma’s Christmas Bird Count at the Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savannah, NY. The Christmas Bird Count (CBC) is a long-standing program of the National Audubon Society, with over 100 years of citizen science involvement. It is an early-winter bird census, where thousands of volunteers across the U.S., Canada and many countries in the Western Hemisphere, go out over a 24-hour period on one calendar day to count birds.  Novice and experienced birders are welcome! (Fee: FREE.) (For information or register call 315-365-3588 or e-mail montezuma@audubon.org)  

19 - Close  of Southern Zone Late Deer and Bear Bowhunting, Crossbow and Muzzleloading Seasons

 

Until our next meeting in the Corner, have a great time in the outdoors. This is Ron Schroder for – “Your In on The Outdoors for Western New York.”

What Do You Think? Have something for other sportspeople? Let us know HERE.

 

 

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12 – 8 – 17

 

Welcome to this week's Conservation Chatter Corner - little bits of happenings concerning our outdoors and you, the sportspeople who enjoy being part of that outdoors.

 

UPDATE ON NON-HUNTER FATALITY: Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) Commissioner Basil Seggos, Chautauqua County District Attorney Patrick E. Swanson and Chautauqua County Sheriff Joseph A. Gerace announced that the man who shot and killed a woman walking her dogs in a field behind her Sherman home last week has been indicted.

Thomas B. Jadlowski, 34, of Sherman, surrendered himself to the Chautauqua County Sheriff's Office in connection with the Nov. 22 incident in which he allegedly opened fire on what he thought was a deer but turned out to be his neighbor. Jadlowski was arraigned in Chautauqua County Court on a two-count indictment alleging manslaughter in the 2nd degree and hunting after legal hours.

"Today, Mr. Jadlowski is being held accountable for his dangerous and reckless conduct when he fired a shot in the dark, causing this terrible tragedy," Commissioner Seggos said. "I commend the work of our Environmental Conservation Police Officers (ECOs), the Chautauqua County Sheriff's Office and Chautauqua County District Attorney Patrick Swanson for their professionalism and careful handling of this case. I hope this sends a loud and clear message that illegal hunting after sunset is dangerous and will be prosecuted to the full extent of the law."

On the day before Thanksgiving, DEC ECOs and Chautauqua County Sheriff's responded to a call of a hunting-related shooting incident just after 5:20 p.m., well beyond the legal close of the daily hunting period at sunset.

Rosemary Billquist, 43, of Sherman, was struck in the hip by a bullet fired by Jadlowski. After firing the shot, hearing a scream and finding Billquist, Jadlowski called 911. Members of the Sherman Stanley Hose Company Volunteer Fire Department responded within minutes of the shooting to find Ms. Billquist unresponsive about 150 yards behind her home. She was immediately transported to UPMC Hamot medical center in Erie, Pennsylvania, but later succumbed to her injuries.

"Like the rest of Chautauqua County, Sherman has many responsible hunters, and having grown up in Sherman myself, I know many families where hunting is a family affair," DA Swanson said. "Responsible hunting is paramount to the safety of anyone enjoying the outdoors. This incident is a tragic reminder of the importance that hunting laws be followed. This incident was completely avoidable. My sincerest condolences go out to the Billquist and Jafarjian families."

Chautauqua County Sheriff Joe Gerace said: "Our thoughts and prayers go out to the family and friends of Rosemary Billquist. This tragic event should never have happened. I am pleased that through the efforts of the Sheriff's Office, the DEC, and the District Attorney's Office, we have charged the defendant whose reckless actions resulted in the death of an innocent woman."

Jadlowski, of Sherman, entered a plea of not guilty in Chautauqua Court in front of Judge David W. Foley. Bail was set at $50,000 cash or $100,000 property. Jadlowski is due back in court on Jan. 29, 2018 for motions. The charges carry a potential state prison sentence of 5 to 15 years.

 

U.S. FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE SOLICITS PUBLIC INPUT ON PROPOSAL TO CELEBRATE THE CONSERVATION ACHIEVEMENT OF WATERFOWL HUNTERS IN THE 2018 FEDERAL DUCK STAMP: Over the past century, waterfowl hunters have helped create and conserve millions of acres of wetland habitat, not only providing places for a wide diversity of wildlife to thrive, but also helping in flood control and water purification efforts, and creating significant economic stimulus for rural communities. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has today proposed to celebrate hunters’ remarkable achievements and our unique American hunting heritage with a change to the 2018 Federal Migratory Bird Conservation Stamp, commonly known as the Duck Stamp.

The Federal Duck Stamp Program has become one of the most popular and successful conservation programs ever initiated. While waterfowl hunters 16 years of age or older are required to purchase a stamp each hunting season, anyone can buy one and contribute to conservation. Some 1.8 million stamps are sold each year, and as of 2017, Federal Duck Stamps have generated more than $1 billion for the preservation of more than 6 million acres of waterfowl habitat in the United States. A current Federal Duck Stamp is also a free pass into any national wildlife refuge that charges an entry fee.

In addition to being the only conservation revenue stamp, the Federal Duck Stamp is also unique in the way it is created. Each year, the Service holds an art contest, the only juried art competition sponsored by the Federal Government.

The Service’s proposal would require entries in the 2018 contest to include one or more visual element that reflect the theme “celebrating our waterfowl hunting heritage.” They must also adhere to existing contest regulations that require a live portrayal of one or more of the five eligible waterfowl species (wood duck, American wigeon, northern pintail, green-winged teal and lesser scaup for 2018) as the dominant foreground feature that is clearly the focus of attention. Contestants will be judged on the quality of their art and how well they illustrate the theme. The contest winner’s art will be made into the 2019-2020 Duck Stamp.

The Service also proposes for 2018 that all selected contest judges must have an understanding and appreciation of America’s waterfowl hunting heritage and be able to recognize scenery or objects related to waterfowl hunting.

In addition to the proposals specific to 2018, the Service is proposing permanent revisions to the scientific names of species on the list of contest design subjects and updates to recognize technological advances in stamp design and printing.

The notice was published in the Federal Register on November 28. Written comments and information concerning this proposal can be submitted by one of the following methods:

Federal eRulemaking Portal: http://www.regulations.gov. Follow the instructions for submitting comments to: [FWS-HQ-MB-2015-0161]

U. S. mail or hand-delivery: Public Comments Processing, Attn: Docket No. [FWS-HQ-MB-2015-0161]; Division of Policy, Performance and Management Programs; U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; 5275 Leesburg Pike - MS: BPHC Falls Church, VA 22041-3808.

Comments must be received within 30 days, on or before December 28, 2017. The Service will post all comments on http://www.regulations.gov. This generally means the agency will post any personal information provided through the process. The Service is not able to accept email or faxes.

For more information, please visit: https://www.fws.gov/birds/get-involved/duck-stamp/duck-stamp-contest-and-event-information.php.

 

THE GOOD GUYS AT WORK:

Pennsylvania Buck Seized During Stop -- Broome County: On Nov. 7, ECO Tony Rigoli was on patrol in the town of Windsor when he observed a large antlered deer carcass in the bed of a pickup truck traveling in the opposite direction. While Rigoli turned his vehicle around, the driver sped off at a high rate of speed. ECO Rigoli caught up to the vehicle and conducted a traffic stop. The driver stated he had shot the impressive buck in Pennsylvania and was taking it to his camp in New York to process. The deer carcass was untagged, but the subject had a completed Pennsylvania tag in his possession. ECO Rigoli advised the subject he was in violation of New York's Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) regulations, and would be ticketed and the carcass seized. The man said he was not going to relinquish the deer carcass. ECO Rigoli contacted Lt. Kenric Warner, who responded and convinced the subject that the deer was going to be seized pursuant to the regulations. The officers also determined that the subject, a Pennsylvania resident, had procured a resident New York hunting license illegally. The man was ticketed for making a false statement to obtain a New York resident hunting license and for violating CWD Regulations. The deer was seized and transferred for testing at Cornell University.



ECO Tony Rigoli and Pennsylvania buck

Upstate Alligator - Broome County: On Nov. 17, Lt. Kenric Warner and ECOs Andy McCormick and Tony Rigoli executed a search warrant at a residence in the town of Kirkwood. Two days earlier, the officers had received information indicating the subject was currently in possession of an alligator. During the execution of the warrant, officers seized a 3 ½-foot long American Alligator. The subject was issued a ticket for the unlawful possession of a wild animal as a pet, returnable to the Town of Kirkwood Court. The alligator was transferred to Animal Adventure Park, a DEC-permitted facility in Harpursville.

The Complainant Becomes the Suspect - Niagara County: On Nov. 18, ECOs George Scheer and Michael Phelps were on patrol when they responded to a call from the Niagara County Sheriff's Office in the town of Royalton. A complainant claimed someone had stolen a deer he just shot. The ECOs and a New York State Trooper interviewed the complainant who told the officers he thought a man on an ATV took a doe that he shot ECO Phelps and Trooper Blair attempted to locate the man with the ATV while ECO Scheer continued to interview the complainant. The complainant was in possession of two firearms with ammunition, one shotgun and one rifle, although rifles are not legal for deer hunting in Niagara County. As the interview continued, ECO Scheer discovered the complainant was in possession of a female's hunting license, four Deer Management Permits (DMPs), and regular season tags. The complainant advised that they were his girlfriend's tags and said that she, "does not hunt anymore." The officers also discovered a used crack pipe, used hypodermic needle, and a small white rock suspected to be crack cocaine. The complainant stated he smoked crack from the pipe the night before but not that day. The man was charged with possession of a rifle during deer season in a non-rifle zone, possession of a hunting license of another person, unlawfully possessing another person's DMPs, and various charges for the drugs and paraphernalia. The charges will be heard in the Town of Royalton Court.


Firearms, hunting licenses, drugs and paraphernalia

 

CHRISTMAS IDEAS: Christmas gift ideas, how about a lifetime license for hunting, fishing and/or trapping or a subscription to the DEC magazine, the Conservationist. The nice part about the magazine you don’t have to worry about next year – just renew.

 

FISH NOTES:

Restoring Native Cisco in Lake Ontario

DEC Region 8 Fisheries and Caledonia Hatchery staff recently assisted staff from the U.S. Geological Survey lab in Tunison, NY and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service  Northeast Fishery Center in stocking 100,000 fingerling ciscoes (lake herring) into Lake Ontario.

DEC staff collected cisco eggs during the late fall and winter of 2016, and they were hatched at the Tunison Lab and Northeast Fishery Center. The stocking is part of an effort to restore Lake Ontario's native herring, which were once an important prey fish in the lake.

 

 

 

Oneida Lake Walleye Fishing Trending Up

Oneida Lake walleye anglers will be pleased to learn that after a down year in 2016, walleye fishing appears to have rebounded. Preliminary results of a summer 2017 creel survey noted improved walleye catch rates, and the gill net catch this past summer was the highest since 1988.

Researchers believe that the reduction in the round goby population in the lake may be the reason. When gobies are abundant, walleyes typically feast on them and are less likely to take a bait presented by an angler. Gobies are also notorious bait thieves and can make fishing difficult. Find out more about the Oneida Lake Fishery.

 

 

THIS WEEK'S EVENTS: (For complete future listings go to the Calendar Page - http://www.huntfishnyoutdoors.com/events.php)

DECEMBER 2017

8 - Montezuma’s Home School Nature Series: Wild About Birds at the Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savannah, NY (10:00 am – 12:00 pm) The Montezuma Wetlands Complex is one of the most unique birding habitats in the northeast United States with 50,000 acres of forests, grasslands, wetlands, and open water and nearly 300 species can be found here. Some are colorful and some are drab. Some are tall and some are small. Through fun, interactive, and hands-on educational activities, homeschoolers ages 5 to 12 will learn how to recognize field marks to identify birds while participating in a citizen science project that will lead to help Audubon conserve bird habitats. (Fee: $8/student.) (For information or register call 315-365-3588 or e-mail montezuma@audubon.org) 

8 - Medicinal Herb Walk at the Reinstein Woods Environmental Education Center, 93 Honorine Drive, Depew, NY (Town of Cheektowaga) (11:00 am) Learn the medicinal values of the wild herbs that grow in Reinstein Woods. For adults and children ages 12 and older. (For information and register call 716-683-5959 or email reinsteinwoods@dec.ny.gov)

9 - The North Forest Ladies Shoot N’ Hoot Program at the Wolcott Guns, 3052 Walden Avenue, Depew, NY. (1:00 – 3:00 pm)The ladies will be enjoying some archery activities on the range and also using a 3-D bow simulator. There are five lanes with the range simulator, allowing distances from 5 to 30 yards at bullseye and 3-D targets. There are 12 lanes in the regular range. Bring your own bows and crossbows, but if you don’t have any equipment, some will be provided for you. (Cost is $25 for adults, $20 for junior ladies ages 13 to 17.) (Preregister by Dec. 6 with Colleen Gaskill at 716-628-9023.) 

9 - Forest Bathing at the Reinstein Woods Environmental Education Center, 93 Honorine Drive, Depew, NY (Town of Cheektowaga) (10:00 am) Ease into the holiday season with this program based on the Japanese practice of shinrin-yoku. We will focus on the sights, sounds and smells of the forest to induce relaxation. (For information and register call 716-683-5959 or email reinsteinwoods@dec.ny.gov)

10 - Close of Southern Zone Regular Deer and Bear Hunting Seasons

10 - Close  of Northern Zone Late Deer and Bear Bowhunting, Crossbow and Muzzleloading Seasons

10 - Genesee Valley Trappers Association Fur Auction at the Clubhouse, 4462 County Road 32 (3 miles east of Honeoye, south of 20A), Honeoye, NY (6:30 am fur checkin/10:00 am auction) ($10.00 charge for non-members) (For information call Tom Miller, 585-229-4759)

11 - Start of Hunting Season for Varying Hare (Snowshoe Rabbit) in Central and Eastern New York (>2/28/18)

11 - Start of Southern Zone Late Deer and Bear Bowhunting, Crossbow and Muzzleloading Seasons (>12/19)

13 - Teachers In Nature: Professional Development Series – Growing Up WILD at the Reinstein Woods Environmental Education Center, 93 Honorine Drive, Depew, NY (Town of Cheektowaga) (4:00 – 7:00 pm) Learn how to connect your students to nature! CTLE credit hours may be available for select programs. (For information and register call 716-683-5959 or email reinsteinwoods@dec.ny.gov)

15 - Close of Lake Ontario and Tributaries Muskellunge and Tiger Muskellunge Fishing Season

16 - Montezuma’s Raptor and Riesling Tour meet at the Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savannah, NY (1:00 – 4:00 pm) The holiday season is here and so are our wintering raptors. Join Montezuma Audubon Center education staff to tour Montezuma’s birding hotspots in our van to search for the elusive Short-eared Owls, Northern Harriers, Bald Eagles, and Snowy Owls!  During the tour, we’ll stop at the Montezuma Winery for wine tastings and to learn how vineyards can provide important bird habitat. Must be 21+. (Fee $20/adult, includes tasting fee.) (For information or register call 315-365-3588 or e-mail montezuma@audubon.org)  

17 - End of Canada Goose Season in the South Zone of Western New York

 

Until our next meeting in the Corner, have a great time in the outdoors. This is Ron Schroder for Your In on The Outdoors for Western New York.

What Do You Think? Have something for other sportspeople? Let us know HERE.

 

 

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12 – 1 – 17

 

Welcome to this week's Conservation Chatter Corner B little bits of happenings concerning our outdoors and you, the sportspeople who enjoy being part of that outdoors.

 

PLEASE BE CAREFUL OUT THERE!!: Tragedy has struck the hunting world of western New York. Environmental Conservation Officers (ECOs) from the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) are leading an investigation into a hunting related shooting incident in Sherman, New York. On November 22, 2017, at approximately 5:30 p.m. Rosemary A. Billquist of Sherman, NY was shot once while walking her dogs in a field allegedly by Thomas Jadlowski, who was hunting in the area. The subject immediately called 9-1-1 and administered first aid on the victim. She was subsequently transported to Hamot Medical Center in Erie, PA and pronounced dead. DEC ECOs and Chautauqua county Sheriffs are in the process of reconstructing the crime scene to determine charges against the subject, and additional information will be provided as the investigation progresses.


PRELIMINARY THREE-DAY PENNSYLVANIA BEAR HARVEST RESULTS: Hunters during the third day of Pennsylvania’s statewide bear season harvested 318 bears, raising the three-day total to 1,628 – an about 30 percent decrease compared to the 2,308 bears taken during the first three days of the 2016 season. Extensive rain on the season’s opening day, Nov. 18, led to the harvest decline. Bears have been harvested in 54 counties so far during the statewide season. The state’s heaviest bear – a male estimated at 700 pounds – was taken in Oil Creek Township, Venango County.

 

NY SEA GRANT KING SALMON VIDEO: New York Sea Grant has released a video highlighting the value of king salmon to the Lake Ontario ecosystem and local economies, and how Cornell University researchers and Sea Grant personnel are using pop-off satellite archival tags developed to work in freshwater to collect unprecedented data about salmon movement and behavior. Free access to the video is posted at https://youtu.be/pb4wJQc-O7A. New York Sea Grant Fisheries and Ecosystem Health Specialist Jesse Lepak wrote and narrated the 3-minute video that shows the tagging process and highlights the value of the data collected by the tags. ˜These freshwater pop-off tags allow for a unique view into the behavior of the fish and will provide data of interest to researchers, aquatic resource managers, and anglers, Lepak said. ˜For example, the tags are equipped with accelerometers indicating when the fish are swimming quickly to catch prey. Sea Grant will be sharing that information with the recreational anglers and charter services that are key economic drivers of the Lake Ontario regional economy, Lepak noted. A tag that was placed on a mature salmon on July 13 in waters near Oswego, NY, was detected on August 31 near Cobourg, Ontario, Canada, 90 miles away. That tag was recovered and contains data, including depth, temperature, and accleration for the fish recorded at one-second intervals for 49 days. With funding from New York Sea Grant, Dr. James M. Watkins with the Cornell University Department of Natural Resources, Ithaca, NY, and biologist Dr. Christopher Perle of Florida State College, Jacksonville, FL, are analyzing the data from the tags that can provide up to 90 days of tracking information. ˜With this tagging process, the fish become lake profilers. For example, data from the tags will track how closely the salmon follow their water temperature preference of 42 to 48 degrees Fahrenheit in the summer and when they choose to leave that preferred temperature to enter either warmer or colder waters in search of forage, says Watkins. Perle, who has been involved in marine electronic tagging research in the Pacific Ocean, notes, ˜Fresh water presents new challenges technologically for electronic pop-up tags. This Sea Grant project will not only provide information about king salmon as a key predator in the ecology of Lake Ontario, it is an opportunity to evaluate a new tag designed specifically for fresh water. Two Lake Ontario charter fishing services assisted the production of the ˜Learning More About Lake Ontario’s King Salmon video. Fish Doctor Charters Captain Ernie Lantiegne, a retired New York State DEC fishery biologist, commented, ˜King salmon are the big draw for anglers in Lake Ontario and the main engine for its multimillion dollar salmonid fishery. Rochester Sport Fishing Charter Captain Kim Mammano agreed, ˜The king salmon fishery of Lake Ontario can be seen as an an invaluable resource, and sustaining this world-class fishery should remain a priority for years to come. New York Sea Grant is a cooperative program of Cornell University and the State University of New York, and one of 33 university-based programs under the National Sea Grant College Program of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. For updates on New York Sea Grant Great Lakes and marine district activities, www.nyseagrant.org has RSS, Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube links.

 

TICKETS ON SALE FOR THE 2018 GREAT AMERICAN OUTDOOR SHOW: Tickets are now on sale for the 2018 Great American Outdoor Show, scheduled for February 3-11 at the Pennsylvania Farm Show Complex in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. Purchase tickets online at www.greatamericanoutdoorshow.org.
The Great American Outdoor Show is a nine-day celebration of hunting, fishing, and outdoor traditions treasured by millions of Americans and their families. Featuring firearm manufacturers, hunting & fishing outfitters, fishing tackle, boats, RVs, archery, and fun for the entire family. More than 1,100 exhibitors fill nine halls and cover 650,000 square feet, making the Great American Outdoor Show the largest consumer sports and outdoor show in the world.
In addition to the expansive exhibit halls, the 2018 Great American Outdoor Show includes a jam-packed schedule of events – including the 3D Bowhunter Challenge, Dock Dogs competitions, celebrity appearances, over 200 seminars, wild game cooking demonstrations, activities just for kids, an NRA Country concert, and much more.
Regular adult admission is only $14. Special rates apply for kids, seniors, groups and multi-day tickets.
For more information and regular updates on the 2018 Great American Outdoor Show, including celebrity guest appearance times, seminar schedule and special events, visit
www.greatamericanoutdoorshow.org.

 

THE GOOD GUYS AT WORK:

Genesee River Detail - Monroe County: Region 8 ECOs conducted a month-long fishing enforcement detail in Rochester on the Genesee River at the lower falls that concluded on Nov. 5. During this detail, officers wrote 178 tickets for various fishing violations, including 41 tickets for snatching, 32 tickets for fishing without a license, and 22 tickets for possession of foul-hooked fish. Other violations included using more than one hook point and fishing with weight below the hook. During this detail, ECOs encountered two subjects with outstanding warrants. These subjects were taken into custody and turned over to the local police agency.



Illegally taken fish stashed among the rocks

Double Trouble - Chautauqua County: On Nov. 7, ECOs Jerry Kinney and Jacob Jankowski responded to a call of a deer exhibiting unusual behavior in the town of Charlotte. Upon their arrival, the officers observed two brothers standing over a large, freshly killed 9-point buck. Further investigation revealed that the buck had been shot by one of the men, but tagged with his brother's archery tag. The shooter admitted to having already taken a buck during the 2017 archery season, just a few days prior. The man was issued two tickets, one for taking big game in excess of bag limit and one for possessing the tag of another person. His brother was issued one ticket for lending a tag to another person. The deer was taken to Troyer's Processing in Panama, and the venison will be donated to the Venison Donation Coalition to help feed people in need.



ECO Jankowski with the illegally killed buck

 

ICE FISHING: 5 STEPS FOR PREPPING YOUR GEAR LIKE A PRO:  Ice anglers are a nervous bunch it seems, from about the time of the whitetail rut, all throughout November. Even if ice doesn’t come in their neck of the woods until December, it seems we find more ways to worry about getting ready for it than we do once it’s actually here. While I can’t do anything about ice-formation, I can certainly give you a peek at my pre-ice checklist. Get the prep-work done, then rest easy until we get some single digit temps and calm winds.

1. Auger

Traditionally, gas-powered engines have made this the first item on my checklist. Should you need a carburetor adjust or other fix, you might be a few weeks out. Better to work on this one sooner rather than later, while service center lines are short and turnaround times are quick.

To prep any auger, you first need winter-blend fuels sold in the ice-belt usually anytime in November. Pre-mix your fuel, or purchase some of the handy pre-mixed gas in a can. Check your spark plug, auger flighting, and blade sharpness, then turn over the engine. If you’re choking and adjusting throttle like mad just to get it to fire, think how much harder that’s going to be on a frozen sheet of ice.

Of course, if you’re part of the electric auger crowd, simply test your batteries, blades and general condition to make sure you’re ready to drill first ice.

 2. Shelter

This comes next on my list as I want to make sure I have time to assess any items that may be broken, torn, or otherwise not functional. Then, I still have ample time to replace items or add new ones such as a light bar, cargo nets, hooks, etc. Were you sick and tired of the bottom of your portable shelter sled holding snow and water last year? Then consider drilling small holes at the back end of the sled in the bottom of the runner wells. That way, as your gear warms and dries, simply prop up the front part of your shelter to allow water to drain out.

3. Electronics

A quick look at your battery and its condition, as well as general operation of the unit itself, completes the trifecta of your big-ticket item pre-ice checklist. Look for a shifting screen, poorly lit marks, loose knobs, frayed cables, or loose connections. All these issues can be carry-overs from the year prior and will make the new year on ice that much more difficult. Again, customer service waits are very short right now, but will be long when everyone breaks out their flasher for the first time of the new ice season. Stay ahead of the curve and be ready to fish when others aren’t.

4. Outerwear and Boots

This could be one of the most overlooked areas to prep for all ice anglers, especially during early ice, when you’re often fishing outside of a shelter or at least roaming the open ice to check for safety. Consider a floating bib and jacket combination that’s designed for the ice, and line its pockets with everything you’ll need. Headlamps, bait-pucks, hand-towels, measuring tapes, superline scissors, GPS, and forceps all fit inside the pockets of my on-ice outerwear. Boots are a subject unto themselves, but make sure your footwear doesn’t leak, and consider equipping them with ice cleats for slick first ice.

5. Tackle

I start with putting fresh line on every ice reel I own. It’s cheap insurance, and tiny 500 series reel spools are made to create memory in ice line. Make sure that reels are firmly taped and/or seated on rod seats, and that everything fits into your transportation tote or rod-box of choice.

Consider how you’ll fish, where, and for what species. Go through the scenarios of what species you’ll likely fish for and where. Configure your storage solutions accordingly. For me, it’s Ziploc bags for small jigs and plastics, individually labeled and sorted, then stuffed into a tackle bag. For hard baits and spoons, I run a series of small boxes that I can separate easily and keep on my person only what I need. Rarely do I bring everything, but I’m still striving for the perfect solution as we all are.

Regarding bait, consider buying in bulk, as I’ll typically buy 1,000 euros at a time then dip ice pucks into that stock as necessary to refill. If they’re left outside to freeze or otherwise die, you haven’t lost it all, and you need to restock less often.

Lastly, and this is the fun part, gather all your ice tackle in a single location, spread them out on the floor and admire how large the pile has become. Make sure to do so in the absence of your significant other, or you’ll likely be prevented from ever adding to it again. Go through old baits, replace hooks as needed and, more than anything, take good inventory on what needs re-stocking.

Be honest with yourself. This is a difficult task. Work new baits and lures into the rotation, but do so sparingly, and then, only in a few selected colors and sizes. Instead, focus on your staples, and make sure you have plenty multiples of them. The worst thing you can do when shopping for lures is to buy a smattering of one each in various lure types. Instead, do your research and know your fishing style, then make educated and targeted purchases in multiples of the colors and sizes of baits you know you’ll make use of this winter. While it can be more expensive, you’re far more likely to have what you need when using this system.

I’ve more recently been a fan of shopping for these items online, mostly because I can order these multiples with greater ease, and typically the stock is virtually limitless. Still, whether online or in-store, supply can be sold thin if you wait too long. This is especially true for brand new lures and baits that get a good amount of press.

From here, you’re more prepared than the vast majority of your ice-fishing brethren, and for good reason, first ice can be the best fishing of the year. So, fill your deer tags, get some fresh winter blend fuel in that ice auger, and wait until Mother Nature gives us the icy layer we need to walk on water.

(by: Joel Nelson  https://www.outdoorhub.com/how-to/2017/11/16/videos-5-best-recipes-seasonal-salmon-harvest/)

 

THIS WEEK'S EVENTS: (For complete future listings go to the Calendar Page - http://www.huntfishnyoutdoors.com/events.php)

DECEMBER 2017

1- Start of Statewide Black Bass catch and release / artificial lures only season (>6/16/18)

1 - Start of Lake Erie and Tributaries Black Bass (20 inch limit) fishing season (>6/16/18)

1–3/7–10/14–17/21–23/28–31 - White Deer Tours: Seneca White Deer, Inc. recently announced that it will start tours of the former Seneca Army Depot. Participants will see the world’s largest herd of white, white-tailed deer in the world, other wildlife, and the relics of 60 years of secret weapons storage. We will visit one of the 519 earth-covered concrete igloos that stored everything from pistol cartridges to tactical missiles, from conventional bombs to nuclear warheads. We can never guarantee where the mystical white deer will be, but our tour guides know the best locations and will stop for pictures as deer and wildlife appear. Tour routes will vary according to the weather and season. This is your opportunity to see the hidden world and experience the magic of the white deer yourself. Our 25 passenger, air-conditioned and heated tour buses give all our visitors a comfortable seat for a 90-minute, narrated trip behind the fences of the former Seneca Army Depot. (Cost: Adults - $30.00/Military and Seniors – $27.00/Children 5–17 - $15.00/Children under 5 – Free) (For information go to https://www.senecawhitedeer.org/.)

2 - NWTF Salmon River Chapter Wheelin Sportsmen Muzzleloader Deer Hunt on private property in 2509 State Route 104, Mexico, NY (For information contact William Wilbur  315-440-4351  wwilbur551@aol.com)

2 - Montezuma’s Nature Photography Tour with Jim Montanus at the Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savannah, NY (12:00 – 4:00 pm) Ever wonder how to take the best picture with your camera?  No camera is too big or small to take the perfect picture. Join us for a traveling photography class lead by renowned photographer Jim Montanus who will begin with a presentation about birding throughout the Montezuma Wetlands Complex and the fundamentals of photography. Later, we’ll travel around the Montezuma Wetlands Complex with Mr. Montanus to explore birding hot spots while receiving expert photography advice. (Fee: $50/adult.) (For information or register call 315-365-3588 or e-mail montezuma@audubon.org)  

2 - Rod & Gun Auction at Hessney Auction Center, 2741 Route 14N, Geneva, NY (9:30 am) Shotguns, rifles, handguns, military, decoys, knives, mounts, fishing, ammo and swords. (For more information call 315-789-9349 or 585-734-6082 or go to www.hessney.com)

2-3 - Niagara Frontier – Clarence Gun Show at the Event Building, 11177 Main St Clarence, NY (9:00 am – 4:00 pm/9:00 am - 3:00pm) 100 tables. NICS background checks available.  (Cost: $5.00/children under 12 free when accompanied by a paid adult) (For information call 716-542-9929 or email  guns@nfgshows.com)          

3 - End of Northern Zone Regular Deer and Bear Hunting Seasons

3 - Alabama Hunt Club Blackpowder Shoot and Meeting at 1854 Lewiston Road, Alabama, NY  (11:00 am) (For information call John Szumigala at 716-714-5514.)

4 - Start of Northern Zone Late Deer and Bear Bowhunting, Crossbow and Muzzleloading Seasons (>12/10)

6 - End of Hunting Seasons for Ducks, Coots, and Mergansers in Western Zone

6 - Teachers In Nature: Professional Development Series – Classroom Citizen Science at the Reinstein Woods Environmental Education Center, 93 Honorine Drive, Depew, NY (Town of Cheektowaga) (4:00 – 7:00 pm) Learn how to connect your students to nature! CTLE credit hours may be available for select programs. (For information and register call 716-683-5959 or email reinsteinwoods@dec.ny.gov)

7 - Ducks Unlimited – Niagara River (Grand Island) Chapter Banquet at the Buffalo Launch Club, Grand Island,  NY. (6:00 pm) Waterfowl conservation is facing important challenges as wetlands and other habitats are being degraded and destroyed across the continent. Ducks Unlimited has a vision to reverse this trend. (Cost: $60 Single, $80 Couple) (Online ticket sales end on 12/4/2017.) (For information call Bob Hobba  716-774-1223 or Ron Rezabek  716-773-1385) 

8 - Montezuma’s Home School Nature Series: Wild About Birds at the Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savannah, NY (10:00 am – 12:00 pm) The Montezuma Wetlands Complex is one of the most unique birding habitats in the northeast United States with 50,000 acres of forests, grasslands, wetlands, and open water and nearly 300 species can be found here. Some are colorful and some are drab. Some are tall and some are small. Through fun, interactive, and hands-on educational activities, homeschoolers ages 5 to 12 will learn how to recognize field marks to identify birds while participating in a citizen science project that will lead to help Audubon conserve bird habitats. (Fee: $8/student.) (For information or register call 315-365-3588 or e-mail montezuma@audubon.org)  

10 - Close of Southern Zone Regular Deer and Bear Hunting Seasons

10 - Close  of Northern Zone Late Deer and Bear Bowhunting, Crossbow and Muzzleloading Seasons

 

Until our next meeting in the Corner, have a great time in the outdoors. This is Ron Schroder for Your In on The Outdoors for Western New York.

What Do You Think? Have something for other sportspeople? Let us know HERE.

 

 

********************************

 

11 – 24 – 17

 

Welcome to this week=s Conservation Chatter Corner B little bits of happenings concerning our outdoors and you, the sportspeople who enjoy being part of that outdoors.

 

DEC SEEKS ASSISTANCE FROM BEAVER TRAPPERS: New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) Region 9 Bureau of Wildlife is seeking fur trappers to harvest beavers on several state Wildlife Management Areas (WMAs) in Allegany, Cattaraugus and Chautauqua counties.

"Beaver populations in these areas have expanded, causing difficulty with effective management of water levels on ponds, marshes and impoundments. Trappers can help by focusing their harvests on these particular areas," said DEC Regional Wildlife Manager Kenneth Baginski.

The Region 9 Bureau of Wildlife is asking trappers to consider beaver trapping on the following areas:

Keeney Swamp WMA - Town of Birdsall - Allegany County

Allegheny Reservoir WMA - Town of South Valley - Cattaraugus County

Conewango Swamp WMA - Town of Conewango - Cattaraugus County

Harwood Lake MUA - Town of Farmersville - Cattaraugus County

Clay Pond WMA - Town of Poland - Chautauqua County

Watts Flats WMA - Town of Harmony - Chautauqua County

For more information about trapping opportunities at these locations, please contact Land Management Biologist, Emilio Rende at 716-379-6366 or by email at region9@dec.ny.gov

 

PUBLIC MEETING ON HABITAT MANAGEMENT PLAN FOR LAKE SHORE MARSHES WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT AREA:  The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) will host a public information session to provide information and answer questions about a recently completed habitat management plan for Lake Shore Marshes Wildlife Management Area (WMA) located in the towns of Huron, Sodus, and Wolcott, Wayne County. The session will take place on Wednesday, November 29, from 6:30 to 8 p.m. at the Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savannah. An open house will take place from 6:30 to 7 p.m., followed by a formal presentation.

Lake Shore Marshes WMA is composed of eight units, covering approximately 6,430 acres, and provides excellent opportunities for wildlife-dependent recreation, such as hunting and bird watching. Habitat management goals for this WMA are to maintain a diversity of wetland and upland habitats that benefit a wide range of resident and migrating wildlife species, including several rare and declining species. DEC will continue to actively manage Lake Shore Marshes WMA to benefit a variety of wildlife, while using best management practices. Planned management activities include: timber harvests to improve forest health and increase forest habitat diversity; maintenance of wetland impoundments, potholes, and ditching; mowing and replanting of grassland fields; and control of invasive plant species

The meeting will include a presentation about the history of management on the WMA, specific activities and locations for the planned management actions, a brief overview of DEC's Young Forest Initiative, and a question and answer period.

The habitat management plan for Lake Shore Marshes WMA can be found on DEC's website. For more information about this event please contact DEC Biologist Michael Palermo at (585) 226-5383.

    

THE GOOD GUYS AT WORK:

A Waterfowl Foul - Monroe County: On Oct. 28, ECOs Kevin Holzle, Eoin Snowdon, and Jeff Johnston responded to a complaint of waterfowl hunting in a closed area within the Braddock Bay Wildlife Management Area in the town of Greece. ECOs Snowdon and Johnston spotted the hunters south of the Lake Ontario State Parkway in Long Pond. ECO Holzle responded with a small vessel capable of maneuvering the shallow waters. ECOs Snowdon, Holzle, and Johnston paddled out to find four hunters with their decoys and 14 recently shot ducks. During initial interviews, the hunters incorrectly identified their ducks as gadwalls. It is important for hunters to correctly identify waterfowl, as New York has specific bag limits for certain species. In this instance, the incorrect identification of the birds did not result in the hunters exceeding bag limits. However, all four hunters were ticketed for trespassing while engaging in a posted activity on Long Pond, returnable to the Town of Greece Court.


 

Tailgate Truck Hunting - Monroe County: On Nov. 2, a concerned hunter called Monroe County 911 and said he observed a hunter with a crossbow breaking the rules. ECO Kevin Holzle responded and met with Monroe County Sheriff's Deputies, who were first on the scene. A blue truck was parked out in a field and a hunter was perched high in the back of the truck with his crossbow cocked and loaded. The hunter admitted he had been hunting from the truck, but thought only hunting from the inside of the vehicle was illegal. The hunter was charged by ECO Holzle with possession of a loaded crossbow in a motor vehicle, hunting from a motor vehicle, and attempting to take deer by means other than specified with a crossbow during the closed season. All of the charges are returnable to the Town of Sweden Court.



GREAT LAKES FISH AND WILDLIFE RESTORATION ACT (GLFWRA) FUNDING OPPORTUNITY: The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is accepting Fiscal Year 2018 project proposals to protect, restore and enhance Great Lakes fish and wildlife habitat under the Great Lakes Fish and Wildlife Restoration Act (Act). The six goals of the Act are: 

  • Restoring and maintaining self-sustaining fish and wildlife resources.
  • Minimizing the impacts of contaminants on fishery and wildlife resources.
  • Protecting, maintaining, and, where degraded and destroyed, restoring fish and wildlife habitat,
  • Including the enhancement and creation of wetlands that result in a net gain in the amount of those habitats.
  • Stopping illegal activities adversely impacting fishery and wildlife resources.
  • Restoring threatened and endangered species to viable, self-sustaining levels.
  • Protecting, managing, and conserving migratory birds.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service requests interested entities to submit restoration, research and Regional project proposals for the restoration of Great Lakes fish and wildlife resources.  Supported in part by the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative, USFWS expects approximately $1.2 million to support projects this fiscal year. The 2016 Reauthorization of the GLFWRA made some significant changes to allowable non-federal match as it relates to time period, land and conservation easements.  Deadline for proposal submission is Monday, January 8, 2018 by 5:00 PM EST. For more information: https://www.fws.gov/midwest/fisheries/glfwra-grants.html

 

GREAT LAKES RESTORATION INITIATIVE COOPERATIVE WEED MANAGEMENT AREAS REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS: The U.S. Forest Service announces that approximately $600,000 in new funds are expected to be available for Cooperative Weed Management Areas (CWMAs) in the Great Lakes Basin. For this work, the minimum requested federal share is $15,000 and the maximum is $40,000, and a minimum 20% match of the total project cost is required. This funding will be competitively awarded based on proposals received through the January 5, 2018, deadline at grants.gov.

The goal of this program area is to detect, prevent, eradicate, and/or control invasive plant species to promote resiliency, watershed stability, and biological diversity on Federal, State, or private land.

CWMAs and similar groups are organized partnerships of Federal, State, and local government agencies, tribes, individuals, and various interested groups that manage invasive species (particularly plants) within a defined area, generally a county or larger in size. NY’s Partnerships for Regional Invasive Species Management within the Great Lakes basin are eligible. Proposals may include work on all land ownerships within the Great Lakes watershed of the United States. For more information: https://www.na.fs.fed.us/fhp/invasive_plants/cwma/

 

2018 ANNUAL EMPIRE PASSES NOW AVAILABLE ONLINE: A new wallet-sized Empire Pass Card that can be shared within a household is now available. It’s a family-friendly alternative to the traditional window decal, and not assigned to a specific vehicle. The new card can be used by parents, grandparents, caregivers and others.

The Empire Pass is your key to all-season enjoyment at New York State Parks. It provides unlimited day-use vehicle entry to most facilities operated by New York State Parks and the State Dept. of Environmental Conservation including forests, beaches, trails and more. Learn where the Empire Pass is Accepted.

Empire Passes are available for different lengths of time: choose from one year, multi-year or lifetime.  Please refer to the Empire Pass Card Guidelines for Use, Empire Pass Decal Guidelines for use and the Empire Pass Frequently Asked Questions for pass replacement, volume sales and other important information.

Annual Empire Pass Card: Available for $65 now through March 31, 2018, the 2018 Empire Pass Card is a new wallet-sized card that can be shared within a household and not assigned to a specific vehicle.

To purchase:

Online: Order Online

In-Person (annual pass only): The 2018 annual Empire Pass is available online only at this time. Check back after January 1, 2018 for information on in-person availability.

By Phone: The 2018 annual Empire Pass is available online only at this time. Check back after January 1, 2018 for information on phone order availability.

Mail: Mail orders are not available at this time. Please check back after January 1, 2018 for information on applications and mail orders.

Multi-Year Empire Pass Card:

Frequent Empire Pass Card purchasers may be interested in a multi-year Empire Pass Card which can be bought online, by mail or telephone. A 3-year Empire Pass Card may be purchased for $205; a 5-year Empire Pass Card may be purchased for $320. Upon purchase you will be mailed an Empire Pass Card. You do not need to contact our office unless your address has changed. If it has, please complete our Change of Address form.

Online: Order Online

By Phone: Telephone orders using a credit card will be processed by calling 518-474-0458 during normal business hours.

Mail: Complete and mail an application with check or money order payable to "NYS Parks" to:

Empire Pass, New York State Parks, Albany, NY 12238

The Lifetime Empire Pass is a convenient option for loyal Empire Pass users. The Lifetime Empire Pass will be issued by the NYS Dept. of Motor Vehicles as an icon that will appear on your NYS Driver License, Non-Driver ID or Learner Permit, eliminating the need for a separate document. For a one-time payment of just $750, it provides an even greater discount for day use vehicle entry than the annual or multi-year Empire Pass, with all the same benefits. With no expiration date, buy it once and enjoy the parks forever!

Apply Online today.

Special one-time bonus: Those purchasing a Lifetime Empire Pass can select to receive a free $100 State Park Gift Card with their order. The gift card can be used at more than 9000 campsites, cabins and cottages throughout the state and select state golf courses. Gift cards has no expiration date, if you prefer not to receive the gift card, just select "No thanks" during the ordering process.

 

 

5 TIPS TO GET THE MOST OUT OF YOUR GAME CAMERA DURING THE RUT: We spend most of the year anticipating deer season. Then we spend most of the season anticipating the rut. Since the typical rut is only a few weeks long, we better make it as eventful as possible. Here are five things to consider when setting up your game camera for deer season’s prime time.

1. Deer are like us, they prefer easy over hard. So, they tend to travel down corridors and funnels rather than blazing new trails through the woods. These funnels are the highways connecting deer to their bedding areas and food plots. For bucks, these paths are also the quick way to get to estrous does. Because of their importance, you’ll want to locate your cameras in these types of locations.

2. Placing your camera at an oblique angle to the trail will give you images that are more useful when it comes to understanding the patterns. A camera positioned at a right angle to the path isn’t as likely to show you the monster buck lurking behind the one that tripped your camera. Setting up at a 45-degree angle, or pointing the camera to shoot directly down the trail, will provide you with the maximum opportunity to get the images you want. Just remember to also factor in the need to be stealthy in your location selection as well.

3. Anything you can do to cause a buck to linger in your camera’s field of view is to your advantage. Try adding a mock crape for extra enticement. At the height of the rut, scrapes are sometimes abandoned or left unused. But you’ve got nothing to lose by trying.

4. The peak of the rut is a flurry of activity. And things can change quickly. A spot that was hot last week may go cold, then heat up again. You’ll need to check your camera frequently, maybe as often as every three to five days. Many of us don’t have the luxury of being able to visit our cameras as frequently as we need to. This is where having a wireless connection to your camera really pays off. Not only is it a matter of convenience, but the less traveling you can do to the camera the less likely you are to disrupt the pattern.

5. And finally, don’t overlook doe bedding areas. Bucks will often continue to visit these areas looking for other does who have just come into estrous. 

(http://www.moultriefeeders.com/blog/5-tips-to-get-the-most-out-of-your-game-camera-during-the-rut/?utm_source=newsletter&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_campaign=Nov2017newsletter)

 

THIS WEEK'S EVENTS: (For complete future listings go to the Calendar Page)

NOVEMBER 2017

25 - Start Of Trapping Seasons for Mink and Muskrat (>2/15/18)

25 - Start Of Trapping Seasons for Beaver in Western New York (> 3/15/18 West portion of Southern Tier/rest >2/15/18)

25 - Montezuma’s Wait Till It Gets Dark Night Walk at the Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savannah, NY (6:00 – 7:30 pm) Join guest naturalist George Steele on a walk exploring the nature of night We’ll explore not only what animals might be out there and how they are adapted to the nighttime but how we can better explore the night by tuning in to our own five senses. Some of these activities will be featured in his new book “Wait Till It Gets Dark”. The walk will be preceded by a short reading from the book and then out in to the night we will go. The new book will be available in the nature store and George will be available to sign copies after the walk. (Fee: $5/child, $7/adult, $20/family.) (For information or register call 315-365-3588 or e-mail montezuma@audubon.org)  

25 - Family Nature Quest: Turkeys at the Reinstein Woods Environmental Education Center, 93 Honorine Drive, Depew, NY (Town of Cheektowaga) 10:00 am) Discover the secret world of turkeys as we search for wild birds and make turkey calls. (For information and register call 716-683-5959 or email reinsteinwoods@dec.ny.gov)

25 - Niagara River Gulls with Buffalo Audubon naturalist Tom Kerr at the New York Power Authority fishing platform in the lower Niagara River. (10:00 am to noon) (For information/pre-registration call 585-457-3228.)

25; 12/2; 12/9; 12/16 - Free Photos with Santa! at Cabela’s Cheektowaga Store, 2003 Walden Avenue, Cheektowaga, NY. (11:00 am – 1:00 pm) Bring the kids to Cabela's to enjoy a free photo with Santa! Due to the popularity of this event, wait times may vary. (For information call 716-608-4770)

26 - End of Canada Goose Season – Part 2 - in the West Central Zone

29 - End of Hunting Season for Brant in the Western Zone New York

29 - Managing Wildlife on Lake Shore Marshes Wildlife Management Area Public Meeting at the Montezuma Audubon Center 2295 State Route 89, Savannah, NY. (6:30 – 8:00 pm) DEC staff will be available for questions, followed by a formal presentation at 7:00 PM. Stop by and learn how the DEC plans to manage habitat for wildlife at this Wayne County/Lake Ontario property. Check out what activities you can do at Lake Shore Marshes WMA. (For information contact the DEC Wildlife Office at 585-226-2466.)

30 - End of Statewide Fishing Season for Black Bass and Muskellunge

30 - End of Trout Season in Green Lake (Onondaga County) and Rushford Lake (Allegany County)

30 - Close of Lake Erie and Tributaries Muskellunge and Tiger Muskellunge Fishing Season

DECEMBER 2017

1- Start of Statewide Black Bass catch and release / artificial lures only season (>6/16/18)

1 - Start of Lake Erie and Tributaries Black Bass (20 inch limit) fishing season (>6/16/18)

1–3/7–10/14–17/21–23/28–31 - White Deer Tours: Seneca White Deer, Inc. recently announced that it will start tours of the former Seneca Army Depot. Participants will see the world’s largest herd of white, white-tailed deer in the world, other wildlife, and the relics of 60 years of secret weapons storage. We will visit one of the 519 earth-covered concrete igloos that stored everything from pistol cartridges to tactical missiles, from conventional bombs to nuclear warheads. We can never guarantee where the mystical white deer will be, but our tour guides know the best locations and will stop for pictures as deer and wildlife appear. Tour routes will vary according to the weather and season. This is your opportunity to see the hidden world and experience the magic of the white deer yourself. Our 25 passenger, air-conditioned and heated tour buses give all our visitors a comfortable seat for a 90-minute, narrated trip behind the fences of the former Seneca Army Depot. (Cost: Adults - $30.00/Military and Seniors – $27.00/Children 5–17 - $15.00/Children under 5 – Free) (For information go to https://www.senecawhitedeer.org/.)

2 - NWTF Salmon River Chapter Wheelin Sportsmen Muzzleloader Deer Hunt on private property in 2509 State Route 104, Mexico, NY (For information contact William Wilbur  315-440-4351  wwilbur551@aol.com)

2 - Montezuma’s Nature Photography Tour with Jim Montanus at the Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savannah, NY (12:00 – 4:00 pm) Ever wonder how to take the best picture with your camera?  No camera is too big or small to take the perfect picture. Join us for a traveling photography class lead by renowned photographer Jim Montanus who will begin with a presentation about birding throughout the Montezuma Wetlands Complex and the fundamentals of photography. Later, we’ll travel around the Montezuma Wetlands Complex with Mr. Montanus to explore birding hot spots while receiving expert photography advice. (Fee: $50/adult.) (For information or register call 315-365-3588 or e-mail montezuma@audubon.org)  

2 - Rod & Gun Auction at Hessney Auction Center, 2741 Route 14N, Geneva, NY (9:30 am) Shotguns, rifles, handguns, military, decoys, knives, mounts, fishing, ammo and swords. (For more information call 315-789-9349 or 585-734-6082 or go to www.hessney.com)

2-3 - Niagara Frontier – Clarence Gun Show at the Event Building, 11177 Main St Clarence, NY (9:00 am – 4:00 pm/9:00 am - 3:00pm) 100 tables. NICS background checks available.  (Cost: $5.00/children under 12 free when accompanied by a paid adult) (For information call 716-542-9929 or email  guns@nfgshows.com)          

3 - End of Northern Zone Regular Deer and Bear Hunting Seasons

3 - Alabama Hunt Club Blackpowder Shoot and Meeting at 1854 Lewiston Road, Alabama, NY  (11:00 am) (For information call John Szumigala at 716-714-5514.)

 

Until our next meeting in the Corner, have a great time in the outdoors. This is Ron Schroder for Your In on The Outdoors for Western New York.

 

What Do You Think? Have something for other sportspeople? Let us know HERE.

 

 

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11 – 17 – 17

 

Welcome to this week's Conservation Chatter Corner - little bits of happenings concerning our outdoors and you, the sportspeople who enjoy being part of that outdoors.

 

 

START OF REGULAR FIREARMS SEASON FOR DEER AND BEAR HUNTING IN SOUTHERN ZONE: The 2017 regular deer and bear hunting seasons in New York's Southern Zone begin at sunrise on Saturday, Nov. 18, and continue through Sunday, Dec. 10. The Southern Zone regular season is New York's most popular hunting season; approximately 85 percent of New York's 575,000 licensed hunters participate. Harvest during this season accounts for nearly 60 percent of the total statewide deer harvest and between 30 to 60 percent of the statewide bear harvest.

Following the regular deer and bear seasons in the Southern Zone, late bowhunting and muzzleloading seasons will run from Dec. 11 through Dec. 19. Hunters taking part in these special seasons must possess a hunting license and either bowhunting or muzzleloading privilege(s).

In the Northern Zone, the regular deer and bear hunting season opened Oct. 21, and will close at sunset on Dec. 3. The Northern Zone includes the Adirondacks, Tug Hill Plateau, Eastern Lake Ontario Plain, and the Champlain and St. Lawrence valleys. A late bowhunting and muzzleloading season for deer will be open in portions of the Northern Zone from Dec. 4 to Dec. 10.

Deer hunting has been changing in New York, with more hunters opting to voluntarily pass up shots at young, small-antlered bucks in favor of letting them grow to be older, larger bucks. DEC is encouraging hunters to make a difference for the future of the deer herd and increase their likelihood of seeing older, larger bucks by choosing to Let Young Bucks Go and Watch Them Grow.

DEC Encourages Hunter Safety
While statistics show that hunting in New York State is safer than ever, mistakes are made every year. DEC believes every hunting-related shooting incident is preventable, and hunters are encouraged to use common sense this season and to remember what they were taught in their DEC Hunters Education Course.

Firearms Safety:

*Point your gun in a safe direction.

*Treat every gun as if it were loaded.

*Be sure of your target and beyond.

*Keep your finger off the trigger until ready to shoot.

DEC also encourages hunters to wear blaze orange or pink. Wearing orange or pink prevents other hunters from mistaking a person for an animal, or shooting in a hunter's direction. Hunters who wear hunter orange are seven times less likely to be shot.

When hunting in tree stands, use a safety harness and a climbing belt, as most tree stand accidents occur when hunters are climbing in and out of the stand. Also, hunters should never climb in or out of a tree stand with a loaded rifle and never set a tree stand above 20 feet.

Report Your Harvest - Remember: Take It - Tag It - Report It
Hunter contributions to deer and bear management don't end when an animal is harvested. All successful hunters are required to report their harvest of deer and bear within seven days. Failure to report is a violation of the Environmental Conservation Law and reduces the data DEC uses to manage deer and bear populations. Hunters may report via DEC's online game harvest reporting system or by calling the toll-free automated reporting system at 1-866-GAME-RPT (1-866-426-3778).

Additional Reminders for the 2017 Southern Zone Regular Hunting Season
Choose non-lead ammunition for high quality meat and reduced risk of lead exposure to humans and wildlife.

Hunger Has A Cure... The Venison Donation Program is a great way to help those less fortunate while assisting with deer management in New York.

For specific descriptions of regulations and open areas, hunters should refer to the 2017-2018 Hunting and Trapping Regulations Guide available on DEC's website. Hunters are urged to review all regulations and safety tips in the guide. Hunters may also be interested in DEC's Hunting the Black Bear in New York (PDF, 727 KB) or reviewing DEC's unit-by-unit Deer Hunting Forecasts.

 

GREAT LAKES ACTION AGENDA WORK GROUP MEETINGS: NYSDEC invites you to join other regional stakeholders in a basinwide partnership to advance ecosystem-based management (EBM) opportunities for New York's Great Lakes basin, as identified in the state's interim Great Lakes Action Agenda (GLAA).  Meeting objectives include:

*Share state and federal Great Lakes updates.

*Report on progress of sub basin work plan implementation and EBM Demonstration Projects, and identify next steps.

*Discuss upcoming funding and partnership opportunities to advance work plan goals.

Four sub basin work groups provide a unique opportunity to connect, coordinate and collaborate with other groups and agencies working locally and basinwide. 

          

                            GL Sub basins                 

 

Please join us for one or more of the following meetings:  

Lake Erie Work Group - Nov 28th, 1:00pm - 4:00pm - Beaver Meadow Audubon Center, 1610 Welch Road, North Java, NY 14113

SW Lake Ontario Work Group - Nov 29th, 9:00am - 12:00pm - Black Creek Park, Sunnyside Lodge, 3835 Union St, North Chili, NY 14514

NE Lake Ontario Work Group - Dec 6th, 10:00am - 2:00pm - Gouverneur Community Center, 4673 NY-58, Gouverneur, NY 13642

SE Lake Ontario Work Group – Dec 7th, 10:00am - 2:00pm - Huron Town Hall, 10880 Lummisville Rd, Wolcott, NY 14590

Please let us know if you can make it: RSVP to greatlakes@dec.ny.gov at least one week in advance of the meeting you plan to attend.

View flyer here: GLAA+work+group+mtg+flyer_Nov2017.pdf. Questions or comments?

Lake Erie & SW Lake Ontario Work Groups: Shannon Dougherty, Shannon.Dougherty@dec.ny.gov, 716-851-7070

SE & NE Lake Ontario Work Groups: Emily Sheridan, Emily.Sheridan@dec.ny.gov, 315-785-2382

 

THE GOOD GUYS AT WORK:

The Night Time Isn't the Right Time -- Niagara County: On the morning of Oct. 21, ECO Mike Phelps was working in Niagara County patrolling for after-hours fishing activity. At approximately 2:30 am., using night vision equipment, he spotted a group of four men fishing on the eastern side of 18-Mile Creek the town of Newfane. Three of the men began walking north along the creek to the parking lot. The remaining fisherman attempted to take fish by scooping at them with a landing net. At 3:40 a.m., ECO Phelps approached the lone fisherman. When questioned, the man said that he and the other three men had come up from New York City together. ECO Phelps then walked back to the parking area with the man and found the other three men inside the gated and fenced-in lot. The officer found nine King salmon in their van, which was parked outside the fence. All four men were charged with fishing after legal hours, three men were charged with illegal possession of salmon, one with fishing by means other than angling, and one with fishing without a valid license. In addition, the Niagara County Sheriff charged the four men with trespassing and theft of services under the Penal Law, as use of the parking lot requires payment. The subjects were arraigned in the Town of Newfane Court and taken to the Niagara County Jail by the Niagara County Sheriff's Department in lieu of bail.

Illegal Fishing on the Genesee River - Monroe County: On Oct. 23, ECOs Kevin Holzle, Eoin Snowdon, and Jeff Johnston responded to a complaint of fish being caught by "snagging" on the Genesee River at the lower falls in Rochester. From the Rt. 104 bridge upstream to the lower falls, the Genesee River is one of the Lake Ontario tributaries subject to seasonal regulations from Sept. 1 to March 31. After conducting surveillance from multiple viewpoints around the lower falls, ECOs Holzle and Johnston entered the gorge and met with several subjects. The ECOs issued a total of 15 tickets for a variety of violations, including fishing without a valid license, taking fish by snagging, and disposing of fish or parts of fish within 100 feet of shore, all returnable to the City of Rochester Court. Additionally, one subject was taken into custody on a warrant from the Town of Gates Police Department.

Late Season Fishing Activity on the Oswego River - Oswego County: On Oct. 24, ECO Matt Harger arrested two fishermen for taking over the daily limit of salmon on the Oswego River. The two subjects tried to camouflage their activities by staging a cooler in the woods about one-half mile upstream of the Oswego River dam. Acting on a tip, ECO Harger found the hidden cooler and waited for the fishermen to return. When the suspects returned to stash additional salmon, ECO Harger caught the pair with 13 salmon, well over the daily limit. On Oct. 29, ECO Rick Head also had an active day patrolling the Oswego River, issuing 10 tickets to individuals for violations of the Environmental Conservation Law ranging from taking fish by blind snatching, possession of foul hooked fish, and fishing without a license, to trespassing on posted property that belongs to the Brookfield Power Company.

 

HUNTERS - DON'T BRING DEER, ELK, OR MOOSE CARCASSES INTO NEW YORK: DEC reminds hunters that because of the risk of chronic wasting disease (CWD), it is illegal to bring deer, elk, or moose carcasses harvested in many states into New York. This includes animals harvested in nearly all western and mid-western states and provinces and a handful of eastern states. Only specific allowed parts may be brought into New York. People who shoot confined deer, elk, or moose in a fenced facility anywhere outside New York, must remove all prohibited parts from the carcass prior to returning to New York. See CWD Regulations for Hunters for details. Please report violations (1-844-DEC-ECOS; 1-844-332-3267) and protect our wild deer and moose.

 

WHAT YOUR FISHING LICENSE PURCHASE DOES FOR CONSERVATION: When you're buying or renewing your fishing license, you're probably only thinking about the possibility of the new season or exploring a promising new stretch of river. But are you aware of just how hard your fishing license is working on your behalf of your future days on the water?
Here are five examples of how the dollars spent on your fishing licenses, boat registrations, and excise taxes on fishing gear and boat fuel purchases go back to conservation and public access. And at
$1.1 billion that's a sizeable down payment on the next generation of anglers in America.

Improving Fishing and Boating Access
First, funds from license sales go toward fishing and boating access projects. One example is the
Ramps & Pier Program in Mississippi, which helps pay for repairs to existing access points and the construction of four to six new boat ramps each year. The state of Oregon also has an excellent model of involving state and federal agencies in adding and upgrading new boating facilities.
Enhancing Water Quality
Boat registration funds help implement clean water projects that benefit fish habitat and improve the experience of anglers and boaters. The Clean Vessel Act program in Hawaii, for example, helped use these funds to construct a new sewage
pump-out station and three new floating restrooms at the Haleiwa Small Boat Harbor—all in an effort to protect the sparkling turquoise waters of Hawaii for future generations.
Maintaining Fish Habitat
The excise taxes on your fishing gear go toward fisheries maintenance projects that help manage our state sport fisheries. For example, in New York State, biologists collect data through creel surveys and work to restore fish habitat for native brookies, American shad, river herring, and striped bass
largely thanks to the taxes paid by the manufacturers of your fishing rods, reels, lures, baits, and flies. In Massachusetts, these funds are used to map fish habitat with GPS technology, sonar, and underwater vehicles through the state's Fisheries Habitat Program. The more these experts learn, the better prepared they are to spot habitat issues and plan for improvements.
Teaching and Recruiting New Anglers
Fishing license funds also go to work for educational and recruitment programs that introduce new anglers to the sport. As more people take up fishing, there is a greater need for education on topics like species identification, conservation, regulations, and proper catch-and-release techniques. The state of Texas offers
free workshops for first-timers or anyone who wants a refresher on the basics, and the saltwater angler education programs hosted by the Massachusetts Division of Marine Fisheries have been so successful that they hope to extend courses to all coastal areas of the state.
Planning for Long-Term Conservation
With an eye toward investing in our marine and freshwaters resources, as well as the next generation of anglers, fishing license fees support long-term conservation plans for our rivers and streams. This robust funding, which has nothing to do with the federal balance sheet, is critical to ensuring an adequate quantity and quality of water to maintain the natural balance of aquatic ecosystems. Texas has used this money to fund its
River Studies Program that addresses long-term water development, water planning, and water quality issues.
Whether state agencies are studying rainbow trout populations or repairing boat ramps, your license fees are put to excellent use.

Sportsmen and women have a long history of giving back to conservation through our purchases. Read about the federal program responsible for that funding model and the hunters in one Western state who wholeheartedly supported raising license fees earlier this year to do even more for fish and wildlife.

(By Debbie Hanson, TakeMeFishing.org)

THIS WEEK'S EVENTS: (For complete future listings go to the Calendar Page - - http://www.huntfishnyoutdoors.com/events.php)

                                         

NOVEMBER 2017

16/17/19/24/26/30 - White Deer Tours: Seneca White Deer, Inc. recently announced that it will start tours of the former Seneca Army Depot. Participants will see the world’s largest herd of white, white-tailed deer in the world, other wildlife, and the relics of 60 years of secret weapons storage. We will visit one of the 519 earth-covered concrete igloos that stored everything from pistol cartridges to tactical missiles, from conventional bombs to nuclear warheads. We can never guarantee where the mystical white deer will be, but our tour guides know the best locations and will stop for pictures as deer and wildlife appear. Tour routes will vary according to the weather and season. This is your opportunity to see the hidden world and experience the magic of the white deer yourself. Our 25 passenger, air-conditioned and heated tour buses give all our visitors a comfortable seat for a 90-minute, narrated trip behind the fences of the former Seneca Army Depot. (Cost: Adults - $30.00/Military and Seniors – $27.00/Children 5–17 - $15.00/Children under 5 – Free) (For information go to https://www.senecawhitedeer.org/.)

17 – Close of Southern Zone Deer and Bear Bowhunting/Crossbow Seasons

17 - Close of Hunting & Trapping Seasons for Bobcat.

17 - Concealed Carry Class presented by Legal Heat at the Cabela’s Cheektowaga Store, 2003 Walden Avenue, Cheektowaga, NY (5:00 am -9:00 pm) This course is designed to meet the qualifying requirements and documentation to obtain the Utah and Arizona concealed carry permits in a fun, informative, non-intimidating class. These permits will allow combined carry reciprocity in approximately 30+ states. Legal Heat's concealed carry class covers firearms safety, handling, transportation, storage, ammunition, self-defense and firearms laws, concealed carry techniques and much more. Legal Heat's firearm training instructors are all NRA and Utah BCI certified, insured and among the most highly experienced in the industry and can answer your CCW questions. This course typically runs approximately 4 hours. This Legal Heat course does not have a 'test' or range requirement. The Utah and Arizona permits are open to residents of any state and can be applied for by mail. You do NOT have to reside in the state of UT or AZ to qualify to apply for their concealed carry permits. Register TODAY for this fun and informative class. Seating may be limited.This class may qualify you for the NY permit in several NY counties but has not been formally approved by any NY counties yet. (Reservations can be made at www.MyLegalHeat.com or by calling 877-252-1055.)

18 - Start of Southern Zone Regular Deer and Bear Hunting Season (>12/10)

18 - Autumn Tree ID Hike at Knox Farm State Park, 437 Buffalo Road, East Aurora, NY (10:00 am - 12:30 pm) (For information/register call 716-549-1050)

18 - Nature Vacation Adventure at the Reinstein Woods Environmental Education Center, 93 Honorine Drive, Depew, NY (Town of Cheektowaga) 10:00 am) Plan your next vacation as we journey through redwood forests, ocean reefs and other natural wonders in this slideshow presentation. For adults only. (For information and register call 716-683-5959 or email reinsteinwoods@dec.ny.gov)

18 - Montezuma’s Girl Scouts Cadette Badge: Trees at the Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savannah, NY (12:00 – 2:00 pm) Girl Scout Cadettes are invited to grab their naturalist hats and get to know trees. From the shade to the science, the fruit to the forest, and the legends to the lumber. To know trees is to love them! All scouts must be accompanied by a parent, leader, or chaperone. (Fee: $7/scout.) (For information or register call 315-365-3588 or e-mail montezuma@audubon.org)  

19 - Cabela's DEC Deer/Bear Check Station at Cabela’s Cheektowaga Store, 2003 Walden Avenue, Cheektowaga, NY. (10:00 am – 6:00 pm) Do your part as a hunter and bring in your harvested doe, buck or bear from NY opening weekend of shotgun/rifle to our DEC Check Station, right here in the store!  DEC Wildlife Biologists will be present to determine the animal's age, answer questions and record valuable information for their research in big-game population management.  As an added bonus, just for bringing in your harvest, you'll be ENTERED to WIN a Deer Hunter's Processing Package worth over $400!  Good luck and be safe this season! (For information call 716-608-4770)

19 - NWTF Salmon River Chapter Wheelin Sportsmen Archery and Crossbow Deer Hunt on private property in 2509 State Route 104, Mexico, NY (For information contact William Wilbur  315-440-4351  wwilbur551@aol.com)

25 - Start Of Trapping Seasons for Mink and Muskrat (>2/15/18)

25 - Start Of Trapping Seasons for Beaver in Western New York (> 3/15/18 West portion of Southern Tier/rest >2/15/18)

25 - Montezuma’s Wait Till It Gets Dark Night Walk at the Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savannah, NY (6:00 – 7:30 pm) Join guest naturalist George Steele on a walk exploring the nature of night We’ll explore not only what animals might be out there and how they are adapted to the nighttime but how we can better explore the night by tuning in to our own five senses. Some of these activities will be featured in his new book “Wait Till It Gets Dark”. The walk will be preceded by a short reading from the book and then out in to the night we will go. The new book will be available in the nature store and George will be available to sign copies after the walk. (Fee: $5/child, $7/adult, $20/family.) (For information or register call 315-365-3588 or e-mail montezuma@audubon.org)  

25 - Family Nature Quest: Turkeys at the Reinstein Woods Environmental Education Center, 93 Honorine Drive, Depew, NY (Town of Cheektowaga) 10:00 am) Discover the secret world of turkeys as we search for wild birds and make turkey calls. (For information and register call 716-683-5959 or email reinsteinwoods@dec.ny.gov)

25 - Niagara River Gulls with Buffalo Audubon naturalist Tom Kerr at the New York Power Authority fishing platform in the lower Niagara River. (10:00 am to noon) (For information/pre-registration call 585-457-3228.)

25; 12/2; 12/9; 12/16 - Free Photos with Santa! at Cabela’s Cheektowaga Store, 2003 Walden Avenue, Cheektowaga, NY. (11:00 am – 1:00 pm) Bring the kids to Cabela's to enjoy a free photo with Santa! Due to the popularity of this event, wait times may vary. (For information call 716-608-4770)

26 - End of Canada Goose Season – Part 2 - in the West Central Zone

 

Until our next meeting in the Corner, have a great time in the outdoors. This is Ron Schroder for Your In on The Outdoors for Western New York.

What Do You Think? Have something for other sportspeople? Let us know HERE.

 

 

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11 – 10 – 17

 

Welcome to this week's Conservation Chatter Corner - little bits of happenings concerning our outdoors and you, the sportspeople who enjoy being part of that outdoors.

 

REGION 9 TO OPERATE TWO DEER AND BEAR CHECK STATIONS ON OPENING WEEKEND:  The DEC will operate two deer and bear check stations on opening weekend of the regular big game season and encourages hunters to visit these stations. DEC's Region 9 annual check station, located on Route 16, in Holland, Erie County (northbound about one mile south of the town of Holland), will operate Saturday, Nov. 18 from noon until 8 p.m., and Sunday, Nov. 19 from 10 a.m. until 6 p.m. Participation is voluntary and helps DEC gather valuable data to help assess the status of the area's big game population. In cooperation with Cabela's®, DEC will also be hosting a second check station on Sunday, Nov. 19 from 10 a.m. until 6 p.m. at the Cheektowaga Cabela's, located at 2003 Walden Ave. Participants will be entered into a drawing to win a Hunter's Processing Package valued at more than $400.

Hunters are encouraged to bring their deer to the check station where DEC staff will determine deer age and collect other important biological and harvest information. With black bear season opening the same day as deer season again this year, staff will check harvested bears, as well.

Technicians from State Department of Health may also be present at the check station to examine deer for ticks and collect samples to test for Lyme disease.

As in previous years, hunters wishing to donate their harvest to "Hunters Helping the Hungry" sponsored by the Venison Donation Coalition, may drop off a deer at the Holland check station during days of operation before 6 p.m.

 

WHITE DEER TOURS BEGIN: Seneca White Deer, Inc. recently announced that it will start tours of the former Seneca Army Depot. Participants will see the world’s largest herd of white, white-tailed deer in the world, other wildlife, and the relics of 60 years of secret weapons storage. We will visit one of the 519 earth-covered concrete igloos that stored everything from pistol cartridges to tactical missiles, from conventional bombs to nuclear warheads. We can never guarantee where the mystical white deer will be, but our tour guides know the best locations and will stop for pictures as deer and wildlife appear. Tour routes will vary according to the weather and season. This is your opportunity to see the hidden world and experience the magic of the white deer yourself. Our 25 passenger, air-conditioned and heated tour buses give all our visitors a comfortable seat for a 90-minute, narrated trip behind the fences of the former Seneca Army Depot. (Cost: Adults - $30.00/Military and Seniors – $27.00/Children 5  – 17 - $15.00/Children under 5 – Free) Dates of tours are November 16/17/19/24/26/30 and December 1 – 3/7 – 10/14 – 17/21 – 23/28 – 31. (For information go to https://www.senecawhitedeer.org/.)

 

IMPROVEMENTS SCHEDULED FOR SALMON RIVER FISH HATCHERY: $150,000 in improvements represent the first phase of renovations planned for the hatchery in the coming year. The improvements include new live fish displays, revitalized public areas, signage, and interpretive displays in the visitor center. In 2018, DEC will embark on an ambitious plan to renovate and modernize the 37-year-old hatchery. Each year, tens of thousands of people, anglers and non-anglers alike, visit DEC's flagship hatchery to learn about the State's Great Lakes Fisheries resources and witness firsthand the fish culture work that supports these premier fisheries.

The Salmon River Fish Hatchery specializes in raising steelhead, chinook salmon, coho salmon, and brown trout. Originally constructed to revive and enhance the fishery of the Great Lakes, this facility produces more than 2 million fingerlings (young fish 3-5 inches long) and 1 million yearlings (fish one-year-old or over) for stockings in Lake Ontario.

The Salmon River fishery generates more than $27 million in angler expenditures annually, and an additional $85.9 million is generated by anglers fishing the open waters of Lake Ontario and other New York tributaries to Lake Ontario each year. The trout and salmon raised and stocked by the hatchery are economic drivers behind this fishery-every dollar spent at the hatchery yields $125 in angler expenditures.

Constructed in 1980, the Salmon River Hatchery requires significant improvements to maintain fish production goals. As part of the Governor's Open for Fishing and Hunting and Adventure NY initiatives, DEC plans to improve the hatchery's physical infrastructure and provide additional visitor area enhancements.

Plans for improvements include:

*A comprehensive engineering study to maximize energy efficiency and reduce water use and enhance fish production;

*Infrastructure upgrades including new windows and doors, a new heating system, backup power, cellular phone service, and a new fish ladder; and

*A reimagining of all interpretive and visitor areas for a seamless and enhanced visitor experience.

For more information concerning the Salmon River Hatchery visit DEC's website.

http://www.dec.ny.gov/press/press.html

 

KUDOS: The Hans Paller Award, named in honor of New York State Outdoor Writers' Association's founding father, is NYSOWA's highest honor and is only given out rarely and carefully to someone who has devoted a lifetime of service to NYSOWA. In its 50-year history it has only been given out five times.
In October 2017 on the 50th anniversary, NYSOWA honored Bill Hilts, Jr. with the Hans Paller Award. Hilts has spent a lifetime devoted to the good of NYSOWA. For 36 years he has served NYSOWA in almost every capacity possible. He has served as Director, Vice President, President, conference chair five times, and conference site chair for many years.
For many years Hilts has been the Newsletter editor and still advises and proofreads it for the current editor. Whenever there was a need for a conference, a committee, or just some task, he would step forward. In all his years that he has been involved he would quietly offer his support and advice to the organization without fanfare or concern for credit. In most cases he would serve as the mainstay to see that the problem was solved and the job was done right.

 

HUNTING TIPS FROM GANDER OUTDOORS:

Fall Upland Hunting

Upland hunters live for the flush of a ring-necked pheasant, drum of a ruffed grouse or the moment when a cottontail darts from a pile of brush. Your next upland hunt will be more enjoyable if you take a moment to ensure safety. You have a responsibility to yourself, other hunters, and your canine  friend to make sure everyone that hunts with you is safe and ready to go. Head out to the field with these tips in mind:

* Eye and Ear Protection – Protect your senses with these staples.

* Firearm Safety – Remember to treat every firearm as if it is loaded, never point your gun at anything you are not willing to shoot, keep your finger off the trigger until ready to fire and know what is beyond your target.

* Safety Orange – Don’t shy away from blaze. The more the better.

* Stay Sober – Save the celebrating for after the hunt.

* Pat Attention to Terrain – Slips, falls and trips are hazards you want to avoid.

* Practice – Practice isn’t only for the rookies. Fine tune your skills and improve chances of coming home successful.

(By Kevin McKown a Gander Field Expert with Gander Outdoors.)

Deer Hunting Out of a Ground Blind:

Many hunters don't have the desire to climb up trees anymore and in some areas, the landscape doesn't always provide adequate foliage to require a tree stand. Read on for three quick tips that will help you be more successful when hunting out of a ground blind this year

* Get Out Early - Our first tip is to get your blind out well before the season starts. Take some time gathering nearby vegatation and apply it to your blind to help it blend into the natural surroundings.

* Set Your Blind Down Wind - Always set your blind down wind of where you expect the deer to travel. Even by taking all the steps to be scent free, it's hard to beat a deer's keen sense of smell.

* Dark Clothing is King - Wearing dark clothing in your blind is your best bet. If you only have the window open to where you expect the deer to travel it will be dark in the blind already. Dark clothing will help conceal any movement you might make while inside your blind.

(By Tom Keenan a Gander Field Expert with Gander Outdoors.)

After The Shot:

The best way to eliminate the need for tracking is practice. Target practice before the hunt can pay huge dividends with more accurate shot placement and less tracking during the hunt. However, even the best laid plans can change. The next time you find yourself tracking a deer after the shot, remember these tips.

* Look & Listen - Post shot, watch for the deer’s reaction. Did it jump, kick, run or stand still? While you watch for a reaction be sure to listen closely. If the deer leaves your line of sight, you may be able to hear where it traveled or bedded down. These clues are crucial in determining your next move.

* Be Patient - If you didn’t witness your deer go down, and you don’t know where your deer is, the next step is patience. Fighting the urge to head out right away is hard, especially when your adrenaline is pumping, but nothing hurts tracking worse than continually bumping an injured deer farther away from you. To avoid this, it's best to wait at least 30 minutes before you move to the site of where the deer was shot. Once you're there, survey the area looking for blood, an arrow, tracks or other clues that will help you track. The weather conditions and type of blood found may also play a factor in how long you wait before heading out to track.

* Bring the Right Tools –

- - Hunting Partner – An extra set of eyes and ears may pick up something you missed.

- - Flashlight and Trail Marking Tape – Key for tracking into the evening hours and marking specific finds that you can come back to.

- - Phone, GPS or Compass – Take notes, communicate with your hunting partner and avoid getting turned around when you’re focused on the track.

- -  Firearm or Bow – It may be necessary to takeanother shot once you’ve located your deer. Where allowed, carry your firearm or bow with you while tracking.

- - Field Dressing Equipment / Deer Drag – Hopefully by the time you find your deer, field dressing will be needed. Save yourself a trip and bring the gear you need to get your animal back to camp.

- - Drinking Water – Toss some water in your pack to help you stay hydrated during the track.

(By Derek Perlich a Gander Field Expert with Gander Outdoors.)

 

DEER & BEAR HARVEST UPDATE:   Many New York hunters are already enjoying the fruits of a successful hunting season, but most harvest is yet to come. Compared to last year at this time, hunters have reported taking about the same number of deer in the Southern Zone and about 10% more in the Northern Zone.

It's a different story with bears, likely due to the warm weather and the abundance of wild foods, which limits bears' movements and reduces their exposure to hunters. In the Northern Zone, hunters have reported about 60% fewer bears than at this point in 2016. The reported harvest is tracking similarly to 2011, another year with lots of fall foods for bears. Reported bear harvest in the Southern Zone is down too, running about 20% lower than last year.

 

MEPPS SEEKING TO BUY SQUIRREL TAILS: Mepps creates hand-tied dressed hooks for its world-famous fish-catching lures. They’ve tried hundreds of other natural and synthetic materials: bear hair, fox, coyote, badger, skunk, deer, even Angus cow, but nothing works as well as squirrel tail hair. Mepps has been recycling squirrel tails for over half a century. In fact, they recycle more of them than anyone else in the world.

The fact is squirrel tails are all hair–no fur. Practically all other animals have fur tails with just a few guard hairs. Fur doesn’t have the rippling, pulsating movement of squirrel hair in the water. Squirrels are plentiful and have some of the best wild meat. Skins are used for caps, coats, glove linings and many other items, but the tail is usually thrown away. Mepps is asking you to help us recycle this valuable resource, AND is offering to reward you for your efforts!

Care & Handling of Squirrel Tails (Please follow carefully):

1) Tails are best on squirrels taken after October 1.

2) Do NOT remove the bone from the tail; deboned & split tails have no value.

3) Salt the butt end of the tail generously. Use either dry salt or dip in a strong saltwater solution.

4) Be sure the tail is straight before drying. Tails that dry curled are useless.