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conservation chatter corner

with ron schroder

************************************************

YOUR IN ON THE OUTDOORS FOR WESTERN NEW YORK
www.huntfishnyoutdoors.com

 

12 - 6 – 19

 

Welcome to this week’s Conservation Chatter Corner – little bits of happenings concerning our outdoors and you, the sportspeople who enjoy being part of that outdoors.

 

CHRISTMAS GIFT IDEAS:

> A lifetime license for hunting, fishing and/or trapping

> A subscription to the DEC magazine, the Conservationist. The nice part about the magazine you don’t have to worry about next year – just renew.

> DEC Camping Gift Cards and electronic gift certificates for stays and services at all DEC Campgrounds are available for purchase online. Gift Cards and electronic Gift Certificates can be purchased online at the ReserveAmerica website. For more information on DEC-operated campgrounds, including a list of campgrounds and schedules, visit DEC's website and go to the Camping link under the Outdoor Recreation section, or call DEC's Bureau of Recreation at 518-457-2500. To make reservations at any of these camping facilities, call ReserveAmerica at 1-800-456-CAMP (2267) or visit the ReserveAmerica website.

                         

 

 

CHRISTMAS BIRD COUNT: The National Audubon Society recently announced the dates for the 120th annual Christmas Bird Count — Dec. 14 through Jan. 5.

The Christmas Bird Count is the longest-running wildlife survey in the world, employing tens of thousands of bird-loving volunteers to gather data on the number and type of bird species found during the peak of migration.

Individual counts take place in a 15-mile-wide circle and are led by a compiler responsible for organizing volunteers and submitting observations to Audubon. Within each circle, participants tally all birds seen or heard that day — not just the species, but total numbers to provide a clear idea of the health of that particular population.

Data from Christmas Bird Counts have been used in more than 200 peer-reviewed, scientific articles, including Audubon’s landmark, “Birds and Climate Change Report.”

There is no fee to participate and the quarterly report, “American Birds,” is available online. Counts are open to birders of all skill levels and Audubon’s free Bird Guide app makes it even easier to chip in. For more information and to find a count near you, visit www.christmasbirdcount.org.

 

 

PA SUNDAY HUNTING BILL: Legislation permitting hunting on three Sundays throughout the year was signed into law today by Gov. Tom Wolf, according to Sen. Jim Brewster (D-Allegheny/Westmoreland).

This bill provides for hunting on three Sundays: one during rifle deer season, one in statewide archery deer season and a third to be determined by the Pennsylvania Game Commission.

The bill also makes trespassing while hunting a primary offense and increases the penalties for trespassing. It also requires written permission from a landowner to hunt on any of the Sundays.

For more details on this historic pro-hunting legislation, visit the NRA Hunters’ Leadership Forum website at https://www.nrahlf.org/articles/2019/11/27/nra-pivotal-in-cracking-pennsylvania-s-sunday-hunting-ban/.

 

IT’S COMING - - ICE SAFETY: Here are 13 tips to follow when going on ice:

*Always remember that ice is never completely safe under any conditions.

*Fish or walk with a friend. It’s safer and more fun.

*Contact local sport shops to ask about ice conditions on the lake or river you want to fish.

*Carry a cell phone, and let people know where you are going and when you’ll return home.

*Wear proper clothing and equipment, including a life jacket or a float coat to help you stay afloat and to help slow body heat loss.

*Wear creepers attached to boots to prevent slipping on clear ice.

*Carry a spud bar to check the ice while walking to new areas.

*Carry a couple of spikes and a length of light rope in an easily accessible pocket to help pull yourself—or others—out of the ice.

*Do not travel in unfamiliar areas, or at night.

*Know if the lake has inlets, outlets, or narrows that have currents that can thin the ice.

*Look for clear ice. Clear ice is generally stronger than ice with air bubbles in it or with snow on it.

*Watch out for pressure ridges or ice heaves. These can be dangerous due to thin ice and open water.

*Take extra mittens or gloves so you always have a dry pair.

*Driving on ice is always a risk. Use good judgment and consider alternatives.

 

General Ice Thickness Guidelines

For New, Clear Ice Only

2" or less - STAY OFF

4" - Ice fishing or other activities on foot

5" - Snowmobile or ATV

8" - 12" - Car or small pickup

12" - 15" - Medium truck

Remember that these thicknesses are merely guidelines for new, clear, solid ice. Many factors other than thickness can cause ice to be unsafe.

 

NEW TRAILS ADDED AT TWO FINGER LAKES STATE PARKS: This fall, State Parks Commissioner Erik Kulleseid  kicked off trail openings in the Finger Lakes Region, where a long-closed trail at Watkins Glen State Park was restored and reopened, and an expanded, accessible trail network was added at Allan H. Treman State Marine Park on Cayuga Lake near Ithaca.

At Watkins Glen State Park, it took crews more than 4,300 hours of work – nearly all of it by hand – during the last two years to restore a steep, badly-eroded and unsafe section of trail from the park’s main entrance to the North Rim Trail at the top of the gorge that had been closed since 1983.

The new trail will allow visitors to bypass the sometimes-crowded gorge trail, as well as allow public access to the park when ice closes the gorge trail in winter.

At Allan H. Treman State Marine Park, 1.7 miles of paved asphalt or stone dust multi-use trails, compliant with the American with Disabilities Act, were added to the park's northern section. The trails connects the park to the city of Ithaca's Cayuga Waterfront Trail and improves access within Allan Treman to picnic areas, Cayuga Lake and Cayuga Inlet. Learn more

 

TRACKING SOUTHBOUND SNOWY OWLS FROM THE ARCTIC: Project SNOWstorm is celebrating its seventh year studying the movements and ecology of Snowy Owls, and this promises to be one of the most interesting years. A number of radio-tagged Snowy Owls have already migrated south from the Arctic, adding new information for ongoing research and showing some fascinating results from new hybrid transmitters. There have already been good numbers of snowy owls showing up in the northern prairies from Alberta to North Dakota, across the Great Lakes and down the Atlantic Coast as far as New York.

Much information will be learned from these radio-tagged Snowy Owls. Already, their movements and survival rates are extremely interesting, and their nesting behavior is slowly being revealed – year by year.

For more information about Project SNOWstorm and other tagged Snowy Owls as they return from the Arctic to reveal more exciting information, refer to https://www.projectsnowstorm.org/posts/a-new-season-a-lot-of-news/.

 

CLEAN BIRD FEEDERS HELP KEEP BIRDS HEALTHY:  Some advice about bird feeder cleanliness before you run out and buy that first twenty dollar bag of seed. Cleaning bird feeders on a regular basis is an important and often overlooked component of feeding birds so they don't become sick.
Feeding birds in the winter is a source of great enjoyment for bird enthusiasts, but it can also cause diseases to spread quickly among wild birds. It is critical to clean those birdfeeders at least once a month in order to prevent a buildup of harmful pathogens.
Bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites can cause diseases such as aspergillosis, salmonella, avian pox, trichomoniasis, and conjunctivitis. Species commonly affected by bird feeder diseases are redpolls, pine siskins, goldfinches, sparrows, and cardinals.
It’s recommended using a solution of one part bleach to nine parts hot water to kill bacteria. Hot water with unscented dish detergent also does an excellent job. Wear rubber gloves to avoid any contamination. Be sure to clean inside and outside surfaces. Bottle brushes work well in tube feeders.
Be sure to thoroughly rinse your feeders to prevent residual chlorine from being ingested by birds. Then, dry the feeders well before filling them again. Any remaining moisture could lead to mold and mildew that can cause rotten, unhealthy seed.
Also, take time to remove seed and droppings in nearby areas where birds congregate. Birds can spill seed and leave debris several feet away from feeders.
Clean birdfeeders and feeding areas will attract more birds and keep them healthier for birders to enjoy.
Additional information about diseases at bird feeders can be found at:
http://www.nwhc.usgs.gov/publications/fact_sheets/coping_with_diseases_at_birdfeeders.jsp

 

THIS WEEK’S EVENTS: (For complete future listings go to the Calendar Page - http://www.huntfishnyoutdoors.com/events.php)

 

DECEMBER 2019

1 - Start of Statewide Black Bass catch and release / artificial lures only season (>6/15?/20)

1 - Start of Lake Erie and Tributaries Black Bass trophy (20 inch +) season (>6/14/20)

1-31 -  Celebrate Canadice Lake Month at the Finger Lakes Museum & Aquarium, 3369 Guyanoga Road, Branchport, NY. The Museum focuses attention on the lake, the highest and smallest Finger Lake! (Free) (For information email mail@fingerlakesmuseum.org.) 

7 - Family-friendly Winter Nature Walk at the Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savannah, NY (1:00 – 3:30 p.m) Join us for a guided, easy to moderate 1-mile stroll through the forest and grasslands and around the wetlands. Along the way, you will learn about how the Montezuma Wetlands Complex was formed and we will look for winter signs of birds and other wildlife. Afterwards, join us inside for a mug of hot cocoa. Binoculars will be provided, but feel free to bring your own. (Fee: $5/child, $10/adult, $25/family, FREE for Friends of the Montezuma Wetlands Complex. PRE-PAID RESERVATIONS REQUIRED.) (For information/register call 315-365-3588 or e-mail montezuma@audubon.org)

7-8 - Niagara Frontier – Clarence Gun Show at the Event Building, 11177 Main St Clarence, NY (9:00 am – 4:00 pm/9:00 am - 3:00pm) 100 tables. NICS background checks available. (Cost: $5.00/children under 12 free when accompanied by a paid adult) (For information call Bruce Johnston at 716-542-9929 or email http://nfgshows.com) 

7-8 - Niagara Frontier - Medina Gun Show at the Ridgeway VFW, 11392 Ridge Road, Rte 104, Medina, NY (Sat. 9:00 am – 4:00 pm/Sun. 9:00am – 3:00 pm) (Cost: $5.00/12 and under free) (65 Tables) (For information call Bruce Johnston at 716-542-9929, email guns@nfgshows.com or go to http://nfgshows.com)

8 - End of Northern and Southern Zones Regular Deer and Bear Hunting Seasons

9 - Start of Northern and Southern Zones Late Deer and Bear Bowhunting, Crossbow and Muzzleloading Seasons (>12/15)

9 - Start of Hunting Season for Varying Hare (Snowshoe Rabbit) in Central and Eastern New York (>2/28/18)

12 - Joint meeting of the Lake Ontario Trout and Salmon Association and the Niagara County Fisheries Development Board at North Amherst Fire Company, 2200 Tonawanda Creek Road, Amherst, NY. (7:00 pm) Tentative guest speaker will be Steve Hurst, Chief of the Bureau of Fisheries for DEC.

13 - Ten X Shooting Club Youth Rifle Shooting Program at the club, 853 Ransom Road, Lancaster NY. (6:00 pm) This program is for ages 9 through 20. New and first-time shooters should arrive at 6 p.m for safety and orientation training. Shooting begins at 6:30 p.m. Membership is not required. (Cost is $3 per night but no shooter is turned away.) (For information call Matt Giansante at 716-622-0705.)

13 - 25th Annual Game Dinner of the Western New York Safari Club at Michael’s Banquet Facility, 4885 Southwestern Boulevard, Hamburg, NY. (Doors open at 5:00 pm, with dinner at 7:00 pm.) (Cost: $45.00 donation.) (For information call Terry at 716-472-2380.)

14 – Ladies Shoot N’ Hoot at North Forest Rod and Gun Club, 6257 Old Niagara Road, Lockport, NY. (1:00 pm) Trap, skeet and 5-Stand, followed by a Pot Luck Christmas dinner. Register by Dec. 11. (For information call Colleen Gaskill at 716-628-9023.)

14 - Wine and Wings Birding Van Tour at the Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savannah, NY (1:00 – 3:30 p.m) The holiday season is here and so are the wintering raptors.  Join us as we head out in our van to look for elusive Short-eared Owls, hunting Northern Harriers, soaring Bald Eagles, and more.  During the tour, we will stop at the Montezuma Winery for wine tastings and to learn how vineyards and Important Birds Areas happily exist side by side. Must be 21+. Binoculars, a spotting scope, and field guides will be provided. (Fee $25/adult, includes tasting fee and a souvenir glass. PRE-PAID RESERVATIONS ARE REQUIRED.) (For information/register call 315-365-3588 or e-mail montezuma@audubon.org)

15 - Close of Lake Ontario and Tributaries Muskellunge and Tiger Muskellunge Fishing Season

15 - End  of Northern Zone Late Deer and Bear Bowhunting, Crossbow and Muzzleloading Seasons

 

Until our next meeting in the Corner, have a great time in the outdoors. This is Ron Schroder for – “Your In on The Outdoors for Western New York.”

What Do You Think? Have something for other sportspeople? Let us know HERE.

 

 

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11 - 29 – 19

 

Welcome to this week’s Conservation Chatter Corner – little bits of happenings concerning our outdoors and you, the sportspeople who enjoy being part of that outdoors.

 

HOPE YOU HAD A HAPPY THANKSGIVING: Still need exercise after your Thanksgiving meal? Well, hunters have lots of opportunity. Small game seasons are open and we’re well into the deer season. Hunters will need more skill to be successful, especially if they’re after a buck. Calculations from past years show that hunters take 40+% of the harvested bucks on opening day and 80% during the first week. For antlerless deer about 60% are taken during the first week. Depending on where you hunt, the weather may be helping your odds. This past week some areas had some snow.

Hunter safety and ethics must be stressed at this time of the season. Some hunters, without deer, may feel desperate for venison, but reason must prevail. You still must be sure of your target and beyond, no shot at sounds in the brush and no long shots at deer - that you might hit. Thus far it’s been a fairly safe season, especially when you consider the numbers of hunters participating in the sport. However, there has been one fatality. In the region we’ve had several incidents involving hunter injuries and property damage. Hunters must be sure what’s behind their target. Hunting is a very safe activity, but only you can insure it stays that way.

 

TREE STAND SAFETY: Hunting deer from trees first became popular with bowhunters who needed to be within "spitting distance" for an effective shot. Today, many firearms hunters have also taken to the trees. Hunting from trees has advantages, but also some big disadvantages.

If you do choose to use one, here are some tips to help get the most out of your arboreal hunting experience.

Use a sturdy, portable stand. Permanent stands nailed into trees are dumb and deadly. They give away your secret hunting spots to anybody who sees them. They are difficult to move when deer change their trails a few feet. Ugly boards and spikes that ruin chain saws make landowners mad. The worst is that they rot. Weakened wooden steps and stands kill and cripple hunters. Even pressure treated wood gets a dangerous slippery growth.

Know the Rules. On state lands, it is illegal to place nails or other hardware into trees, or to build permanent structures, such as tree stands, platforms and blinds. On private lands, it is illegal to cut or remove trees or other plants, or to cut limbs or damage bark (such as from putting up blinds or tree stands, or cutting shooting lanes or trails) without the landowner's permission.

Don't go too high. Remember that the higher you go, the smaller the vital zone on a deer becomes. And the likelihood of a serious injury escalates if you fall from high up. Usually, 15 to 20 feet is high enough.

Use a safety belt for climbing. Most falls happen when going up and down the tree, and in and out of the stand. Good commercial climbing belts are available.

Never try to carry guns or bows up and down trees. They get in the way of safe climbing; they get dropped; and climbing with guns can result in hunters shooting themselves. Always use a rope to raise and lower bows and guns -- Unloaded.

As soon as you get in a tree stand -- strap in. A body harness is better than a plain safety belt, but a belt is a whole lot better than nothing. If you just have a safety belt, attach it high - around your chest - to avoid injury from the belt if you fall. A short tether connecting you to the tree to prevent a fall is safer than a long one to catch you after a fall. Also, a short tether can make you a better shot. It lets you concentrate on shooting instead of balancing.

 

REMAINING DEER MANAGEMENT PERMITS AVAILABLE FOR HUNTERS: The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) announced that the remaining Deer Management Permits (DMPs) in Wildlife Management Units (WMUs) 1C, 3M, 3R, 3S, 7F, 7H, 7J, 8A, 8C, 8F, 8G, 8H, 8J, 8N, 8R, 9A, 9F and 9G are still available to hunters as of 11–15-19. For WMU locations, refer to the 2019-20 Hunting and Trapping Regulations Guide or visit DEC's website.

Leftover DMPs are not available by phone, mail, or internet. Applicants who previously paid the $10 DMP application fee during the initial application period, or are exempt from the application fee, will not be charged for this additional application. Hunters who did not previously apply for a deer management permit are required to pay the $10 application fee.

 

NEW YORK ACTIVIST LAWMAKER ATTACKS TRAPPING: Most legislators from Manhattan don’t normally know much about what it takes to manage wildlife, let alone the importance that trapping plays in scientific management. But that hasn’t stopped Assemblywoman Linda Rosenthal, from the Upper West Side of Manhattan, from introducing Assembly Bill 8733 that would ban use of foothold traps. 

Trapping continues to be the number-one target of animal-rights activists. Even though trapping is managed through scientifically-based regulations that are strictly enforced by conservation officers in every state, activist politicians continue to introduce bills and push their radical agenda. Banning the use of foothold traps in New York will do more harm than good; foothold traps are especially effective at controlling the population of animals that often carry rabies.

“It is no surprise that Assemblywoman Rosenthal is once again pushing her own personal agenda onto the 19 million residents of New York,” said Bruce Tague, Sportsmen’s Alliance vice president government affairs. “In 2009, her then legislative director is quoted as saying ‘Rosenthal has been an animal rights activist for a number of years…’ and a 2014 New York Daily News article described her as An ethical vegetarian and a fierce force for animals in New York’s state legislature.”

Take Action Today! New York sportspeople should contact their Assembly member to oppose AB 8733.

 

THE GOOD GUYS AT WORK: ANIMAL RESCUE:

Oh, Deer - Putnam County: On Nov. 20, ECOs Craig Tompkins and Charles Eyler III responded to Sunset Hill Road and Lakeview Drive in the town of Putnam Valley for a deer with a Halloween pumpkin bucket stuck over its nose and the handle caught in its antlers. Concerned citizens and the local SPCA reported that the yearling buck had been seen with the bucket on its head for several days. When ECOs Tompkins and Eyler arrived on scene at around 2:30 p.m., they corralled the deer down a narrow path between a house and a large wood pile. Eventually the deer ran into a fence and behind the wood pile where it was able to hit enough brush and sticks to knock the pumpkin bucket free. The deer reunited with a larger doe nearby and headed into the woods.

small deer with it's nose stuck in a jack-o-lantern halloween candy bucket
Deer with Halloween bucket on its head - set free in Putnam County

Trapped Deer - Dutchess County: On Nov. 20, ECOs Zachary Crain and Deo Read responded to a report of a deer trapped in a large Water Well/Supply Tank in the town of Amenia. A hunter discovered the deer when he heard a noise coming from the tank, which is approximately 40 feet long, 40 feet wide, and 16 feet deep. Two deer jumped onto the tin roof of the water well and fell through. One died and the other survived and was running around the tank bottom. The ECOs and four other civilians assisted with the rescue. ECO Crain and two others climbed to the bottom of the water supply tank. They cornered the surviving deer and tied it with some rope before ECO Read and another man lifted it out of the tank vertically. They untied the deer and it ran away.

 

KUDOS: DEC ANNOUNCES WINNERS OF "I BIRD NY" CHALLENGES: New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) announced the four top winners of DEC's annual I Bird NY challenges for beginner and experienced birders. I Bird NY was launched in 2017 to celebrate New York's natural resources and promote low-cost outdoor recreation opportunities people can enjoy near where they live.

DEC announced the annual I Bird NY Beginner's Birding Challenge in May and encouraged children 16 years of age and younger to identify 10 common New York bird species. DEC also offered the I Bird NY Experienced Birder Challenge, requiring birders of all ages to identify at least 10 of 50 listed bird species found across New York State. The two I Bird NY challenges encourage New York residents and visitors to watch birds at any time of year. Birdwatching is easy and fun. Whether at the beach or in the forest, or simply with a backyard birdfeeder, birdwatching can be enjoyed by people of all ages and backgrounds.

Participants in these challenges receive a certificate of participation, an official I Bird NY bracelet, and are entered into a drawing for birding accessories. Four winners were chosen at random from the entries received. The winners are:

Beginner's Challenge
Saige Myers (Grafton, NY)
Ethan Buckley (Hammondsport, NY)
Experienced Challenge
Kevin Skrzynski (Lackawanna, NY)
Marcy Gordon (Whitehall, NY)

Prizes include essential birding equipment, including a spotting scope and binoculars, and were awarded at random to the winners. All winners received birding journals to keep track of their sightings.

With 47 million birders in the United States, bird watching is one of the fastest growing outdoor recreational activities that can be enjoyed by people of all ages and experiences in any community. According to a 2011 survey by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, wildlife watching contributed $4.2 billion to New York's economy.

 

THIS WEEK’S EVENTS: (For complete future listings go to the Calendar Page - http://www.huntfishnyoutdoors.com/events.php)

 

NOVEMBER 2019

1-30 -  Celebrate Hemlock Lake Month at the Finger Lakes Museum & Aquarium, 3369 Guyanoga Road, Branchport, NY. The Museum focuses attention on the lake, protected by NYS to be "forever wild"! (Free) (For information email mail@fingerlakesmuseum.org.) 

25 - Start Of Trapping Seasons for Beaver in Western New York (> 3/15/20 West portion of Southern Tier/rest >2/15/20)

25 - Start Of Trapping Seasons for Mink and Muskrat (>2/15/20)

30 - End of Statewide Fishing Season for Black Bass

30 - End of Lake Erie and Tributaries and Lake Ontario and Tributaries Muskellunge and Tiger Muskellunge Fishing Season

30 - Start of Hunting Seasons for Ducks, Coots and Mergansers – Part 2 - in Western Zone (>1/5/20)

30 - Explore Hidden Gems Of Nature at the Reinstein Woods Environmental Education Center, 93 Honorine Drive, Depew, NY (Town of Cheektowaga) (10:00 am) Take a virtual walk to local parks and natural areas in this slideshow presentation. For adults and children age 8 and older.  (For information and register call 716-683-5959 or email reinsteinwoods@dec.ny.gov)

30 - Montezuma Birding Van Tour at the Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savannah, NY (10:00 am – 12:30 p.m) Looking to get out of the house after the holiday? Join us on this late autumn day for an excursion to explore the Montezuma Wetlands Complex. We will look for ducks, geese, swans, and wintering raptors. Binoculars, a spotting scope, and field guides will be provided, but feel free to bring your own and a camera as well. (Fee: $8/child, $15/adult, $40/family. PRE-PAID RESERVATIONS REQUIRED.) (For information/register call 315-365-3588 or e-mail montezuma@audubon.org)

DECEMBER 2019

1 - Start of Statewide Black Bass catch and release / artificial lures only season (>6/15?/20)

1 - Start of Lake Erie and Tributaries Black Bass trophy (20 inch +) season (>6/14/20)

1 – End of Canada Goose Season - Part 2 - in the West Central Zone of Western New York

1-31 -  Celebrate Canadice Lake Month at the Finger Lakes Museum & Aquarium, 3369 Guyanoga Road, Branchport, NY. The Museum focuses attention on the lake, the highest and smallest Finger Lake! (Free) (For information email mail@fingerlakesmuseum.org.) 

4 - Montezuma Birding Van Tour at the Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savannah, NY (1:00 – 3:30 p.m) Waterfowl have left their breeding grounds and are ready for the long, cold winter. Join us for a birding van tour to see dozens of ducks, geese and swans as they rest, feed, and socialize in Montezuma’s marshes. Binoculars, a spotting scope, and field guides will be provided. (Fee: $8/child, $15/adult, $40/family. PRE-PAID RESERVATIONS REQUIRED.) (For information/register call 315-365-3588 or e-mail montezuma@audubon.org)

7 - Family-friendly Winter Nature Walk at the Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savannah, NY (1:00 – 3:30 p.m) Join us for a guided, easy to moderate 1-mile stroll through the forest and grasslands and around the wetlands. Along the way, you will learn about how the Montezuma Wetlands Complex was formed and we will look for winter signs of birds and other wildlife. Afterwards, join us inside for a mug of hot cocoa. Binoculars will be provided, but feel free to bring your own. (Fee: $5/child, $10/adult, $25/family, FREE for Friends of the Montezuma Wetlands Complex. PRE-PAID RESERVATIONS REQUIRED.) (For information/register call 315-365-3588 or e-mail montezuma@audubon.org)

7-8 - Niagara Frontier – Clarence Gun Show at the Event Building, 11177 Main St Clarence, NY (9:00 am – 4:00 pm/9:00 am - 3:00pm) 100 tables. NICS background checks available. (Cost: $5.00/children under 12 free when accompanied by a paid adult) (For information call Bruce Johnston at 716-542-9929 or email http://nfgshows.com) 

7-8 - Niagara Frontier - Medina Gun Show at the Ridgeway VFW, 11392 Ridge Road, Rte 104, Medina, NY (Sat. 9:00 am – 4:00 pm/Sun. 9:00am – 3:00 pm) (Cost: $5.00/12 and under free) (65 Tables) (For information call Bruce Johnston at 716-542-9929, email guns@nfgshows.com or go to http://nfgshows.com)

8 - End of Northern and Southern Zones Regular Deer and Bear Hunting Seasons

9 - Start of Northern and Southern Zones Late Deer and Bear Bowhunting, Crossbow and Muzzleloading Seasons (>12/15)

9 - Start of Hunting Season for Varying Hare (Snowshoe Rabbit) in Central and Eastern New York (>2/28/18)

 

Until our next meeting in the Corner, have a great time in the outdoors. This is Ron Schroder for – “Your In on The Outdoors for Western New York.”

What Do You Think? Have something for other sportspeople? Let us know HERE.

 

 

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11 - 22 – 19

 

Welcome to this week’s Conservation Chatter Corner – little bits of happenings concerning our outdoors and you, the sportspeople who enjoy being part of that outdoors.

 

REGULATIONS TO PROTECT NEW YORK DEER AND MOOSE FROM CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE: The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) announced that DEC is adopting regulatory changes that will further protect New York's wild deer and moose from Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD).

DEC is working collaboratively with the New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets (DAM) and the agricultural community to prevent CWD from gaining a foothold in New York.

The regulations' most significant change is that hunters are now prohibited from returning to New York State with whole carcasses of deer, elk, moose, or caribou harvested outside of New York. Only the deboned meat, cleaned skull cap, antlers with no flesh adhering, raw or processed cape or hide, cleaned teeth or lower jaw, and finished taxidermy products of CWD-susceptible animals may be brought into New York.

Hunting seasons are already underway throughout the state and the nation, and hunters should not risk losing their prized deer or elk because they failed to follow New York law. DEC Environmental Conservation Police Officers will be monitoring roadways and entry points along state borders and whole carcasses that are imported into New York illegally will be confiscated and destroyed.

Transportation of carcasses through New York is still legal, provided that no parts are disposed of or remain in New York, but hunters should verify importation rules in their destination state or province.

Other adopted changes include:
• Increasing the ease with which DEC's Environmental Conservation Police Officers can enforce DAM regulations to ensure compliance by owners of captive cervids (animals in the deer family); and
• Clarifying disposal requirements for taxidermists that process CWD-susceptible animals.

These regulations went into effect on November 13, 2019.

 

2020 WINTER 'BOW IN THE SNOW' WORKSHOP: Come learn snowshoeing, cross country skiing, fat tire biking, winter survival, ice fishing, K-9 first aid, food preservation, wild game cuts and cooking, knot tying, and much more!

BOW snowshoeing class

                                                               NYSDEC Photo

When: February 7th-9th, 2020

Where: Allegany State Park
Camp Allegany
Red House, NY 14779
(Southern Tier, Western NY)
Cost: $240
Lodging: Camp Allegany is dormitory-style lodging with 4-5 persons to a room. Beds are all single beds (no bunks). Newly installed heating in each room provides a warm stay.  Bathrooms are shared. You must bring linens for sleeping and towels/toiletries.
There are no single rooms available and there is no discount if you do not stay at the camp.

Registration Lottery: Registration for the workshop is determined via lottery. Registrations must be postmarked by December 3rd, 2019 to be entered into the lottery.  You will be notified if your registration was chosen. If your envelope is not chosen, you will have the choice to be placed on a waitlist or have your registration and payment destroyed. 
Coming with a friend? If you would like to attend with a friend(s), send both/all of your registration forms in the same envelope.  This will ensure that if one of you gets chosen in the lottery, you all will get in!
Scholarships: Partial scholarships are available to those who demonstrate financial need. Contact BOW for scholarship application.
Information
: Go to https://www.dec.ny.gov/docs/administration_pdf/2020bowinthesnow.pdf.