t
 
Home Fish News Youth Photos Humor Clubs Contact
Your ?? Hunt Trap Calendar Links Web Extras Bios Join us on Facebook
 

       

http://www.fotosearch.com/bthumb/DNV/DNV225/052F0505PM.jpg

 

conservation chatter corner

with ron schroder

************************************************

YOUR IN ON THE OUTDOORS FOR WESTERN NEW YORK
www.huntfishnyoutdoors.com

 

12 - 14 – 18

 

Welcome to this week’s Conservation Chatter Corner – little bits of happenings concerning our outdoors and you, the sportspeople who enjoy being part of that outdoors.

 

SUMMER CAMP REGISTRATIONS OPEN JANUARY 23, 2019: Online registration for DEC's 2019 Summer Camps program will open Wednesday, January 23, 2019, at 10:00 a.m Applications should be submitted through the online registration program available through the Summer Camps webpage. Parents and guardians are encouraged to register early since some of the weeks fill up quickly.

Now in its 72nd year, the Summer Camps program offers week-long adventures in conservation education for children ages 11-17. DEC operates four residential camps for children: Camp Colby in Saranac Lake (Franklin County); Camp DeBruce in Livingston Manor (Sullivan County); Camp Rushford in Caneadea (Allegany County), and Pack Forest in Warrensburg (Warren County).

Introduced in 2017, camps Colby and DeBruce are offering two weeks of programing for children aged 14-17, and five weeks of programming for ages 11-13. Camp Pack Forest will continue to host children aged 14-17 for six weeks and ages 11-13 for two weeks. Camp Rushford will continue to offer two weeks of programming for children aged 14-17 and five weeks of programming for ages 11-13. The complete schedule of camp weeks and ages is available on the Summer Camps webpage.

Campers will have the opportunity to participate in a wide variety of outdoor adventures and are encouraged to try new things. Activities may include fishing, bird watching, fly-tying, archery, canoeing, hiking, camping, orienteering, and hunter safety education.

One hunter education program for either gun, bow, or trapping is offered at each camp each week. Class size is limited for hunter education programs and campers must sign up for it during registration and complete the homework in advance.

Along with adventure experiences, DEC campers engage in fun, hands-on activities and outdoor exploration focused on field, forest, stream, and pond ecological principles. Campers might collect insects in a field, use nets in a stream, investigate soil composition, measure tree sizes, or practice taking field notes and writing in journals. Trips to nearby state lands might include kettle bogs, state parks, fish hatcheries, or nature museums.

Camp Pack Forest will once again offer "Outdoor Adventure Week 2.0" during Week 5 (July 21-26). DEC encourages teens aged 14 to 17 who love being outdoors to sign up for this popular program that will help deepen their enjoyment and widen their horizons while exploring environmental careers at Camp Pack Forest. During this week, campers will develop hands-on outdoor skills that go above and beyond the traditional camp week. Alongside canoeing, fishing, and games, campers will engage in forestry, citizen science, conservation science, and more. Guest DEC, higher education, and natural resource professionals will provide opportunities for campers to consider career paths.

All four camps will operate for seven one-week sessions (Sunday to Friday) beginning June 30, 2019; Pack Forest operates for eight weeks. Drop-off time is 3:00 p.m. on Sunday, and the closing ceremony and pick-up time is Friday at 4:30 p.m. One week of camp remains $350 per child for the 2019 year, and includes meals, trips, and a camp t-shirt.

In addition to inviting parents to register their children to participate in the DEC environmental education Summer Camps program, sporting clubs, civic groups, and environmental organizations are encouraged to sponsor one or more children for a week at camp. Groups that deposit funds to sponsor six (6) paid campers in one transaction will receive a scholarship to send a seventh child to camp for free. The seventh camper will use a sponsorship code generated by the Albany Camps administration. Information about becoming a sponsor and managing sponsor accounts is available on DEC's website.

For more information, visit DEC's website, call 518-402-8014, visit "NYS DEC Summer Camps" on Facebook or write to DEC Camps, 3rd Floor, 625 Broadway, Albany, New York 12233-5256.

 

PRO-SPORTSMEN'S BILLS NEED YOUR SUPPORT NOW! CONTACT U.S. HOUSE AND SENATE LEADERSHIP TODAY!: Congress is getting ready to adjourn for the year, but there is still time to get pro-sportsman legislation passed –  with your help. The proposed packages of legislation would create additional hunting, fishing and recreational shooting opportunities, while conserving and maintaining wildlife habitat and fisheries. 

Similar packages of bills have been proposed over the past few years with limited success. Up for consideration now, are provisions important to hunters, anglers, trappers and recreational shooters, including: “Open Until Closed,” the Target Practice and Marksmanship Training Support Act, Pittman-Robertson Modernization Act and many others.

>“Open Until Closed” would require lands managed by the Bureau of Land Management and U.S. Forest Service be open for hunting, fishing and recreational shooting, unless specifically closed for cause. This action would help to prevent lawsuits brought by anti-hunting groups attempting to use the courts to stop hunting opportunities on public land.

>The Target Practice and Marksmanship Training Support Act would improve public shooting range access, which is a direct benefit to hunters and recreational shooters. 

>The Pittman-Robertson Modernization Act will improve recruitment of new hunters by allowing states to use existing excise tax funds to help promote hunting and recreational shooting.

These provisions garner wide, bipartisan support. Despite this, the bills have not made their way through the process and time is running out before Congress adjourns for the year. The leadership of the House and Senate have the ability to put these bills up for a vote – but they must hear from you today. Please call the individuals listed below and urge them to show their support for hunters, anglers and trappers by approving these critical provisions before the end of the year. 

U.S. House of Representatives:  

Speaker of the House: Speaker Paul Ryan (Wisconsin)  202-225-0600

Majority Leader: Kevin McCarthy (California)  202-225-4000

Minority Leader: Nancy Pelosi (California)  202-225-0100

Minority Whip: Steny Hoyer (Maryland)  202-225-4300

U.S. Senate:

Senate Majority Leader: Mitch McConnell (Kentucky)  202-224-2541

Majority Whip: John Cornyn (Texas)  202-224-2934

Minority Leader: Chuck Schumer (New York)  202-224-6542

Minority Whip: Dick Durbin (Illinois)  202-224-2152

(From Sportsmen’s Alliance: Online, Facebook, Twitter and Instagram)

 

THE GOOD GUYS AT WORK:

Perfect Timing - Ontario County: On Nov. 21, Lt. Aaron Gordon was driving past a residence in the town of Manchester when he observed a deer hanging in the garage. As the ECO pulled into the driveway to check the tag, a shot rang out from behind the house. Lt. Gordon encountered the homeowner and asked if he heard the gunshot. The homeowner said he believed it must have been one of his neighbors hunting in the woods behind his house. Lt. Gordon walked behind the house and discovered a shooting lane cut in the brush, perfectly aligned with one of the residence's windows. There were two large piles of corn and a dead, eight-point buck approximately 40 yards from the first corn pile. ECO Kevin Thomas responded to assist Lt. Gordon. The homeowner admitted to shooting the deer from the window of his house. The buck was confiscated and tickets were issued for discharging a firearm within 500 feet of a house, hunting deer over bait, illegal taking of protected wildlife, and taking deer in excess of the bag limit.

Deceased deer close-up with corn in it's mouth
Eight-point buck taken illegally over corn pile

Road Hunters become the Hunted - Livingston County: On Nov. 26, ECO Shawn Dussault received a call about a deer being shot from the road by someone in a small white sedan in the town of Conesus. He headed to the location and spotted the dead deer just off the roadway. Thinking that the suspects would return for the deer, he requested an unmarked car to respond to assist him. Capt. William Powell drove to the area and parked his unmarked patrol vehicle in a driveway across from the location. About 20 minutes later, a white sedan appeared and parked nearby. The subjects spotted ECO Dussault in the woods and sped off. Capt. Powell pulled over the sedan and found an unloaded shotgun and rifle inside. Initially, the male and female subjects denied having any involvement in the incident, but after interviewing them separately, the pair admitted to shooting the antlerless deer from inside the vehicle with the shotgun. K-9 Ski was requested and found the components from the slug that killed the deer, as well as an empty shell casing. Both subjects face several charges, including reckless endangerment, possessing a loaded firearm in a motor vehicle, discharging a firearm from a public highway, discharging a firearm within 500 feet of a residence, trespassing, taking an illegal deer, taking an antlerless deer without a proper Deer Management Permit, and taking wildlife from a motor vehicle.

Cooperative Effort for a Proactive CWD Checkpoint - Broome County: On Dec. 1, Capt. James Boylan, Lt. Kenric Warner, and ECOs Andy McCormick and Anthony Rigoli conducted a Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) checkpoint just north of the Pennsylvania border in the town of Vestal along with officers from the Vestal Police Department and State of Pennsylvania Wildlife Conservation. The detail was part of DEC's Division of Law Enforcement initiative to prevent CWD-infected carcasses and prohibited parts of deer taken in Pennsylvania from entering New York. CWD is an untreatable and fatal brain and nervous system disease found in deer, elk, and moose and poses a serious threat to New York's white-tailed deer population. The first vehicle checked was transporting a whole carcass taken in Pennsylvania. Over the course of the detail, two more vehicles were found to be transporting deer carcasses into New York State in violation of the ECL. DEC is conducting testing on the confiscated deer. One truck contained four whole, untagged carcasses. Pennsylvania officers addressed the unlawfully taken deer, as well as other violations of Pennsylvania's Fish and Game laws. In addition, ECOs charged two men with possession of loaded firearms in a motor vehicle and Vestal Police issued numerous tickets for vehicle and traffic offenses.

Deer carcasses in back of ECO truck
Seized deer taken for testing and destruction

Case Closed on Out-of-Season Deer - Chautauqua County: On Dec. 3, ECO Jerry Kinney attended Town of Harmony Court to finalize a case involving a deer killed on June 10. A 19-year-old man traveling on Wilcox Road in Harmony saw a doe in a field and took a single shot .22 caliber rifle and fired it out of the back passenger window of the car. The deer was wounded and the subject did not have any more ammunition, so he used a knife to kill the deer. This case was solved thanks to interviews conducted by ECO Kinney and a video taken by a passenger in the vehicle. The shooter accepted a civil settlement for taking a deer out of season, using rimfire ammunition to hunt deer, possessing a loaded firearm in a motor vehicle, discharging a firearm from the roadway, and using a motor vehicle to take wildlife, with total penalties of $1,712.50.

Three Men with Poaching Deer - Steuben County: New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) Environmental Conservation Police Officers (ECOs) have charged two Potter County, PA, residents and one Steuben County resident in connection with a recent deer poaching incident. Alex Nadjadi, 23, of Savona, and Jeffery Duell, Jr., 29, and Nathan Karns, 24, of Couldersport, PA, have been charged with a total of 40 misdemeanor offenses stemming from an investigation into the illegal taking of eight deer. The offenses include 38 Environmental Conservation Law (ECL) misdemeanors, one New York Vehicle and Traffic Law misdemeanor, and one Criminal Possession of a Weapon misdemeanor.

On Dec. 9, ECO Farrand received a complaint from a resident that reported hearing a gun shot and observing a car repeatedly driving up and down a road in the town of Woodhull. ECO Farrand immediately responded to the complaint and found the complainant had confronted Duell, who had been driving up and down the road. ECO Farrand then located Karns walking down the road.

Duell had dropped Karns off to look for a deer the pair had shot with the use of the vehicle's headlights, while Duell drove up and down the road looking for a signal from Karns. The signal was never given because Karns saw the complainant confront Duell.

The ECOs investigation determined that eight deer had been illegally shot after sunset with the aid of a motor vehicle on Saturday, Dec. 8, and Sunday, Dec. 9. Further investigation led to ECOs identifying Nadjadi as a third suspect.

ECOs Farrand, Lomozik, and Baker located the poached deer dispersed in four separate locations: a field in Woodhull, dropped on the roadside in Woodhull, in Nadjadi's possession, and in a barn in Allegany County.

The three men were charged with multiple misdemeanor offenses.

Karns was arrested for the following 17 misdemeanor offenses and faces up to $41,000 in fines and/or up to 17 years in jail:

Eight counts of taking a deer with the aid of a motor vehicle (misdemeanor) $2000/misd

Eight counts of the illegal taking of a deer (misdemeanor) $3000/misd

Criminal Possession of a Weapon (misdemeanor) $1,000/misd

Duell was ticketed for the following violations and faces up to $40,500 in fines and/or up to 16 years in jail:

Eight counts of taking a deer with the aid of a motor vehicle (misdemeanor)

Eight counts of the illegal taking of a deer (misdemeanor)

One count of aggravated unlicensed operation of a motor vehicle (misdemeanor)

Nadjadi was ticketed for the following violations and faces up to $15,000 in fines and/or up to 6 years in jail:

Three counts of taking a deer with the aid of a motor vehicle (misdemeanor)

Three counts of the illegal taking of a deer (misdemeanor)

The charges are answerable in Woodhull Town Court on Jan. 8. The deer were seized as evidence and the meat was donated to a New York State member of the Venison Donation Coalition.

HOW ABOUT A BOOK FOR CHRISTMAS?: Looking for that unique and special Christmas gift? Look no further.

"Another Good Day in the Woods" is a look at nature through the lenses of professional wildlife photographer and HuntFishNYOutdoors Website/Photography Advisor John Adamski, and includes images of whitetail deer, elk, moose, bison and many other wild animals and birds, together with some stunning landscape photos taken along the way.

You can preview and order "Another Good Day in the Woods" here:

http://www.blurb.com/b/6559441-another-good-day-in-the-woods?fbclid=IwAR2lc9sGjmpz58WzKYHSgNPVsd1eXFtazRutvZzog4MVo0KW0Ybm2ZagTnw

“My Best Shots!” is a compilation of 175 wildlife and wilderness landscape photos taken over 40 years by veteran nature photographer John Adamski. His wide range of images include full-color photos of whitetail deer, elk, moose, pronghorns, bighorn sheep, black bears, grizzly bears, bison, and wild birds--all taken in their natural surroundings. Landscape images include stunning photos of the Adirondacks, Maine, and the American and Canadian Rockies.

Preview and order "My Best Shots!" here:

http://www.blurb.com/b/7654467-my-best-shots?fbclid=IwAR1UoW72V8P7dfxL-jWaaiA-TiEk6_WycrIGmQCSjmjPpRodznvh1nD65uM

Both books are available in hard and soft cover.

 

ANOTHER CHRISTMAS IDEA - THE GIFT OF A LIFETIME FISHING, TRAPPING, OR HUNTING LICENSE: Lifetime Licenses are available to New York State residents who have resided in New York for at least 12 months prior to purchase (proof of residency required). Lifetime licenses may be purchased at any license-issuing agent, by phone (866-922-2257), or online with a current NYS DMV driver or non-driver ID containing a valid NYS address. Allow two weeks for delivery of Lifetime Licenses purchased online or by phone.

Lifetime Licenses may also be purchased as gifts for residents under the age of 16 with proof of age (birth certificate, passport, driver's license) and proof of residency (parent/legal guardian proof of residency) for the recipient. Gift lifetime licenses can be purchased in person at any license issuing agent.

Lifetime fishing, trapping or hunting licenses and privileges entitle the holder to all the privileges of equivalent annual licenses and privileges, but these licenses are good for a lifetime (with appropriate hunter/trapper education requirements) - even if the holder is no longer a New York State resident. The combination Lifetime License includes both hunting and fishing privileges, as well as turkey permits:

Available Lifetime Licenses:
Lifetime License (includes hunting, fishing, and turkey hunting privileges)
For a person age 0-4 years: $380
For a person age 5-11 years: $535
For a person age 12-69 years: $765
For a person age 70 years, and older: $65
Lifetime Fishing License
For a person age 0-69 years: $460
For a person age 70 years and older: $65
Lifetime Hunting License: $535
Lifetime Bowhunting Privilege: $235
Lifetime Muzzleloading Privilege: $235
Lifetime Trapping License: $395
Habitat & Access Stamp Sales Promotion

DEC also encourages gift givers to consider supporting efforts to help create and manage wildlife habitat and enhance access for wildlife-dependent recreation.

Now through December 31, purchasers of the $5 Habitat & Access Stamp receive a collectible 2018-19 Habitat Patron pin featuring a barred owl. Revenue from the sale of Habitat & Access Stamps supports DEC's efforts to improve fish and wildlife habitat and increase access for outdoor recreation. Habitat & Access Stamps can be purchased online, by phone at 1-866-933-2257 (Mon - Fri 8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.), or at any License Issuing Agent.

In addition, during this promotional period, anyone that purchases seven stamps in one transaction ($35 donation), will receive the entire DEC collector series of seven pins, including the barred owl, beaver, white-tailed deer, wild turkey, wood duck, bluebird, and woodcock pins, plus an extra 2018-19 barred owl pins.

*Quantities are limited and will be sold on a first-come, first-served basis. DEC can only guarantee Christmas delivery of pins for Habitat Stamps sold by December 16, but we will continue to fulfill all orders through the end of the year. For questions or to make a special pin request, contact DEC's License Sales hotline at 866-472-4332, Mon.-Fri., 8 a.m. - 4 p.m., by December 14.

 

THIS WEEK’S EVENTS: (For complete future listings go to the Calendar Page - http://www.huntfishnyoutdoors.com/events.php)
DECEMBER 2018

15 - Close of Lake Ontario and Tributaries Muskellunge and Tiger Muskellunge Fishing Season

15 - Frosty Forest at the Reinstein Woods Environmental Education Center, 93 Honorine Drive, Depew, NY (Town of Cheektowaga) (10:00 am) Don’t know the difference between a spruce and a pine tree? Come learn how to ID local trees in winter! (For information and register call 716-683-5959 or email reinsteinwoods@dec.ny.gov)

15 -  Woods Walk: Migrate, Adapt Or Die at the Reinstein Woods Environmental Education Center, 93 Honorine Drive, Depew, NY (Town of Cheektowaga) (10:00 am) Learn about ways that animals survive the winter season on a guided nature walk. No registration required (For information call 716-683-5959 or email reinsteinwoods@dec.ny.gov)

15 -  Wine and Wings Birding Van Tour meet at the Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savannah, NY (1:00 – 4:00 pm) The holiday season is here and so are our wintering raptors.  Join us as we head out in our van to look for elusive Short-eared Owls, hunting Northern Harriers, soaring Bald Eagles, and more.  During the tour we’ll stop at the Montezuma Winery for wine tastings and to learn how vineyards and Important Birds Areas happily exist side by side. Must be 21+. Binoculars, a spotting scope, and field guides will be provided. (Fee $20/adult, includes tasting fee. PRE-PAID RESERVATIONS ARE REQUIRED. (For information or register call 315-365-3588 or e-mail montezuma@audubon.org) 

19 -  Montezuma Birding Van Tour meet at the Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savannah, NY (9:00 – 11:00 am) Waterfowl have left their breeding grounds and are ready for the long, cold winter. Join us for a birding van tour to see dozens of ducks, geese and swans as they rest, feed, and socialize in Montezuma’s marshes. Binoculars, a spotting scope, and field guides will be provided. (Fee: $8/child; $15/adult, $40/family. PRE-PAID RESERVATIONS ARE REQUIRED.) (For information or register call 315-365-3588 or e-mail montezuma@audubon.org)

22 – 119th Annual Christmas Bird Count at the Beaver Meadow Nature Center, North Java, NY. (8:00 am - Noon(For information/register call 585-457-3228)  

 

Until our next meeting in the Corner, have a great time in the outdoors. This is Ron Schroder for – “Your In on The Outdoors for Western New York.”

What Do You Think? Have something for other sportspeople? Let us know HERE.

 

 

*******************************

 

12 - 7 – 18

 

Welcome to this week’s Conservation Chatter Corner – little bits of happenings concerning our outdoors and you, the sportspeople who enjoy being part of that outdoors.

 

CHRISTMAS IDEAS: Christmas gift ideas, how about a lifetime license for hunting, fishing and/or trapping or a subscription to the DEC magazine, the Conservationist. The nice part about the magazine you don’t have to worry about next year – just renew.

 

IT”S COMING - - ICE SAFETY: Here are 13 tips to follow when going on ice:

*Always remember that ice is never completely safe under any conditions.

*Fish or walk with a friend. It’s safer and more fun.

*Contact local sport shops to ask about ice conditions on the lake or river you want to fish.

*Carry a cell phone, and let people know where you are going and when you’ll return home.

*Wear proper clothing and equipment, including a life jacket or a float coat to help you stay afloat and to help slow body heat loss.

*Wear creepers attached to boots to prevent slipping on clear ice.

*Carry a spud bar to check the ice while walking to new areas.

*Carry a couple of spikes and a length of light rope in an easily accessible pocket to help pull yourself—or others—out of the ice.

*Do not travel in unfamiliar areas, or at night.

*Know if the lake has inlets, outlets, or narrows that have currents that can thin the ice.

*Look for clear ice. Clear ice is generally stronger than ice with air bubbles in it or with snow on it.

*Watch out for pressure ridges or ice heaves. These can be dangerous due to thin ice and open water.

*Take extra mittens or gloves so you always have a dry pair.

*Driving on ice is always a risk. Use good judgment and consider alternatives.

 

General Ice Thickness Guidelines

ice thickness guide card

For New, Clear Ice Only

2" or less - STAY OFF

4" - Ice fishing or other activities on foot

5" - Snowmobile or ATV

8" - 12" - Car or small pickup

12" - 15" - Medium truck

Remember that these thicknesses are merely guidelines for new, clear, solid ice. Many factors other than thickness can cause ice to be unsafe.

  

ASIAN LONGHORNED TICK: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is working with public health, agricultural, and academic experts to understand the possible threat posed by the spread of the Asian longhorned tick (Haemaphysalis longicornis) in several U.S. states since its discovery in 2017, according to today’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

Nymph and adult female longhorned ticks

“The full public health and agricultural impact of this tick discovery and spread is unknown,” said Ben Beard, Ph.D., deputy director of CDC’s Division of Vector-Borne Diseases.  “In other parts of the world, the Asian longhorned tick can transmit many types of pathogens common in the United States. We are concerned that this tick, which can cause massive infestations on animals, on people, and in the environment, is spreading in the United States.”

New Jersey and eight other states report finding this tick

New Jersey was the first state to report the tick on a sheep in August 2017. Since then, 45 counties or county equivalents in New Jersey and eight other states—Arkansas, Connecticut, Maryland, North Carolina, New York, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and West Virginia—have reported finding the tick on a variety of hosts, including people, wildlife, domestic animals, and in environmental samples.

In contrast to most tick species, a single female tick can reproduce offspring (1-2,000 eggs at a time) without mating. As a result, hundreds to thousands of ticks can be found on a single animal, person, or in the environment. Livestock producers and pet owners should work with their veterinarians to maintain regular tick prevention and report any unknown tick species to their local department of agriculture.

In other parts of the world where the Asian longhorned tick is common, it is a serious threat to livestock. In some regions of New Zealand and Australia, this tick can reduce production in dairy cattle by 25 percent.

CDC and its partners work to learn more, prevent spread of disease

To better understand the full potential impact of this tick discovery in the United States, CDC is working with a network of federal, state, and local experts representing veterinary and agricultural science and public health to:

>Determine the geographic distribution of Asian longhorned tick in the United States.

>Determine the kinds of pathogens carried by Asian longhorned ticks in affected states that could infect people. Pathogens found in these ticks in other parts of the world, also endemic to the United States, include Borrelia, Anaplasma, Ehrlichia, Rickettsia, and Babesia.

>Determine what new laboratory tests are needed to detect pathogens that could be introduced or spread by these ticks in the United States.

>Establish a clean colony (ticks with no pathogens) for studies.

>Determine how frequently the Asian longhorned tick bites people and animals in the United States.

>Determine effective prevention and control strategies.

Eventually operating under a national strategy, this network of collaborators will work to limit the spread of tickborne diseases before they affect people and animals. This concerted, sustained national effort is needed to address the threat posed by the Asian longhorned tick, as well as the threat posed by the ongoing increase in vector-borne diseases in the United States.

Protect against tickborne diseases

Everyone can take steps to prevent tick bites:

Use Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-registered insect repellents containing DEET, picaridin, IR3535, oil of lemon eucalyptus (OLE), para-menthane-diol (PMD), or 2-undecanone. Always follow product instructions.

Treat clothing and gear with products containing 0.5 percent permethrin. Permethrin can be used to treat boots, clothing, and camping gear and remain protective through several washings. Alternatively, you can buy permethrin-treated clothing and gear.

Check your body and clothing for ticks upon return from potentially tick-infested areas, including your own backyard. Use a hand-held or full-length mirror to view all parts of your body. Place tick-infested clothes in a dryer on high heat for at least 10 minutes to kill ticks on dry clothing after you come indoors.

Shower soon after being outdoors. Showering within two hours of coming indoors has been shown to reduce your risk of getting Lyme disease and may be effective in reducing the risk of other tickborne diseases. Showering may help wash off unattached ticks and is a good time to do a tick check.

Talk to your veterinarian about tickborne diseases in your area and prevention products for your dog.  

For more information:

What you need to know about Asian longhorned ticks – A new tick in the United States

Preventing tick bites

Tickborne Diseases of the United States

 

THE GOOD GUYS AT WORK:

Wildland Search, Recovery: Town of Gates, Monroe County: On Nov. 30, the Monroe County Fire Bureau requested Forest Ranger assistance to help locate a 57-year-old Rochester man last seen on Nov. 4. The man was presumed to be deceased in the woodlands near his residence. Five Forest Rangers assisted Gates Police Department personnel on Dec. 2, with search management, including employing an unmanned aerial vehicle (drone) for reconnaissance and search documentation. By midday, one of the local search teams located the man's body in the primary search area. Further investigation will be conducted by Gates Police and Monroe County Coroner.

Wildland Search: Town of Dryden, Tompkins County: On Dec. 1, a cross-country skier reported to Tompkins County 911 that she had become separated from her two skiing companions on Hammond Hill State Forest. The pair had not returned to their vehicle when she did. Two DEC Forest Rangers responded to the Dryden Fire Station to assist the Fire Chief, and State Police launch a search to locate the women. State Police, State Park Police, Tompkins County Sheriff's Deputies, and firefighters from Dryden, Moravia, Trumansburg, and Enfield all participated in search for the 43- and 56-year-old Ithaca women. Shortly after midnight on Dec. 2, the women were found together, sheltered under a tree. The pair was evaluated by local emergency medical technicians and transported by all-terrain vehicle to a waiting ambulance. The two women reported that they became disoriented while skiing and were unable to find their way back to their vehicle.

Not a White Tail - Cattaraugus County:  On Nov. 25, Lt. Don Pleakis, ECOs Jason Powers, Nate Mead and Wildlife Biologist Ryan Rockefeller responded to a report of a red deer taken in the town of Franklinville. DLE and the Division of Wildlife had received reports that there was a red deer, a species not native to New York, living in the wild in that area. New York's Department of Agriculture and Markets had attempted to locate the owner unsuccessfully. On Nov. 23, a 16-year-old female shot her first deer, an unusually large doe. The family field dressed it, transported it to their residence in Farmersville, and called ECO Jason Powers when they became suspicious of the animal. The officers confirmed the doe to be a red deer, weighing roughly 175 pounds.

 

DEC STAFF CONTINUE SAUGER RESTORATION EFFORTS:

DEC staff with saugerSauger are a native sportfish in New York State and are a close relative of walleye. However, their populations have severely declined. They are now considered “critically imperiled.” DEC Bureau of Fisheries staff is conducting restoration efforts in the Allegheny River watershed and in Lake Champlain. Staff have been stocking sauger annually in the Allegheny watershed since 2014. These fish are surviving and growing well. Signs of spawning activity in the spring have also been observed. While these are encouraging signs, the stocking program will continue for several more years to achieve the goal of creating a self-sustaining population. Lake Champlain supported the last viable sauger population in New York State. DEC staff are currently developing a plan to restore the Lake Champlain population, as well. For more information on sauger management, visit the DEC website.

 

HELP KEEP WILDLIFE SAFE WHILE VIEWING: Winter is right around the corner. It is a great time to get outdoors and observe birds and other wildlife. Some species of birds spend their summers in the tundra and their winters in New York. Unfortunately, some birders, in their enthusiasm to photograph the birds up close, may approach the birds and flush them – cause them to fly. This can deplete the birds’ energy reserves, and in extreme cases, can cause death. It is better to observe wildlife in a manner that is safe for both you and wildlife.

Image of three people snowshoeing and observing the wildlife. One is using binoculors to view from a safe distance.

               DEC Photo 

Some ways to respect wildlife and others around you:

>View wildlife from a distance using binoculars.

>Stay on trails.

>Only enter private property if you have permission.

>Park in designated spots or completely off the road, out of travel lanes.

  

THIS WEEK’S EVENTS: (For complete future listings go to the Calendar Page - http://www.huntfishnyoutdoors.com/events.php)
DECEMBER 2018

7 -  Junior Home School Nature Series: Fish Adaptations (Ages 5-10) at the Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savannah, NY (10:00 am – 12:00 pm) Winter is coming and fish will have to adapt to their icy environments to survive. But how will they do it? Explore the amazing characteristics that fish employ to survive in Montezuma’s waterways and learn where you can go to catch the big one. (Fee: $8/class. PRE-REGISTRTATION and PAYMENT are required.) (For information or register call 315-365-3588 or e-mail montezuma@audubon.org) 

8 - Rod & Gun Auction at Hessney Auction Center, 2741 Lyons Road (Route 14N), Geneva, NY (9:30 am) Shotguns, rifles, handguns, military, decoys, knives, mounts, fishing, ammo and swords. (For more information call 315-789-9349 or 585-734-6082 or go to www.hessney.com)

8 - Family Snowshoe Walk at the Iroquois National Wildlife Refuge, Basaom, NY (10:00 am) Join us for a guided snowshoe walk along the trails as we look for signs of wildlife. Snowshoe rental: $5. (For information and register call 716-683-5959 or email reinsteinwoods@dec.ny.gov)

15 - Close of Lake Ontario and Tributaries Muskellunge and Tiger Muskellunge Fishing Season

15 - Frosty Forest at the Reinstein Woods Environmental Education Center, 93 Honorine Drive, Depew, NY (Town of Cheektowaga) (10:00 am) Don’t know the difference between a spruce and a pine tree? Come learn how to ID local trees in winter! (For information and register call 716-683-5959 or email reinsteinwoods@dec.ny.gov)

15 -  Woods Walk: Migrate, Adapt Or Die at the Reinstein Woods Environmental Education Center, 93 Honorine Drive, Depew, NY (Town of Cheektowaga) (10:00 am) Learn about ways that animals survive the winter season on a guided nature walk. No registration required (For information call 716-683-5959 or email reinsteinwoods@dec.ny.gov)

15 -  Wine and Wings Birding Van Tour meet at the Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savannah, NY (1:00 – 4:00 pm) The holiday season is here and so are our wintering raptors.  Join us as we head out in our van to look for elusive Short-eared Owls, hunting Northern Harriers, soaring Bald Eagles, and more.  During the tour we’ll stop at the Montezuma Winery for wine tastings and to learn how vineyards and Important Birds Areas happily exist side by side. Must be 21+. Binoculars, a spotting scope, and field guides will be provided. (Fee $20/adult, includes tasting fee. PRE-PAID RESERVATIONS ARE REQUIRED. (For information or register call 315-365-3588 or e-mail montezuma@audubon.org) 

 

Until our next meeting in the Corner, have a great time in the outdoors. This is Ron Schroder for – “Your In on The Outdoors for Western New York.”

What Do You Think? Have something for other sportspeople? Let us know HERE.

 

 

*******************************

 

11 - 30 – 18

 

Welcome to this week’s Conservation Chatter Corner – little bits of happenings concerning our outdoors and you, the sportspeople who enjoy being part of that outdoors.

 

CWD-SUSPECTED DEER DETERMINED TO BE A FALSE ALARM: The New York State Departments of Environmental Conservation (DEC) and Agriculture and Markets (DAM) today announced that Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) has not been found in a suspected CWD-positive sample from an adult female deer killed by a bowhunter in Chautauqua County and submitted for testing as part of DEC's routine surveillance efforts. An initial screening test performed by the Animal Health Diagnostic Center at Cornell University suggested the deer as a possible CWD case. DEC and DAM immediately sent additional tissue samples to the National Veterinary Services Lab (NVSL) in Ames, Iowa, for additional definitive testing. DEC conducts confirmatory testing on all suspected CWD samples. Final diagnosis from NVSL indicates CWD was not detected. Although CWD poses a serious threat to New York's white-tailed deer and moose populations, there are no known cases of CWD transmission from animals to humans. In an abundance of caution, DEC will continue strategic CWD surveillance in Chautauqua County and around the state as deer hunting season continues.

The potential discovery of CWD triggered DEC and DAM to immediately initiate New York's CWD Response Plan (PDF, 2 MB) prior to the regular deer hunting season, which began Saturday, Nov. 17. If CWD was confirmed, DEC was prepared to establish a CWD containment area in the location where the deer was taken to determine the prevalence and distribution of the disease and to prevent the spread of CWD into other parts of New York. DEC would have enacted regulations requiring hunters to register and provide tissue samples of all deer harvested within the containment area and to prohibit movement of deer carcasses and high-risk parts (brain, eyes, spinal cord, tonsils, intestinal tract, spleen, and retropharyngeal lymph nodes) out of the containment area.

In addition, the Department of Agriculture and Markets was prepared to work with all the deer farm owners in the area to monitor herds for compliance with the State's CWD prevention program, to control animal movement from the farms, and to inspect the deer farms' fences and structures for secure containment.

Because CWD was ultimately not detected, such measures are not necessary.

Hunters can protect New York's deer herd from CWD by following these tips:

>If hunting any type of deer, elk, moose, or caribou outside of New York, hunters should debone harvested animals before bringing harvest back to the state, and follow the law about importing carcass parts from outside of New York. See CWD Regulations for Hunters. DEC will confiscate and destroy illegally imported carcasses and parts, including antlers. Intact deer carcasses cannot be brought into New York from Pennsylvania or Ohio, which are both CWD positive states.

>Dispose of carcass waste in a landfill, not just out on the landscape

>Hunt only wild deer and support fair chase hunting principles.

>Report any deer that appears sick or acting abnormally by contacting your local DEC wildlife office or Environmental Conservation Officer.

CWD is an untreatable and fatal brain and nervous system disease of the cervid family (deer, elk, moose, and reindeer/caribou) caused by an abnormal protein called a prion. It is in the same family of diseases as bovine spongiform encephalopathy ("mad cow" disease) and scrapie in sheep. CWD prions can be spread directly from animal-to-animal contact or indirectly from infected carcasses, parts, products, or contaminated environments. Prions are found throughout the body of infected animals, and live animals can shed prions in saliva, feces, and urine even before they appear sick. Once the ground is contaminated with CWD prions from feces, saliva, urine, or infected carcass parts, the prions can remain infective to other cervids for 16 years or more.

DEC began monitoring for CWD in 2002 and intensified its efforts in 2005 after CWD was found in five captive and two wild deer in Oneida County-the first incidents of the disease in New York State. At that time, DEC took immediate action to contain the disease. DEC and DAM depopulated the affected captive herds and culled several hundred deer near the incident cases. Since then, DEC has tested more than 46,800 deer with no additional cases being discovered. DEC continues to annually monitor hunter-harvested deer for CWD, and DAM routinely tests a portion of CWD-susceptible animals in captive cervid facilities.

More information about CWD is available on DEC's website. To understand what NY is doing about CWD, read more in the CWD informational booklet (PDF, 10 MB).

 

"WOMENHUNTFISHNY" PHOTO CONTEST: New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) announced the beginning of a statewide photo contest, "WomenHuntFishNY," to celebrate women hunters in New York State.
"Women are the fastest growing segment of adult hunters and DEC is excited to provide a forum to share their experiences with others interested in hunting and outdoor recreation in New York State," said Commissioner Seggos. "Hunting is a proud tradition in New York and we hope this new contest will inspire the next generation of hunters and conservationists to take up the sport and grow the hunting economy in the state."

Women who hunt in New York State are encouraged to share their photos via the DEC social media Dropbox at socialmedia@dec.ny.gov. DEC welcomes photos of all aspects of safe and ethical hunting, including:

>Preparing to go afield

>The act of hunting

>After the hunt

>With family members

The deadline for contest entries is Dec. 31, 2018. However, DEC encourages hunters to share and send photos to the agency any time of year.

Winning entries will be featured in next year's New York State Hunting and Trapping Regulations Guide, and may appear in a future issue of the Conservationist magazine, social media posts, the DEC website, and other outreach.

According to the most recent National Survey of Fishing, Hunting and Wildlife-Associated Recreation conducted by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, women make up more than 25 percent of all anglers, a number that has increased over the last several decades. While the proportion of hunters who are women is smaller relative to fishing, the percentage of female hunters has also steadily risen in recent years.

According to DEC records, nearly 50,000 women are licensed to hunt in New York State.