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conservation chatter corner

with ron schroder

************************************************

YOUR IN ON THE OUTDOORS FOR WESTERN NEW YORK
www.huntfishnyoutdoors.com

11 – 17 – 17

 

Welcome to this week's Conservation Chatter Corner - little bits of happenings concerning our outdoors and you, the sportspeople who enjoy being part of that outdoors.

 

 

START OF REGULAR FIREARMS SEASON FOR DEER AND BEAR HUNTING IN SOUTHERN ZONE: The 2017 regular deer and bear hunting seasons in New York's Southern Zone begin at sunrise on Saturday, Nov. 18, and continue through Sunday, Dec. 10. The Southern Zone regular season is New York's most popular hunting season; approximately 85 percent of New York's 575,000 licensed hunters participate. Harvest during this season accounts for nearly 60 percent of the total statewide deer harvest and between 30 to 60 percent of the statewide bear harvest.

Following the regular deer and bear seasons in the Southern Zone, late bowhunting and muzzleloading seasons will run from Dec. 11 through Dec. 19. Hunters taking part in these special seasons must possess a hunting license and either bowhunting or muzzleloading privilege(s).

In the Northern Zone, the regular deer and bear hunting season opened Oct. 21, and will close at sunset on Dec. 3. The Northern Zone includes the Adirondacks, Tug Hill Plateau, Eastern Lake Ontario Plain, and the Champlain and St. Lawrence valleys. A late bowhunting and muzzleloading season for deer will be open in portions of the Northern Zone from Dec. 4 to Dec. 10.

Deer hunting has been changing in New York, with more hunters opting to voluntarily pass up shots at young, small-antlered bucks in favor of letting them grow to be older, larger bucks. DEC is encouraging hunters to make a difference for the future of the deer herd and increase their likelihood of seeing older, larger bucks by choosing to Let Young Bucks Go and Watch Them Grow.

DEC Encourages Hunter Safety
While statistics show that hunting in New York State is safer than ever, mistakes are made every year. DEC believes every hunting-related shooting incident is preventable, and hunters are encouraged to use common sense this season and to remember what they were taught in their DEC Hunters Education Course.

Firearms Safety:

*Point your gun in a safe direction.

*Treat every gun as if it were loaded.

*Be sure of your target and beyond.

*Keep your finger off the trigger until ready to shoot.

DEC also encourages hunters to wear blaze orange or pink. Wearing orange or pink prevents other hunters from mistaking a person for an animal, or shooting in a hunter's direction. Hunters who wear hunter orange are seven times less likely to be shot.

When hunting in tree stands, use a safety harness and a climbing belt, as most tree stand accidents occur when hunters are climbing in and out of the stand. Also, hunters should never climb in or out of a tree stand with a loaded rifle and never set a tree stand above 20 feet.

Report Your Harvest - Remember: Take It - Tag It - Report It
Hunter contributions to deer and bear management don't end when an animal is harvested. All successful hunters are required to report their harvest of deer and bear within seven days. Failure to report is a violation of the Environmental Conservation Law and reduces the data DEC uses to manage deer and bear populations. Hunters may report via DEC's online game harvest reporting system or by calling the toll-free automated reporting system at 1-866-GAME-RPT (1-866-426-3778).

Additional Reminders for the 2017 Southern Zone Regular Hunting Season
Choose non-lead ammunition for high quality meat and reduced risk of lead exposure to humans and wildlife.

Hunger Has A Cure... The Venison Donation Program is a great way to help those less fortunate while assisting with deer management in New York.

For specific descriptions of regulations and open areas, hunters should refer to the 2017-2018 Hunting and Trapping Regulations Guide available on DEC's website. Hunters are urged to review all regulations and safety tips in the guide. Hunters may also be interested in DEC's Hunting the Black Bear in New York (PDF, 727 KB) or reviewing DEC's unit-by-unit Deer Hunting Forecasts.

 

GREAT LAKES ACTION AGENDA WORK GROUP MEETINGS: NYSDEC invites you to join other regional stakeholders in a basinwide partnership to advance ecosystem-based management (EBM) opportunities for New York's Great Lakes basin, as identified in the state's interim Great Lakes Action Agenda (GLAA).  Meeting objectives include:

*Share state and federal Great Lakes updates.

*Report on progress of sub basin work plan implementation and EBM Demonstration Projects, and identify next steps.

*Discuss upcoming funding and partnership opportunities to advance work plan goals.

Four sub basin work groups provide a unique opportunity to connect, coordinate and collaborate with other groups and agencies working locally and basinwide. 

          

                            GL Sub basins                 

 

Please join us for one or more of the following meetings:  

Lake Erie Work Group - Nov 28th, 1:00pm - 4:00pm - Beaver Meadow Audubon Center, 1610 Welch Road, North Java, NY 14113

SW Lake Ontario Work Group - Nov 29th, 9:00am - 12:00pm - Black Creek Park, Sunnyside Lodge, 3835 Union St, North Chili, NY 14514

NE Lake Ontario Work Group - Dec 6th, 10:00am - 2:00pm - Gouverneur Community Center, 4673 NY-58, Gouverneur, NY 13642

SE Lake Ontario Work Group – Dec 7th, 10:00am - 2:00pm - Huron Town Hall, 10880 Lummisville Rd, Wolcott, NY 14590

Please let us know if you can make it: RSVP to greatlakes@dec.ny.gov at least one week in advance of the meeting you plan to attend.

View flyer here: GLAA+work+group+mtg+flyer_Nov2017.pdf. Questions or comments?

Lake Erie & SW Lake Ontario Work Groups: Shannon Dougherty, Shannon.Dougherty@dec.ny.gov, 716-851-7070

SE & NE Lake Ontario Work Groups: Emily Sheridan, Emily.Sheridan@dec.ny.gov, 315-785-2382

 

THE GOOD GUYS AT WORK:

The Night Time Isn't the Right Time -- Niagara County: On the morning of Oct. 21, ECO Mike Phelps was working in Niagara County patrolling for after-hours fishing activity. At approximately 2:30 am., using night vision equipment, he spotted a group of four men fishing on the eastern side of 18-Mile Creek the town of Newfane. Three of the men began walking north along the creek to the parking lot. The remaining fisherman attempted to take fish by scooping at them with a landing net. At 3:40 a.m., ECO Phelps approached the lone fisherman. When questioned, the man said that he and the other three men had come up from New York City together. ECO Phelps then walked back to the parking area with the man and found the other three men inside the gated and fenced-in lot. The officer found nine King salmon in their van, which was parked outside the fence. All four men were charged with fishing after legal hours, three men were charged with illegal possession of salmon, one with fishing by means other than angling, and one with fishing without a valid license. In addition, the Niagara County Sheriff charged the four men with trespassing and theft of services under the Penal Law, as use of the parking lot requires payment. The subjects were arraigned in the Town of Newfane Court and taken to the Niagara County Jail by the Niagara County Sheriff's Department in lieu of bail.

Illegal Fishing on the Genesee River - Monroe County: On Oct. 23, ECOs Kevin Holzle, Eoin Snowdon, and Jeff Johnston responded to a complaint of fish being caught by "snagging" on the Genesee River at the lower falls in Rochester. From the Rt. 104 bridge upstream to the lower falls, the Genesee River is one of the Lake Ontario tributaries subject to seasonal regulations from Sept. 1 to March 31. After conducting surveillance from multiple viewpoints around the lower falls, ECOs Holzle and Johnston entered the gorge and met with several subjects. The ECOs issued a total of 15 tickets for a variety of violations, including fishing without a valid license, taking fish by snagging, and disposing of fish or parts of fish within 100 feet of shore, all returnable to the City of Rochester Court. Additionally, one subject was taken into custody on a warrant from the Town of Gates Police Department.

Late Season Fishing Activity on the Oswego River - Oswego County: On Oct. 24, ECO Matt Harger arrested two fishermen for taking over the daily limit of salmon on the Oswego River. The two subjects tried to camouflage their activities by staging a cooler in the woods about one-half mile upstream of the Oswego River dam. Acting on a tip, ECO Harger found the hidden cooler and waited for the fishermen to return. When the suspects returned to stash additional salmon, ECO Harger caught the pair with 13 salmon, well over the daily limit. On Oct. 29, ECO Rick Head also had an active day patrolling the Oswego River, issuing 10 tickets to individuals for violations of the Environmental Conservation Law ranging from taking fish by blind snatching, possession of foul hooked fish, and fishing without a license, to trespassing on posted property that belongs to the Brookfield Power Company.

 

HUNTERS - DON'T BRING DEER, ELK, OR MOOSE CARCASSES INTO NEW YORK: DEC reminds hunters that because of the risk of chronic wasting disease (CWD), it is illegal to bring deer, elk, or moose carcasses harvested in many states into New York. This includes animals harvested in nearly all western and mid-western states and provinces and a handful of eastern states. Only specific allowed parts may be brought into New York. People who shoot confined deer, elk, or moose in a fenced facility anywhere outside New York, must remove all prohibited parts from the carcass prior to returning to New York. See CWD Regulations for Hunters for details. Please report violations (1-844-DEC-ECOS; 1-844-332-3267) and protect our wild deer and moose.

 

WHAT YOUR FISHING LICENSE PURCHASE DOES FOR CONSERVATION: When you're buying or renewing your fishing license, you're probably only thinking about the possibility of the new season or exploring a promising new stretch of river. But are you aware of just how hard your fishing license is working on your behalf of your future days on the water?
Here are five examples of how the dollars spent on your fishing licenses, boat registrations, and excise taxes on fishing gear and boat fuel purchases go back to conservation and public access. And at
$1.1 billion that's a sizeable down payment on the next generation of anglers in America.

Improving Fishing and Boating Access
First, funds from license sales go toward fishing and boating access projects. One example is the
Ramps & Pier Program in Mississippi, which helps pay for repairs to existing access points and the construction of four to six new boat ramps each year. The state of Oregon also has an excellent model of involving state and federal agencies in adding and upgrading new boating facilities.
Enhancing Water Quality
Boat registration funds help implement clean water projects that benefit fish habitat and improve the experience of anglers and boaters. The Clean Vessel Act program in Hawaii, for example, helped use these funds to construct a new sewage
pump-out station and three new floating restrooms at the Haleiwa Small Boat Harbor—all in an effort to protect the sparkling turquoise waters of Hawaii for future generations.
Maintaining Fish Habitat
The excise taxes on your fishing gear go toward fisheries maintenance projects that help manage our state sport fisheries. For example, in New York State, biologists collect data through creel surveys and work to restore fish habitat for native brookies, American shad, river herring, and striped bass
largely thanks to the taxes paid by the manufacturers of your fishing rods, reels, lures, baits, and flies. In Massachusetts, these funds are used to map fish habitat with GPS technology, sonar, and underwater vehicles through the state's Fisheries Habitat Program. The more these experts learn, the better prepared they are to spot habitat issues and plan for improvements.
Teaching and Recruiting New Anglers
Fishing license funds also go to work for educational and recruitment programs that introduce new anglers to the sport. As more people take up fishing, there is a greater need for education on topics like species identification, conservation, regulations, and proper catch-and-release techniques. The state of Texas offers
free workshops for first-timers or anyone who wants a refresher on the basics, and the saltwater angler education programs hosted by the Massachusetts Division of Marine Fisheries have been so successful that they hope to extend courses to all coastal areas of the state.
Planning for Long-Term Conservation
With an eye toward investing in our marine and freshwaters resources, as well as the next generation of anglers, fishing license fees support long-term conservation plans for our rivers and streams. This robust funding, which has nothing to do with the federal balance sheet, is critical to ensuring an adequate quantity and quality of water to maintain the natural balance of aquatic ecosystems. Texas has used this money to fund its
River Studies Program that addresses long-term water development, water planning, and water quality issues.
Whether state agencies are studying rainbow trout populations or repairing boat ramps, your license fees are put to excellent use.

Sportsmen and women have a long history of giving back to conservation through our purchases. Read about the federal program responsible for that funding model and the hunters in one Western state who wholeheartedly supported raising license fees earlier this year to do even more for fish and wildlife.

(By Debbie Hanson, TakeMeFishing.org)

THIS WEEK'S EVENTS: (For complete future listings go to the Calendar Page - - http://www.huntfishnyoutdoors.com/events.php)

                                         

NOVEMBER 2017

16/17/19/24/26/30 - White Deer Tours: Seneca White Deer, Inc. recently announced that it will start tours of the former Seneca Army Depot. Participants will see the world’s largest herd of white, white-tailed deer in the world, other wildlife, and the relics of 60 years of secret weapons storage. We will visit one of the 519 earth-covered concrete igloos that stored everything from pistol cartridges to tactical missiles, from conventional bombs to nuclear warheads. We can never guarantee where the mystical white deer will be, but our tour guides know the best locations and will stop for pictures as deer and wildlife appear. Tour routes will vary according to the weather and season. This is your opportunity to see the hidden world and experience the magic of the white deer yourself. Our 25 passenger, air-conditioned and heated tour buses give all our visitors a comfortable seat for a 90-minute, narrated trip behind the fences of the former Seneca Army Depot. (Cost: Adults - $30.00/Military and Seniors – $27.00/Children 5–17 - $15.00/Children under 5 – Free) (For information go to https://www.senecawhitedeer.org/.)

17 – Close of Southern Zone Deer and Bear Bowhunting/Crossbow Seasons

17 - Close of Hunting & Trapping Seasons for Bobcat.

17 - Concealed Carry Class presented by Legal Heat at the Cabela’s Cheektowaga Store, 2003 Walden Avenue, Cheektowaga, NY (5:00 am -9:00 pm) This course is designed to meet the qualifying requirements and documentation to obtain the Utah and Arizona concealed carry permits in a fun, informative, non-intimidating class. These permits will allow combined carry reciprocity in approximately 30+ states. Legal Heat's concealed carry class covers firearms safety, handling, transportation, storage, ammunition, self-defense and firearms laws, concealed carry techniques and much more. Legal Heat's firearm training instructors are all NRA and Utah BCI certified, insured and among the most highly experienced in the industry and can answer your CCW questions. This course typically runs approximately 4 hours. This Legal Heat course does not have a 'test' or range requirement. The Utah and Arizona permits are open to residents of any state and can be applied for by mail. You do NOT have to reside in the state of UT or AZ to qualify to apply for their concealed carry permits. Register TODAY for this fun and informative class. Seating may be limited.This class may qualify you for the NY permit in several NY counties but has not been formally approved by any NY counties yet. (Reservations can be made at www.MyLegalHeat.com or by calling 877-252-1055.)

18 - Start of Southern Zone Regular Deer and Bear Hunting Season (>12/10)

18 - Autumn Tree ID Hike at Knox Farm State Park, 437 Buffalo Road, East Aurora, NY (10:00 am - 12:30 pm) (For information/register call 716-549-1050)

18 - Nature Vacation Adventure at the Reinstein Woods Environmental Education Center, 93 Honorine Drive, Depew, NY (Town of Cheektowaga) 10:00 am) Plan your next vacation as we journey through redwood forests, ocean reefs and other natural wonders in this slideshow presentation. For adults only. (For information and register call 716-683-5959 or email reinsteinwoods@dec.ny.gov)

18 - Montezuma’s Girl Scouts Cadette Badge: Trees at the Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savannah, NY (12:00 – 2:00 pm) Girl Scout Cadettes are invited to grab their naturalist hats and get to know trees. From the shade to the science, the fruit to the forest, and the legends to the lumber. To know trees is to love them! All scouts must be accompanied by a parent, leader, or chaperone. (Fee: $7/scout.) (For information or register call 315-365-3588 or e-mail montezuma@audubon.org)  

19 - Cabela's DEC Deer/Bear Check Station at Cabela’s Cheektowaga Store, 2003 Walden Avenue, Cheektowaga, NY. (10:00 am – 6:00 pm) Do your part as a hunter and bring in your harvested doe, buck or bear from NY opening weekend of shotgun/rifle to our DEC Check Station, right here in the store!  DEC Wildlife Biologists will be present to determine the animal's age, answer questions and record valuable information for their research in big-game population management.  As an added bonus, just for bringing in your harvest, you'll be ENTERED to WIN a Deer Hunter's Processing Package worth over $400!  Good luck and be safe this season! (For information call 716-608-4770)

19 - NWTF Salmon River Chapter Wheelin Sportsmen Archery and Crossbow Deer Hunt on private property in 2509 State Route 104, Mexico, NY (For information contact William Wilbur  315-440-4351  wwilbur551@aol.com)

25 - Start Of Trapping Seasons for Mink and Muskrat (>2/15/18)

25 - Start Of Trapping Seasons for Beaver in Western New York (> 3/15/18 West portion of Southern Tier/rest >2/15/18)

25 - Montezuma’s Wait Till It Gets Dark Night Walk at the Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savannah, NY (6:00 – 7:30 pm) Join guest naturalist George Steele on a walk exploring the nature of night We’ll explore not only what animals might be out there and how they are adapted to the nighttime but how we can better explore the night by tuning in to our own five senses. Some of these activities will be featured in his new book “Wait Till It Gets Dark”. The walk will be preceded by a short reading from the book and then out in to the night we will go. The new book will be available in the nature store and George will be available to sign copies after the walk. (Fee: $5/child, $7/adult, $20/family.) (For information or register call 315-365-3588 or e-mail montezuma@audubon.org)  

25 - Family Nature Quest: Turkeys at the Reinstein Woods Environmental Education Center, 93 Honorine Drive, Depew, NY (Town of Cheektowaga) 10:00 am) Discover the secret world of turkeys as we search for wild birds and make turkey calls. (For information and register call 716-683-5959 or email reinsteinwoods@dec.ny.gov)

25 - Niagara River Gulls with Buffalo Audubon naturalist Tom Kerr at the New York Power Authority fishing platform in the lower Niagara River. (10:00 am to noon) (For information/pre-registration call 585-457-3228.)

25; 12/2; 12/9; 12/16 - Free Photos with Santa! at Cabela’s Cheektowaga Store, 2003 Walden Avenue, Cheektowaga, NY. (11:00 am – 1:00 pm) Bring the kids to Cabela's to enjoy a free photo with Santa! Due to the popularity of this event, wait times may vary. (For information call 716-608-4770)

26 - End of Canada Goose Season – Part 2 - in the West Central Zone

 

Until our next meeting in the Corner, have a great time in the outdoors. This is Ron Schroder for Your In on The Outdoors for Western New York.

What Do You Think? Have something for other sportspeople? Let us know HERE.

 

 

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11 – 10 – 17

 

Welcome to this week's Conservation Chatter Corner - little bits of happenings concerning our outdoors and you, the sportspeople who enjoy being part of that outdoors.

 

REGION 9 TO OPERATE TWO DEER AND BEAR CHECK STATIONS ON OPENING WEEKEND:  The DEC will operate two deer and bear check stations on opening weekend of the regular big game season and encourages hunters to visit these stations. DEC's Region 9 annual check station, located on Route 16, in Holland, Erie County (northbound about one mile south of the town of Holland), will operate Saturday, Nov. 18 from noon until 8 p.m., and Sunday, Nov. 19 from 10 a.m. until 6 p.m. Participation is voluntary and helps DEC gather valuable data to help assess the status of the area's big game population. In cooperation with Cabela's®, DEC will also be hosting a second check station on Sunday, Nov. 19 from 10 a.m. until 6 p.m. at the Cheektowaga Cabela's, located at 2003 Walden Ave. Participants will be entered into a drawing to win a Hunter's Processing Package valued at more than $400.

Hunters are encouraged to bring their deer to the check station where DEC staff will determine deer age and collect other important biological and harvest information. With black bear season opening the same day as deer season again this year, staff will check harvested bears, as well.

Technicians from State Department of Health may also be present at the check station to examine deer for ticks and collect samples to test for Lyme disease.

As in previous years, hunters wishing to donate their harvest to "Hunters Helping the Hungry" sponsored by the Venison Donation Coalition, may drop off a deer at the Holland check station during days of operation before 6 p.m.

 

WHITE DEER TOURS BEGIN: Seneca White Deer, Inc. recently announced that it will start tours of the former Seneca Army Depot. Participants will see the world’s largest herd of white, white-tailed deer in the world, other wildlife, and the relics of 60 years of secret weapons storage. We will visit one of the 519 earth-covered concrete igloos that stored everything from pistol cartridges to tactical missiles, from conventional bombs to nuclear warheads. We can never guarantee where the mystical white deer will be, but our tour guides know the best locations and will stop for pictures as deer and wildlife appear. Tour routes will vary according to the weather and season. This is your opportunity to see the hidden world and experience the magic of the white deer yourself. Our 25 passenger, air-conditioned and heated tour buses give all our visitors a comfortable seat for a 90-minute, narrated trip behind the fences of the former Seneca Army Depot. (Cost: Adults - $30.00/Military and Seniors – $27.00/Children 5  – 17 - $15.00/Children under 5 – Free) Dates of tours are November 16/17/19/24/26/30 and December 1 – 3/7 – 10/14 – 17/21 – 23/28 – 31. (For information go to https://www.senecawhitedeer.org/.)

 

IMPROVEMENTS SCHEDULED FOR SALMON RIVER FISH HATCHERY: $150,000 in improvements represent the first phase of renovations planned for the hatchery in the coming year. The improvements include new live fish displays, revitalized public areas, signage, and interpretive displays in the visitor center. In 2018, DEC will embark on an ambitious plan to renovate and modernize the 37-year-old hatchery. Each year, tens of thousands of people, anglers and non-anglers alike, visit DEC's flagship hatchery to learn about the State's Great Lakes Fisheries resources and witness firsthand the fish culture work that supports these premier fisheries.

The Salmon River Fish Hatchery specializes in raising steelhead, chinook salmon, coho salmon, and brown trout. Originally constructed to revive and enhance the fishery of the Great Lakes, this facility produces more than 2 million fingerlings (young fish 3-5 inches long) and 1 million yearlings (fish one-year-old or over) for stockings in Lake Ontario.

The Salmon River fishery generates more than $27 million in angler expenditures annually, and an additional $85.9 million is generated by anglers fishing the open waters of Lake Ontario and other New York tributaries to Lake Ontario each year. The trout and salmon raised and stocked by the hatchery are economic drivers behind this fishery-every dollar spent at the hatchery yields $125 in angler expenditures.

Constructed in 1980, the Salmon River Hatchery requires significant improvements to maintain fish production goals. As part of the Governor's Open for Fishing and Hunting and Adventure NY initiatives, DEC plans to improve the hatchery's physical infrastructure and provide additional visitor area enhancements.

Plans for improvements include:

*A comprehensive engineering study to maximize energy efficiency and reduce water use and enhance fish production;

*Infrastructure upgrades including new windows and doors, a new heating system, backup power, cellular phone service, and a new fish ladder; and

*A reimagining of all interpretive and visitor areas for a seamless and enhanced visitor experience.

For more information concerning the Salmon River Hatchery visit DEC's website.

http://www.dec.ny.gov/press/press.html

 

KUDOS: The Hans Paller Award, named in honor of New York State Outdoor Writers' Association's founding father, is NYSOWA's highest honor and is only given out rarely and carefully to someone who has devoted a lifetime of service to NYSOWA. In its 50-year history it has only been given out five times.
In October 2017 on the 50th anniversary, NYSOWA honored Bill Hilts, Jr. with the Hans Paller Award. Hilts has spent a lifetime devoted to the good of NYSOWA. For 36 years he has served NYSOWA in almost every capacity possible. He has served as Director, Vice President, President, conference chair five times, and conference site chair for many years.
For many years Hilts has been the Newsletter editor and still advises and proofreads it for the current editor. Whenever there was a need for a conference, a committee, or just some task, he would step forward. In all his years that he has been involved he would quietly offer his support and advice to the organization without fanfare or concern for credit. In most cases he would serve as the mainstay to see that the problem was solved and the job was done right.

 

HUNTING TIPS FROM GANDER OUTDOORS:

Fall Upland Hunting

Upland hunters live for the flush of a ring-necked pheasant, drum of a ruffed grouse or the moment when a cottontail darts from a pile of brush. Your next upland hunt will be more enjoyable if you take a moment to ensure safety. You have a responsibility to yourself, other hunters, and your canine  friend to make sure everyone that hunts with you is safe and ready to go. Head out to the field with these tips in mind:

* Eye and Ear Protection – Protect your senses with these staples.

* Firearm Safety – Remember to treat every firearm as if it is loaded, never point your gun at anything you are not willing to shoot, keep your finger off the trigger until ready to fire and know what is beyond your target.

* Safety Orange – Don’t shy away from blaze. The more the better.

* Stay Sober – Save the celebrating for after the hunt.

* Pat Attention to Terrain – Slips, falls and trips are hazards you want to avoid.

* Practice – Practice isn’t only for the rookies. Fine tune your skills and improve chances of coming home successful.

(By Kevin McKown a Gander Field Expert with Gander Outdoors.)

Deer Hunting Out of a Ground Blind:

Many hunters don't have the desire to climb up trees anymore and in some areas, the landscape doesn't always provide adequate foliage to require a tree stand. Read on for three quick tips that will help you be more successful when hunting out of a ground blind this year

* Get Out Early - Our first tip is to get your blind out well before the season starts. Take some time gathering nearby vegatation and apply it to your blind to help it blend into the natural surroundings.

* Set Your Blind Down Wind - Always set your blind down wind of where you expect the deer to travel. Even by taking all the steps to be scent free, it's hard to beat a deer's keen sense of smell.

* Dark Clothing is King - Wearing dark clothing in your blind is your best bet. If you only have the window open to where you expect the deer to travel it will be dark in the blind already. Dark clothing will help conceal any movement you might make while inside your blind.

(By Tom Keenan a Gander Field Expert with Gander Outdoors.)

After The Shot:

The best way to eliminate the need for tracking is practice. Target practice before the hunt can pay huge dividends with more accurate shot placement and less tracking during the hunt. However, even the best laid plans can change. The next time you find yourself tracking a deer after the shot, remember these tips.

* Look & Listen - Post shot, watch for the deer’s reaction. Did it jump, kick, run or stand still? While you watch for a reaction be sure to listen closely. If the deer leaves your line of sight, you may be able to hear where it traveled or bedded down. These clues are crucial in determining your next move.

* Be Patient - If you didn’t witness your deer go down, and you don’t know where your deer is, the next step is patience. Fighting the urge to head out right away is hard, especially when your adrenaline is pumping, but nothing hurts tracking worse than continually bumping an injured deer farther away from you. To avoid this, it's best to wait at least 30 minutes before you move to the site of where the deer was shot. Once you're there, survey the area looking for blood, an arrow, tracks or other clues that will help you track. The weather conditions and type of blood found may also play a factor in how long you wait before heading out to track.

* Bring the Right Tools –

- - Hunting Partner – An extra set of eyes and ears may pick up something you missed.

- - Flashlight and Trail Marking Tape – Key for tracking into the evening hours and marking specific finds that you can come back to.

- - Phone, GPS or Compass – Take notes, communicate with your hunting partner and avoid getting turned around when you’re focused on the track.

- -  Firearm or Bow – It may be necessary to takeanother shot once you’ve located your deer. Where allowed, carry your firearm or bow with you while tracking.

- - Field Dressing Equipment / Deer Drag – Hopefully by the time you find your deer, field dressing will be needed. Save yourself a trip and bring the gear you need to get your animal back to camp.

- - Drinking Water – Toss some water in your pack to help you stay hydrated during the track.

(By Derek Perlich a Gander Field Expert with Gander Outdoors.)

 

DEER & BEAR HARVEST UPDATE:   Many New York hunters are already enjoying the fruits of a successful hunting season, but most harvest is yet to come. Compared to last year at this time, hunters have reported taking about the same number of deer in the Southern Zone and about 10% more in the Northern Zone.

It's a different story with bears, likely due to the warm weather and the abundance of wild foods, which limits bears' movements and reduces their exposure to hunters. In the Northern Zone, hunters have reported about 60% fewer bears than at this point in 2016. The reported harvest is tracking similarly to 2011, another year with lots of fall foods for bears. Reported bear harvest in the Southern Zone is down too, running about 20% lower than last year.

 

MEPPS SEEKING TO BUY SQUIRREL TAILS: Mepps creates hand-tied dressed hooks for its world-famous fish-catching lures. They’ve tried hundreds of other natural and synthetic materials: bear hair, fox, coyote, badger, skunk, deer, even Angus cow, but nothing works as well as squirrel tail hair. Mepps has been recycling squirrel tails for over half a century. In fact, they recycle more of them than anyone else in the world.

The fact is squirrel tails are all hair–no fur. Practically all other animals have fur tails with just a few guard hairs. Fur doesn’t have the rippling, pulsating movement of squirrel hair in the water. Squirrels are plentiful and have some of the best wild meat. Skins are used for caps, coats, glove linings and many other items, but the tail is usually thrown away. Mepps is asking you to help us recycle this valuable resource, AND is offering to reward you for your efforts!

Care & Handling of Squirrel Tails (Please follow carefully):

1) Tails are best on squirrels taken after October 1.

2) Do NOT remove the bone from the tail; deboned & split tails have no value.

3) Salt the butt end of the tail generously. Use either dry salt or dip in a strong saltwater solution.

4) Be sure the tail is straight before drying. Tails that dry curled are useless.

5) Keep tails away from flies. Best storage is in a freezer. Do NOT send tails that have been exposed to flies.

6) Do NOT put tails in a plastic bag for storage or shipment. They could heat up and spoil.

7) The best time to ship is during the cold months (December, January, February, March), although dried squirrel tails may be shipped anytime.

8) Put your name, mailing address and phone number or e-mail address, along with the tail count, inside EACH package.

9) Shipping is refunded on shipments of 50+ tails. Ship First Class Mail, First Class Parcel, Priority Mail or UPS Ground only. No refund on insurance charges or service fees charged by independent mailing services.

Send your squirrel tails to: Sheldons’, Inc., 626 Center St., Antigo, WI 54409-2496

WE DO NOT ADVOCATE HUNTING SQUIRRELS SOLELY FOR THEIR TAILS!

Questions? call toll free 800/237-9877 Mon-Thur 7:30 am to 4:00 pm or visit www.mepps.com.

 

THIS WEEK'S EVENTS: (For complete future listings go to the Calendar Page - - http://www.huntfishnyoutdoors.com/events.php)

                                         

NOVEMBER 2017

10 - Start of Trapping Season for Beaver in Central and southeast portions of New York (4/7/18)

10 - Montezuma’s Home School Nature Series: Bird Migration at the Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savannah, NY (10:00 am – 12:00 pm) The bird migration season continues and millions of birds are on the move! But, how do our feathered friends know where to go when they migrate?  Homeschooled children ages 5-12 will discover how birds uses a variety of tools to find their way to their wintering locations and back home again (Fee: $8/student) (For information or register call 315-365-3588 or e-mail montezuma@audubon.org) 

11 - FREE FISHING DAY in New York State. No license required.

11 - The Life and Times of Snowy Owls by Tom McDonald at the Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Center, 3395 U.S. Route 20 East, Seneca Falls, NY. (2:00 pm) During the presentation, Tom will cover and chronical an entire year in the life of a snowy owl from hatching, migration, and the bird's return to the Arctic Circle.  We will also explore how and where snowys move in New York State, as well as take an intimate look into their daily wintertime routines. Lastly, we will discuss environmental changes that are affecting their life cycle and the future of the tundra. Tom has worked with over 500 snowy owls and has outfitted over a dozen owls with state of the art radio transmitters. He has been an active and contributing member of the International Snowy Owl Working Group since 2009 and is the New York State regional coordinator for Project SnowStorm.  He is presently working on a book titled, "Snowy Owls of New York." The program is free. (For information, email andrea_vanbeusichem@fws.gov or call 315-568-5987.)

11 - Ladies Shoot N’ Hoot program at North Forest Rod and Gun Club, 6257 Old Niagara Road,  Lockport, NY (1:00 pm) Lesson in trap and 5-Stand as well as properly cleaning and maintaining your firearms. (For information call 716-438-2009.)

11 - Montezuma’s Boy Scout Merit Badge: Environmental Conservation at the Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savannah, NY (12:00 – 3:00 pm) Boy Scouts are invited to complete the requirements for the Environmental Conservation Merit Badge with our fun and interactive program. Please be prepared to spend time outside, and dress for the weather.  Pre-requisites and pre-registration are required.  All scouts must be accompanied by a parent, leader, or chaperone. (Fee: $8/scout.) (For information or register call 315-365-3588 or e-mail montezuma@audubon.org)  

11 - Whitney Point Sportsman Association Coonhound Event at the club on NY Route 206, Whitney Point, NY (5:00 pm – Coonhound Bench Show-Poor Boy - $12.00/7:00 pm Coonhound Event Nite Hunt-Poor Boy - $12.00) (For information call Ralph Canniff at 607-240-1129 or John Marshall 607-345-5366)

11-12 - Niagara Frontier – Springville Gun Show at the Springville Vol. Fire Hall, 405 Main St, Springville, NY (9:00 am – 4:00 pm/9:00 am - 3:00pm) 60 tables. NICS background checks available.  (Cost: $5.00/children under 12 free when accompanied by a paid adult) (For information call 716-542-9929 or email  guns@nfgshows.com)

13 – Ruffed Grouse Society Triple Flush Chapter 31st Annual Conservation & Sportsmen’s Banquet Lib’s Supper Club, 106 W. 5th Street, Elmira, NY (Social – 6:00 pm/Dinner – 7:30 pm) (For further information contact Peggy Barberi  970-589-1918  or email verdebutterfly@hotmail.com )

13 - Cayuga Bird Club Presentation - Stories from Project FeederWatch: What We Have Learned From 30 Years of Counting Birds at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology Auditorium, 159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, NY (7:30 – 9:00 pm) Project FeederWatch is a continentwide bird-counting effort in which people keep track of the birds that visit their feeders in winter. Learn about how the program works and what scientists have learned from 30 years of data collection. Why are Anna’s Hummingbirds expanding their range? Is feeding birds harmful or helpful? FeederWatch leader Emma Greig will offer insights into these and other questions about our beloved backyard birds. The presentation follows club business; everyone is welcome to attend.

14 - Close of Woodcock Hunting Season

15 - First Day Ice Fishing Tip-Ups Can Be Used Statewide (>4/30/15)

15 - Teachers In Nature: Professional Development Series – Flying WILD at the Reinstein Woods Environmental Education Center, 93 Honorine Drive, Depew, NY (Town of Cheektowaga) (4:00 – 7:00 pm) Learn how to connect your students to nature! CTLE credit hours may be available for select programs. (For information and register call 716-683-5959 or email reinsteinwoods@dec.ny.gov)

16 - Montezuma’s Migration Mania Tour meeting at the Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savannah, NY (2:30 - 5:00 pm) The Montezuma Wetlands Complex is Audubon’s first globally significant Important Bird Area because of the incredible number of waterfowl that stop here during the spring and fall migrations. Enjoy a leisurely ride in the Montezuma Audubon Center ‘s van for an excursion to Montezuma’s birding hot spots where hundreds of thousands of ducks, geese and swans can be seen. Bald Eagles, Short-eared Owls and other raptors are a possibility too! Binoculars and bird guides will be provided. (Fee: $8/child; $15/adult; $40/family) (For information or register call 315-365-3588 or e-mail montezuma@audubon.org)

16 - How To Prep Your Trophy For Mounting by taxidermist Franklin Thompson at the Southtowns Walleye Association of WNY,  monthly meeting at the club house located at 5895 Southwestern Blvd., Hamburg, NY. (7:30 pm) (For information call 716-649-8202)

17 – Close of Southern Zone Deer and Bear Bowhunting/Crossbow Seasons

17 - Close of Hunting & Trapping Seasons for Bobcat.

17 - Concealed Carry Class presented by Legal Heat at the Cabela’s Cheektowaga Store, 2003 Walden Avenue, Cheektowaga, NY (5:00 am -9:00 pm) This course is designed to meet the qualifying requirements and documentation to obtain the Utah and Arizona concealed carry permits in a fun, informative, non-intimidating class. These permits will allow combined carry reciprocity in approximately 30+ states. Legal Heat's concealed carry class covers firearms safety, handling, transportation, storage, ammunition, self-defense and firearms laws, concealed carry techniques and much more. Legal Heat's firearm training instructors are all NRA and Utah BCI certified, insured and among the most highly experienced in the industry and can answer your CCW questions. This course typically runs approximately 4 hours. This Legal Heat course does not have a 'test' or range requirement. The Utah and Arizona permits are open to residents of any state and can be applied for by mail. You do NOT have to reside in the state of UT or AZ to qualify to apply for their concealed carry permits. Register TODAY for this fun and informative class. Seating may be limited.This class may qualify you for the NY permit in several NY counties but has not been formally approved by any NY counties yet. (Reservations can be made at www.MyLegalHeat.com or by calling 877-252-1055.)

18 - Start of Southern Zone Regular Deer and Bear Hunting Season (>12/10)

18 - Autumn Tree ID Hike at Knox Farm State Park, 437 Buffalo Road, East Aurora, NY (10:00 am - 12:30 pm) (For information/register call 716-549-1050)

18 - Nature Vacation Adventure at the Reinstein Woods Environmental Education Center, 93 Honorine Drive, Depew, NY (Town of Cheektowaga) 10:00 am) Plan your next vacation as we journey through redwood forests, ocean reefs and other natural wonders in this slideshow presentation. For adults only. (For information and register call 716-683-5959 or email reinsteinwoods@dec.ny.gov)

18 - Montezuma’s Girl Scouts Cadette Badge: Trees at the Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savannah, NY (12:00 – 2:00 pm) Girl Scout Cadettes are invited to grab their naturalist hats and get to know trees. From the shade to the science, the fruit to the forest, and the legends to the lumber. To know trees is to love them! All scouts must be accompanied by a parent, leader, or chaperone. (Fee: $7/scout.) (For information or register call 315-365-3588 or e-mail montezuma@audubon.org)  

19 - Cabela's DEC Deer/Bear Check Station at Cabela’s Cheektowaga Store, 2003 Walden Avenue, Cheektowaga, NY. (10:00 am – 6:00 pm) Do your part as a hunter and bring in your harvested doe, buck or bear from NY opening weekend of shotgun/rifle to our DEC Check Station, right here in the store!  DEC Wildlife Biologists will be present to determine the animal's age, answer questions and record valuable information for their research in big-game population management.  As an added bonus, just for bringing in your harvest, you'll be ENTERED to WIN a Deer Hunter's Processing Package worth over $400!  Good luck and be safe this season! (For information call 716-608-4770)

19 - NWTF Salmon River Chapter Wheelin Sportsmen Archery and Crossbow Deer Hunt on private property in 2509 State Route 104, Mexico, NY (For information contact William Wilbur  315-440-4351  wwilbur551@aol.com)

 

Until our next meeting in the Corner, have a great time in the outdoors. This is Ron Schroder for B AYour In on The Outdoors for Western New York.

What Do You Think? Have something for other sportspeople? Let us know HERE.

 

 

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11 – 3 – 17

 

Welcome to this week=s Conservation Chatter Corner B little bits of happenings concerning our outdoors and you, the sportspeople who enjoy being part of that outdoors.

 

GOODBYE TO A FRIEND - MIKE ALLEN: Mike was a coworker at DEC and a friend of mine. He was also a friend of anyone who likes to see eagles fly in New York State. Mike, nicknamed "Eagleman" by his coworkers, was instrumental in bringing the bald eagle back from the brink of extinction in the state. In the 1960s there was one sterial pair of eagles nesting on the shores of Hemlock Lake. 2017 has a count of 323 nesting pairs and the total population of immature, adult and “visitor” eagles at about 3,000.  Mike died Saturday – flying on eagle’s wings with the angels.

 

 

MOTORISTS SHOULD USE CAUTION TO AVOID COLLISIONS WITH DEER: Deer are more active this time of the fall. Crops are being harvested and deer breeding season is in full swing.

 

 

Some suggestions to help drivers avoid deer-vehicle accidents and lessen the risk of injury or vehicle damage.

-- During the breeding season, bucks become more active searching for does with which to breed. Bucks are bolder, less wary and more susceptible to collisions with vehicles. Deer movement peaks each day near dawn and dusk.
-- Anticipate the possibility of a deer on the road and plan how to avoid a collision. Be prepared to stop suddenly, but braking too sharply or swerving may cause you to lose control and roll your vehicle.
-- Wear your seat belt.
-- When driving near shelterbelts, woodlots or creeks, especially during evening or early morning, slow down and watch for deer. Keep your headlights on bright if there is no approaching traffic.
-- When you spot a deer, assume there will be others in the same area.
-- Deer often seem to be disoriented or confused by headlights. Some react by freezing in the light, some dart into the path of the vehicle and others bolt away. Honk your horn and flash your headlights to frighten deer away. If there is other traffic on the road, activate your emergency flashers and tap your brakes to alert other drivers to the potential danger.
-- Many places where deer-vehicle collisions occur are posted with deer crossing signs.
-- If a deer is struck, the driver may take possession of it but must contact a DEC conservation officer within 24 hours to obtain a salvage tag.

 

AVOID CAVES AND MINES TO PROTECT NEW YORK'S BAT POPULATIONS: Outdoor adventurers should suspend exploration of cave and mine sites that may serve as seasonal homes for hibernating bats. Human disturbances are especially harmful to the State's bat population since the arrival of the disease known as white-nose syndrome, which has killed more than 90 percent of bats at hibernation sites in New York.

 

 

All posted notices restricting the use of caves and mines should be followed. If New Yorkers or visitors to the State encounter hibernating bats while underground, DEC encourages them to leave the area as quickly and quietly as possible.

When bats are disturbed during hibernation it forces them to raise their body temperature, depleting their fat reserves. This stored fat is the only source of energy available to the bats until the weather warms in spring.

The message comes as conservation groups and government agencies across the United States and Canada observe National Bat Week, Oct. 24-31, a celebration of bats and their important role in nature.

DEC's drones have been used to detect bat hibernation sites across New York using thermal imagery. Check out DEC's video to learn more.

Two species of bats are currently protected under federal and State endangered species law. The Indiana bat, which is sparsely distributed across New York, is a federally endangered bat listed before white-nose syndrome began impacting bat populations.

The northern long-eared bat is protected as a threatened species under both federal and New York State Endangered Species law. The current population for this formerly common bat is approximately one percent of its previous size, making the species the most severely impacted by white-nose syndrome. Nonetheless, northern long-eared bats are still widely distributed in New York. Their presence is documented in most of the 100 or so caves and mines that serve as bat hibernation sites in the State.

Anyone entering a northern long-eared bat hibernation site from October 1 through April 30, the typical period of hibernation for bats, may be subject to prosecution.

There is currently no treatment for bats suffering from white-nose syndrome. Along with the New York State Department of Health, DEC is partnering with researchers from the National Wildlife Health Center in Madison, Wisconsin, and experts at several universities across the country to better understand the disease and develop a treatment. This collaborative effort helped identify that reducing disturbances at hibernation sites during the winter can help the remaining animals survive.

For more information about white-nose syndrome, visit DEC's website.

Details about the protection of the northern long-eared bat can be found on DEC's website.

http://www.dec.ny.gov/press/press.html

 

THE GOOD GUYS AT WORK:

Search - Town of Leicester, Livingston County: On Oct. 24 at 7:40 p.m. Lt. Tim Flanagan received a request from the Livingston County Sheriff's Department for assistance in locating a 21-year-old female who had run away from her residence in Leicester. The subject had a history of running away from home. Over the course of the next three days, 15 Forest Rangers set up an incident command structure to organize search efforts involving more than 150 personnel, including DEC Environmental Conservation Officers (ECOs) and DEC K-9 units, Livingston County Sheriff's Department, numerous area fire departments, State Police, NY Federation of Search and Rescue, and community volunteers. Operations included utilizing ground crews and NY State Police Aviation, boats, and K-9 units. Livingston County Sheriff's and State Police investigators conducted an intensive investigation involving door-to-door interviews and issuing a Missing Vulnerable Alert. Crews searched wooded areas outward from the residence, with unsuccessful results. At 7:20 p.m. on Oct. 26, the subject returned to the residence, at which time the family notified authorities.

Robert DeRoo Memorial Conservation Dinner and Youth Hunt - Wayne County: On Oct. 13, 33 youth hunters gathered at the Montezuma Audubon Center in Savannah to participate in the 10th Annual Robert DeRoo Memorial Youth Hunt. The hunt is put on every year through the cooperation of ECOs, the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, Montezuma Audubon Center, local sportsman federations, and area companies. At the dinner, children enjoyed a wild game meal and learned about wildlife management and conservation, gun and hunter safety, and how to be ethical hunters. Experts talked about dog handling, hunting techniques, and how to properly clean game. Eight 14- and 15-year-olds were assisted in the youth deer hunt by Lt. Matthew Lochner and Lt. Aaron Gordon, ECOs Kevin Thomas and Anthony Drahms, and volunteers, and several kids were lucky enough to harvest their first deer with the help of these guides. Eighteen youth participated in the waterfowl and pheasant hunts with the help of volunteers and ECOs Drahms, Mark Colesante, Scott Sincebaugh, Scott Angotti, David Thomas, and Zach Prentice.

K-9 Assists in Finding Fleeing Subject - Steuben County: On Oct. 21, ECO Matthew Baker responded to assist the Steuben County Sheriff's Office with a motor vehicle accident in which the operator fled on foot in the town of Wayland. The vehicle had left the roadway and crashed into a parked vehicle in the driveway of a residence. The operator was confronted by the homeowner and subsequently fled down an embankment after seeing a Sheriff's Deputy approach. After arriving on scene and speaking with the Deputy, ECO Baker learned the operator was a registered sex offender, had two stolen license plates on the vehicle, and had a suspended license. ECO Fay Fuerch and K-9 Handley responded to the scene. The suspect's sneaker was located. A short time later, a Sheriff's Deputy spotted the suspect running into a cornfield. ECO Baker set up a perimeter and K-9 Handley was redeployed into the cornfield and located the suspect sitting in a row of standing corn. The suspect surrendered upon seeing the K-9 and the Deputy and ECO Baker took the suspect into custody without incident.

Illegal Disposal of Abandoned Automotive Repair Shop - Chautauqua County: On Oct. 23, ECO Jerry Kinney completed an investigation into the illegal disposal of a commercial business located at 2799 State Rt. 20 in the town of Sheridan. The automotive garage had been in poor condition for several years and the owner of the building decided to borrow a friend's excavator and dig a large hole in an attempt to demolish and bury the building. Nearly half the demolished building was placed in the hole prior to ECO Kinney receiving an anonymous complaint. After speaking with the property owner, ECO Kinney determined that asbestos abatement was not completed as required for all commercial demolitions. The waste needed to be legally disposed of at a regulated facility and not buried on site. The owner was cited for illegal disposal of solid waste, returnable to the Town of Sheridan Court.  

 

DEC ENCOURAGES PUBLIC TO PROMOTE ARBOR DAY WITH ARTWORK: The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) is now accepting submissions for artwork to help celebrate Arbor Day 2018. The Arbor Day Planning Committee is accepting original art and photography submissions to be selected as the 2018 New York State Arbor Day Poster.

DEC will accept submissions on behalf of the committee through December 31, 2017. The winning artist is honored at the annual State Arbor Day celebration, held on the last Friday in April.

The Arbor Day Committee includes representatives from DEC, The Empire State Forest Foundation, NYS Arborist Association, NYS Department of Agriculture and Markets, and the International Paper Company.

Artwork submissions should be sent directly to arborday@dec.ny.gov. The winning artwork will be replicated as the official 2018 New York State Arbor Day Poster and distributed at schools, libraries, government offices, nursery and landscaping businesses, and environmental organizations throughout the state.

For more information about the Arbor Day Artwork contest visit DEC's website or email arborday@dec.ny.gov. To obtain past New York State Arbor Day posters, contact any local DEC forestry office or call 518-402-9428.

 

FEEDER BIRDS: IDENTIFICATION AND BEHAVIOR: Bird feeding is a joyful reminder of the wild—right in your backyard. And there's so much more to feeding birds than keeping the feeders well stocked. Ready to confidently distinguish among the finches and the sparrows?

Learn how to attract more species? Decode feeder bird body language? Recognize the dramas unfolding at your feeder?

The Cornell Lab's Bird Academy has created a new online course, Feeder Birds: Identification and Behavior, to help you get more out of your bird feeding experience.

 

 

Learn Tricky IDs with SnapID: Innovative New Practice Tool

Build your confidence with easily confused species at your feeder, such as Purple and House Finch. As you play and replay SnapID, your winning streaks reveal the moment when you've mastered those tricky IDs.

Decode Bird Body Language

Gain fascinating insight into your feeder birds' lives and social interactions through subtle body language. We will teach you how to interpret bird behaviors and help you uncover a whole new way to appreciate and enjoy feeder birds.

Attract New Species to Your Feeder

The key to drawing new birds to your feeders is getting a handle on who eats what (and why!). Get the full scoop on feeding styles so that you can tailor your feeding setup to attract the birds you most wish would visit your backyard. 

As a bonus for participating in this course, we'll send you a free high quality double-sided color poster of the common feeder birds (East and West) and provide a one-year membership to the FeederWatch citizen science project. 

 

THIS WEEK'S EVENTS: (For complete future listings go to the Calendar Page - http://www.huntfishnyoutdoors.com/events.php)

NOVEMBER:                                         

4 - Start of Southern Zone Deer and Bear Crossbow Seasons (>11/17)

4-5 – Little Valley Volunteer Fire Department Sportsmen’s Show at the Cattaraugus County Fair Grounds, 501 Erie Street, Little Valley, NY (Sat. 9:00 am – 4:00 pm/Sun. 9:00am – 3:00 pm) (Cost: $5.00/12 and under free) (65 Tables) Fire Arms, Ammo, Hunting and Fishing Supplies (New & Old ). All federal, state and local firearm ordinances and laws must be obeyed. (For information call Jim Miller  716-938-6928, email lvsc1982@yahoo.com or go to http://www.lvvfd.com)

5 - Niagara Frontier - NYS Military Collectors Show at Syracuse, NY (8:30 am - 2:00 pm) The NYS Military Collectors Show is held at Veterans of Foreign Wars and hosted by Niagara Frontier Gun Shows. All federal, state and local firearm ordinances and laws must be obeyed. There are NO Guns for sale or display at this show. Military Collectibles – swords, medals, patches, headgear, flags, clothing, historical items, surplus, documents, pictures, etc. (Admission: $5.00) (For more information call Bruce Johnston  716-542-9929 or email  nfgshows@aol.com  or go to http://nfgshows.com)

6 - Sapsucker Woods Monday Night Seminar - Arthur Singer: The Wildlife Art of An American Master at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology Auditorium, 159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, NY (7:30 – 9:00 pm) The sons of renowned bird artist Arthur Singer will speak about their father’s life and work, and have just released a biography called Arthur Singer, The Wildlife Art of an American Master, a two-year labor of love. Arthur Singer (1917-1990) redefined the concept of the bird guide with his 1966 release, The Golden Field Guide to Birds of North America, and millions have enjoyed Singer’s work published in books, magazines, prints, and commemorative stamps. A selection of Singer’s original bird artwork will be on display at the Cornell Lab from November 2, 2017 through February 2018. The book will be available for purchase and signing at the Wild Birds Unlimited store in the Visitor Center. This seminar is being streamed live

8 - Teachers In Nature: Professional Development Series – STEM in the Schoolyard at the Reinstein Woods Environmental Education Center, 93 Honorine Drive, Depew, NY (Town of Cheektowaga) (4:00 – 7:00 pm) Learn how to connect your students to nature! CTLE credit hours may be available for select programs. (For information and register call 716-683-5959 or email reinsteinwoods@dec.ny.gov)

9 – Close of Hunting seasons for Snipe, Rails & Gallinules

10 - Start of Trapping Season for Beaver in Central and southeast portions of New York (4/7/18)

10 - Montezuma’s Home School Nature Series: Bird Migration at the Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savannah, NY (10:00 am – 12:00 pm) The bird migration season continues and millions of birds are on the move! But, how do our feathered friends know where to go when they migrate?  Homeschooled children ages 5-12 will discover how birds uses a variety of tools to find their way to their wintering locations and back home again (Fee: $8/student) (For information or register call 315-365-3588 or e-mail montezuma@audubon.org) 

11 - FREE FISHING DAY in New York State. No license required.

11 - Montezuma’s Boy Scout Merit Badge: Environmental Conservation at the Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savannah, NY (12:00 – 3:00 pm) Boy Scouts are invited to complete the requirements for the Environmental Conservation Merit Badge with our fun and interactive program. Please be prepared to spend time outside, and dress for the weather.  Pre-requisites and pre-registration are required.  All scouts must be accompanied by a parent, leader, or chaperone. (Fee: $8/scout.) (For information or register call 315-365-3588 or e-mail montezuma@audubon.org)  

11 - Whitney Point Sportsman Association Coonhound Event at the club on NY Route 206, Whitney Point, NY (5:00 pm – Coonhound Bench Show-Poor Boy - $12.00/7:00 pm Coonhound Event Nite Hunt-Poor Boy - $12.00) (For information call Ralph Canniff at 607-240-1129 or John Marshall 607-345-5366)

11-12 - Niagara Frontier – Springville Gun Show at the Springville Vol. Fire Hall, 405 Main St, Springville, NY (9:00 am – 4:00 pm/9:00 am - 3:00pm) 60 tables. NICS background checks available.  (Cost: $5.00/children under 12 free when accompanied by a paid adult) (For information call 716-542-9929 or email  guns@nfgshows.com)

 

Until our next meeting in the Corner, have a great time in the outdoors. This is Ron Schroder for Your In on The Outdoors for Western New York.

 

What Do You Think? Have something for other sportspeople? Let us know HERE.

 

 

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10 – 27 – 17

 

Welcome to this week=s Conservation Chatter Corner B little bits of happenings concerning our outdoors and you, the sportspeople who enjoy being part of that outdoors.

 

REMAINING DEER MANAGEMENT PERMITS AVAILABLE FOR HUNTERS: remaining Deer Management Permits (DMPs) in several Wildlife Management Units (WMUs) will be available to hunters beginning Nov. 1.

Deer Management Permits allow hunters to harvest antlerless deer and are issued for specific WMUs to control deer populations. In some WMUs, all applicants received permits during the initial application process and the DMP target has not been reached. In these units, DEC will re-open the DMP application process on a first-come, first-served basis. Hunters may apply for up to two additional DMPs in these WMUs at any DEC license sales outlet beginning Nov. 1.

Leftover DMPs are not available by phone, mail, or internet. Applications must be made at license issuing outlets. Applicants who previously paid the $10 application fee during the initial application period, or are exempt from the application fee, will not be charged for this additional application. Hunters who did not previously apply for a deer management permit are required to pay the $10 application fee.

Applications for leftover DMPs will be accepted for the following WMUs: 1C, 3M, 3R, 3S (bowhunting-only), 7F, 7H, 7J, 8A, 8C (bowhunting-only), 8F, 8G, 8H, 8J, 8N, 8R, 9A, 9F, and 9G. Additionally, Bonus DMPs are available for hunters who successfully take an antlerless deer in WMUs 1C, 3S, 4J, or 8C.
For WMU locations, refer to the
2017-18 Hunting and Trapping Regulations Guide on DEC's website.

During this extended application period, DEC will issue DMPs for an individual WMU until the target issuance quota is achieved. The status of permits will be reviewed daily, and as individual units are filled they will be removed from the list of those available the following day. A list of units with leftover DMPs will be routinely updated on DEC's website or via the DMP Hotline at 1-866-472-4332.

 

DUCKS UNLIMITED LAUNCHES NATIONAL SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM: Ducks Unlimited (DU) launched its inaugural national scholarship program offering graduating high school seniors who are DU members the opportunity to advance their education.

Starting in 2018, DU will annually award 61, one-time scholarships, funded on an annual basis through the Youth & Education Endowment, to eligible applicants at the following levels:
50 Varsity Scholarships at $500 each
10 Conservation Scholarships at $1,000 each
1 National Scholarship of $10,000
"We are very proud to be able to give back to our high school members who support DU in a variety of ways," said Doug Schoenrock, DU senior vice president and chairman of the national youth and education committee. "These young men and women have made a huge impact for our organization, and it is time for us to do the same for them."
The online application is now open and will close on Jan. 15. Applicants will need to provide their high school transcript, DU member/volunteer history and a list of any service or academic awards received. In addition, applicants will be required to write a 300-word essay describing their most memorable outdoor experience and how it has impacted their view on conservation. All applications will be reviewed by DU's National Scholarship Selection Committee and recipients will be chosen based on the merits of those submissions.
The list of scholarship recipients will be sent to all applicants by April 15 with awarded checks released to the student's college or university prior to registration. Recipients will be recognized in Ducks Unlimited magazine, and the national scholarship winner will be announced at the DU National Convention. (For more information visit
www.ducks.org/scholarship)

 

NY OPEN FOR HUNTING & FISHING INITIATIVE: Governor Cuomo's NY Open for Fishing and Hunting Initiative is an effort to improve recreational opportunities for sportsmen and women and to boost tourism activities throughout the state. This initiative includes streamlining fishing and hunting licenses, reducing license fees, improving access for fishing and increasing hunting opportunities in New York State.
In support of this initiative, this year's budget includes $6 million in NY Works funding to support creating 50 new land and water access projects to connect hunters, anglers, bird watchers and others who enjoy the outdoors to more than 380,000 acres of existing state and easement lands that have gone largely untapped until now. These 50 new access projects include building new boat launches, installing new hunting blinds and building new trails and parking areas. In addition, the 2014-15 budget includes $4 million to repair the state's fish hatcheries; and renews and allows expanded use of crossbows for hunting in New York State.
This year's budget also reduces short-term fishing licenses fees; increases the number of authorized statewide free fishing days to eight from two; authorizes DEC to offer 10 days of promotional prices for hunting, fishing and trapping licenses; and authorizes free Adventure Plates for new lifetime license holders, discounted Adventure Plates for existing lifetime license holders and regular fee Adventure Plates for annual license holders.

KUDOS:
NY FISHERIES SPECIALIST RECEIVES NATIONAL AWARD: David B. MacNeill of Syracuse, NY, was awarded the 2017 William Q. Wick Visionary Career Leadership Award presented by the National Sea Grant Extension Assembly at its biennial meeting in Oregon earlier this month. The Wick award is the highest honor given to Sea Grant Extension personnel by their peers. MacNeill was selected for the honor from among the 571 Sea Grant Extension professionals serving across the United States.
MacNeill, who recently retired, served 28 years as the Great Lakes Fisheries and Ecosystem Health Specialist with New York Sea Grant Extension, based at SUNY Oswego. Research, extension and outreach work by MacNeill has advanced the communication and understanding of Great Lakes science to diverse audiences.
Highlights of the impact of the work by MacNeill include research and outreach into fish trawl methods that led to changes in how personnel on each of the Great Lakes scientifically sample fish and has improved stakeholder understanding of the data collected by trawling. His trawl design outreach information was utilized by the University of Southern Bohemia in the Czech Republic to build a new trawling vessel and gear now being used to sample on inland lakes in the European Union.
A report written by MacNeill in 2005 after assembling a panel of world-renown fisheries experts on Lake Ontario fish stocking issues is a constant reference for resource managers in New York State and, in the past three years, has helped improve Lake Ontario forage fish trawling efforts, which now take into account sampling in Canadian waters as recommended by that report.
Anglers and fisheries managers are more alert to the next generation of aquatic invasive species to watch for across the Great Lakes Basin thanks to programming developed by MacNeill.
In 2010, MacNeill and Dr. Paul Bowser of Cornell University received the first Sea Grant Association Research to Application award from the National Sea Grant Office for their research and outreach, particularly to commercial aquaculture business owners, on viral hemorrhagic septicemia, a deadly infectious fish disease.
MacNeill championed opportunities to enhance how educators communicate about the uncertainties associated with the natural environment. His programming on climate change science was the first training for all land grant and Sea Grant extension educators at Cornell University and was requested as a training for National Weather Service employees.
The Dogs and HABs publication written by MacNeill in 2014 on how pet owners can protect their dogs from toxins associated with HABs, harmful algal blooms, remains in high demand and was stocked at selected New York State Parks this past summer. Ducks Unlimited magazine shared this educational message nationwide.
MacNeill received the Great Lakes Sea Grant Network Outstanding Program Award in 1990, 1992 and 1998; the Sea Grant Advisory Service Award of Excellence in 1993; the Northeast Extension Directors Award of Excellence in 1995; and the Great Lakes Sea Grant network Superior Outreach Award in 2012.

THE GOOD GUYS AT WORK:  New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) Environmental Conservation Police Officers (ECOs) enforce the 71 Chapters of NY Environmental Conservation Law, protecting fish and wildlife and preserving environmental quality across New York.

Going After That One Fish - Chautauqua County: On Oct. 11, ECO Chris Freeman was conducting foot patrol along Canadaway Creek in the town of Dunkirk when he was approached by a concerned fisherman who explained that he had observed a fisherman standing on a log attempting to snag some vulnerable steelhead along the bank of the creek. A few minutes later, ECO Freeman caught up with the suspected fisherman still fishing from the log. ECO Freeman watched as the fisherman dropped his line straight down in front of him and rip upward in a clear snagging motion. The fisherman repeated this action several times before finally hooking a steelhead. Hooking up with the fish made the fisherman loose his balance and fall into the creek. After unhooking the fish, rather than releasing it, the fisherman headed toward the road where he was met by ECO Freeman. When confronted with his illegal fishing tactics, the fisherman admitted that knew he was in violation but simply stated "It looked like an easy catch." The fisherman was issued two tickets for taking steelhead by snatching and for keeping a foul hooked steelhead, returnable to the Town of Dunkirk Court.



ECO Freeman with the illegally caught steelhead

 

Dangerous Crossing - Oswego County: On Sept. 5, Major Matt Revenaugh was working at the DEC Training Academy in Pulaski when an individual rushed in asking staff to call 911. The person explained that a car had just been hit by a train at the CSX crossing on Centerville Road, near the Academy. Major Revenaugh and Sgt. Kati Reynolds grabbed first aid equipment and rushed to the scene, where they found a silver SUV pushed nearly 100 yards down the track from the crossing. A quick assessment revealed the elderly vehicle operator was suffering only minor cuts and scrapes. Had the train operator been unable to stop the train, the car and operator would have ended up making the 50-foot drop from the railway bridge into the Salmon River. Evidence at the scene indicated the driver failed to observe the warnings at the crossing and drove through the crossing arm and into the path of the moving train.




Sgt. Reynolds and State Police at the accident scene

 

WHEELCHAIR ACCESSIBLE FISHING ACCESS CONSTRUCTED ON SCRIBA CREEK:

A new fishing access site on Scriba Creek has been completed at the north end of the Oneida Hatchery in the Village of Constantia (Oneida County). The site accommodates 5-7 anglers and has lowered railing for anglers fishing out of wheelchairs. The site is fully accessible and includes two picnic tables built to accommodate a wheel chair at either end. Fishing is generally best in the spring, but there are fish in the creek most of the year.

 

SAFETY, NOT FOOD, ENTICES GEESE TO CITIES: Canada Geese have shifted their winter range northward in recent years by taking advantage of conditions in urban areas—but what specific features of cities make this possible? A new study from The Condor: Ornithological Applications suggests that rather than food, geese are seeking safety, congregating in areas where they can avoid hunters and be buffered from the coldest winter temperatures.


Heath Hagy of the University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign and his colleagues captured 41 geese in the Greater Chicago Metropolitan Area between 2014 and 2016 and fitted them with radio transmitters to track their movements. While the geese used a remarkable variety of urban habitats, they preferred deep water and rivers over green space such as parks when temperatures dropped enough to tax their ability to maintain their body temperature. For geese that remained within the metropolitan area, winter survival was 100%, but this dropped to 48% for those that emigrated out to forage in surrounding agricultural fields, countering expectations that the proximity of agricultural habitat may be a factor in geese's winter expansion in the area. Together, these results suggest that sanctuary may be a higher priority for wintering geese than good foraging habitat.
Better understanding how geese use urban habitat in winter may help reduce human–wildlife conflicts such as collisions with airplanes. "The growth of urban areas and northward expansion of row-crop agriculture have changed the way geese migrate. Unfortunately, some of our large cities have become goose sanctuaries, where resident geese and migratory geese congregate during winter to escape hunting pressure," says Hagy. "Although additional research is needed, our data will be useful to guide goose harassment efforts, which may offset the benefits of remaining inside urban areas during winter and open hunting seasons."
"This work offers comprehensive insights into the biology and behavior of a large wintering population of Canada geese that inhabits a major metropolitan area in the mid-western U.S. Appropriately grounded in an energetic context, the study thoroughly describes how Canada geese utilize the urban environment under varying weather conditions and demonstrates the survival benefits of urban adaptation," according to The Ohio State University's Robert Gates, a wildlife management expert who was not involved in the research. "Findings from this study provide a firm biological grounding for the development and implementation of management actions to alleviate human–Canada goose conflicts in urban areas."
(Survival and habitat selection of Canada Geese during autumn and winter in metropolitan Chicago, USA is available at
http://www.bioone.org/doi/abs/10.1650/CONDOR-16-234.1.)

 

THIS WEEK'S EVENTS: (For complete future listings go to the Calendar Page - http://www.huntfishnyoutdoors.com/events.php)

27 – Ruffed Grouse Society Central New York Chapter 37th Annual Conservation & Sportsmen’s Banquet at The Whitetail At Woodcrest Golf Course, 6200 Old Cheese Factory Road, (Route 173 & Cheese Factory Road) , Manlius, NY. (Social – 6:00 pm/Dinner – 7:30 pm) Must pre-register by October 20th.(For further information contact Bob Papworth  315-471-0914 email rppwrth@verizon.net or Tim McCarthy 315-696-8987 email tmac@twcny.rr.com )

27 - Clymer Coonhunters Club Coonhound Event at their clubhouse on 8023 Ravlin Hill Road, Panama, NY (8:00 pm – Coonhound Event Nite Hunt - $20.00) (For information call Willis Miller  716-355-4540)

27 - Concealed Carry Class presented by Legal Heat at the Cabela’s Cheektowaga Store, 2003 Walden Avenue, Cheektowaga, NY (5:00 – 9:00 pm) This course is designed to meet the qualifying requirements and documentation to obtain the Utah and Arizona concealed carry permits in a fun, informative, non-intimidating class. These permits will allow combined carry reciprocity in approximately 30+ states. Legal Heat's concealed carry class covers firearms safety, handling, transportation, storage, ammunition, self-defense and firearms laws, concealed carry techniques and much more. Legal Heat's firearm training instructors are all NRA and Utah BCI certified, insured and among the most highly experienced in the industry and can answer your CCW questions. This course typically runs approximately 4 hours. This Legal Heat course does not have a 'test' or range requirement. The Utah and Arizona permits are open to residents of any state and can be applied for by mail. You do NOT have to reside in the state of UT or AZ to qualify to apply for their concealed carry permits. Register TODAY for this fun and informative class. Seating may be limited.This class may qualify you for the NY permit in several NY counties but has not been formally approved by any NY counties yet. (Reservations can be made at www.MyLegalHeat.com or by calling 877-252-1055.)

28 – Start of Hunting Seasons for Ducks, Coots and Mergansers – Part 1 - in Western Zone (>12/6)

28 - Start of Canada Goose Seasons - Part 2 - in the West Central (>11/26) and South Zones (>12/17) of Western New York

28 - Cabela’s Sportsman’s Seminars - at Cabela’s Cheektowaga Store, 2003 Walden Avenue, Cheektowaga, NY. (11:00 am – 12:00 pm) - Preparedness: Woods Pack for Survival - When you venture into the deep outdoors, are you carrying the items you might need to survive?  Whether it's a hunting trip, remote fishing expedition, long hike or any other activity in the backwoods, come learn about the essential items you'll need to include in your woods pack to be fully prepared for almost anything. (12:00 – 2:00 pm) – Wild Game Processing - So you shot a big-game animal.  Now what?  In this seminar, you'll learn the basics of butchering wild game and where each cut of meat comes from.  After watching this demonstration, you'll be able to take your newfound skills to the field and do it yourself. (12:00 – 1:00 pm) - Camouflage: Technologies and Patterns - Don't be lost in the mix of camouflage options.  Head in to our camo department to learn the features, advantages, and benefits of the various camo patterns and types of apparel. We'll test some technologies out and have you walking away with the knowledge on what camo rightly suits your hunting needs. (2:00 – 3:00 pm) - Pick the Right Knife - Knives range from no-nonsense, fixed blades to compact pocket knives, and specialized knives for scenarios such as quartering your elk or deer in the field.  Since no one knife will suit every task, some people carry multiple knives.  However, with some careful consideration you can select a single knife that will handle most of your needs. (For information call 716-608-4770)

28 – The Beauty of Bats at The Portville Free Library, 1 North Main Street, Portville, NY (10:00 – 11:30 am) While it is a fact that bats rank very high on the list of most disliked species, it is also a fact bats are greatly misunderstood. Bats are not the creepy, scary and vicious animals they are sometimes made out to be. Folks who love animals know that all animals deserve to be treated with kindness and bats are no exception. Join us for this entertaining and enlightening talk as we explore the world of bats. We will discover how necessary, beneficial and wonderful bats are to have as friends and neighbors. (Cost: Free for members, $5.00 for non-members and free for children 13 and under. Minors must be accompanied by an adult.) Register by 4:00 pm October 26. (For information/register call 716-933-0187.)

28 - Whitney Point Sportsman Association Coonhound Event at the club on NY Route 206, Whitney Point, NY (4:00 pm - Coonhound Water Race-Poor Boy - $12.00/Coonhound Bench Show- Poor Boy - $12.00/7:00 pm Coonhound Nite Hunt-Poor Boy - $15.00) (For information call Ralph Canniff at 607-240-1129)

28 – Aliens at the Reinstein Woods Environmental Education Center, 93 Honorine Drive, Depew, NY (Town of Cheektowaga) (2:30 pm) Are there visitors from outer space in Reinstein Woods? No, just plants and animals introduced from other parts of the world. Join a guided tour to meet some of these alien invaders. (For information and register call 716-683-5959 or email reinsteinwoods@dec.ny.gov)

29 - KTBA Bass Club 8th Annual "STONE COLD" Tournament on Oneida Lake (6:00 am – 2:00 pm) (Cost: $80.00 boat for Members/$100.00 boat for Non-Members) (For information contact Tom Testa - tuzzytny@yahoo.com )

30 – Close Of Trapping Season for Fisher

31 - Status of Brook Trout in WNY at the WNY Chapter of Trout Unlimited’s October meeting at the Donovan American Legion Post, 3210 Genesee Street, Cheektowaga, NY. (7:30 pm)  Speakers are Scott Cornett of the Allegany Office of DEC and Tom Hoffman of the US Fish & Wildlife Service. Open to the public.

NOVEMBER 2017

1 - Leftover DMPs go on sale. Permits will not be available by phone, mail or the internet only in person at a license issuing agent on a first come/first served basis. 

1 – Migration at Montezuma at the Beaver Lake Nature Center, 8477 East Mud Lake Road, Baldwinsville, NY (8:00 am – 1:00 pm) Mid-November is the peak migration for waterfowl at Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge. This van tour will focus on viewing and learning the natural history of the species that frequent the area. Some days this time of year, the refuge sees 150,000 water birds at one time. Advance registration required. (Cost $25.00 per person) (For information and to register call 315-638-7382)

3 - Close of Turkey Hunting Season

4 - Start of Southern Zone Deer and Bear Crossbow Seasons (>11/17)

                                     

Until our next meeting in the Corner, have a great time in the outdoors. This is Ron Schroder for Your In on The Outdoors for Western New York.

What Do You Think? Have something for other sportspeople? Let us know HERE.

 

 

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10 – 20 – 17

 

Welcome to this week's Conservation Chatter Corner - little bits of happenings concerning our outdoors and you, the sportspeople who enjoy being part of that outdoors.

 

DEC PUBLIC MEETINGS ON TROUT STREAM: New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) announced today that it will hold two public meetings in Region 7 this fall as part of a series of statewide meetings on trout stream management. The meetings will provide an overview of the state's approach to trout stream management and elicit feedback from anglers regarding their preferences and expectations for the management of trout stream waters.

The meetings will feature a 30-minute presentation by DEC Fisheries staff describing current management practices for trout streams and will include key findings of a statewide study completed in 2015. Following the presentation, meeting attendees will have an opportunity a to provide input and feedback regarding their preferences and expectations for the management of trout streams.

The upcoming meetings are scheduled for:

Monday, October 23 6:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. (Doors open at 6:30 p.m. and the presentation begins at 7:00 p.m.)

NYSDEC Region 8 Office

6274 East Avon-Lima Rd. (Routes 5 and 20), Avon, NY 14414

Thursday, October 26 6:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. (Doors open at 6:30 p.m. and the presentation begins at 7:00 p.m.)
Whitney Point High School
10 Keibel Road Whitney Point, NY 13862

Since 1990, DEC has generally managed trout streams for a desired catch rate. DEC fisheries managers seek to examine how well the current management goal fits the purpose of satisfying the desires of today's recreational trout stream anglers. Understanding the fishery characteristics valued most by trout stream anglers will help DEC biologists to identify and develop effective future management strategies.

 

STATE PARKS GRAND ISLAND WATERFOWL BLIND LOTTERY: With the regular duck and goose seasons opening up on October 28, the New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation has announced the lottery drawing guidelines for Beaver Island State Park, West River Parkway, Strawberry Island and Motor Island. Waterfowl blind permits will be drawn every Monday, Wednesday and Friday beginning on Oct. 27 in the Beaver Island Club House basement at 6:30 p.m. sharp. Doors open at 6 p.m. Drawings will take place through Dec. 4 (duck season closes on Dec. 6). To participate in the lottery drawings, hunters must be present, show a valid hunting license with a signed duck stamp, proof of completion of a waterfowl ID course and proof of registration in the Harvest Information Program (HIP). Since Canada goose season continues through Dec. 17, blinds will be conducted through call-ins starting Wednesday, Dec. 6 from 9 a.m. to noon at 773-2010 (also every Monday, Wednesday and Friday through Dec. 15).

 

THE GOOD GUYS AT WORK: New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) Environmental Conservation Police Officers (ECOs) enforce the 71 Chapters of NY Environmental Conservation Law, protecting fish and wildlife and preserving environmental quality across New York.

Injured Bald Eagle - Orleans County: On Sept. 19, ECO Kevin Holzle responded to a report of an injured immature bald eagle in a field in the town of Kendall. The concerned farmer had viewed the eagle the previous day feeding in the squash field and became concerned with the bird's condition the next morning, when he was able to walk right up to it. ECO Holzle arrived on scene and determined that the eagle needed medical attention. DEC Wildlife staff arrived to assist in the capture and transport of the eagle to a licensed rehabilitator for treatment, recovery, and future release.

Lost and Found - Genesee County: On Sept. 15, ECO Fay Fuerch was contacted by a Genesee County Sheriff's Deputy concerning a convicted felon who accidentally shot himself in the leg the night before in the town of Darien. The Deputy requested ECO Fuerch's partner, K-9 Handley, to help locate a .22 caliber rifle that was missing. The victim initially explained that he was holding a .22 round with a pair of pliers and hit the primer end with a hammer causing the round to discharge and enter his leg above his knee and exit near his ankle while he was in a garage on his grandfather's property. This story did not make sense and the grandfather advised that there was a .22 rifle missing from an abandoned vehicle on the property. The victim asked for a lawyer when questioned about the rifle, so its location remained unknown. The grandfather was fully cooperative and gave consent to search the property, including the garage. A quick search of the garage didn't locate the rifle and when K-9 Handley searched the woods and surrounding property, he didn't locate the rifle. ECO Fuerch returned the following day and took a closer look in the garage, locating the rifle hidden among pieces of rebar and other long, slender objects. The grandfather confirmed it was the missing rifle. All of the evidence was turned over to the Sheriff's Department and charges are pending.

Opening Day Hunting Over Bait - Monroe County: Late in the day on Sept. 30, ECO Kevin Holzle received information from ECO Eoin Snowden concerning a complaint of a baited tree stand in the town of Webster. The complainant wanted to remain anonymous and shared little information for ECOs to investigate. The following morning, the opening day of the early archery season for deer, ECO Holzle spent an hour moving slowly through thick brush toward a tree stand, attempting to locate the hunter and the illegal bait. ECO Holzle spotted the location within 40 yards of the hunter and found him hunting over two freshly laid piles of corn. The hunter was issued a summons for hunting deer with the aid of bait returnable to the Town of Webster Court.

 

DEC DUCK HUNTER SURVEY: DEC is seeking your opinion on waterfowl season dates!

Each year, DEC selects waterfowl hunting season dates in four of New York’s waterfowl hunting zones (Western, Northeastern, Southeastern, and Long Island). The season dates are based on U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) limits, which include maximum number of days earliest possible opening date, and latest possible closing date.

DEC, with Cornell University and the Waterfowl Hunter Task Forces around the state, have developed a survey to ensure that the perspectives of a cross-section of waterfowl hunters are considered when season dates are selected.

If you are one of the 6,000 duck hunters who receive this survey via e-mail or U.S. Postal Service, please take a few minutes to complete the questionnaire. Your opinion matters and will help shape future duck hunting seasons in the area you hunt!

 

PENNSYLVANIA: LEAD POISONING IN BALD EAGLES ON THE RISE: An increasing number of bald eagles have been admitted to wildlife-rehabilitation centers across Pennsylvania exhibiting signs of illness such as weakness, lethargy, emaciation, labored respiration and drooping wings. Blood tests often reveal that the eagles are suffering from lead toxicity. Lead poisoning occurs when toxic levels of lead are absorbed into the body. Raptors are particularly susceptible to lead poisoning because when they ingest lead particles, the acidic nature of their stomach causes rapid absorption of the metal, said Pennsylvania Game Commission Wildlife Veterinarian Justin Brown.
"Lead poisoning is a debilitating disease in bald eagles," said Brown. "You have this powerful bird and you find it in the field – limp and weak. You can pick it up and it doesn't even know you are there. "
After a blood test reveals that a bald eagle has lead toxicity, intensive treatments can begin. Drugs treatments can take the metal out of the body's tissue and blood. And if metal is detected in an eagle's digestive system, it can be flushed out and removed. But treatment often is unsuccessful because the eagles have already absorbed too much lead.
In the past year, Red Creek Wildlife Center has treated 12 bald eagles with lead toxicity and only one of those eagles survived, said center director Peggy Hentz.
"As there are more eagles in the wild, we are getting more eagles in the wildlife-rehabilitation centers and the problem has become evident," Hentz said.
Since 2006, the Game Commission has been conducting necropsies on bald eagles that die to monitor causes of death and potential diseases. The data from 2006 to 2016 reveals that approximately one-third of the state's known bald-eagle mortalities are associated with a toxin, with lead being the most common. In fact, lead toxicity is a significant cause of death in all raptors, not just eagles.
Lead is a heavy, relatively inexpensive, malleable metal, which often is used in fishing lures, ammunition and other materials. Research has shown that fragments of lead can be found as far as 18 inches from a bullet's point of impact. In addition, 30 to 40 percent of the lead can remain in the target after the bullet has passed through. Small-game carcasses and big-game entrails that remain in the field could contain lead that might be ingested by opportunistic scavenging eagles and other wildlife.
The main source of ingested lead has not been clearly identified. However, hunters can help to reduce the potential that bald eagles ingest lead fragments from the remains of harvested game animals by burying the carcasses and gutpiles, or by covering them with branches. Doing so will make it less likely that aerial scavengers will find and consume the remains, which might contain lead particles. Hunters also could consider eliminating lead from their harvests by using non-lead ammunition.
Although lead toxicity has been identified as a leading cause of mortality among the state's eagles, the eagle population continues to thrive and increase in number. In the early 1980s, there were only three active bald eagle nests in Pennsylvania. Today, thanks to the restoration efforts of the Pennsylvania Game Commission and partners, there are more than 250 active bald eagle nests in the state. Bald eagles met the requirements for removal from the state threatened species list in 2014 and are now classified as a protected species.

 

BIRD BAND REPORTING MOVES TO ONLINE ONLY: Waterfowl hunters who find bands on harvested game birds or have recovered a band are now asked to report it online to the National Bird Banding Laboratory. The toll-free 1-800-327-BAND system was discontinued in June of 2017.

The website reporting system: streamlines data collection / reduces error / is mobile-friendly /

provides the hunter with instant information about the bird

Biologists place these uniquely numbered bands on many species of birds. These birds may be recaptured in the future by biologists, may be found dead by the public, or harvested by hunters. Data from the bird banding program helps biologists understand how birds are impacted by environmental conditions and is used to set annual migratory game bird regulations, including season lengths and bag limits.

 

THIS WEEK'S EVENTS: (For complete future listings go to the Calendar Page - http://www.huntfishnyoutdoors.com/events.php)

OCTOBER 2017

20 - End of Northern Zone Deer & Bear Bowhunting and Crossbow Seasons

20 - Montezuma’s Home School Nature Series: Owls at the Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savannah, NY (10:00 am – 12:00 pm) When you hear the word “owl,” what comes to mind? Do you picture a mysterious big-eyed bird of the night? Maybe you think about a symbol of wisdom or a character in books. Clearly, people are fascinated by owls and the best way to understand them is to learn as much as possible about them.  Homeschooled children ages 5-12 will explore owl habitat, their unique characteristics and conservation projects at Montezuma. (Fee: $8/student) (For information or register call 315-365-3588 or e-mail montezuma@audubon.org) 

20 - Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge Nature Storytime Walk at the Refuge Visitor Center, 3395 U.S. Route 20 East, Seneca Falls, NY. Led by Librarian and The Lodge Nature Store Manager, Gayle James, Nature Storytime Story Walk is recommended for children in pre-K through 3rd grade.  There is no fee for this program. Participants will take a walk with Miss Gayle along the Seneca Trail to see how the story of Little Boo unfolds!  Each page from the book is stationed along the trail, along with an activity. Parents are required to stay with their children during the program.  Please come prepared for the weather; the majority of the program is outside on the trail. Program is rain or shine (If it’s too rainy, we will move the program to inside the Visitor Center). For information, email andrea_vanbeusichem@fws.gov or call 315-568-5987.)

20 - Chemung County Coon Hunters Association Inc Coonhound Event at their clubhouse on Rumsey Hill Road, Van Etten, NY. (5:00pm – Coonhound Event Field Trial - $12.00/6:30pm – Coonhound Bench Show-Poor Boy – $12.00/8:00pm Coonhound Event Nite Hunt - $15.00) (For information call Herschel Burt at 570-596-2149)

21 - Start of Pheasant Hunting Season in Western New York (>12/31 north or >2/28/18 south)

21 - Start of Turkey Hunting Season (>11/3) 

21 - Start of Northern Zone Regular Deer and Bear Hunting Season (>12/3)

21 - Montezuma’s Happy Owl-ween at the Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savannah, NY (6:00 - 8:00 pm) We are happy to welcome back Jean Soprano, of Kindred Kingdoms Wildlife Rehabilitation, who will have live owls on display during her presentation about the silent hunters of the night. Then, join the Montezuma Audubon Center staff for an owl prowl around the woods and grasslands to search for Montezuma’s wild owls and other nighttime wildlife. (Fee: $6/child, $8/adult, $25/family.) (For information or register call 315-365-3588 or e-mail montezuma@audubon.org) 

21 - Birding 101: Class #10 at the Reinstein Woods Environmental Education Center, 93 Honorine Drive, Depew, NY (Town of Cheektowaga) (2:30 pm) Learn which birds will be in the area for the winter season. For adults and children ages 8 and older. (For information and register call 716-683-5959 or email reinsteinwoods@dec.ny.gov)

21 - Steuben County Coon Hunters, Inc. Coonhound Event at their clubhouse at 4082 Depot Street, Cameron, NY (4:30 pm - Coonhound Bench Show - $20.00/8:00 pm - Coonhound Nite Hunt - $25.00) (For information call Roger Barney at 607-695-9024 or email ten.sehguh@yenrab_jr)

21 - Whitney Point Sportsman Association Coonhound Event at the club on NY Route 206, Whitney Point, NY (4:00 pm - Coonhound Water Race-Poor Boy - $12.00/Coonhound Bench Show- Poor Boy - $12.00/7:00 pm Coonhound Event Nite Hunt-Poor Boy - $15.00) (For information call Ralph Canniff at 607-240-1129)

21 - Becoming an Outdoors-Woman (BOW) Workshop - Become Skilled with Map & Compass at Tupper Lake, NY (Cost: $50.00) (For information/register contact Adirondack Foothills Guide Service, LLC  518-359-8194  adkfoothills@yahoo.com  or go to www.adkfoothills.com)   

21 -  Letchworth Region Friends of NRA Event at the Firemens Exempt, 5939 Stone Hill Road, Lakeville, NY (5:00 pm) (Cost: $40.00) (For information call Janet Green 585-451-4988 or email jgreen102161@gmail.com )

21 - Southern Tier Bassmasters (Open) Tournament on Conesus Lake at the State Launch (ENTRY FEE: -$25/Angler --$5/optional lunker) (For information Call 585-314-7142 or email tournaments@southerntierbass.com)

21 - Whitney Point Sportsman Association Coonhound Event at the club on NY Route 206, Whitney Point, NY (4:00 pm - Coonhound Event Water Race - $12.00/6:00 pm – Coonhound Bench Show - $12.00/8:00 pm Coonhound Event Nite Hunt - $15.00) (For information call Ralph Canniff at 607-240-1129 or John Marshall 607-345-5366)

21 - Friends of NRA Event at the Lakeville Exempt Club, 5939 Stone Hill Road, Lakeville , NY. (For information contact Janet Green at 585-451-4988 or email jgreen102161@gmail.com)

21 - Owl Prowl at Klydell Wetlands, North Tonawanda, NY (6:30 – 8:00 pm) (Cost: $7.00) Space is limited. (For information/pre-register call 585-457-3228.)

21-31 – “Halloween” Event at Bass Pro Shops. Bass Pro Shops in the Finger Lakes Mall, 1579 Clark Street Road, Auburn, NY. The free event will feature activities including fun crafts for kids, a Halloween costume parade, trick-or-treating and much more. The event schedule includes: Saturday, Oct. 21, and Sunday, Oct. 22: - Noon to 5:00 pm  – Free 4x6 photo with life-size cutouts of Peanuts characters, Charlie Brown, Snoopy, Linus, Sally and Lucy (photo packages also available for sale). First 100 kids to have a photo taken will receive a free LED flashing necklace; Free crafts for kids.  Kids will have the opportunity to color a free garden tips booklet on Saturday and to decorate a felt jack-o-lantern on Sunday. Friday, Oct. 27 – 5:00–7:00 pm – FREE 4x6 photo with the Peanuts gang and decorate a Halloween bat craft. Oct. 28, Saturday – Noon-5:00 pm FREE 4x6 photo with the Peanuts gang, Decorate a Halloween pumpkin craft and Pumpkin Toss game – play for a chance to win a prize; 3:00–5:00 pm – Trick-or-Treating; 4:00 pm - Costume parade; participants receive a free jack o’ lantern tote. Sunday, Oct. 29 - Noon – 5 p.m. – FREE 4x6 photo with the Peanuts gang; Decorate a Halloween pumpkin craft; Pumpkin Toss game – play for a chance to win a prize. Oct. 30, Monday – 5:00–7:00 pm – FREE 4x6 photo with the Peanuts gang; Decorate a Halloween bat craft. Tuesday, Oct. 31 – 4:00–8:00 pm – FREE 4x6 photo with the Peanuts gang; Decorate a Halloween treat bag: Pumpkin Toss game – play for a chance to win a prize; 5:00 pm – Trick-or-treating; 6:00 pm – Costume parade; participants receive a free jack o’ lantern tote.For more information on the grant and how to enter, visit www.basspro.com/halloween. (For information call 315-258-2700 or email Manager_Finger_Lakes_NY@basspro.com)

23 - Trout Stream Management in New York at the NYSDEC Region 8 Office, 6274 East Avon-Lima Road, (Routes 5 and 20), Avon, NY (6:30 – 9:00 pm) To provide a convenient opportunity for trout stream anglers and other interested members of the public to discuss these questions with NYSDEC biologists, a series of public meetings will be held in each NYSDEC region. The meetings will feature a 30-minute presentation describing how DEC currently manages trout streams and will summarize key findings of a statewide study completed in 2015 (PDF, 2.6 MB). This will be followed by a 90-minute discussion period aimed at identifying the measures of trout stream angling quality most important to this segment of New York's the angling public. (For information call 585-226-2466)

25 – Start of Hunting & Trapping Seasons for Weasel, Skunk, Opossum, Raccoon, Red Fox and Gray Fox (>2/15/17)

25 – Start of Hunting & Trapping Seasons for Bobcat(Southern portion of Western New York (>11/17)

25 – Start Of Trapping Seasons for Coyote (>2/15/18)

25 - Start Of Trapping Season for Fisher (>10/30)

25 - Montezuma’s Bird Watching Tour at the Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savannah, NY (9:00 - 11:00 am) The peak of the waterfowl migration is upon us. Join our education staff and we’ll drive you in our van to visit several Montezuma birding hotspots where thousands of ducks, geese and swans rest and feed during their long and impressive journey. Binoculars and field guides will be provided. (Fee: $8/child; $15/adult, $40/family.) (For information or register call 315-365-3588 or e-mail montezuma@audubon.org) 

26 - Trout Stream Management in New York at the Whitney Point High School, 10 Keibel Road Whitney Point, NY (6:30 – 9:00 pm) To provide a convenient opportunity for trout stream anglers and other interested members of the public to discuss these questions with NYSDEC biologists, a series of public meetings will be held in each NYSDEC region. The meetings will feature a 30-minute presentation describing how DEC currently manages trout streams and will summarize key findings of a statewide study completed in 2015 (PDF, 2.6 MB). This will be followed by a 90-minute discussion period aimed at identifying the measures of trout stream angling quality most important to this segment of New York's the angling public. (For information call 607-753-3095)

27 – Ruffed Grouse Society Central New York Chapter 37th Annual Conservation & Sportsmen’s Banquet at The Whitetail At Woodcrest Golf Course, 6200 Old Cheese Factory Road, (Route 173 & Cheese Factory Road) , Manlius, NY. (Social – 6:00 pm/Dinner – 7:30 pm) Must pre-register by October 20th.(For further information contact Bob Papworth  315-471-0914 email rppwrth@verizon.net or Tim McCarthy 315-696-8987 email tmac@twcny.rr.com )

27 - Clymer Coonhunters Club Coonhound Event at their clubhouse on 8023 Ravlin Hill Road, Panama, NY (8:00 pm – Coonhound Event Nite Hunt - $20.00) (For information call Willis Miller  716-355-4540)

27 - Concealed Carry Class presented by Legal Heat at the Cabela’s Cheektowaga Store, 2003 Walden Avenue, Cheektowaga, NY (5:00 – 9:00 pm) This course is designed to meet the qualifying requirements and documentation to obtain the Utah and Arizona concealed carry permits in a fun, informative, non-intimidating class. These permits will allow combined carry reciprocity in approximately 30+ states. Legal Heat's concealed carry class covers firearms safety, handling, transportation, storage, ammunition, self-defense and firearms laws, concealed carry techniques and much more. Legal Heat's firearm training instructors are all NRA and Utah BCI certified, insured and among the most highly experienced in the industry and can answer your CCW questions. This course typically runs approximately 4 hours. This Legal Heat course does not have a 'test' or range requirement. The Utah and Arizona permits are open to residents of any state and can be applied for by mail. You do NOT have to reside in the state of UT or AZ to qualify to apply for their concealed carry permits. Register TODAY for this fun and informative class. Seating may be limited.This class may qualify you for the NY permit in several NY counties but has not been formally approved by any NY counties yet. (Reservations can be made at www.MyLegalHeat.com or by calling 877-252-1055.)

28 – Start of Hunting Seasons for Ducks, Coots and Mergansers – Part 1 - in Western Zone (>12/6)

28 - Start of Canada Goose Seasons - Part 2 - in the West Central (>11/26) and South Zones (>12/17) of Western New York

28 - Cabela’s Sportsman’s Seminars - at Cabela’s Cheektowaga Store, 2003 Walden Avenue, Cheektowaga, NY. (11:00 am – 12:00 pm) - Preparedness: Woods Pack for Survival - When you venture into the deep outdoors, are you carrying the items you might need to survive?  Whether it's a hunting trip, remote fishing expedition, long hike or any other activity in the backwoods, come learn about the essential items you'll need to include in your woods pack to be fully prepared for almost anything. (12:00 – 2:00 pm)Wild Game Processing - So you shot a big-game animal.  Now what?  In this seminar, you'll learn the basics of butchering wild game and where each cut of meat comes from.  After watching this demonstration, you'll be able to take your newfound skills to the field and do it yourself. (12:00 – 1:00 pm) - Camouflage: Technologies and Patterns - Don't be lost in the mix of camouflage options.  Head in to our camo department to learn the features, advantages, and benefits of the various camo patterns and types of apparel. We'll test some technologies out and have you walking away with the knowledge on what camo rightly suits your hunting needs. (2:00 – 3:00 pm) - Pick the Right Knife - Knives range from no-nonsense, fixed blades to compact pocket knives, and specialized knives for scenarios such as quartering your elk or deer in the field.  Since no one knife will suit every task, some people carry multiple knives.  However, with some careful consideration you can select a single knife that will handle most of your needs. (For information call 716-608-4770)

28 – The Beauty of Bats at The Portville Free Library, 1 North Main Street, Portville, NY (10:00 – 11:30 am) While it is a fact that bats rank very high on the list of most disliked species, it is also a fact bats are greatly misunderstood. Bats are not the creepy, scary and vicious animals they are sometimes made out to be. Folks who love animals know that all animals deserve to be treated with kindness and bats are no exception. Join us for this entertaining and enlightening talk as we explore the world of bats. We will discover how necessary, beneficial and wonderful bats are to have as friends and neighbors. (Cost: Free for members, $5.00 for non-members and free for children 13 and under. Minors must be accompanied by an adult.) Register by 4:00 pm October 26. (For information/register call 716-933-0187.)

28 - Whitney Point Sportsman Association Coonhound Event at the club on NY Route 206, Whitney Point, NY (4:00 pm - Coonhound Water Race-Poor Boy - $12.00/Coonhound Bench Show- Poor Boy - $12.00/7:00 pm Coonhound Nite Hunt-Poor Boy - $15.00) (For information call Ralph Canniff at 607-240-1129)

28 – Aliens at the Reinstein Woods Environmental Education Center, 93 Honorine Drive, Depew, NY (Town of Cheektowaga) (2:30 pm) Are there visitors from outer space in Reinstein Woods? No, just plants and animals introduced from other parts of the world. Join a guided tour to meet some of these alien invaders. (For information and register call 716-683-5959 or email reinsteinwoods@dec.ny.gov)

29 - KTBA Bass Club 8th Annual "STONE COLD" Tournament on Oneida Lake (6:00 am – 2:00 pm) (Cost: $80.00 boat for Members/$100.00 boat for Non-Members) (For information contact Tom Testa - tuzzytny@yahoo.com )

30 – Close Of Trapping Season for Fisher

31 - Status of Brook Trout in WNY at the WNY Chapter of Trout Unlimited’s October meeting at the Donovan American Legion Post, 3210 Genesee Street, Cheektowaga, NY. (7:30 pm)  Speakers are Scott Cornett of the Allegany Office of DEC and Tom Hoffman of the US Fish & Wildlife Service. Open to the public.

 

Until our next meeting in the Corner, have a great time in the outdoors. This is Ron Schroder for Your In on The Outdoors for Western New York.

What Do You Think? Have something for other sportspeople? Let us know HERE.

 

 

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10 – 13 – 17

Welcome to this week's Conservation Chatter Corner - little bits of happenings concerning our outdoors and you, the sportspeople who enjoy being part of that outdoors.


ARBY’S – WE GOT THE VENISON: Good news that’s sure to spruce up any deer camp, Arby’s has announced it will continue the success it had with venison sandwiches last year, and they’re even taking it up a notch this hunting season.
According to USA Today, venison sandwiches will be back on the menu in all 3,300 restaurants in the U.S. starting Saturday, October 21. That’s not all, either . . .
If you live in Colorado, Wyoming or Montana, you get a special wild game surprise!
This hunting season, Arby’s is rolling out a special limited-edition Elk Sandwich that will only be available in the three states mentioned above.
If you remember from last year, Arby’s venison sandwiches sold out in minutes, and will likely sell out again quickly this year, Arby’s Chief Marketing Officer Jim Taylor says.
“If people are interested in trying the sandwich, the only way to guarantee they can get one is to get there when we open or a little before and make sure they are in line, just like folks last year,” Taylor said.
Just like last year, the restaurant chain uses a New Zealand supplier that sells grass-fed free-range venison. Jim says it took a little over a year to set up an arrangement with suppliers in order to secure enough product for what he calls “the biggest venison promotion in the world and restaurant has ever done.”
“We took a look at what hunters and wild game enthusiasts love to talk about eating, and elk was something that kept popping up, and we said, ‘this is another great tasting game meat we think our guests would enjoy,'” he continued.
Taylor sure hit the nail on the head with his remarks, because elk meat might very well just be the best-tasting meat on the planet, and it’s about time someone said it!
For those lucky enough to feast their lips on an elk sandwich, they will be available at the following restaurants:
200 East 144th Ave., Thornton, Colorado 80023
2607 CY Ave., Casper, Wyoming 82604
2834 King Ave. W, Billings, Montana 59102

DEC PUBLIC MEETINGS ON TROUT STREAM: New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) announced today that it will hold two public meetings in Region 7 this fall as part of a series of statewide meetings on trout stream management. The meetings will provide an overview of the state's approach to trout stream management and elicit feedback from anglers regarding their preferences and expectations for the management of trout stream waters.
The meetings will feature a 30-minute presentation by DEC Fisheries staff describing current management practices for trout streams and will include key findings of a statewide study completed in 2015. Following the presentation, meeting attendees will have an opportunity a to provide input and feedback regarding their preferences and expectations for the management of trout streams.
The upcoming meetings are scheduled for:
Wednesday, October 18 - 6:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. (Doors open at 6:30 p.m. and the presentation begins at 7:00 p.m.)
Paul V. Moore High School
44 School Drive Central Square, NY 13036
Thursday, October 19 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. (Doors open at 6:30 p.m. and the presentation begins at 7:00 p.m.)
Hammondsport High School
8272 Main Street, Hammondsport, NY 14840
Monday, October 23 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. (Doors open at 6:30 p.m. and the presentation begins at 7:00 p.m.)
NYSDEC Region 8 Office
6274 East Avon-Lima Rd. (Routes 5 and 20), Avon, NY 14414
Thursday, October 26 - 6:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. (Doors open at 6:30 p.m. and the presentation begins at 7:00 p.m.)
Whitney Point High School
10 Keibel Road Whitney Point, NY 13862
Since 1990, DEC has generally managed trout streams for a desired catch rate. DEC fisheries managers seek to examine how well the current management goal fits the purpose of satisfying the desires of today's recreational trout stream anglers. Understanding the fishery characteristics valued most by trout stream anglers will help DEC biologists to identify and develop effective future management strategies.

DUCKS UNLIMITED NEW YORK LICENSE PLATE: Show your DU pride on your vehicle! Here’s your chance to show your support of Ducks Unlimited in New York! A Ducks Unlimited custom license plate from the New York State Department of Motor Vehicles is now available to motorists in both passenger and commercial class.
More than 16,000 Ducks Unlimited members in New York support conservation with waterfowling. To date, DU has protected, restored or enhanced 54,000 acres and has invested nearly $37 million in the state.

Help promote Ducks Unlimited, anywhere you drive!
ORDER YOURS TODAY!
To order online: Visit the New York Department of Motor Vehicles website
By mail: Download an order form at the New York DMV site.
Call: (518) 402-4838, Monday through Friday between 8 a.m. and 4 p.m.
Cost: A standard Ducks Unlimited plate can be purchased for an initial fee of $85. The annual fee is $56.25, which is in addition to the standard registration renewal fee. The plate can be personalized with up to six characters, including spaces, for an initial fee of $116.25. The annual fee for a personalized plate is $87.50, which is in addition to the standard registration renewal fee.
Questions? Contact the New York Department of Motor Vehicles.

THE GOOD GUYS AT WORK:
Scrap Metal Burn - Wayne County:
ECO Kevin Thomas was driving down a back country road on patrol in the town of Rose and saw blue and black smoke coming from behind a trailer. When he investigated, ECO Thomas found an individual standing over a burn barrel with numerous pieces of scrap metal laying around the barrel and in his pickup truck. Most of the metal pieces were small engine starters with a copper interior. The man said he burned the machinery to obtain the copper and then planned to sell it back to the scrap yard. In all, more than 50 engine starters were discovered, allegedly violating open burning laws. ECO Thomas issued the subject a ticket for illegal open burn.
Zurich Bog Search and Rescue -- Wayne County: While on patrol, ECO Kevin Thomas heard a call over the radio that a hiker and two small children were lost in Zurich Bog in the town of Arcadia. Zurich Bog is a 600-acre sphagnum swamp in Wayne County that has been designated a National Natural Historic Landmark by the National Park Service. ECO Thomas met New York State Troopers and Wayne County Sheriff's deputies at the head of the trail into the bog and spoke with the hiker's husband. Using her cell phone, the hiker said she had gotten lost more than two hours earlier, didn't know where she was, and that her cell phone battery was running low. She also had her seven and 10-year-old sons with her, trying to help them earn a Cub Scout badge. ECO Thomas had a trooper turn on his siren to see if the lost hiker could hear it, but she could not. A team of six officers then ventured into the bog, dividing into two teams when the trail split. A short time later, ECO Thomas' group heard a response from the lost hiker after calling out for her. Soon after, the officers found the family, tired but uninjured. They were escorted out of the bog through a marked trail.
One-Stop Shopping - Cayuga County: On Sept. 8, ECO Mark Colesante spotted a Craigslist ad listing native snakes for sale in the city of Auburn. Initially, ECOs planned to arrange a purchase, but when officers learned the alleged salesman was only 16 years old, they decided to simply interview the subject. The young man said he had not sold any of the 75 native snakes in his possession, including northern water snakes, eastern ribbon snakes, eastern garter snakes, and brown snakes. He also had 25 leopard frogs and three black bass in an aquarium. The subject was educated about the laws of wildlife possession and charged with possessing protected wildlife without a permit. The entire menagerie was released back to the wild.



Native frogs offered for sale on Craigslist

Marijuana Eradication - Allegany and Cattaraugus Counties: From Sept. 13 to Sept. 22, DEC Division of Law Enforcement personnel participated in a multi-agency marijuana eradication detail focusing on locating and removing marijuana plants throughout Allegany and Cattaraugus counties. New York State Police, the Allegany County Sheriff's Department, and the Southern Tier Drug Task Force participated in the effort along with ECOs Jason Powers, Jamie Powers, Russell Calanni, Dustin Oliver, Sean Rockefeller, Max Woyton, Darci Dougherty, Chris Freeman, Michael Wozniak, and Lt. Don Pleakis. The officers conducted work both on the ground and by air from a State Police helicopter and checked approximately 30 sites over the course of 10 days.
Cub Scouts Score Fishing Merit Badge - Schuyler County: On August 12, ECO Josh Crain participated in a fishing event with Cub Scouts from Penn Yan that were obtaining their fishing merit badges. The event was well attended, with the excited scouts collectively catching more than 100 bluegill and bass with their families. After the event, ECO Crain spoke to the scouts about the duties of an ECO, fishing regulations, and the importance of fish, wildlife, and environmental conservation laws.
Lost and Found - Genesee County: On Sept. 15, ECO Fay Fuerch was contacted by a Genesee County Sheriff's Deputy concerning a convicted felon who accidentally shot himself in the leg the night before in the town of Darien. The Deputy requested ECO Fuerch's partner, K-9 Handley, to help locate a .22 caliber rifle that was missing. The victim initially explained that he was holding a .22 round with a pair of pliers and hit the primer end with a hammer causing the round to discharge and enter his leg above his knee and exit near his ankle while he was in a garage on his grandfather's property. This story did not make sense and the grandfather advised that there was a .22 rifle missing from an abandoned vehicle on the property. The victim asked for a lawyer when questioned about the rifle, so its location remained unknown. The grandfather was fully cooperative and gave consent to search the property, including the garage. A quick search of the garage didn't locate the rifle and when K-9 Handley searched the woods and surrounding property, he didn't locate the rifle. ECO Fuerch returned the following day and took a closer look in the garage, locating the rifle hidden among pieces of rebar and other long, slender objects. The grandfather confirmed it was the missing rifle. All of the evidence was turned over to the Sheriff's Department and charges are pending.

OSWEGO COUNTY TRIBUTARIES WILL BE SATURATED WITH STEELHEAD THIS FALL: A steady stream of mature kings and cohos ranging from 8 to 40 pounds has been ascending the Salmon River since the middle of September, drought conditions notwithstanding. With all that spawning going on, the river is being carpeted with salmon eggs, the favorite food of Oswego County’s most popular cold weather fish, steelhead. Aka chromers, steelhead, like the salmon mentioned above, are indigenous to the Pacific Ocean. Both anadromous (they spend most of their adult lives in open water and return to streams to spawn) they were introduced into the Great Lakes in the second half of the last century to help control blooms of baitfish while offering anglers trophy fishing opportunities.
But the similarities end there. Steelhead are a strain of rainbow trout, and instead of dying after spawning, they return to the lake to feast on its cornucopia and return to tributaries to spawn again.
Their greatest difference, however, is in taste. Salmon indulge in gluttonous lives, pigging out on Lake Ontario’s massive schools of bait fish like there’s no tomorrow, putting on incredible weight in their 3 ½ years of life. Steelies, on the other hand are a little more fastidious, feeding on the same baitfish, but also on a host of insects…and caviar.
Like a siren’s song, red caviar draws them out of the safe depths of Lake Ontario each fall and into the dangerous rapids of the big pond’s tributaries. And while just about every other fish in the feeder stream dives for cover, cowering in the shadow of the salmon, steelhead run with them, picking off the eggs right after they’re dropped, sometimes even while the parents, often big enough to bite the chromer in half, are watching.
This noble courage, combined with their gentle dietary habits (they’ll take a tiny fly, too), incredible beauty (their color ranges from proof silver in fresh run fish to every shade of the rainbow in fish that have been in the river for a couple weeks) and physical stamina (when hooked, their spectacular leaps and sizzling runs in the battle for freedom are legendary) endear them in the hearts of their fans, from purist fly-fishermen to bottom dragging bait anglers.
Come mid-late November, when the salmon runs are nothing but fond memories and the crowds of anglers who stood shoulder to shoulder just a few days earlier go deer hunting or settle into winter mode, sinking into armchairs to watch college sports, fresh waves of steelies charge the streams to take advantage of their warmer temperatures and the steady source of caviar swept out from under the rocks all winter long by endlessly shifting currents.
Spring gathers the lake’s holdouts and sends them running upstream, too. You see, when snowmelt swells the tributaries, sending their plumes two to three times deeper into the lake than normal, the fresh scent hooks the steelies’ hormones, drawing them upstream to spawn. Their bellies loaded with eggs or milt, they have little room in their stomachs for food, right when they need it most to climb the raging rapids. Again, their needs are met by protein rich salmon caviar.
The action begins this month. October’s cooler nights will lower water temperatures to levels trout find comfortable, and they’ll rush in like college freshmen to their first party away from home. The Salmon River will see the first schools, followed by the Oswego River. Skinny creeks like Little Sandy and Grindstone will get their fair share immediately after heavy rains.
So if you’ve ever dreamt of hooking a rainbow, now’s the time to do it. You won’t find a pot of gold at the end. What you will get, provided you’re skilled with rod and reel, is the light-tackle fight of your life from one of nature’s most beautiful fish, set against a backdrop of quivering autumn colors.
(For year-round fishing conditions in Oswego County and visitor information, call 1-800-248-4FUN (4386) or go to www.visitoswegocounty.com.)

THIS WEEK'S EVENTS: (For complete future listings go to the Calendar Page)

OCTOBER 2017
13 - End of Northern Zone Early Bear Season
13&14 - New York Houndsmen Conservation Association Inc. New York State Championship Coonhound Event
at 10491 Rte. 240, West Valley, NY. (10/13 6:00 pm – Coonhound Bench Show-Purina Event - $20.00/8:00 pm – Coonhound Nite Hunt-Purina Event - $30.00 and 10/14 6:00 pm – Coonhound Bench Show-Purina Event - $20.00/8:00 pm - Coonhound Nite Hunt-Purina Event - $30.00) (For information call Jason Muckey 607-589-4710)
14 - Heritage Maker Food & Craft Fair at the Cumming Nature Center, 6472 Gulick Road, Naples, NY (9:00 am – 3:00 pm) Join us this fall for a celebration of heritage food and craft as we showcase the Cumming Nature Center's Heritage Maker Workshop Series. Enjoy mini-workshops, demos and informational booths including: Kombucha; Blacksmithing; Mushrooms; Stained Glass; Storytelling; Soapmaking; Woodworking And more! (Cost: Suggested donation at the door $3/person or $10/family) (For information call 585-374-6160)
14 - Rod & Gun Auction at Hessney Auction Center, 2741 Route 14N, Geneva, NY (9:30 am) Shotguns, rifles, handguns, military, decoys, knives, mounts, fishing, ammo and swords. (For more information call 315-789-9349 or 585-734-6082 or go to www.hessney.com)
14 - Montezuma’s 10th Annual Robert F. DeRoo Memorial Youth Waterfowl and Pheasant Hunts at the Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savannah, NY. Youth ages 12 to 15 and their adult mentors are welcome to celebrate conservation through sportsmen activities. Youth hunters must possess a NYS issued Hunter Safety Certificate, a current NYS 2017-2018 Junior Hunting License, an appropriate firearm and should attend with an adult hunting mentor with a current 2017-2018 hunting license. Pre-registration is required. (For more information, please call Donna Richardson at 315-365-3588.) (Fee: FREE.)
14 - Cabela’s Sportsman’s Seminar - Firearms Safety Depends On You at Cabela’s Cheektowaga Store, 2003 Walden Avenue, Cheektowaga, NY. (11:00 am – 12:00 pm) - Owning firearms is your Second Amendment right, but with that comes responsibility. Learn how to properly store firearms and ammunition in your home from this informative seminar sponsored by Cabela's and the National Shooting Sports Foundation. (For information call 716-608-4770)
14 - Cabela’s Sportsman’s Seminars - at Cabela’s Cheektowaga Store, 2003 Walden Avenue, Cheektowaga, NY. (1:00 – 2:00 pm) - Cabela's Cup - Combine your love for shooting and competition with the excitement of laser guns for a chance to win the Cabela's Cup! (2:00 – 3:00 pm) - Kids' Cabela's Cup - Bring the kids out to try their aim in our safe, portable BB gun range. First-time shooters and seasoned shooters alike are welcome and will get to keep their targets! (For information call 716-608-4770)
14 - Spey Casting on the Water Demo. Meet at Orvis Buffalo, 4545 Transit Road, Williamsville, NY. (9:45 am) Caravan to the creek for a demonstration on spey fishing. Bring your own waders and gear for some tips. (Free) (For information/register call 716-276-7200 or go on line at https://goo.gl/EbQXYd)
14 - Steelhead Fly Fishing 101 at Orvis Buffalo, 4545 Transit Road, Williamsville, NY (12:00 – 2:00 pm) with Fishing Manager Drew Disbet. (Free) (For information/register call 716-276-7200 or go on line at https://goo.gl/EbQXYd)
14 - Steelhead Fly Tying from Simple to Complex at Orvis Buffalo, 4545 Transit Road, Williamsville, NY (3:00 - 4:00 pm) (Free) (For information/register call 716-276-7200 or go on line at https://goo.gl/EbQXYd)
14-15 - Western New York Youth Waterfowl Hunt (Saturday-Sunday) Young hunters age 12 to 15 years, possessing a junior hunting license may hunt ducks, coots, mergansers, and Canada geese on 2 special days in each zone. Daily bag limits are the maximum allowed during the regular duck season, and 2 per day for Canada geese. Young hunters MUST be accompanied by a licensed adult hunter (including current HIP registration and duck stamp). Adult hunter may not shoot any birds.
14-15 - Western New York Youth Pheasant Hunt Weekend
14 - Ed Warnick Memorial Youth Pheasant Hunt
at John White WMA, Basom, NY (Genesee County). The Region 8 North Instructors Association (RENIA) and the Reg 8 SpEd office will be holding the annual youth pheasant hunt. This year, it is the weekend AFTER Columbus Day, so there is no conflict (for attention or time) with the Youth Deer season as in the past. (For information call 585-226-5457 or
e-mail Frank.Phillips@DEC.NY.gov )
14 - NWTF Wheelin Sportsmen Muzzleloader Deer Hunt on private property in Sandy Creek, NY (For information contact William Wilbur 315-440-4351 wwilbur551@aol.com)
14 - Fun Guy’s Guide To Fungi at the Reinstein Woods Environmental Education Center, 93 Honorine Drive, Depew, NY (Town of Cheektowaga) (10:30 am) Our knowledge of fungi has mushroom for improvement to say the yeast. Come learn about these mysterious organisms with former intern Marcus Rosten and by the end we’re sure you’ll be lichen them! (For information and register call 716-683-5959 or email reinsteinwoods@dec.ny.gov)
14-15 - 11th Annual Southern Tier Outdoor Show at the Steuben County Fairgrounds, Bath, NY (Sat - 9:00 am – 5:00 pm/Sun – 10:00 am – 4:00 pm) Free seminars on bass fishing, NY black bear, fishing from shore, trout streams of NY, river recreation, invasive insects, food plots, women and archery, retriever training and tracking wounded deer. For youth – fishing, archery, turkey calling and petting zoo. (For information call 607-664-2300 or go to www.SouthernTierOutdoorShow.com)
15 - Regular State Trout Season Closes (See fishing regulation guide. Great Lakes and tributaries as well as some inland waters are open all year)
15 - Hunting Musky With a Fly by author Rick Kustich at Orvis Buffalo, 4545 Transit Road, Williamsville, NY (1:00 - 3:00 pm) Rick will go through what you need, finding fish and all about the flies.. (Free) (For information/register call 716-276-7200 or go on line at https://goo.gl/EbQXYd)
15 - SUP on the Fly by Damon Newpher at Orvis Buffalo, 4545 Transit Road, Williamsville, NY (3:00 – 4:00 pm) Damon will be talking about using the paddle board to fly fish new waters. (Free) (For information/register call 716-276-7200 or go on line at https://goo.gl/EbQXYd)
15 - Southern Tier Outdoor Show Wild Turkey Calling Contest at the Steuben County Fairgrounds, 15 E. Washington Street, Bath, NY (For information call Jim McGlynn at 607-776-6263 or email elkmcg@wildblue.net )
16 - Start of Catch and Release (Artificial Lures Only) Season for Trout in Salmon Creek (Cayuga County), East Branch Owego Creek, East and West Branchs Tioughnioga River and the Otselic River (Cortland County), Owego Creek and East & West Branches of Creek (Tioga County), Salmon Creek Above Ludlow Falls & West Branch Owego Creek (Tompkins County), Spring Creek except Caledonia State Fish Hatchery Property, Hatchery Property - 8:00 am B 3:30 pm (Livingston County), Oatka Creek from Bowerman Road Upstream to Union Street and from the Wheatland Center Road Upstream to the Mouth of Spring Creek, and Spring Creek (Monroe County), East Koy & Wiscoy Creeksand Chenunda Creek (Allegany County), Lime Lake Outlet, McKinstry, Elm Creek, Elton Creek, Mansfield Creek, (Cattaraugus County), Hosmer Brook and Cattaraugus Creek upstream of Springville Dam (Erie County), Clear Creek from the mouth to the Wyoming-Cattaraugus County line, Wiscoy Creek 0.5 mile upstream and downstream from the East Hillside Road bridge, East Koy Creek, Chenunda Creek, Cattaraugus Creek upstream of Springville Dam, Clear Creek (Ellington), Fenton Brook and Oatka Creek (Wyoming County) (>3/31/18)
16 - Start of Catch and Release (Artificial Lures Only) Season for Trout in Clear Creek and Prendagast Creek (Chautauqua County) (>3/31/18)
18 - Teachers In Nature: Professional Development Series – Aquatic WILD
at the Reinstein Woods Environmental Education Center, 93 Honorine Drive, Depew, NY (Town of Cheektowaga) (4:00 – 7:00 pm) Learn how to connect your students to nature! CTLE credit hours may be available for select programs. (For information and register call 716-683-5959 or email reinsteinwoods@dec.ny.gov)
18 - Trout Stream Management in New York at the Paul V. Moore High School, 44 School Drive, Central Square, NY (6:30 – 9:00 pm) To provide a convenient opportunity for trout stream anglers and other interested members of the public to discuss these questions with NYSDEC biologists, a series of public meetings will be held in each NYSDEC region. The meetings will feature a 30-minute presentation describing how DEC currently manages trout streams and will summarize key findings of a statewide study completed in 2015 (PDF, 2.6 MB). This will be followed by a 90-minute discussion period aimed at identifying the measures of trout stream angling quality most important to this segment of New York's the angling public. (For information call 607-753-3095)
18-20 - St. Mary’s Archer’s Club Catch and Release Tournament - For fishermen of all ages this great event features fantastic tributary fishing on the World Famous Oak Orchard River by the St. Mary’s Archer’s Club. Entry fee includes parking and meals. (For information contact John Denniston at 585-682-3067.)
19 - Trout Stream Management in New York at the Hammondsport High School, 8272 Main Street, Hammondsport, NY (6:30 – 9:00 pm) To provide a convenient opportunity for trout stream anglers and other interested members of the public to discuss these questions with NYSDEC biologists, a series of public meetings will be held in each NYSDEC region. The meetings will feature a 30-minute presentation describing how DEC currently manages trout streams and will summarize key findings of a statewide study completed in 2015 (PDF, 2.6 MB). This will be followed by a 90-minute discussion period aimed at identifying the measures of trout stream angling quality most important to this segment of New York's the angling public. (For information call 585-226-2466)
20 - End of Northern Zone Deer & Bear Bowhunting and Crossbow Seasons
20 - Montezuma’s Home School Nature Series: Owls
at the Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savannah, NY (10:00 am – 12:00 pm) When you hear the word “owl,” what comes to mind? Do you picture a mysterious big-eyed bird of the night? Maybe you think about a symbol of wisdom or a character in books. Clearly, people are fascinated by owls and the best way to understand them is to learn as much as possible about them. Homeschooled children ages 5-12 will explore owl habitat, their unique characteristics and conservation projects at Montezuma. (Fee: $8/student) (For information or register call 315-365-3588 or e-mail montezuma@audubon.org)
20 - Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge Nature Storytime Walk at the Refuge Visitor Center, 3395 U.S. Route 20 East, Seneca Falls, NY. Led by Librarian and The Lodge Nature Store Manager, Gayle James, Nature Storytime Story Walk is recommended for children in pre-K through 3rd grade. There is no fee for this program. Participants will take a walk with Miss Gayle along the Seneca Trail to see how the story of Little Boo unfolds! Each page from the book is stationed along the trail, along with an activity. Parents are required to stay with their children during the program. Please come prepared for the weather; the majority of the program is outside on the trail. Program is rain or shine (If it’s too rainy, we will move the program to inside the Visitor Center). For information, email andrea_vanbeusichem@fws.gov or call 315-568-5987.)
20 - Chemung County Coon Hunters Association Inc Coonhound Event at their clubhouse on Rumsey Hill Road, Van Etten, NY. (5:00pm – Coonhound Event Field Trial - $12.00/6:30pm – Coonhound Bench Show-Poor Boy – $12.00/8:00pm Coonhound Event Nite Hunt - $15.00) (For information call Herschel Burt at 570-596-2149)
21 - Start of Pheasant Hunting Season in Western New York (>12/31 north or >2/28/18 south)
21 - Start of Turkey Hunting Season (>11/3)
21 - Start of Northern Zone Regular Deer and Bear Hunting Season (>12/3)
21 - Montezuma’s Happy Owl-ween
at the Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savannah, NY (6:00 - 8:00 pm) We are happy to welcome back Jean Soprano, of Kindred Kingdoms Wildlife Rehabilitation, who will have live owls on display during her presentation about the silent hunters of the night. Then, join the Montezuma Audubon Center staff for an owl prowl around the woods and grasslands to search for Montezuma’s wild owls and other nighttime wildlife. (Fee: $6/child, $8/adult, $25/family.) (For information or register call 315-365-3588 or e-mail montezuma@audubon.org)
21 - Birding 101: Class #10 at the Reinstein Woods Environmental Education Center, 93 Honorine Drive, Depew, NY (Town of Cheektowaga) (2:30 pm) Learn which birds will be in the area for the winter season. For adults and children ages 8 and older. (For information and register call 716-683-5959 or email reinsteinwoods@dec.ny.gov)
21 - Steuben County Coon Hunters, Inc. Coonhound Event at their clubhouse at 4082 Depot Street, Cameron, NY (4:30 pm - Coonhound Bench Show - $20.00/8:00 pm - Coonhound Nite Hunt - $25.00) (For information call Roger Barney at 607-695-9024 or email ten.sehguh@yenrab_jr)
21 - Whitney Point Sportsman Association Coonhound Event at the club on NY Route 206, Whitney Point, NY (4:00 pm - Coonhound Water Race-Poor Boy - $12.00/Coonhound Bench Show- Poor Boy - $12.00/7:00 pm Coonhound Event Nite Hunt-Poor Boy - $15.00) (For information call Ralph Canniff at 607-240-1129)
21 - Becoming an Outdoors-Woman (BOW) Workshop - Become Skilled with Map & Compass at Tupper Lake, NY (Cost: $50.00) (For information/register contact Adirondack Foothills Guide Service, LLC 518-359-8194 adkfoothills@yahoo.com or go to www.adkfoothills.com)
21 - Letchworth Region Friends of NRA Event at the Firemens Exempt, 5939 Stone Hill Road, Lakeville, NY (5:00 pm) (Cost: $40.00) (For information call Janet Green 585-451-4988 or email jgreen102161@gmail.com )
21 - Southern Tier Bassmasters (Open) Tournament on Conesus Lake at the State Launch (ENTRY FEE: -$25/Angler --$5/optional lunker) (For information Call 585-314-7142 or email tournaments@southerntierbass.com)
21 - Whitney Point Sportsman Association Coonhound Event at the club on NY Route 206, Whitney Point, NY (4:00 pm - Coonhound Event Water Race - $12.00/6:00 pm – Coonhound Bench Show - $12.00/8:00 pm Coonhound Event Nite Hunt - $15.00) (For information call Ralph Canniff at 607-240-1129 or John Marshall 607-345-5366)
21 - Friends of NRA Event at the Lakeville Exempt Club, 5939 Stone Hill Road, Lakeville , NY. (For information contact Janet Green at 585-451-4988 or email jgreen102161@gmail.com)

Until our next meeting in the Corner, have a great time in the outdoors. This is Ron Schroder for Your In on The Outdoors for Western New York.

What Do You Think? Have something for other sportspeople? Let us know HERE.

 

 

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10 – 6 – 17

 

Welcome to this week's Conservation Chatter Corner - little bits of happenings concerning our outdoors and you, the sportspeople who enjoy being part of that outdoors.

 

DEC PUBLIC MEETINGS ON TROUT STREAM: New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) announced today that it will hold two public meetings in Region 7 this fall as part of a series of statewide meetings on trout stream management. The meetings will provide an overview of the state's approach to trout stream management and elicit feedback from anglers regarding their preferences and expectations for the management of trout stream waters.

The meetings will feature a 30-minute presentation by DEC Fisheries staff describing current management practices for trout streams and will include key findings of a statewide study completed in 2015. Following the presentation, meeting attendees will have an opportunity a to provide input and feedback regarding their preferences and expectations for the management of trout streams.

The upcoming meetings are scheduled for:

Wednesday, October 18 6:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. (Doors open at 6:30 p.m. and the presentation begins at 7:00 p.m.)
Paul V. Moore High School
44 School Drive Central Square, NY 13036

Thursday, October 19 6:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. (Doors open at 6:30 p.m. and the presentation begins at 7:00 p.m.)

Hammondsport High School

8272 Main Street, Hammondsport, NY 14840

Monday, October 23 6:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. (Doors open at 6:30 p.m. and the presentation begins at 7:00 p.m.)

NYSDEC Region 8 Office

6274 East Avon-Lima Rd. (Routes 5 and 20), Avon, NY 14414

Thursday, October 26 6:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. (Doors open at 6:30 p.m. and the presentation begins at 7:00 p.m.)
Whitney Point High School
10 Keibel Road Whitney Point, NY 13862

Since 1990, DEC has generally managed trout streams for a desired catch rate. DEC fisheries managers seek to examine how well the current management goal fits the purpose of satisfying the desires of today's recreational trout stream anglers. Understanding the fishery characteristics valued most by trout stream anglers will help DEC biologists to identify and develop effective future management strategies.

 

TICKS AND LYME DISEASE: Hunters, trappers and anglers are urged to protect themselves and their families against ticks and tick-borne illnesses while afield this fall. Not all ticks can cause disease and not all bites will make you sick, but it's important to be informed and to follow a few simple steps to reduce your chances of being infected by a tick bite.  In tick-infested areas, your best protection is to avoid contact with soil, leaf litter and vegetation. However, if you hike, camp, hunt, work or otherwise spend time in the outdoors, you can still take steps to protect yourself.   

  • Dress to repel – Wear light colored clothing so you can easily spot ticks; wear long sleeves and pants, and tuck pants into socks or boots
  • Use insect repellant – Follow label directions and apply repellant carefully
  • Remove a tick as soon as you find it – Removing immediately will reduce the likelihood of contracting any disease that a tick may be carrying.  

For additional information on ticks, tick removal and Lyme Disease prevention, please see the Ticks and Lyme Disease brochure from the NYS Department of Health or visit their website at  https://www.health.ny.gov/diseases/communicable/lyme/

 

COMMON SENSE GUIDELINES FOR AVOIDING EXPOSURE TO RABIES: (Two rabid deer have been encountered in the last few weeks; one in North Carolina and one in Troy, NY.) Do not take any extraordinary risks if you do see a potentially rabid animal – the presence of a potentially rabid animal should be reported to the proper authorities. If it is necessary to kill the animal before the proper authorities can be contacted or can arrive, avoid killing the animal by a head shot or causing any trauma to the animal's head – the brain must be intact for rabies to be confirmed. Do not handle any potentially rabid animals without proper protection (such as gloves), and avoid any contact with the animal's mouth, eyes and nose.

If you are bitten or come into physical contact (scratches or direct contact with the brain or saliva) with a potentially rabid animal, immediately wash the area with soap and water. Contact your physician immediately; rabies is almost always fatal if not treated immediately. Also contact the local or state health department.

General precautions

• Do not eat any part of a deer that appears sick.

• Do not eat the eyes, brain, spinal cord, spleen, tonsils or lymph nodes of any deer.

Field dressing

• Wear rubber or latex gloves when field dressing.

• Minimize contact with the brain, spinal cord, spleen and lymph nodes as you work.

• Use only knives or utensils selected for the purpose of field dressing.

• Remove all internal organs.

• Clean knives and equipment of residue and disinfect with a 50/50 solution of household chlorine bleach and water.

Cutting and processing

• Wear rubber or latex gloves.

• Minimize handling brain or spinal tissues.

• Do not cut through the spinal column except to remove the head. Use a knife designated only

for this purpose.

• Bone out the meat from the deer and remove all fat and connective tissue. This will also remove lymph nodes.

• Dispose of brain and spinal cord, eyes, spleen, tonsils, bones, and head as instructed by the State you are hunting in.

• Thoroughly clean and sanitize equipment and work areas with bleach water after processing.

 

DEC SURVEYS ENDANGERED MUSSEL POPULATION IN WESTERN NY: In early September, DEC Region 9 staff surveyed Cassadaga Creek for the federally and NYS-endangered  clubshell mussel (Pleurobema clava). This is a small to medium size mussel, up to three inches long. The shell exterior is yellow to brown with bright green blotchy rays. The shell interior is typically white. The shell is wedge shaped and solid, with a pointed, and fairly high umbo. The breeding season appears to be initiated by seasonal changes, such as water temperature. Reproduction requires a stable, undisturbed habitat and a sufficient population of fish hosts to complete the mussel's larval development. When the male discharges sperm into the current, females downstream siphon in the sperm in to fertilize their eggs, which they store in their gill pouches until the larvae hatch. The females then expel the larvae. Those larvae which manage to attach themselves by means of tiny clasping valves to the gills of a host fish, grow into juveniles with shells of their own. At that point they detach from the host fish and settle into the streambed, ready for a long (possibly up to 50 years) life as an adult mussel. Its New York Range is the Allegheny River and its tributaries.

Freshwater mussels are sedentary filter-feeders, and as such, they are vulnerable to substrate disturbance, silt deposition, scouring, sensitive to water quality degradation, changes in channel morphology, and alterations of river hydrology. Sedimentation from development, nutrients (nitrates and phosphates) and chemicals from agricultural runoff and potassium, zinc, copper, cadmium and other elements from industrial pollution and extensive impoundments for navigation are some of the main threats to this species. The clubshell is long lived, and annually has low juvenile survival rates. This species, like many mussels, is susceptible to both temporary and periodic environmental degradation, as well as more permanent effects. Reduced populations may take several decades to recover, even if no further degrading events occur.

DEC staff had stocked the mussels in 2015 and 2016 as part of a project with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission to bolster the population in western New York. The survey turned up 175 tagged mussels and revealed a preliminary survival rate of 50-75%.

 

SHOOTING FOR A SAFE DEER SEASON:

Opening day for most hunters is right around the corner, and that means deer season preparations are well under way. Some of you have been preparing since last season ended, while others are just getting started. To ensure we’re ready for the big day, we carve out time to shoot our bows and firearms, hang stands, trim shooting lanes and run as many trail cameras as our budget will allow. Countless hours go into preparing for a successful deer season. But have you put in the hours to ensure a safe deer season? More important than bringing home that buck of a lifetime is returning home safe and sound at the end of every day afield. Here are four ways to make sure you do just that.

1) Check Your Stands -  Whether you pack a climber in with you each time you hunt or use hang-on stands that have been in place since last season, be sure to check your equipment thoroughly. On the stand itself, be on the lookout for any cracks in the metal or the welds and any bolts or clips that may need replacing. If you use a climbing stand, you’ll also want to check the band or cable that attaches the stand to the tree for any wear or damage that could potentially cause it to fail. On hang-ons and ladder stands, pay careful attention to the straps or chains that hold the stand to the tree. This is especially true if you leave your stands out year-round. If the straps appear even the least bit stretched, frayed or dry-rotted, replace them with new ones. The cost of a few ratchet straps is a small price to pay to prevent a treestand fall.

2) Always Use A Safety Harness and Lifeline - Despite the fact that most every hunter has either fallen from a treestand or knows someone who has, many still refuse to wear a safety harness when they hunt. It’s reckless, and there is no excuse for it. With today’s access to a variety of affordable safety harnesses, there’s no reason we — as deer hunters — shouldn’t be able to get through an entire season without a single treestand fatality nationwide. I hope I live to see that day. If you don’t already have one, get a good, comfortable full-body harness that can be used with a lineman’s belt for hanging stands and steps. If you hunt from hang-ons or ladder stands that you leave out, be sure to invest in some Hunter Safety System Lifelines that allow you to remain connected to the tree from the time you leave the ground until the time you return. It’s not enough just to strap in once you get into your stand, because most falls occur climbing into or out of the stand (for more statistics, see the excellent infographic below, courtesy of the TSSA).

3) Hang Your Stands With Care - Where and how you hang your stands can also play a role in keeping you safe this deer season.  Start by choosing a tree that’s safe. First and foremost make sure the tree is alive! Check for any sign of rot or any cavities that may indicate the tree is at least partially hollow. Also look for any dead limbs above that could come down during a hunt. If there is any question at all about the reliability of the tree, find another one.

Once you’ve found a safe tree, make sure you are attached to that tree the entire time you are hanging a new stand. This can be done with a lineman’s-style belt attached to your safety harness.

When hanging a lock-on stand, I always make sure the stand is hung well below the top of my climbing sticks so I can easily step over and onto the stand without having to lift my leg up or stretch, which could result in a fall. And while many hang-on stands only come with one strap to hang the stand, I always add a second near the bottom of the stand to stabilize the platform and avoid any potential for the stand to shift while I’m on it. (A locked security cable can provide extra fall-prevention as well as theft-prevention.)

4) Let Someone Know Where You’ll Be - After turning 40 and hearing numerous stories of guys falling from stands or having heart attacks in the woods, I decided it would be a good idea for someone to know where I am and when I plan to be home every time I hit the woods. For me, that someone is my wife. Since I mainly hunt public land, my potential hunting spot can quickly change if someone is hunting where I was planning to go. As soon as I get to where I’m going, I use Google Maps on my smartphone to drop a pin at my location, which I then text to my wife. If something were to happen to me, she could provide emergency responders with the corresponding GPS coordinates, and they could walk right to me. It only takes a few seconds of my time and gives both me and my wife some peace of mind about my safety. If you aren’t tech savvy or if you hunt the same area every time, then a simple hand-drawn map to your location will work just fine.

I truly hope each of you has a successful season this fall. May your freezer end up full of fresh venison and your taxidermist stay busy mounting that buck of a lifetime. But more importantly than that, I hope each of you has a safe hunting season. Let’s make this the year that no one has to bury a spouse, child or parent because of a preventable hunting mistake.

(By Brian Grossman from Quality Deer Management Association (QDMA) https://www.qdma.com/shooting-safe-deer-season/)

 

THIS WEEK'S EVENTS: (For complete future listings go to the Calendar Page)

                                         

OCTOBER 2017

7 - Southern Tier Bassmasters (Open) Tournament on Honeoye Lake at the State Launch (ENTRY FEE: -$25/Angler --$5/optional lunker) (For information Call 585-314-7142 or email tournaments@southerntierbass.com)

7 - Southern Tier Cha Inc. Coonhound Event at the clubhouse at 7359 Rood Road, Sinclairville NY (3:00 pm – Coonhound Event Bench Show - $15.00/4:30 pm – Coonhound Field Trial - $10.00/4:30 pm – Coonhound Water Race - $10.00/8:00 pm - Coonhound Nite Hunt - $20.00) (For information call Kevin Noody at 716-595-2053 or email moc.oohay@ydoonnivek)

7-9 - Youth Firearms Deer Hunt Weekend

8 - Midstate Arms Collectors Lisle Gun Show at the Lisle Fire Co., Route 79 North, Lisle, NY (9:00 am – 3:00 pm) (For information call Sandy Ackerman at 607-748-1010 (1-6 p.m.)

8 -  Deer Hair Bass and Musky Fly-tying Demo  at Orvis Buffalo, 4545 Transit Road, Williamsville, NY. (1:00 – 3:00 pm) (Free) (For information/register call 716-276-7200 or go on line at https://goo.gl/EbQXYd

8-9 - KTBA Bass Club Classic Tournament on Oneida Lake (6:00 am – 2:00 pm) (Cost: $80.00 boat for Members/$100.00 boat for Non-Members) (For information contact Tom Testa - tuzzytny@yahoo.com )

11 - Start of Northern Zone Deer & Bear Crossbow Seasons (>10/20)

11 - Montezuma’s Sunset Bird Watching Walk at the Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savannah, NY (4:30 – 6:30 pm) The peak of the waterfowl migration is here. Join us for a casual, 1-mile stroll through our grasslands and wetlands to see dozens of duck, goose, swan species as they settle into Montezuma for a good night’s rest. Binoculars and field guides will be provided. (Fee: $5/child; $7/adult, $20/family.) (For information or register call 315-365-3588 or e-mail montezuma@audubon.org)

11 - Teachers In Nature: Professional Development Series - Schoolyard Habitat at the Reinstein Woods Environmental Education Center, 93 Honorine Drive, Depew, NY (Town of Cheektowaga) (4:00 – 7:00 pm) Learn how to connect your students to nature! CTLE credit hours may be available for select programs. (For information and register call 716-683-5959 or email reinsteinwoods@dec.ny.gov)

13 - End of Northern Zone Early Bear Season

13&14 - New York Houndsmen Conservation Association Inc. New York State Championship Coonhound Event at 10491 Rte. 240, West Valley, NY. (10/13 6:00 pm – Coonhound Bench Show-Purina Event - $20.00/8:00 pm – Coonhound Nite Hunt-Purina Event - $30.00 and 10/14 6:00 pm – Coonhound Bench Show-Purina Event - $20.00/8:00 pm - Coonhound Nite Hunt-Purina Event - $30.00) (For information call Jason Muckey  607-589-4710)

14 - Heritage Maker Food & Craft Fair at the Cumming Nature Center, 6472 Gulick Road, Naples, NY (9:00 am – 3:00 pm) Join us this fall for a celebration of heritage food and craft as we showcase the Cumming Nature Center's Heritage Maker Workshop Series. Enjoy mini-workshops, demos and informational booths including: Kombucha; Blacksmithing; Mushrooms; Stained Glass; Storytelling; Soapmaking; Woodworking And more! (Cost: Suggested donation at the door $3/person or $10/family) (For information call 585-374-6160)

14 - Rod & Gun Auction at Hessney Auction Center, 2741 Route 14N, Geneva, NY (9:30 am) Shotguns, rifles, handguns, military, decoys, knives, mounts, fishing, ammo and swords. (For more information call 315-789-9349 or 585-734-6082 or go to www.hessney.com)

14 - Montezuma’s 10th Annual Robert F. DeRoo Memorial Youth Waterfowl and Pheasant Hunts at the Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savannah, NY. Youth ages 12 to 15 and their adult mentors are welcome to celebrate conservation through sportsmen activities. Youth hunters must possess a NYS issued Hunter Safety Certificate, a current NYS 2017-2018 Junior Hunting License, an appropriate firearm and should attend with an adult hunting mentor with a current 2017-2018 hunting license. Pre-registration is required. (For more information, please call Donna Richardson at 315-365-3588.) (Fee: FREE.)

14 - Cabela’s Sportsman’s Seminar - Firearms Safety Depends On You at Cabela’s Cheektowaga Store, 2003 Walden Avenue, Cheektowaga, NY. (11:00 am – 12:00 pm) - Owning firearms is your Second Amendment right, but with that comes responsibility.  Learn how to properly store firearms and ammunition in your home from this informative seminar sponsored by Cabela's and the National Shooting Sports Foundation. (For information call 716-608-4770)

14 - Cabela’s Sportsman’s Seminars - at Cabela’s Cheektowaga Store, 2003 Walden Avenue, Cheektowaga, NY. (1:00 – 2:00 pm) - Cabela's Cup -  Combine your love for shooting and competition with the excitement of laser guns for a chance to win the Cabela's Cup! (2:00 – 3:00 pm) - Kids' Cabela's Cup - Bring the kids out to try their aim in our safe, portable BB gun range.  First-time shooters and seasoned shooters alike are welcome and will get to keep their targets! (For information call 716-608-4770)

14 - Spey Casting on the Water Demo. Meet at Orvis Buffalo, 4545 Transit Road, Williamsville, NY. (9:45 am) Caravan to the creek for a demonstration on spey fishing. Bring your own waders and gear for some tips. (Free) (For information/register call 716-276-7200 or go on line at https://goo.gl/EbQXYd)   

14 - Steelhead Fly Fishing 101 at Orvis Buffalo, 4545 Transit Road, Williamsville, NY (12:00 – 2:00 pm) with Fishing Manager Drew Disbet. (Free) (For information/register call 716-276-7200 or go on line at https://goo.gl/EbQXYd

14 - Steelhead Fly Tying from Simple to Complex at Orvis Buffalo, 4545 Transit Road, Williamsville, NY (3:00 - 4:00 pm) (Free) (For information/register call 716-276-7200 or go on line at https://goo.gl/EbQXYd

14-15 - Western New York Youth Waterfowl Hunt (Saturday-Sunday) Young hunters age 12 to 15 years, possessing a junior hunting license may hunt ducks, coots, mergansers, and Canada geese on 2 special days in each zone. Daily bag limits are the maximum allowed during the regular duck season, and 2 per day for Canada geese. Young hunters MUST be accompanied by a licensed adult hunter (including current HIP registration and duck stamp). Adult hunter may not shoot any birds.

14-15  - Western New York Youth Pheasant Hunt Weekend

14 - Ed Warnick Memorial Youth Pheasant Hunt at John White WMA, Basom, NY (Genesee County). The Region 8 North Instructors Association (RENIA) and the Reg 8 SpEd office will be holding the annual youth pheasant hunt.  This year, it is the weekend AFTER Columbus Day, so there is no conflict (for attention or time) with the Youth Deer season as in the past. (For information call 585-226-5457 or

e-mail Frank.Phillips@DEC.NY.gov )

14 - NWTF Wheelin Sportsmen Muzzleloader Deer Hunt on private property in Sandy Creek, NY (For information contact William Wilbur  315-440-4351  wwilbur551@aol.com)

14 - Fun Guy’s Guide To Fungi at the Reinstein Woods Environmental Education Center, 93 Honorine Drive, Depew, NY (Town of Cheektowaga) (10:30 am) Our knowledge of fungi has mushroom for improvement to say the yeast. Come learn about these mysterious organisms with former intern Marcus Rosten and by the end we’re sure you’ll be lichen them! (For information and register call 716-683-5959 or email reinsteinwoods@dec.ny.gov)

14-15 - 11th Annual Southern Tier Outdoor Show at the Steuben County Fairgrounds, Bath, NY (Sat - 9:00 am – 5:00 pm/Sun – 10:00 am – 4:00 pm) Free seminars on bass fishing, NY black bear, fishing from shore, trout streams of NY, river recreation, invasive insects, food plots, women and archery, retriever training and tracking wounded deer. For youth – fishing, archery, turkey calling and petting zoo. (For information call 607-664-2300 or go to www.SouthernTierOutdoorShow.com)

15 - Regular State Trout Season Closes (See fishing regulation guide. Great Lakes and tributaries as well as some inland waters are open all year)

15 - Hunting Musky With a Fly by author Rick Kustich at Orvis Buffalo, 4545 Transit Road, Williamsville, NY (1:00 - 3:00 pm) Rick will go through what you need, finding fish and all about the flies.. (Free) (For information/register call 716-276-7200 or go on line at https://goo.gl/EbQXYd

 15 - SUP on the Fly by Damon Newpher at Orvis Buffalo, 4545 Transit Road, Williamsville, NY (3:00 – 4:00 pm) Damon will be talking about using the paddle board to fly fish new waters. (Free) (For information/register call 716-276-7200 or go on line at https://goo.gl/EbQXYd

 15 - Southern Tier Outdoor Show Wild Turkey Calling Contest at the Steuben County Fairgrounds, 15 E. Washington Street, Bath, NY (For information call Jim McGlynn at 607-776-6263 or email elkmcg@wildblue.net )

 

Until our next meeting in the Corner, have a great time in the outdoors. This is Ron Schroder for Your In on The Outdoors for Western New York.

What Do You Think? Have something for other sportspeople? Let us know HERE.

 

 

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9 – 29 – 17

 

Welcome to this week's Conservation Chatter Corner - little bits of happenings concerning our outdoors and you, the sportspeople who enjoy being part of that outdoors.

 

START OF SMALL GAME HUNTING SEASONS:

Season dates, bag limits, and other hunting regulations can be found in the New York Hunting and Trapping Regulations Guide, which can be obtained from a license issuing agent and on the DEC website (see links below)

Wild Turkey Hunting

In 2015, DEC updated the fall turkey hunting season structure in response to declines in turkey populations and to ensure that harvest opportunities are sustainable and in line with current environmental conditions. With good production in summer 2015 followed by two mild winters, there are more birds on the landscape than in previous years. However, this increase in numbers may be offset by poor reproductive success this summer due to above-average rainfall in the spring.

Hunters should also keep in mind that in areas with good hard and soft mast production, turkeys do not have to roam far and wide in search of food, so hunters may have to work harder to locate a flock.

Season dates for fall 2017:

October 1 - 14, in the Northern Zone

October 21 - November 3, in the Southern Zone

November 18 - December 1, in Suffolk County, Long Island

The statewide, season bag limit is one bird of either sex.

Waterfowl Hunting and Youth Waterfowl Days

Hunting seasons for waterfowl, ducks, geese, and brant, begin in early October in many parts of the state, but there are also special opportunities for junior hunters 12 to 15 years old prior to the regular season. Junior hunters must be accompanied by a licensed adult hunter, and both the junior hunter and adult must be registered with the Harvest Information Program (HIP). Adult hunters must also have a federal migratory bird stamp. Youth waterfowl days this fall are:

September 23 and 24, Northeast and Lake Champlain zones

October 14 and 15, Western Zone

November 11 and 12, Long Island Zone

Pheasant Hunting

Approximately 30,000 adult pheasants will be released on lands open to public hunting for the upcoming fall pheasant hunting season. The pheasant hunting season begins:

October 1, northern and eastern portions of New York

October 21, central and western portions of the state

November 1, Long Island

Since 2007, DEC has offered a special youth-only season to provide junior hunters the opportunity to hunt pheasants during the weekend prior to the regular pheasant hunting season. In northern and eastern New York, the youth pheasant hunt weekend is September 23 and 24. In western New York, the youth pheasant hunt weekend is October 14 and 15, and on Long Island it is October 28 and 29. Both the junior hunter and their adult mentor must have a hunting license. Only the junior hunter is allowed to carry a firearm and harvest birds on these dates.

All release sites for pheasants are provided by state-funded programs and are open to public hunting. Pheasants will be released on state-owned lands prior to and during the fall hunting season, and at a number of sites on New York City Watershed lands thanks to a partnership with New York City Department of Environmental Protection. Pheasant hunting opportunities have also been augmented by private landowners that have opened their land to public hunting. DEC is grateful for their help in providing high quality hunting experiences for New York's sportsmen and sportswomen. A list of statewide pheasant release sites and sites receiving birds for the youth-only pheasant hunt weekends can be found on DEC's website.

Squirrel, Ruffed Grouse, Rabbit, and Hare

The hunting season for squirrels began September 1, and for ruffed grouse in the Northern Zone the season began September 20. Seasons for ruffed grouse, rabbit, and hare begin October 1, in many regions. Dates and season maps can be found on the DEC website and in the annual Hunting and Trapping Regulations Guide.

Citizen Science

"Citizen science" efforts such as the Grouse and Woodcock Hunting Log, Bow Hunter Sighting Log, and the Furbearer Sighting Survey provide hunters with the opportunity to partner with DEC to monitor game species. To learn more about how to participate in these efforts, visit DEC's website Citizen Science: Wildlife Observation Data Collection.

Additional hunting and wildlife observation information for the following links can be found on DEC's website:

Turkey Hunting

Waterfowl Hunting & Youth Waterfowl Days

Pheasant Release Sites

Small Game Hunting Seasons

New York Hunting and Trapping Regulations Guide

 

FINAL PLAN TO RESTORE WILDLIFE HABITAT AND RECREATION ON ONONDAGA LAKE RELEASED: The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USF&WS) today released the final plan outlining projects to restore wildlife habitat and recreation on Onondaga Lake. The Onondaga Lake Natural Resource Damage Assessment Restoration Plan and Environmental Assessment Final Report is a significant milestone in the revitalization of Onondaga Lake.

The final plan increases habitat quality and quantity, promotes habitat connectivity, creates new and improves existing public use opportunities, and benefits natural resources within the ecosystem. The final plan and additional information on the Natural Resource Damage Assessment and Restoration process can be found online at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service website.

The agencies selected 20 restoration projects in the final restoration plan. These projects, in total, will:

Extend the Erie Canalway Trail from Camillus to the Loop the Lake Trail (3.2 miles) and from the Honeywell Visitor Center to Harbor Brook (1.2 miles);

Improve preservation efforts, bolster habitat restoration, and increase public access to more than 1,400 acres along Ninemile and Onondaga creeks in the Onondaga Lake watershed, including public fishing rights and parking areas;

Install structures within over 275 acres of Onondaga Lake to provide habitat for fish, amphibians, and invertebrates;

Provide 15 years of funding to identify and remove invasive species within approximately 1,700 acres of wetlands, lake/river littoral zone, and riparian habitat;

Restore wetland and fish habitat within and adjacent to Onondaga County parklands;

Restore 100 acres of warm season grassland;

Construct a new deepwater fishing pier on Onondaga Lake;

Enhance jetties at the Onondaga Lake outlet to improve access;

Construct a new boat launch along the Seneca River;

Transfer the Honeywell Visitor Center to a public agency; and

Include a new Future Projects Fund.

The selected restoration alternative is the result of significant public contribution including several years of input from partner organizations, community representatives, and existing documents and plans, culminating in four public information sessions, one public hearing, and more than 230 public comments on the draft plan submitted during the extended comment period. A Responsiveness Summary is included with the final plan, which summarizes public comments on the Restoration Plan, grouped by categories, and provides the Trustees' responses to those comments.

Specifically, the Trustees changed the Restoration Plan in response to public comments to include information on the proposed projects, as well as those projects that were not proposed for implementation. All project suggestions submitted in response to the Trustees' request for project suggestions are included, and additional text was added to clarify assessment methodologies, explain the public participation process, and discuss the role of the Onondaga Nation. Alternative B was clarified as the preferred alternative of a suite of projects that best meet the regulatory criteria.

The Plan acknowledges that certain geographic areas (e.g. Onondaga Creek) are not represented in Alternative B, but the Trustees will consider projects in those areas, as appropriate, as planning for additional projects under the Future Projects Fund proceeds. The Trustees will continue stakeholder outreach and public participation to solicit additional restoration projects and develop proposed projects that satisfy all relevant criteria.

David Stilwell, the USF&WS Field Supervisor at the New York Field Office, commented "The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service looks forward to restoring and conserving the natural resources of Onondaga Lake and its watershed, in partnership with the local community."

Next Steps

Implementation of projects in the Restoration Plan is contingent upon settlement of the Trustees' Natural Resource Damages claims. This settlement will involve the preparation of a Consent Decree subject to additional public comment. The settlement will be combined with the $2.3 million in proceeds from a settlement reached as part of the General Motors bankruptcy in 2012, so that numerous additional restoration projects can be implemented using the Future Projects Fund.

About NRDAR

As part of the Onondaga Lake Natural Resource Damage Assessment and Restoration (NRDAR) process, DEC and USF&WS assessed contaminant-related injuries to natural resources such as waterfowl and turtles, and quantified the lost use of natural resources to the public, such as fishing. The agencies then solicited restoration project ideas from stakeholders to identify the types and scale of restoration needed to compensate for those injuries. The ultimate goal of the process is to replace, restore, rehabilitate, or acquire the equivalent of injured natural resources and resource services lost due to the release of hazardous substances-at no cost to the taxpayer.

Under federal law, federal and state agencies and Native American tribes are authorized to act as trustees on behalf of the public for natural resources they own, manage or control. In this role, trustees assess and recover damages or implement restoration projects to compensate for injuries to natural resources due to hazardous substance releases (e.g. mercury). The natural resource damage assessment regulations encourage the participation of potentially responsible parties (PRPs) in the assessment process, and Honeywell agreed to cooperatively assess natural resource damages and identify restoration projects at Onondaga Lake with the trustees. Read more information on this process at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service website.

 

MESSAGE FROM CHAUTAUQUA COUNTY: Fish-on! The drag sounds off with a gentle scream. Line begins to quickly peel away and a flashy, silvery, figure of a fish leaps above the lake surface in the distance behind the boat. Exciting? YES! This is only the beginning of an electrifying Chautauqua County fishing season as the calendar turns toward the end of summer and the evolving Lake Erie fishery rotates to a new season of fishing thrills. 

Steelhead stage in the deep water off the larger Chautauqua County tributaries as they prepare for their seasonal fall run.  Walleye trollers targeting fish in the thermocline (60-90 feet of water) catch a good number of these high-flying, hard-fighting, steelhead. 

Walleye anglers use a variety of lures and baits, but one new tactic involves spinner/worm rigs dressed with a brightly-colored plastic worm.  The combo will entice deep water steelhead to strike, often fooling walleye on the same rigs. 

Trolling spoons are also effective. The deep water steelhead bite will last through September, but as morning temperatures lower with the change of seasons, creek temperatures drop. Trolling and casting for steelhead moves to areas adjacent to our major tributary outflow areas. Starting in mid-September and through October, fishing these areas will offer peak, fish-catching fun. 

From shore, anglers in waders use spinning tackle to cast for steelhead looking to swim upstream in the trib’s. Casting #2 and #3 size spinners such as the Blue Fox and Mepps Aglia, or ½-3/4 ounce spoons such the Luhr-Jensen Krocodile and Johnson Sprite, will often yield frequent hook-ups with fresh run fish. Sunrise and sunset periods are best.

As colorful autumn leaves come into view, October fishing appeals an increasingly large group of anglers looking to catch stream steelhead. It’s quiet, it’s peaceful and it’s simply fun.  Every stream that has any outflow to Lake Erie may offer a steelhead run, even the tiniest streams, especially after a heavy rain  Anglers use fly tackle, float fishing tackle and spinning tackle with success - so pack your favorite fishing gear and head for the water.

The major Lake Erie tributaries among steelhead anglers in Chautauqua County include Cattaraugus Creek, Canadaway Creek and Chautauqua Creek. Steelhead runs in these trib’s are consistent with lots of fish and there is adequate public access in these streams.  Two special hotspots include the Westfield Waterworks Dam on Chautauqua Creek and the waterfalls near Laona on Cassadaga Creek. 

Other smaller Chautauqua tributaries include Silver Creek and Walnut Creek, and many other smaller streams, these also receive good runs of steelhead, but offer little public access. Anglers can check in with property owners for landowner permission. With permission, the waterfalls below Route 39 on Walnut Creek and the waterfalls near Hanover and King Roads on Silver Creek are true hotspots on these smaller streams.

Barcelona Harbor and Dunkirk Harbor each offer excellent fishing for steelhead, brown trout and an occasional pink salmon from October through April. Anglers don’t have to walk far from their vehicles and can cast from shore locations to catch sizeable fish all through winter.

Come over and join us for this exciting late summer fishing adventure. Tight lines.  

I BIRD NY CHALLENGE ENGAGES YOUNG PEOPLE IN BEGINNING BIRDING: The Spring 2017 I BIRD NY program launch encouraged New Yorkers to engage in birding all summer. New, improved signage has been added to 38 priority Bird Conservation areas across the state near urban and suburban areas to better identify opportunities for the public to bird watch.

From Montauk to Buffalo, New York is home to a vast array of habitat that supports more than 450 different bird species. Bird watching is one of the fastest growing outdoor recreational activities that can be enjoyed by people of all ages and experiences in any community.

New York State is part of the Atlantic Flyway, which runs along the Eastern coast of the U.S. Each Fall, migrating birds can be seen flying south to their wintering grounds. This is the ideal time of year for New York residents and visitors to head to Bird Conservation Areas (BCAs) across the state for great bird watching opportunities. Visitors can search fields and forests for warblers, sparrows, and other songbirds and explore lakes, ponds, and beaches to see waterfowl and shorebirds. While exploring, visitors can hawk watch (http://www.hmana.org/) to witness the amazing spectacle of raptor migration.

Accessible state lands, parks, and facilities can promote physical activity, an important element of overall wellness. I BIRD NY is one of several initiatives aimed at ensuring New Yorkers have access to green spaces, including focus on unique opportunities close to urban and suburban areas.

In addition, the state launched a website portal, I Bird NY, with information on where and how to bird watch, including upcoming bird walks and additional resources. I BIRD NY also provides a I BIRD NY kids booklet available at DEC Environmental Education Centers and official I BIRD NY bird walks and other events. The website provides user-friendly information for New Yorkers and visitors to find information about how to get started in birding, links to events and walks, and information on bird species.

More information on I BIRD NY, including upcoming events, can be found on DEC's website.

 

BASS PRO SHOPS AND CABELA'S TOGETHER:

Frequently Asked Questions

What are the customer benefits of uniting these companies? This is an opportunity to create a "best of the best" shopping experience for all outdoor enthusiasts. It means more selection as we are bringing together the best in fishing with Bass Pro Shops, the best in Hunting with Cabela's and the best in boating with Tracker Boats. Increased buying power will also help us deliver greater value to our customers. At the same time, it means continuing to provide unmatched expert service. In general, we plan to retain and grow everything customers love about both brands. As a bonus, we also plan to be a powerful, unified voice for conservation and become a stronger advocate for the outdoors and sportsmen's rights.

Will the company's name change? We will continue celebrating and promoting both the Bass Pro Shops and Cabela's brands as we bring our two great companies together.

Will Bass Pro Shops gift cards be honored at Cabela's locations and vice versa?

Customers can exchange a Bass Pro Shops gift card to a Cabela's gift card for an equal amount and vice versa. Gift cards are exchanged at the customer service counter in either store or by contacting our online customer service centers. To exchange a Cabela's gift card that you would like to use at Bass Pro Shops, call 1-800-211-6440 to have it exchanged. To exchange a Bass Pro Shops gift card that you would like to use at Cabela's, call 1-800-237-4444 to have it exchanged. We are working to improve this process moving forward.

Will I be able to return Cabela's purchases to Bass Pro Shops locations and vice versa?

Yes, Cabela's purchases can be returned to our customer service counters at Bass Pro Shops and vice versa or by contacting our online customer service centers.

Will existing exclusive brands and products still be available at Bass Pro Shops and Cabela's? Bass Pro Shops and Cabela's have strong national proprietary brands in several categories. Our goal is to continue developing and growing our brands to ensure we provide the same exceptional quality, service and value that customers have come to know and trust from Bass Pro Shops and Cabela's exclusive products.

Will Cabela's CLUB Visa cardholders earn points at Bass Pro Shops locations? Yes, Cabela's CLUB Visa holders will earn 1% back on all purchases made at Bass Pro Shops and all locations that accept Visa. In addition, Cabela's CLUB Visa members will still earn 2%, 3% or 5% back on qualifying purchases at all Cabela's locations, earning points for free gear and incredible outdoor experiences. We are working on solutions to better connect the programs.

Will Bass Pro Shops Outdoor Rewards Mastercard cardholders earn points at Cabela's locations? Yes, Bass Pro Shops Outdoor Rewards Mastercard holders will earn 1% back on all purchases made at Cabela's and all locations that accept Mastercard. In addition, you will still earn 3% or 5% back on qualifying purchases at all Bass Pro Shops locations, earning points for free gear and unique experiences. We are working on solutions to better connect the programs.

 

THIS WEEK'S EVENTS: (For complete future listings go to the Calendar Page)

                                         

SEPTEMBER 2017

29 - Ducks Unlimited – North Shore Oneida Lake Chapter Banquet at the Greenview Country Club, West Monroe, NY. (5:00 pm) Waterfowl conservation is facing important challenges as wetlands and other habitats are being degraded and destroyed across the continent. Ducks Unlimited has a vision to reverse this trend. (Cost: $60 Single, $85 Couple) (For information call Chris Sanson 315-225-7988 or Katie Long 623-696-5597) 

29 - Becoming an Outdoors-Woman (BOW) Workshop - High Peak Jaunt: Views from the Summit at Tupper Lake, NY (Cost: $50.00 plus option of canoe/kayak rental) (For information/register contact Adirondack Foothills Guide Service, LLC  518-359-8194  adkfoothills@yahoo.com  or go to www.adkfoothills.com)

29 - National Wild Turkey Federation – Enchanted Mountain Chapter Dinner at the Bartlett Country Club, 32 Euclid Avenue, Olean, NY. (5:00 pm) The NWTF banquets are where you can buy exclusive merchandise and have a great time with friends. All the while, you will be raising vital funds for wild turkey conservation and important programs that introduce the outdoors to women, children and the disabled.  (For more information contact Randy Opferbeck  (716) 373-3322  gobbler648@verizon.net )

29 - Clymer Coonhunters Club Coonhound Event at their clubhouse on 8023 Ravlin Hill Road, Panama, NY (7:00 pm - Coonhound Event Bench Show - $15.00/8:00 pm – Coonhound Event Nite Hunt - $20.00) (For information call Chester Bricker at 716-355-6442

29-30 - Grape Country Coonhunters Association Coonhound Event at their clubhouse on Williams Hill Road, Branchport, NY (9/29 7:00 pm - Coonhound Bench Show - $15.00/9:00 pm - Coonhound Nite Hunt - $20.00 and 9/30 6:00 pm – Coonhound Bench Show - $15.00/8:00 pm coonhound Nite Hunt - $20.00) (For information call Josh Wood at 315-729-4773)

30 – Close of Frog & Snapping Turtle Seasons

30 - End of Bow Fishing for Carp Season
30 – Close of Fishing Season on Lake Ontario, the Lower Niagara River and Tributaries for Lake Trout

30 – Alabama Gunslingers Shoot at the Alabama Hunt Club, Lewiston Road, Alabama, NY (9:00 am start) (For information call John Szumigala at 716-714-5514.)

30 - Cabela’s Sportsman’s Seminars at Cabela’s Cheektowaga Store, 2003 Walden Avenue, Cheektowaga, NY. Sessions include: Scent Control Secrets (11:00 am – 1:00 pm) - Learn about scent control from a pro.  We'll demystify all of our products and options, so you can leave with your senses tuned for fall hunts.; Footwear For Hunting Season (11:00 am – 12:00 pm) - Our Footwear Outfitters will help you choose the right footwear specs for your hunting needs.; Antler Scoring with Pope & Young (12:00 – 2:00 pm) - There's a method to the antler scoring process.  Bring your antlers in and we'll break it down from point to point and provide a score!; Survival Strategies (12:00 – 1:00 pm) - Should you ever become lost in the woods, we'll focus on the signals, gadgets and survival kits that could be lifesavers.; Long-Range Optics (1:00 – 2:00 pm) - our optics Outfitter will demonstrate new fall options and provide tips for you to consider when purchasing optics for long-range shooting.; Intro to Bowhunting: Women Only (1:00 – 2:00 pm) - We'll provide tips on the basic necessitites to get started with insight from the field to make your hunt more enjoyable. (For information call 716-608-4770)

30 - Family Nature Quest: Turtles at the Reinstein Woods Environmental Education Center, 93 Honorine Drive, Depew, NY (Town of Cheektowaga) (10:30 am) Explore the world of turtles at Reinstein Woods, and meet our captive wood and painted turtles. (For information and register call 716-683-5959 or email reinsteinwoods@dec.ny.gov)

30 - Birding 101: Class #9 at the Reinstein Woods Environmental Education Center, 93 Honorine Drive, Depew, NY (Town of Cheektowaga) (2:30 pm) Learn how to identify the different raptors (birds of prey) found in Reinstein Woods. For adults and children ages 8 and older. (For information and register call 716-683-5959 or email reinsteinwoods@dec.ny.gov)

30 - Cattaraugus County Houndsmen and Conservation Club Inc. Coonhound Event at their clubhouse at 10491 Route 240, West Valley, NY (6:00 pm - Coonhound Bench Show - $15.00/8:00 pm - Coonhound Event Nite Hunt - $20.00) (For information call Chris Deperro  716-570-6798)

30 – Whitetails Unlimited - Finger Lakes Chapter Hunters Night Out at American Legion Hall, 71 Old Ithaca Road, Horseheads, NY. (Cost: $50.00 Single/$30.00 Spouse or Youth) WTU provides grants to local projects and activities that advance our mission. Proceeds from this event will benefit Chemung County youth and habitat programs. (Deadline for sign-up 9/27/17) (For information go to http://www.whitetailsunlimited.com/events/banquets/horseheads-ny-finger-lakes-chapter-hunters-night-out/)

30 - National Wild Turkey Federation – Enchanted Mountain Chapter Hunting Heritage Banquet at the Bartlett Country Club, 32 Euclid Avenue, Olean, NY (5:00 pm) The NWTF banquets are where you can buy exclusive merchandise and have a great time with friends. All the while, you will be raising vital funds for wild turkey conservation and important programs that introduce the outdoors to women, children and the disabled.  (For more information contact Randy Opferbeck   gobbler648@verizon.net   716-373-3322)

30 - New York State Trapper Education at the Wyoming Conservation Association, 2091 Dale Road, Warsaw, NY (8:00 am - 4:00 pm) Trapper Education is required for all new trappers. This course covers how to trap responsibly and selectively and how to handle pelts to produce marketable furs. All courses require the completion of homework prior to attending the course. If you do not complete the homework you cannot complete the course. (Instructed by Neil A. Parmerter)  

30 - New York State Trapper Education at the West Falls Conservation Society, 55 Bridge Street, West Falls, NY 14170 (8:30 am - 5:00 pm) Trapper Education is required for all new trappers. This course covers how to trap responsibly and selectively and how to handle pelts to produce marketable furs. All courses require the completion of homework prior to attending the course. If you do not complete the homework you cannot complete the course. (Instructed by Arthur F. Segool)

OCTOBER 2017

1 – Falconry Season Opens (>3/31/18)

1 - Start of Southern Zone Deer and Bear Bowhunting Seasons (>11/17)

1 – Start of Hunting Seasons for Cottontail Rabbit, Ruffed Grouse (>2/28/18) & Coyote (3/25/18)

1 – Start of Woodcock Hunting Season (11/14)

1 - Start of Hunting Season for Snow Geese (>4/15/17) and Brant (>11/29) in the Western Zone

1 – Cabela’s Sportsman’s Seminars at Cabela’s Cheektowaga Store, 2003 Walden Avenue, Cheektowaga, NY. Sessions include: Calls of the Wild: Big-Game Tactics (11:00 am – 12:00 pm) - Listen to the calls of the wild and learn how to duplicate them so you will get closer to your quarry this fall. (For information call 716-608-4770)

3 - Trout Stream Management in New York at the Reinstein Woods Nature Center, 93 Honorine Drive, Depew, NY. (6:30 – 9:00 pm) To provide a convenient opportunity for trout stream anglers and other interested members of the public to discuss these questions with NYSDEC biologists, a series of public meetings will be held in each NYSDEC region. The meetings will feature a 30-minute presentation describing how DEC currently manages trout streams and will summarize key findings of a statewide study completed in 2015 (PDF, 2.6 MB). This will be followed by a 90-minute discussion period aimed at identifying the measures of trout stream angling quality most important to this segment of New York's the angling public. (For information call 716-683-5959)

3 – NY State Pistol Permit Safety Class at Calvary Baptist Church, 3515 Galloway Road, Batavia, NY (6:00 pm start) Hosted by the Genesee County Chapter of SCOPE. (For information/preregister call Jim Carr at 716-778-9431.)

5 - Trout Stream Management in New York at the NYSDEC Region 9 Sub-office, 182 East Union Street, Allegany, NY. (6:30 – 9:00 pm) To provide a convenient opportunity for trout stream anglers and other interested members of the public to discuss these questions with NYSDEC biologists, a series of public meetings will be held in each NYSDEC region. The meetings will feature a 30-minute presentation describing how DEC currently manages trout streams and will summarize key findings of a statewide study completed in 2015 (PDF, 2.6 MB). This will be followed by a 90-minute discussion period aimed at identifying the measures of trout stream angling quality most important to this segment of New York's the angling public. (For information call 716-372-0645)

7 - Southern Tier Bassmasters (Open) Tournament on Honeoye Lake at the State Launch (ENTRY FEE: -$25/Angler --$5/optional lunker) (For information Call 585-314-7142 or email tournaments@southerntierbass.com)

7 - Southern Tier Cha Inc. Coonhound Event at the clubhouse at 7359 Rood Road, Sinclairville NY (3:00 pm – Coonhound Event Bench Show - $15.00/4:30 pm – Coonhound Field Trial - $10.00/4:30 pm – Coonhound Water Race - $10.00/8:00 pm - Coonhound Nite Hunt - $20.00) (For information call Kevin Noody at 716-595-2053 or email moc.oohay@ydoonnivek)

7-9 - Youth Firearms Deer Hunt Weekend

8 - Midstate Arms Collectors Lisle Gun Show at the Lisle Fire Co., Route 79 North, Lisle, NY (9:00 am – 3:00 pm) (For information call Sandy Ackerman at 607-748-1010 (1-6 p.m.)

8-9 - KTBA Bass Club Classic Tournament on Oneida Lake (6:00 am – 2:00 pm) (Cost: $80.00 boat for Members/$100.00 boat for Non-Members) (For information contact Tom Testa - tuzzytny@yahoo.com )

 

Until our next meeting in the Corner, have a great time in the outdoors. This is Ron Schroder for Your In on The Outdoors for Western New York.

What Do You Think? Have something for other sportspeople? Let us know HERE.

 

 

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9 – 22 – 17

 

Welcome to this week's Conservation Chatter Corner - little bits of happenings concerning our outdoors and you, the sportspeople who enjoy being part of that outdoors.

 September 23, 2017

Scheduled Events:

23 - Erie County Federation of Sportsmen's Clubs 46th Annual NHF Day Celebration at the Elma Conservation Club, 600 Creek Road, Elma, NY (10:00 am – 4:00 pm) Open to everyone of all ages. Come join the Erie County Federation of Sportsmen's Clubs in celebrating National Hunting and Fishing Day celebration. Learn from the local experts on how to hunt, fish, trap, shoot, and much more. Free event, rain or shine! (For information contact Rich Davenport 716-510-7952 rich@weloveoutdoors.org or go to www.eriectyfsc.org/events.htm)

23 – 21st Annual Salmon River Hatchery Open House and Family Day at The Salmon River Hatchery, 2133 County Route 22, Altmar, NY (Oswego County). (9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m) Admission is free. Tours of the facility will be given throughout the day, providing attendees with behind-the-scenes access to the inner workings of the hatchery. In addition, the fish ladder will be on display, offering the opportunity to view salmon as they migrate. Children will have the opportunity to learn to cast a fishing rod, tie flies, participate in a laser shooting range, observe the aquatic life of Beaverdam Brook, and learn about rare and threatened fish species in New York State. (For information contact Fran Verdoliva, NYSDEC Salmon River Coordinator, at 315-298-7605.) 

23 – National Hunting & Fishing Day Celebration at the NYS Game Farm, 8 Game Farm Road, Ithaca, NY (9:00 am) Connect with local sporting clubs and organizations for a family friendly day celebrating our outdoor heritage. Activities will include waterfowl and upland bird hunting demonstrations, fly casting instruction, kids archery range, and much more. (For information contact Cosmo Genova at 607-972-7088 or email cosmogenova@gmail.com) 

23 – Tompkins County Federation of Sporting Clubs’ National Hunting and Fishing Day Celebration at the NYSDEC Reynolds Game Farm 81 Game Farm Road, Ithaca, NY (9:00 am - ) There will be demonstrations all day, including a waterfowl and upland game hunting demonstration, small game processing class, kids archery range, fly casting instruction, Cornell Raptor showcase, DEC K9 demo, etc. (For information call 607-273-2768)

23-24 - Honeywell Sportsmen’s Days at Carpenter’s Brook Fish Hatchery, Route 321, Elbridge, NY. (11:00 am - 5:00 pm) Created as a tribute to National Hunting and Fishing Day, this annual festival is a terrific opportunity for all ages to try their hand at a variety of outdoor pursuits, including skeet shooting, waterfowl identification, axe/knife throwing, turkey calling, archery, 3-D laser big game hunting, crossbow, BB gun, fly fishing, jig tying, canoeing, muzzle loading, Conservation Officers, Forest Rangers and Smokey Bear, woodsmen demonstrations, local wildlife artists and authors and trout fishing. Activities subject to change. (Cost: $5.00 per vehicle) (For information call 315-689-9367) 

23-24 - 32th Annual Wildlife Festival in Celebration of National Hunting and Fishing Day at the New York Power Authority’s Power Vista, 5777 Lewiston Road (adjacent to Niagara University), Lewiston, NY (10:00 am – 5:00 pm) Catch a fish at the Niagara River Anglers fishing pond or shoot pellet guns at the Niagara County Federation of Conservation Club’s shooting trailer. Loads of fun for the whole family! Kids fishing contest for youngsters age 15 and under in the public waters of Niagara County. Two ages classes. Weigh in will be at the Wildlife Festival between noon and 2 p.m. both days. Awards on Sunday at 3 p.m. Largest fish caught out of the NYPA reservoir and from the NYPA fishing platform will also receive a prize. (For information call 866-697-2386 or visit their website at www.nypa.gov.)

 

 

DEER URINE COMMENTS FROM DEC: As wildlife managers, conservationists, and hunters, our primary concern should be the health and sustainability of the wildlife populations we manage, weighing those concerns over our own personal interests and practices.

Given current limitations there is no way to ensure that natural urine-based scents are prion free. Presently, the only guaranteed prion-free scent is one that doesn’t contain natural urine or other deer excretions. The fact remains that numerous studies have documented CWD prions in urine of infected and pre-symptomatic deer. Further, there is no accurate CWD test of live deer, and there is no rapid, cost-effective test to determine whether commercial deer urines are prion-free. Even if scent manufacturers claim that commercial urine is collected from “CWD-free” herds, we know that in recent years CWD has been detected in captive herds that were previously thought to be “CWD-free” according to the USDA certification standards. The deer on these herds could have been shedding prions for many months prior to detection, all the while potentially contaminating any urine products produced from those herds and the ground upon which those products were distributed.

We do not know exactly what the risk level is for CWD transmission via urine scents, but the research clearly suggests that there is some risk. As thousands of hunters repeatedly use natural urine-based products (often in the exact same location from one hunt to the next), the risk is additive. CWD prions remain in the environment and potentially infectious for years. Models have demonstrated that risk of CWD transmission from the environment increases over time as prions accumulate. Therefore, repeatedly applying deer urine at the same place over time could potentially build a reservoir of prions, increasing the probability of transmission. In tests, healthy deer have contracted CWD when exposed to water bowls, feed, and bedding of infected deer and when held in a paddock that previously (2 years) held infected deer. There is no safe does of prions for deer. Should CWD be introduced to NY via infected urine products, the consequences are severe, and in all likelihood, permanent. The risk is not quantifiable but not zero.

Undoubtedly enforcement will be challenging, as unscrupulous individuals will always seek to skirt the law. Just as hunters intent on violating rules or uncaring about the health and welfare of wildlife can buy and illegally use lead shot for waterfowl or barbed broadheads for deer, dishonest hunters may continue to buy urine online or in other states or put natural urine in a bottle labeled synthetic. If we were to propose a partial ban on natural deer urine products (e.g., allow deer urine only from NY producers or allow use of urine/tarsals collected by hunters), that would exacerbate enforcement challenges and not adequately reduce risks.

Hunters and retailers have a safe alternative through synthetic attractants. Too, research on deer attractants, though limited, has found similar visitation rates to mock scrapes treated with buck urine, doe urine, human urine, and “new car” scent. This raises significant question to the perceived benefit of urine-based attractants for hunters and whether continued use of urine-based lures is remotely justified relative to the associated potential risks.

Our responsibility as wildlife managers is to recommend every measure available to prevent the introduction of CWD to the NY deer herd. Prohibiting the use of urine and scents containing urine is one preventative measure based on our knowledge of prions and exposure of CWD susceptible animals to prions. If future research reveals that urine is definitively not associated with CWD transmission or provides an effective and robust mechanism to test commercial urine products, we will be able to amend regulations to be more flexible. Until that time, I don’t believe that any controllable risk is acceptable.

Jeremy Hurst, Big Game Unit Leader, Division of Fish & Wildlife, NYSDEC

2017 WATERFOWL FORECAST: This year's waterfowl survey results were released in mid-August, and once again the report contained good news for hunters and other waterfowl enthusiasts. According to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), duck numbers in the traditional survey area were statistically similar to the 2016 estimate. The total population was estimated at 47.3 million breeding ducks, which was 34 percent above the 1955−2016 average and the fifth largest estimate on record. With the exception of northern pintails and scaup, populations of the 10 most abundant duck species were near or above their long-term averages (see chart). In addition, the projected mallard fall flight index is 12.9 million birds, similar to the 2016 estimate of 13.5 million birds.

When ducks and geese returned to the breeding grounds this past spring, they found improved wetland conditions on many important waterfowl breeding areas. May ponds—the unit of measure for wetland abundance on the prairies—increased 22 percent, from just over 5 million ponds in 2016 to almost 6.1 million ponds this spring. The total May pond count was 17 percent above the long-term average, largely due to carryover water stored in wetland basins from the previous summer and fall.

"The surveys indicate that wetland conditions and populations of most frequently harvested ducks remain above the long-term average. There were some declines in several species from last year, but generally hunters are not likely to notice that annual variation out in the field, especially if timely cold winter weather develops in northern and mid-latitude areas of the continent," said DU Chief Scientist Dr. Tom Moorman. "This is great news for waterfowlers, who can now turn their attention to preparing habitat, tuning up dogs, and relentlessly watching the weather forecasts for the onset of fall and winter weather that will push the birds on their annual southward migration."

Although annual changes in duck and goose numbers have important implications for waterfowlers, they do not necessarily influence individual hunting success. Weather and local habitat conditions often affect the fortunes of waterfowlers more than the size of the fall flight, especially in migration and wintering areas. With that in mind, the following is an overview of waterfowl populations in each flyway, based on reports from biologists in the field.

The majority of Atlantic Flyway waterfowl are raised in the northeastern United States and Canada, although this flyway also receives large numbers of dabbling ducks and divers from the prairies. In 2017, the total breeding duck population estimate for the six most abundant species in the eastern survey area (covering eastern Ontario, Quebec, Atlantic Canada, Maine, and northern New York) was 2.6 million birds. This year's estimate of approximately 500,000 American black ducks was similar to last year's, but was 12 percent below the 1990−2016 average. Populations of mallards, American green-winged teal, and goldeneyes were similar to last year's estimates and their long-term averages. And ring-necked ducks were down 19 percent from last year's estimate, but remained near the long-term average. Approximately 1.3 million breeding ducks were surveyed in the northeastern United States, similar to last year's total and the long-term average.

DU Canada biologist Nic McLellan reports that wetland conditions were generally favorable for waterfowl production in Atlantic Canada (New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, and Prince Edward Island), a key breeding area for black ducks and many other waterfowl species. "Although waterfowl nesting efforts were delayed this spring due to high water levels, observations from the field indicate that brood sizes appear to be large this year," McLellan says. "Summer precipitation has been near average across much of this region, and water levels are currently stable, providing favorable habitat for brood rearing."

The forecast for Atlantic Flyway goose populations is variable. The breeding pair estimate for Atlantic Population Canada geese was similar to last year's estimate and the long-term average, and these birds were expected to have fair to good production this summer. Just over 930,000 resident Canada geese were surveyed in the Atlantic Flyway, and production was expected to be good to excellent for this population. In the eastern Canadian Arctic, greater snow goose numbers were down 18 percent this year, and average production was expected. Atlantic brant numbers were similar to those of 2016, and surveys indicate that breeding success was variable for these birds.

About the Survey

Each year, biologists with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Canadian Wildlife Service, state and provincial wildlife agencies, and nonprofit conservation organizations including Ducks Unlimited take part in the Waterfowl Breeding Population and Habitat Survey—the world's longest-running and most comprehensive wildlife population survey. These dedicated men and women physically count ducks and geese by air and on foot along thousands of miles of standardized survey transects from South Dakota to Alaska. The information collected during this survey has been the cornerstone of waterfowl harvest management in North America for more than 60 years. For more information about this year's survey results, visit flyways.us.

 

CORNELL LAB OF ORNITHOLOGY PROJECT FEEDERWATCH:

What is Project FeederWatch?

Project FeederWatch is a winter-long survey of birds that visit feeders. You simply identify and count the birds outside your window. You can count every week between November and April, or you can count once all season—the time you spend is up to you. Using our easy online data entry, you can see all of your counts and view colorful tables, graphs, and summaries.
Who can participate?

Anyone interested in birds can participate; you don’t have to be an expert. If you attract birds to your yard with food or habitat, then you just need a window to watch and an interest in who shows up. We will send you all that you need to get started identifying the visitors.

New participants will receive:

FeederWatch Handbook & Instructions

Full-color poster of common feeder birds

Bird-Watching Days Calendar

Our annual report, Winter Bird Highlights

Digital access to Living Bird magazine

This September only: Hummingbirds poster!

Why participate?

You will learn about your backyard birds and contribute to a 30-year-and-running dataset of bird population changes. With FeederWatch, you become a scientist in your own backyard. Explore the millions of FeederWatch sightings on our website and make your own discoveries.

Sign up now for $18 ($15 for current Lab Members) and enjoy the limited print of our favorite hummingbird poster. Your participation fee keeps the project running; without it, Project FeederWatch wouldn't be possible.

OUTDOOR NEWS, INC., PARTNERS WITH CABELA'S FOR YOUTH WRITING CONTEST:

Outdoor News, Inc., publisher of locally written fishing and hunting outdoor newspapers in seven Great Lake states, has partnered with Cabela's, the World's Foremost Outfitter of hunting, fishing and outdoor gear, for the annual Youth Writing Contest for students in Minnesota, Wisconsin, Michigan, Pennsylvania, New York, Ohio and Illinois.
Outdoor News, Inc. has promoted the writing contest since 1998, which encourages youths to submit an outdoors-oriented essay or poem.
"This contest, which combines youth with topics such as hunting, fishing, camping and other outdoor adventures, makes this multi-year partnership with Outdoor News a natural fit," said Christine Wamsley, Director of Communications and Partnerships for Cabela's.
Cabela's sponsorship enables the awarding of cash prizes for each of the two age categories for students in grades 6-12 through the contest.
"Each year, more than 1,000 entries are received from youth sharing their first hunting experiences, fishing adventures or memorable time spent in the field," said Rob Drieslein, managing editor for Outdoor News publications and one of the judges who selects the winning entries.
For students in grades 9-12, who qualify in the Senior Division, and 6-8 grade students entered in the Junior Division, the chance to win a $100 first place prize or $50 second place award is just part of the incentive to participate. Winning entries are printed in Outdoor News publications, and the winners are also presented plague to honor their winning submissions. But this isn't the end of their story. Winning entries in the Outdoor News contest will then be forwarded for entry into the Outdoor Writers Association of America annual writing contest. The OWAA contest offers the chance for youth writers to earn additional cash prizes and recognition.
Contest submissions and information on the 2017 Outdoor News Youth Writing Contest can be found online at
http://www.outdoornews.com/youthwritingcontest/

 

THIS WEEK'S EVENTS: (For complete future listings go to the Calendar Page.