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conservation chatter corner

with ron schroder

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YOUR IN ON THE OUTDOORS FOR WESTERN NEW YORK
www.huntfishnyoutdoors.com

 

10 - 19 – 18

 

Welcome to this week’s Conservation Chatter Corner – little bits of happenings concerning our outdoors and you, the sportspeople who enjoy being part of that outdoors.

 

ONEIDA LAKE BOAT LAUNCH CLOSED: The South Shore boat launch on Oneida Lake east of the Hamlet of Bridgeport will be closed temporarily to allow the paving of the access drive. The site is expected to be closed for up to eight days beginning October 18.

For boaters seeking alternative launch sites in the Bridgeport area, there are several private marinas within four miles of the South Shore site where fee launching is available. Farther west, boaters can use the launch at Oneida Shores Onondaga County Park on Bartell Road in the town of Brewerton. An additional alternative is DEC’s Godfrey Point boat launch on the north shore of Oneida Lake in Oneida County, approximately two miles east of the village of Cleveland.

If you have any questions concerning the closure of the site, please direct them to the DEC Region 7 Fisheries Office (607) 753-3095 ext. 213, or fwfish7@dec.ny.gov .

 

GREAT LAKES ACTION AGENDA WORK GROUP MEETINGS: NYSDEC invites interested public to join other regional stakeholders in a basinwide partnership to advance ecosystem-based management (EBM) opportunities for New York's Great Lakes basin, as identified in the state's interim Great Lakes Action Agenda (GLAA).  Meeting objectives include:

Share information on funding and resources, key project updates and collaborative opportunities relevant to sub basin work plans.

Discuss progress of EBM demonstration area watersheds and identify next steps.  

Four sub basin work groups provide a unique opportunity to connect, coordinate and collaborate with other groups and agencies working locally and basinwide.

Please join us for one or more of the following meetings:

>Lake Erie Work Group - November 7th, 1:00pm - 4:00pm -- Reinstein Woods Nature Preserve, 93 Honorine Dr, Depew, NY 14043

>SW Lake Ontario Work Group - November 8th, 9:00am - 12:00pm -- Watershed Education Center, 5828 Big Tree Rd, Lakeville, NY 14480

>NE Lake Ontario Work Group - November 29th, 1:00pm - 4:00pm -- Potsdam Civic Center Community Room, 38 Main St, Potsdam, NY 13676

>SE Lake Ontario Work Group – November 30th, 10:30am - 2:00pm -- Cayuga County Soil and Water Conservation office, 7413 County House Rd. Auburn, NY 13021

All NYS Great Lakes stakeholders are invited to participate -- including environmental orgs, academic institutions, state and federal agencies, local government, individuals and other diverse stakeholder groups (business, health, recreation, planning, etc).

Please let us know if you can make it: RSVP to greatlakes@dec.ny.gov at least one week in advance of the meeting you plan to attend.

Questions or comments -

Lake Erie & SW Lake Ontario Work Groups: Shannon Dougherty, Shannon.Dougherty@dec.ny.gov, 716-851-7070

SE & NE Lake Ontario Work Groups: Emily Sheridan, Emily.Sheridan@dec.ny.gov, 315-785-2382

GL Sub basins

 

ARBOR DAY POSTER AND ARTWORK CONTESTS:  New York's fifth graders are invited to showcase their artistic talents and help to increase public awareness about trees by participating in the 5th Grade Arbor Day Poster Contest. The annual contest is sponsored by DEC, DAM, and Education. Students are asked to create an original poster depicting this year's contest theme: "Habitats for Bats."

Posters must be submitted by December 21, 2018 to your local DEC regional office to allow time for judging and printing of the artwork. The contest is open to all students enrolled in fifth grade. For more information, contact Mary Martin, DEC's Arbor Day 5th Grade Poster Contest coordinator, at (518) 402-9428, or visit DEC's website.

The Arbor Day Planning Committee will also be accepting original art and photography submissions to be selected as the New York State Arbor Day Poster. The Arbor Day Committee includes DEC, Empire State Forest Foundation, NYS Arborist Association, State Department of Agriculture and Markets (DAM), as well as the International Paper Company.

The winner/s will have his or her artwork replicated as the official 2019 New York State 5th Grade Arbor Day Poster and the official 2019 New York State Arbor Day Original Artwork Poster. The winning artists will be announced and honored at the annual Arbor Day celebration, held the last Friday in April. Last year, New York printed more than 200,000 Arbor Day posters for distribution at schools, libraries, government offices, nursery and landscaping businesses, and environmental organizations throughout the State.

DEC will accept artwork on behalf of the committee through December 31, 2018. Original artwork entries should be sent to arborday@dec.ny.gov. For more information about the contest, visit DEC's website or email arborday@dec.ny.gov. To obtain past NYS Arbor Day posters, contact any local DEC forestry office or call 518-402-9428.

 

HUNTERS REMINDED TO FORGET THE BAIT: With the onset of deer season, hunters start to consider ways to improve their odds of success. Unfortunately, some hunters may turn to unethical or illegal practices to gain an edge. Baiting is one such practice. Recently, baiting has become all too common in New York. This is evidenced by the preponderance of deer feeds and mineral supplements that show up at retail stores just prior to deer season, and then quickly disappear after the season ends.

Baiting deer is illegal. New York Environmental Conservation Law Section 11-0901 states: “no person shall hunt deer… with the aid of a pre-established bait pile…” So why are products available every season that are illegal to use? Because currently, there is no ban on the sale of these products, some of which have alternate uses for domestic animals. But by providing them in camouflaged bags with pictures of big bucks on the packaging, it is clear who the products are intended for.

Here are some things to consider before purchasing deer bait:

>Baiting wildlife is illegal. Hunters have an obligation to follow the law. Shooting a deer with the aid of bait is poaching.

>Those who bait deer (or other wildlife) take opportunities away from other hunters and the general public.

>Baiting is a type of supplemental feeding, which can affect how deer behave. Concentrating deer at feeding areas can cause localized problems.

The public is generally supportive of hunting when hunters observe fair chase principles. Baiting deer (or other wildlife) casts hunters and hunting in a negative light, which has the potential to reduce public support for hunting. Ethical hunters are the best advocates for their sport. The biggest “trophy” is knowing that a hunter “did it right.” Forget the bait; enjoy the wait!

 

BE ALERT FOR MOOSE IN THE ADIRONDACKS: Motorists should be alert for moose on roadways in the Adirondacks and surrounding areas at this time of year during peak moose activity, advises the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC). In the last couple of weeks six moose have been killed in automobile collisions.

Early fall is the breeding season for moose in northern New York. During this time moose are wandering looking for mates, leading them to areas where they are not typically seen. While this improves the opportunities for people to enjoy sighting of a moose, it also increases the danger of colliding with one on the roadway.

Moose are much larger and taller than deer. Their large body causes greater damage, and, when struck, their height often causes them to impact the windshield of a car or pickup truck, not just the front of the vehicle. This past weekend three moose-vehicle crashes were reported resulting in the death of the moose in each collision. New York has no recorded human fatalities resulting from a crash with a moose.

Moose are most active at dawn and dusk, which are times of poor visibility. Moose are especially difficult to see at night because of their dark brown to black coloring and their height - which puts their head and much of their body above vehicle headlights.

DEC advises motorists to take the following precautions to prevent moose vehicle collisions:

>Use extreme caution when driving at dawn or dusk, especially during September and October;

>Reduce your speed, stay alert, and watch the roadsides;

>Slow down when approaching moose standing near the roadside, as they may bolt at the last minute when a car comes closer, often running into the road;

>Moose may travel in pairs or small groups, so if a moose is spotted crossing the road, be alert for others that may follow;

>Make sure all vehicle occupants wear seatbelts and children are properly restrained in child safety seats;

>Use flashers or a headlight signal to warn other drivers when moose are spotted near the road;

>Motorcyclists should be especially alert for moose;

>If a moose does run in front of your vehicle, brake firmly but do not swerve.

Swerving can cause a vehicle-vehicle collision or cause the vehicle to hit a fixed object such as a tree or pole; and

>If a moose is hit and killed by a vehicle, the motorist should not remove the animal unless a permit is obtained from the investigating officer at the scene of the crash.

Hunters, hikers, and other outdoor enthusiasts are encouraged to enjoy wildlife from a distance. Do not approach wildlife, particularly species like bear or moose that could be aggressive toward humans or protective of their young.
More information about moose can be found on DEC's website.

 

THE GOOD GUYS AT WORK:

Conservation Field Days - Monroe County: Lt. Bruce Hummel and ECOs John Lutz, J.T. Rich, and Eoin Snowdon participated in the annual Monroe County Conservation Field Days from Sept. 18-20, at Ellison Park in the town of Penfield. The interactive environmental education event draws classes of 5th graders from schools across Monroe County. The ECOs gave 20-minute presentations to students focusing on issues regarding the environment, conservation, wildlife, and extinct animals, including a "Feast or Famine" conservation experiment led by ECO Lutz. The presentations were well received by students and teachers alike, and the event was rewarding for the participating ECOs.

Genesee River Snagging - Monroe County: On Sept. 23, ECOs Spencer Noyes, J.T. Rich, and Evan McFee were monitoring fishing activity during the salmon run at the Lower Falls of the Genesee River in the city of Rochester when four fishermen "snagging" fish near the waterfall caught the ECOs' attention. The ECOs walked into the gorge and discovered the fishermen as the group was walking out. A total of eight salmon and one walleye were found to be caught illegally, all foul hooked. The fishermen denied any wrongdoing until they were found to be in possession of large, weighted treble hooks used to snag the fish. The four were issued tickets for snagging fish, possession of foul hooked fish, and taking over the daily limit for salmon.

On the morning of Sept. 29, ECO McFee returned to the Lower Falls and again found illegal snagging activity on both sides of the river. ECOs Rich and Lt. Bruce Hummel responded to assist McFee. Several fishermen were fishing legally but others were observed adding illegal treble hooks and weights. By the end of the day, 19 tickets were issued for various fishing violations including taking fish by snagging, use of treble hooks contrary to special regulations, use of weighted hooks contrary to special regulations, possession of foul hooked fish, taking over the daily limit for salmon, possession of trout and salmon eggs over one quart, and discarding fish carcasses within 100 feet of the shoreline. All of the tickets issued on the two dates are returnable to the City of Rochester Court.

Deer Hunting Double Trouble - Cayuga County: On Oct 6, ECO Scott Sincebaugh returned to the site of a complaint alleging deer baiting in the town of Brutus. ECO Sincebaugh located the illegal bait pile and, after surveilling the site, found a hunter waiting over the bait pile with a crossbow. Crossbows are not legal hunting implements during the archery season for big game. The subject was issued tickets for hunting with a crossbow in the archery-only season and hunting over bait.

pile of cornCrossbow in grass
Illegal bait for deer and crossbow used by the hunter

HOW OLD IS THAT DEER?  It’s that time of year again when the smell of falling leaves and other earthly scents flood the air and trigger the hunter’s instincts. Hopefully, pre-season work of hanging stands, cutting shooting lanes, and most importantly, practicing with the implement of choice, will pay dividends this big game season. An often-overlooked aspect of hunting is being able to properly age and size up one’s prey.

Antlered Bucks – Yearling Or Older?  By identifying and passing up shots on yearling bucks this season, hunters improve their odds of seeing older-age, larger bucks in the years to come. Remember, though antlers can be helpful to distinguish young bucks, sometimes antlers can be misleading.  Body characteristics are also very important. Here are some good ways to distinguish between yearling bucks and adult bucks: 

                            Yearling Buck                                          Older Buck

Body Size        Similar to adult doe                     Larger than adult doe

Legs                    Appear long and skinny            Appear stockier due to deeper chest

Muscles            Often not clearly defined          Well defined in shoulders and thighs

Body Shape     Slender, belly  tucks up            Belly flat or even saggering

Antlers             Thin, spread narrower than       Spread almost as wide as ear tips on

                            ear tips                                          2.5-year-old, wider if older 

These bucks from Washington County, NY demonstrate typical age-related differences in body size and antler growth.

Deer

Antlerless Deer – Doe or Fawn?

It can be difficult to distinguish adult does from fawn deer, particularly late in the season or anytime if the deer are alone. Though fawns provide excellent table fare, some hunters prefer to target adult deer. Taking adult female deer contributes to management objectives, and passing buck fawns may allow some of them to be available later as antlered bucks. By learning the differences between does and fawns, hunters can make more informed harvest choices.

adult doe  doe head   fawn  fawn head

Adult Doe                                                                 Fawn

Body longer than tall (rectangle)                         Body about as long as tall (square)

Long neck and elongated nose                           Short neck and compact nose/head

                                                                                    Eyes look large for head

                                                                                    Doe fawns have a more rounded head

                                                                                    shape between their ears

                                                                                    Buck fawn’s heads appear flattened and

                                                                                    may have visible antler nubs or “buttons”          

Hunting Tips                                                                        

Wait until several antlerless deer are present before making a harvest decision.

Harvest antlerless deer early in the season when differences are most noticeable.  

After the Shot

Check out DEC’s Guide to Aging Deer in New York to learn how to age deer by looking at their teeth.

 

THIS WEEK’S EVENTS: (For complete future listings go to the Calendar Page - http://www.huntfishnyoutdoors.com/events.php)
OCTOBER 2018

17-19 - St. Mary’s Archer’s Club Catch and Release Fly Fishing Derby - For fishermen of all ages this great event features fantastic tributary fishing on the World Famous Oak Orchard River by the St. Mary’s Archer’s Club. Entry fee includes parking and meals. (For information  contact John Denniston at 585-682-3067.)

18 - Hibernation Hullabaloo at the Seneca Meadows Education Center, 1977 State Route 414, Seneca Falls, NY. (6:30 – 7:30 pm) Meet our touchable turtles, and their reptilian friends, and find out the crazy things they do to survive the winter! (Free) (For information call 315-539-5624)

20 - Montezuma’s Happy Owl-ween at the Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savannah, NY (6:00 - 8:00 pm) We are happy to welcome back Jean Soprano, of Kindred Kingdoms Wildlife Rehabilitation, who will have live owls on display during her presentation about the silent hunters of the night. Then, join the Montezuma Audubon Center staff for an owl prowl around the woods and grasslands to search for Montezuma’s wild owls and other nighttime wildlife. (Fee: $5/child, $10/adult, $25/family.) (For information or register call 315-365-3588 or e-mail montezuma@audubon.org) 

20 - Mysterious Mushrooms at Baltimore Woods Nature Center, 4007 Bishop Hill Road, Marcellus, NY (10:00 – 11:30 am) Come join us as we explore The Woods in search of those mysterious mushrooms. Learn how to identify one from the next and even get a mushroom’s fingerprints! For ages 5 and up. (Cost: $6.00 members/$9.00 public.) (For information/register call 315-673-1350)
20 - Arcadia Bass Anglers 2018 Die Hard Series Tournament – Sodus Bay at the State Launch on Route 14. Also open to Lake fishing. (7:30 am – 3:30 pm) (Entry fee: $60.00) (For information call 585-615-3620 or email aba3620@yahoo.com or go to  www.arcadiabassanglers.com)

20 - CVBM Keuka Lake Open at the Branchport Launch (7:00 am – 3:00 pm) (Entry Fee: $60.00 (For information call Tom Shafer  607-731-4870 or Chris Ripley  607-259-5735.)

21 - Fix It 4U Trail Bass Tournament – Owasco Lake Tuff Guy I (6:00 am – 3:00 pm) (For information call Evan Perry 570-662-1247 or go to http://www.fixit4utrail.com/)

21 - CVBM Keuka Lake Tournament at Branchport Launch (6:00 am – 2:00 pm) (For information call Tom Shafer  607-731-4870 or Chris Ripley  607-259-5735.)

20 - Southern Tier Bassmasters Conesus Lake Open Derby at the State Park Launch (7:00 am – 3:00 pm) The entry fee for OPEN team tournaments is $85/boat. (For information call 585-314-7142 or email tournaments@southerntierbass.com)

25 - Great Lakes Educator Workshop Series - Life Science Connections With Project Wild at the Reinstein Woods Environmental Education Center, 93 Honorine Drive, Depew, NY (Town of Cheektowaga) (4:00 – 7:00 pm) Discover activities designed to meet new NYSSLS requirements. Anyone who works with kids is welcome! Attend at least three workshops and receive one free in-school program for your classroom or after school program. For educators of students in grades K-12. (3 CTLE hours provided)  (For information and register call 716-683-5959 or email reinsteinwoods@dec.ny.gov)

25 - Montezuma’s Birding Van Tour at the Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savannah, NY (9:00 - 11:00 am) The peak of the waterfowl migration is upon us. Join our education staff and we’ll drive you in our van to visit several Montezuma birding hotspots where thousands of ducks, geese and swans rest and feed during their long and impressive journey. Binoculars and field guides will be provided. (Fee: $8/child; $15/adult, $40/family. Pre-Paid Reservations Required.) (For information or register call 315-365-3588 or e-mail montezuma@audubon.org) 

26 – Ruffed Grouse Society - 38th Annual Central New York Chapter Banquet the Whitetail at Woodcrest Golf Course, 6200 Old Cheese Factory Road (Route 173 & Cheese Factory Road), Manlius, NY (Social Hour - 6:00 pm/Dinner -  7:30 pm) (Attendees must pre-register by October 20) (For information/register contact Bob Papworth  315-471-0914  rppwrth@verizon.net or Bryan Eastman  607-216-7901  leastman60@aol.com)

27 – Start of Hunting Seasons for Ducks, Coots and Mergansers – Part 1 - in Western Zone (>12/8)

27 - Start of Canada Goose Seasons - Part 2 - in the West Central (>11/26) and South Zones (>11/14) of Western New York

27 - An Evening of Owls the Pfeiffer Nature Center, 1974 Lillibridge Road Portville NY (7:00 – 8:30 pm) Halloween is the perfect time to explore the superstitions surrounding mysterious, wise old owls. Learn about the many beautiful species of owls that we have in our neighborhoods and then set off into the woods in hopes of an up close conversation with these fascinating creatures of the night. (Program fee: $5 non- members, free for members, free for children 13 and under). Preregistration is required. Register by 4:00 pm, October 25th.) Minors must be accompanied by an adult. Register here or contact the office at 716-933-0187. Pfeiffer Nature Center is supported by United Way Funding. Pfeiffer Nature Center where science, art & nature come together.

27 - Creepy Critters at the Reinstein Woods Environmental Education Center, 93 Honorine Drive, Depew, NY (Town of Cheektowaga) (10:30 am) Come have fun learning about bats and owls through stories, activities and crafts. For children ages 4-8. (For information and register call 716-683-5959 or email reinsteinwoods@dec.ny.gov)

28 - Fix It 4U Trail Bass Tournament – Conesus Lake Tuff Guy II (6:00 am – 3:00 pm) (For information call Evan Perry 570-662-1247 or go to http://www.fixit4utrail.com/)

28 -  CVBM Owasco Lake Open at the Emerson Park Launch (7:00 am – 3:00 pm) (Entry Fee: $60.00 (For information call Tom Shafer  607-731-4870 or Chris Ripley  607-259-5735.)

 

Until our next meeting in the Corner, have a great time in the outdoors. This is Ron Schroder for – “Your In on The Outdoors for Western New York.”

What Do You Think? Have something for other sportspeople? Let us know HERE.

 

 

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10 - 12 – 18

 

Welcome to this week’s Conservation Chatter Corner – little bits of happenings concerning our outdoors and you, the sportspeople who enjoy being part of that outdoors.

 

INVASIVE SPOTTED LANTERNFLY CONFIRMED IN ALBANY AND YATES COUNTIES:

In mid-September, DEC and Agriculture and Markets confirmed that spotted lanternfly (SLF), an invasive pest from Asia, was found in Albany and Yates counties. An adult insect was discovered in Penn Yan, Yates County and in a vehicle in the Capital District. SLF is a destructive pest that feeds on more than 70 plant species including maples, apple trees, grapevines, and hops. SLF feedings can stress plants, making them vulnerable to disease and attacks from other insects. SLF also excretes large amounts of sticky "honeydew," which attracts sooty molds that harm the growth and fruit yield of plants.

Adult SLF are active from July to December. They are approximately one-inch long and half an inch wide, with eye-catching wings. Adults begin laying eggs in October. Signs of an SLF infestation may include:

>Sap oozing or weeping from open wounds on tree trunks, which appear wet and give off fermented odors.

>One-inch-long egg masses that are brownish-gray, waxy, and mud-like when new. Old egg masses are brown and scaly.

>Massive honeydew build-up under plants, sometimes with black sooty mold.

If you suspect you have found SLF, please send a photo to spottedlanternfly@dec.ny.gov.

 

OCTOBER - NATIONAL HUNTING AND FISHING MONTH: U.S. Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke proclaimed the month of October 2018 as National Hunting and Fishing Month. The Trump Administration has prioritized public access to Federal lands for sportsmen and sportswomen to expand opportunities for all citizens to enjoy hunting, fishing, and outdoor recreation across our nation.

“I am proud to designate the month of October as National Hunting and Fishing month” said Secretary Zinke. “American hunters and anglers are the backbone of conservation efforts, generating over a billion dollars each year for conservation. For more than 150 years, sportsmen and women have led efforts to protect and conserve our Nation’s fish and wildlife. In an effort to serve as good neighbors and stewards of our public lands, the Department has opened millions of acres for hunting, and we are currently working to protect big game migration corridors. I call upon all Americans to join us in recognizing the lasting benefits hunters and anglers have provided our society through their time, tireless efforts, and financial resources.”

Secretary Zinke signed Secretarial Order 3362 on February 9, 2017, which aims to improve habitat quality and western big game winter range and migration corridors for antelope, elk, and mule deer. The order fosters improved collaboration with states and private landowners and facilitates all parties using the best available science to implement conservation activities that help ensure that robust big game populations continue to exist. The order seeks to improve wildlife management and conservation and expand opportunities for big game hunting by improving priority habitats within important and migration corridors across the West. Priority states currently include Arizona, California, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming.

In September, Secretary Zinke opened more than 251,000 acres to new or expanded hunting and fishing opportunities at 30 national wildlife refuges across the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s National Wildlife Refuge System.

Hunting, fishing and other outdoor activities contributed more than $156 billion in economic activity in communities across the United States in 2016 according to the Service’s National Survey of Fishing, Hunting and Wildlife-Associated Recreation, published every five years. More than 101 million Americans – 40 percent of the U.S. population 16 and older – pursue wildlife-related recreation – hunting, fishing and birding among others.

 

GOOD GUYS AT WORK:

ECO's Assist with Flooding Evacuations - Chemung County: Region 8 ECOs staged personnel and equipment in the Finger Lakes and Southern Tier areas in preparation for possible flooding due to severe rainfall from Hurricane Florence. At approximately 1:45 a.m. on Sept. 18, ECO Travis McNamara was contacted by Chemung County dispatch requesting ECOs to help evacuate residents stranded due to flooding. ECOs McNamara, John Lifrieri, and Lt. Matt Lochner responded to the staging point at the Wellsburg Fire Department where they coordinated with first responders from the Wellsburg Fire, West Elmira Fire Department, and Chemung Fire Department. The ECOs assisted personnel throughout the night in evacuating residents and conducting welfare checks, including visiting a local animal kennel housing an estimated 20 cats and dogs.

Right Place at the Right Time - Ontario County: On Sept. 19, a citizen approached ECO Keith Levanway and park security officer Matt McDonald in the parking lot of Boughton Park in East Bloomfield looking for assistance with a dog having difficulty breathing up a narrow trail. The officers ran to the dog's aid and ECO Levanway recognized the condition as mega-esophagus from his own experience with a family pet. The officer held the dog in a position that allowed it to breath while the owner brought a vehicle down the park's trail to transport the dog for veterinary care. The dog is expected to make a full recovery.

ECO helping distressed dog
ECO Levanway rendering assistance to distressed pet

Caught Snagging - Niagara County: On Sept. 19, ECOs George Scheer and Shea Mathis were on boat patrol in the Lower Niagara River when they were approached by a group of fishermen in another boat. The anglers reported an individual in a red shirt blatantly snagging fish from shore about a mile upriver along the Gorge Trail in Niagara Falls. From their patrol vessel, the ECOs could not navigate that far upriver due to strong currents and underwater obstructions. The ECOs piloted their vessel back to its mooring in Youngstown and drove to Niagara Falls, hoping to catch the subject before he left the scene. In Niagara Falls, the ECOs walked the trail and spotted the subject in the red shirt making repeated and exaggerated jerking motions of his fishing rod. Three other individuals were with him. The four were ticketed for attempting to take fish by snagging, possession of snatch hooks, and fishing without valid licenses.

Illegal fisihing hooks used for snagging
Illegal snatch hooks

 

DEC LAUNCHES GROUSE STUDY IN WESTERN AND CENTRAL NY: DEC recently initiated a three-year ruffed grouse study in Regions 7 (Central NY) and 9 (Western NY). The main objectives of the study are to determine seasonal habitat site selection and survival rates on Hanging Bog Wildlife Management Area (WMA) and Connecticut Hill WMA. Ruffed grouse are captured using modified “lily-pad” shaped traps and banded with aluminum leg bands. Necklace-style very high frequency radio transmitters are placed on the birds to monitor their seasonal movements. Trapping began in mid-August.

 

BOATING IS BIG FOR THE U.S. ECONOMY: In a data-driven world, knowing your “numbers” is a crucial part of achieving success. And in the halls of power of Washington, D.C., and 50 state capitals, credible data carries extra weight when it comes to advancing policies and laws that benefit recreational boaters. That’s why Boat Owners Association of The United States (BoatUS) is calling attention to today’s release of economic data by the Department of Commerce’s Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) that shows the significance of the outdoor industry – and boating in particular – to the U.S. economy.

First, the numbers:

Outdoor recreation accounted for $412 billion of the U.S. gross domestic product, representing 2.2 percent of the overall GDP.

This translates to 4.5 million jobs with compensation of $214 billion in the same year.

Outdoor recreation contribution to GDP is greater than farming, mining or public utilities, and is comparable to broadcasting/telecommunications.

Recreational boating and fishing accounted for $36.93 billion of that total, the single largest category of activities identified in the report.

“As we work for boaters in Washington and state capitals, this data will help policymakers understand that boating is more than just fun on the water,” said BoatUS Manager of Government Affairs David Kennedy. “For boaters, the BEA data will help BoatUS advocate for laws and policies that support access to waterways and help boaters enjoy a variety of water-based recreation activities.”

The analysis was a result of passage of the Outdoor Recreation Jobs and Economic Impact Act of 2016, which required the Department of Commerce, acting through BEA, to enter into a joint memorandum with the Department of Agriculture and the Department of the Interior to conduct, assess and analyze the outdoor-recreation economy of the United States and its effects on the overall U.S. economy.

The BEA report can be found at https://www.bea.gov/data/special-topics/outdoor-recreation

 

HUNT SAFE, HUNT SMART – TREE STAND SAFETY: With bow season underway in many parts of the state, hunters are reminded to take precautions when hunting from a tree stand. Tree stand falls are becoming a major cause of hunting-related injuries and fatalities. Of the 12 incidents investigated by DEC law enforcement in 2017, 50 percent were fatal. All of the incidents involved a hunter who was not wearing a safety harness or the harness was not attached to the stand or tree at the time of their fall. The proper use of tree stands and full-body harnesses will help prevent these injuries and fatalities.

Remember to:

>Read the manufacturer’s instructions and warnings before using your stand, inspect it every season (including straps and chains), and replace any worn or missing parts.

>Use a full-body harness with a lifeline, and stay connected from the time you leave the ground to the time you get back down.

>Use a lifeline or safety rope that is secured at the base of the tree or stand and to the tree just above your head when sitting in the stand. Attach the tether from your full-body harness to the lifeline using a carabiner and prusik knot, which easily slides up and down the lifeline, keeping you connected at all times.

>Once you are safely in your stand and your tether is attached to the tree, raise your equipment into your stand. Always use a haul line, such as a strong rope, to raise and lower your unloaded gun or cocked crossbow or bow with quiver up the stand. Do not tie the haul line around the trigger or trigger guard on a firearm. Raise a firearm with the muzzle pointing down.

>Let a reliable person know where you will be hunting and when you will return. A map showing your stand location makes it easier for others to find you if you do not return on time.

>Carry emergency equipment, such as a knife, cell phone, flashlight and whistle in your pockets at all times (not in your pack hanging in the tree).

For more information, including the 2017 Hunting Safety Statistics and the 2017 Tree Stand Safety Statistics, visit the DEC website.

 

RECYCLE SQUIRREL TAILS WITH THE MEPPS SQUIRREL TAIL PROGRAM: Mepps® continues to ask hunters and trappers to save their squirrel tails for them. The tails are recycled and used for their hand-tied dressed hooks, which anglers find on their world-famous fishing lures. Mepps Squirrel Tail Program has been recycling squirrel tails for over half-a-century.

Dressed Aglia

The fact is squirrel tails are all hair—no fur. Practically all other animals have fur tails with just a few guard hairs. Fur doesn’t have the rippling, pulsating movement of squirrel hair in the water. And, squirrels are plentiful. Plus, squirrel is some of the best wild meat and their skins are used for caps, coats, glove linings and many other items, but the tail is usually thrown away. We’re asking you to help us recycle this valuable resource.

AND, they’re offering to reward you for your efforts!

Mepps buys fox, black, grey and red squirrel tails and will pay up to 26 cents each for tails, depending on quality and quantity. Plus, the cash value is doubled if the tails are traded for Mepps lures.

NOTE: Mepps Squirrel Tail Program is only interested in recycling tails taken from squirrels that have been harvested for the table. We do not advocate taking squirrels strictly for their tails. It is illegal to sell squirrel tails in the states of CA & ID, and it’s illegal to sell Western Grey Squirrel tails in the state of OR.

How to Submit Your Squirrel Tails:

Please follow these instructions carefully.

>Tails are best on squirrels taken after October 1st.

>Do NOT remove the bone from the tail. Deboned and split tails have no value.

>Salt the butt end of the tail generously. Use either dry salt or dip in a strong saltwater solution.

>Be sure the tail is straight before drying. Tails that dry in a curled position cannot be used.

>Keep tails away from flies. Best storage is in a freezer. Do not send tails that have been exposed to flies.

>Do not put tails in a plastic bag for storage or shipment. They could heat up and spoil.

The best time to ship is during cold weather months (Jan, Feb, & Mar). Dried squirrel tails may be shipped anytime.

>Put your name, address, phone number, e-mail address, and tail count inside each package. >And, please indicate whether you would like to receive the cash value for your tails or you would like to take advantage of lure exchange program. You can simply write “Trade for cash” or “Trade for lures”.

>Ship First Class Mail, First Class Parcel, Priority Mail if under 10 pounds or UPS Ground if over 10 pounds. Pack without fill in smallest packaging possible. Shipping will be refunded on shipments over 50 tails.

Send your tails to:
  Sheldons’, Inc. 
   626 Center St. 
   Antigo, WI 54409-2496

Once Mepps Squirrel Tail Program has received your tails, our experienced team will grade the tails as premium, average, or unusable. With over 30 years of experience, you can trust their appraisal will be fair and accurate. If you have indicated “Trade for cash” (see step 8), a check will be sent to you. If you have indicated “Trade for lures”, you will be contacted to take your lure order.

 

 

THIS WEEK’S EVENTS: (For complete future listings go to the Calendar Page - http://www.huntfishnyoutdoors.com/events.php)
OCTOBER 2018

13 - 2018 Ed Warnick Memorial Youth Pheasant Hunt at John White WMA located in Basom, Genesee County. This Youth Pheasant Hunt is a day of supervised fun and a hands-on learning experience for Jr. hunters. It is open to all interested and licensed Junior Hunters (ages 12-15). Hunters & Mentors are required to bring a blaze orange hunting hat & vest (license and back tag), their own shotguns, and ammunition. Morning snacks, lunch, stocked male pheasants, and top notch hunting dogs with handlers will be provided. Certified Hunter Education Instructors will provide trained supervision afield. (RSVP deadline: October 9th) (Event limited to 25 hunters) (For information Frank Phillips  585-226-5457   Frank.Phillips@DEC.NY.gov)

13 - FREE Kids Fishing Classes at Lake Neatahwantha, Town of Granby, Oswego County (11:00 am – 1:00 pm) All bait and tackle provided FREE. (For information email mmcgrath2@twcny.com or srybaak@yahoo.com.)

13 -  Birding 101: Class #10 at the Reinstein Woods Environmental Education Center, 93 Honorine Drive, Depew, NY (Town of Cheektowaga) (2:30 pm) Learn which birds will be in the area for the winter season. For adults and children ages 8 and older. (For information and register call 716-683-5959 or email reinsteinwoods@dec.ny.gov)

13 - National Wild Turkey Federation - Salmon River Chapter Wheelin’ Sportsmen Muzzleloader Deer Hunt on Private Property, Sandy Creek, NY (For information contact William Wilbur 315-440-4351  wwilbur551@hotmail.com)

13 - Finger Lakes Open Bass Tournament – Keuka Lake. Launch Location: Branchport, NY. (For information contact Tucker Kautz  607-426-9978 or email Kautzt86@yahoo.com)  

13 - Oak Orchard River Bass Angler’s Conesus Lake Open at the State Launch. (7:00 am – 3:00 pm) 1 or 2 anglers per boat. (Entry Fee:  $60 per boat (cash only) (For information contact Em Seefeldt 585-798-4441 or em@orleanscountybass.com)

13-14 - Western New York Youth Waterfowl Hunt (Saturday-Sunday) Young hunters age 12 to 15 years, possessing a junior hunting license may hunt ducks, coots, mergansers, and Canada geese on 2 special days in each zone. Daily bag limits are the maximum allowed during the regular duck season, and 2 per day for Canada geese. Young hunters MUST be accompanied by a licensed adult hunter (including current HIP registration and duck stamp). Adult hunter may not shoot any birds.

13-14 - 12th Annual Southern Tier Outdoor Show at the Steuben County Fairgrounds, Bath, NY (Sat - 9:00 am – 5:00 pm/Sun – 10:00 am – 4:00 pm) Free seminars on bass fishing, NY black bear, fishing from shore, trout streams of NY, river recreation, invasive insects, food plots, women and archery, retriever training and tracking wounded deer. For youth – fishing, archery, turkey calling and petting zoo. (For information call 607-664-2300 or go to www.SouthernTierOutdoorShow.com)

13-14 - KTBA Bass Club Tournament on Oneida & Onondaga Lakes (7:00 am – 3:00 pm) (Cost: $85.00 boat for Members/$105.00 boat for Non-Members) (For information call Jonathan Bechy 607-761-3037)

13-14 - Niagara Frontier – Akron Gun Show at the Newstead Fire Hall, 5691 Cummings Road, Akron, NY (Sat 9:00 am – 4:00 pm /Sun 9:00 am - 3:00pm) 85 tables.(Cost: $5.00/children under 12 free when accompanied by a paid adult) (For information call 716-542-9929 or email  guns@nfgshows.com)

14 - Southern Tier Outdoor Show Wild Turkey Calling Contest at the Steuben County Fairgrounds, Chestnut Street Entrance, Bath, NY (For information call Jim McGlynn at 607-776-6263 or email elkmcg@wildblue.net)

15 - Regular State Trout Season Closes (See fishing regulation guide. Great Lakes and tributaries as well as some inland waters are open all year)

15 - Robots, Telemetry, and the Sex Lives of Wild Birds: Using Technology to Understand and Protect an Enigmatic Bird - Paul C. Mundinger Distinguished Lectureship by Gail Patricelli, Evolution & Ecology, University of California, Davis, California, at B25 Warren Hall, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY. (5:00 pm) Animals use a dizzying array of sounds, smells, colors, dances, electrical fields, and seismic vibrations to convince each other to mate. Gail Patricelli will talk about using robotic female birds (see photo above) and other technology to study courtship behaviors in the Greater Sage-Grouse, and how such research informs conservation of this iconic North American bird and its habitat.  This event will be streamed live. Watch it here and sign up for alerts about upcoming presentations. (For information call 800-843-2473.)

16 - Start of Catch and Release (Artificial Lures Only) Season for Trout in Salmon Creek (Cayuga County), East Branch Owego Creek, East and West Branchs Tioughnioga River and the Otselic River (Cortland County), Owego Creek and East & West Branches of Creek (Tioga County), Salmon Creek Above Ludlow Falls & West Branch Owego Creek (Tompkins County), Spring Creek except Caledonia State Fish Hatchery Property, Hatchery Property - 8:00 am B 3:3 0 pm (Livingston County), Oatka Creek from Bowerman Road Upstream to Union Street and from the Wheatland Center Road Upstream to the Mouth of Spring Creek, and Spring Creek (Monroe County), East Koy & Wiscoy Creeksand Chenunda Creek (Allegany County), Lime Lake Outlet, McKinstry, Elm Creek, Elton Creek, Mansfield Creek, (Cattaraugus County), Hosmer Brook and Cattaraugus Creek upstream of Springville Dam (Erie County), Clear Creek from the mouth to the Wyoming-Cattaraugus County line, Wiscoy Creek 0.5 mile upstream and downstream from the East Hillside Road bridge, East Koy Creek, Chenunda Creek, Cattaraugus Creek upstream of Springville Dam, Clear Creek (Ellington), Fenton Brook and Oatka Creek (Wyoming County) (>3/31/18)

16 - Start of Catch and Release (Artificial Lures Only) Season for Trout in Clear Creek and Prendagast Creek (Chautauqua County) (>3/31/18)

17-19 - St. Mary’s Archer’s Club Catch and Release Fly Fishing Derby - For fishermen of all ages this great event features fantastic tributary fishing on the World Famous Oak Orchard River by the St. Mary’s Archer’s Club. Entry fee includes parking and meals. (For information  contact John Denniston at 585-682-3067.)

18 - Hibernation Hullabaloo at the Seneca Meadows Education Center, 1977 State Route 414, Seneca Falls, NY. (6:30 – 7:30 pm) Meet our touchable turtles, and their reptilian friends, and find out the crazy things they do to survive the winter! (Free) (For information call 315-539-5624)

20 - Montezuma’s Happy Owl-ween at the Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savannah, NY (6:00 - 8:00 pm) We are happy to welcome back Jean Soprano, of Kindred Kingdoms Wildlife Rehabilitation, who will have live owls on display during her presentation about the silent hunters of the night. Then, join the Montezuma Audubon Center staff for an owl prowl around the woods and grasslands to search for Montezuma’s wild owls and other nighttime wildlife. (Fee: $5/child, $10/adult, $25/family.) (For information or register call 315-365-3588 or e-mail montezuma@audubon.org) 

20 - Mysterious Mushrooms at Baltimore Woods Nature Center, 4007 Bishop Hill Road, Marcellus, NY (10:00 – 11:30 am) Come join us as we explore The Woods in search of those mysterious mushrooms. Learn how to identify one from the next and even get a mushroom’s fingerprints! For ages 5 and up. (Cost: $6.00 members/$9.00 public.) (For information/register call 315-673-1350)
20 - Arcadia Bass Anglers 2018 Die Hard Series Tournament – Sodus Bay at the State Launch on Route 14. Also open to Lake fishing. (7:30 am – 3:30 pm) (Entry fee: $60.00) (For information call 585-615-3620 or email aba3620@yahoo.com or go to  www.arcadiabassanglers.com)

20 - CVBM Keuka Lake Open at the Branchport Launch (7:00 am – 3:00 pm) (Entry Fee: $60.00 (For information call Tom Shafer  607-731-4870 or Chris Ripley  607-259-5735.)

20 - Southern Tier Bassmasters Conesus Lake Open Derby at the State Park Launch (7:00 am – 3:00 pm) The entry fee for OPEN team tournaments is $85/boat. (For information call 585-314-7142 or email tournaments@southerntierbass.com)

21 - Fix It 4U Trail Bass Tournament – Owasco Lake Tuff Guy I (6:00 am – 3:00 pm) (For information call Evan Perry 570-662-1247 or go to http://www.fixit4utrail.com/)

21 - CVBM Keuka Lake Tournament at Branchport Launch (6:00 am – 2:00 pm) (For information call Tom Shafer  607-731-4870 or Chris Ripley  607-259-5735.)