t
 
Home Fish News Youth Photos Humor Clubs Contact
Your ?? Hunt Trap Calendar Links Web Extras Bios Join us on Facebook
 

       

http://www.fotosearch.com/bthumb/DNV/DNV225/052F0505PM.jpg

 

conservation chatter corner

with ron schroder

************************************************

YOUR IN ON THE OUTDOORS FOR WESTERN NEW YORK
www.huntfishnyoutdoors.com

 

1 - 18 – 19

 

Welcome to this week’s Conservation Chatter Corner – little bits of happenings concerning our outdoors and you, the sportspeople who enjoy being part of that outdoors.

 

DEC NURSERY STOCK NOW AVAILABLE: DEC's Saratoga Tree Nursery spring seedling sale is happening now through May 9! More than 40 native tree and shrub species are available for low prices. Can't decide what you want? Try a mixed species packet like streamside habitat builders, Long Island-specific natives, or pollinator-popular flowering species. DEC strongly urges customers to order by phone at 518-587-1120 so that operators can provide the most up-to-date availability information.

                                                   DEC PHOTO

Birders and Photographers: DEC Needs your Help Finding Marked Brant

Atlantic brant

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     DEC PHOTOS

Last year, DEC kicked-off a five-year Atlantic brant migration and breeding ecology study with the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection and the Canadian Wildlife Service. Crews began marking brant with geolocators attached to red and white plastic-colored leg bands, which have a three-digit code of letters and numbers on them (left photo). The geolocators themselves are clear, plastic electronics about the size of a "fat nickel" and have a plastic cable lock tie. In addition, crews will begin marking brant with two smaller colored leg bands, one on each leg. These bands will consist of one letter or number on a white background (right photo). Some birds also have GPS transmitters on their backs (middle photo). 
How can you help? Sightings and/or photographs of color bands and birds with transmitters are very helpful to the study. 

>If you see a brant with either type of colored leg band, please report the observation to the Patuxent Bird Banding Laboratory website. When you complete the report, the bird banding lab will e-mail you a certificate of appreciation for your time and assistance. 

>If you see a bird with a transmitter on its back, but no color leg bands, please e-mail us to report your observation. Pictures of the bird would be greatly appreciated.

 

TIPS ON KEEPING YOUR DOG SAFE WHILE ICE FISHING: Our canine companions tag along for a lot of outdoor adventures. With Wyoming ice fishing season taking shape, bringing your dog along for company could be tempting — but also dangerous. A fun activity for you can turn hazardous for a pet; leaving it at home is the best way to make sure your dog is safe. But, if you decide sit on the ice with your best furry friend, follow this advice:

Make sure your dog stays warm. They should wear a neoprene vest — ideally one with extra floatation for extra warmth on the ice and will help keep the dog afloat should it fall through a pressure ridge, thin ice, or go in an open pocket.

Keep its paws free of ice. Iced-up paws can hurt a dog and make it hard for it to walk. Take along a pad or blanket, too, for the dog to stand or lie on.

Watch your dog in the hut. Keep your dog away from ice holes so a paw doesn’t slip in, and watch for a wild tail wagging too close to the heater. Also, because of dogs’ curious nature, be cautious with baited lures and hooks. Colorful and smelly lures can grab a mischievous dog’s attention. Keep lures tucked away in your gear both on the ice and in your vehicle.

Keep it leashed. Even if your pooch is typically well-behaved, the ice is a new and exciting place. Even the best dogs sometimes ignore verbal commands, so leashing it is good for its safety and is a courtesy to other anglers. If a dog is allowed to run on the ice way from its owner, there is a greater likelihood of it falling through a pressure ridge, thin ice or into an open section of water.

If the worst does happen and your dog falls through the ice and can’t get out, don’t attempt to rescue it alone. You are at risk of falling through the ice, too. Find help quickly, preferably a search and rescue team that has experience and proper equipment for ice rescues.

(https://www.thefishingwire.com/releases/b3443039-b6bb-446d-8858-ffc0e982aab5)

 

THE GOOD GUYS AT WORK:

Dumping Complaint Leads to Illegal Deer Charges - Niagara County: On Jan. 4, ECO George Scheer responded to a complaint that someone had dumped several deer carcasses in the city of Lockport. During the investigation, and based on his wildlife forensics training, ECO Scheer identified one of the carcasses as being only a few days old and that it had been shot on site over bait and with a crossbow. He determined that the carcasses were being used as bait for coyotes. ECO Scheer identified a suspect who was subsequently interviewed and confirmed the evidence. After admitting to shooting the deer over bait on Dec. 30, 12 days after the season had closed, the individual was charged with hunting deer out of season and hunting deer over bait.

deer carcasses
                Dumped deer carcasses DEC PHOTO

 

SENTENCING OF THOMAS JADLOWSKI: A man who had mistaken a woman for a deer while hunting illegally after sunset in November 2017 was sentenced to prison. Thomas Jadlowski, 34, of Sherman, NY, was sentenced in Chautauqua County Court by Judge David Foley to serve one to three years at a facility to be determined by the New York State Department of Corrections. The sentence was issued as a result of Jadlowski's guilty plea to criminally negligent homicide in the shooting death of Rosemary Billquist on Thanksgiving Eve 2017.

Jadlowski, who was illegally hunting deer after official sunset, aimed and fired at Billquist, his neighbor, when he mistook her for a deer as she was walking in a field behind her home in Sherman.

"Every hunting accident in New York is preventable when people follow basic hunting safety rules," said DEC Commissioner Basil Seggos. "I hope this tragedy serves as a reminder to hunters across the state to always be sure of their targets and beyond. We are grateful to the hard work of our Environmental Conservation Police Officers (ECOs), Chautauqua County District Attorney Patrick Swanson, and the Chautauqua County Sheriff's Office to bring this case to justice."

 

 

THIS WEEK’S EVENTS: (For complete future listings go to the Calendar Page - http://www.huntfishnyoutdoors.com/events.php)

JANUARY 2019

1-2/28 - NYS Winter Classic Fishing Tournament. There are 7 species categories to choose from – pike, perch, trout, crappie, pickerel, panfish and walleye. The prize structure will be based on how many anglers are competing across the state. Anglers can enter fish caught through the ice or in open water. The contest includes all state waterways. More than 65 weigh-in locations are available, which are also registration points. You can also register online at www.nyswinterclassic.com. That same website has other tournament information such as rules and a leaderboard once the contest is underway.  (For information go to www.nyswinterclassic.com.)

2-3/15 – Capt. Bob’s Outdoors Winter Fishing Derby (Entry fee is $20) 8 species divisions. (For information call 716-407-3021)

9-2/13 – Fly Tying Course for Beginners at the Field & Stream Store, Market Place Mall, 1200 Miracle Mile Drive, Rochester, NY. (6 Wednesdays at 6:00 pm) Visit store to register. Fly tying equipment will be provided for use during class. Learn a different fly each week. (For more information call 585-456-1964.)

18-20 - Greater Niagara Fishing & Outdoor Expo 2019 The Expo will be offering plenty of other seminar opportunities for salmon from the likes of captains like Vince Pierleoni, Bob Songin, Lucas Faulkner, Mike Lavender, Scott Richardson, Mark Penner and many others focusing on salmon and trout for every level of expertise. There are similar offerings for walleye, bass, perch, streams, electronics and more. In fact, there will be nearly 200 free seminars this coming Expo, the most ever. (For information go to www.niagarafishingexpo.com.

19 - Cattaraugus County Trappers Association Fur Auction at the Hinsdale Volunteer Fire Department, Hinsdale, NY (For information call Brian Davis at 716-945-4223.)

19 - The Lake Ontario Trout and Salmon Association’s Salmon School at the Greater Niagara Fishing and Outdoor Expo at the Conference and Event Center, Niagara Falls, NY Offering Lake Ontario salmon fishermen an extensive salmon school – a full day of in-depth angling information. If you were planning on attending this special Chinook instruction, you are too late. According to LOTSA President Joe Yaeger, the Salmon School is already SOLD OUT. There is an opportunity to get on to a waiting list. Send an email to Alan Sauerland at lotsa1.org@gmail.com to be contacted should there be a cancellation. Check out the LOTSA website at www.lotsa1.org for more information.

19 - Woods Walk: What’s Out In The Winter? at the Reinstein Woods Environmental Education Center, 93 Honorine Drive, Depew, NY (Town of Cheektowaga) (1:00 pm) Join a guided nature walk through the woods to search for winter-active animals. No registration required. (For information call 716-683-5959 or email reinsteinwoods@dec.ny.gov)

19 - National Wild Turkey Federation – Lakeshore Longbeards Chapter Dinner at The Kosciuszko Club, 252 Nevins Street, Dunkirk, NY. (5:00 pm) The NWTF banquets are where you can buy exclusive merchandise and have a great time with friends. All the while, you will be raising vital funds for wild turkey conservation and important programs that introduce the outdoors to women, children and the disabled. (For more information contact Scott Dibble 716-595-3897 svdibble@yahoo.com )

19-20 - Niagara Frontier - Akron Gun Show at the Newstead Fire Hall, 5691 Cummings Road,  Akron, NY (9:00 am – 4:00 pm/9:00 am - 3:00pm) 85 tables. NICS background checks available. (Cost: $5.00/children under 12 free when accompanied by a paid adult) (For information call Bruce Johnston 716-542-9929 or email  nfgshows@aol.com)

19-20 - Greater Olean Area Outdoor & Recreational Sports Show at the Daniel A Carter Events Center, 2593 W 5 Mile Road, Allegany, NY (Sat 10:00 am – 5:00 pm/Sun 10:00 am – 3:00 pm) Hosted by the Greater Olean Chamber of Commerce. 60 booths. (Admission: $3.00/Seniors $2.00/Children 12 and under free) (For information call 716-372-4433 or email meme@oleanny.com or go to http://www.oleanny.com)

19-20 – Mid Atlantic - Watkins Glen Gun & Knife Show 2019 at the Clute Park Community Center, 521 East 4th Street, Watkins Glen, NY (Sat 9:00am - 5:00pm/Sun 9:00am - 3:00pm) 120 tables. (Cost: $7.00) (For information call 570-280-5450 or email maacpsse@echoes.net)

20 - National Wild Turkey Federation – Lakeshore Longbeards Chapter Dinner at The Kosciuszko Club, 252 Nevins Street, Dunkirk, NY. (5:00 pm) The NWTF banquets are where you can buy exclusive merchandise and have a great time with friends. All the while, you will be raising vital funds for wild turkey conservation and important programs that introduce the outdoors to women, children and the disabled. (For more information contact Scott Dibble 716-595-3897 svdibble@yahoo.com )

23 – The Start Of Online Registration For The DEC's 2018 Summer Camps Program. (10:00 am) Applications should be submitted through the online registration program available through a link from the Summer Camps website. Parents and guardians are encouraged to register early since some of the weeks fill up quickly. Camps for children are: Camp Colby in Saranac Lake (Franklin County); Camp DeBruce in Livingston Manor (Sullivan County); Camp Rushford in Caneadea (Allegany County), and Pack Forest in Warrensburg (Warren County). Campers will have the opportunity to participate in a wide variety of outdoor adventures and are encouraged to try new things. Activities may include fishing, bird watching, fly-tying, archery, canoeing, hiking, camping, orienteering, and hunter safety education. (For more information visit the DEC's website at www.dec.ny.gov, or call 518-402-8014.)

24 - Cayuga Lake Birding Van Tour meet at the Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savannah, NY (12:00 – 2:30 pm) Cayuga Lake is an Audubon designated Important Bird Area because of the incredible number of waterfowl that use the lake during the winter and migration seasons. Hop in our van for an excursion to the northern part of the lake where up to 30 species of ducks, geese and swans can be seen. Bald Eagles and other raptors are a possibility too. Binoculars and bird guides will be provided. Fee: $8/child, $15/adult. PRE-PAID RESERVATIONS REQUIRED. (For information or register call 315-365-3588 or e-mail montezuma@audubon.org)

25 - Whitetails Unlimited – Wine Country Chapter Banquet at Kings Banquet Center, 4031 Routes 5 & 20, Canandaigua, NY. Deadline for ticket sales – 1-19-19. (Cost: Adult - $40.00/Spouse - $35.00/Youth - $35.00) Through our Grassroots Program, WTU provides grants to local projects and activities that advance our mission. Proceeds from this event will benefit youth conservation and training event. (For information go to http://www.whitetailsunlimited.com/events/banquets/)

25-26 - “Birds on the Niagara” Festival. Sponsored by Buffalo Audubon, Tifft Nature Preserve, Friends of Times Beach, Pollinator Conservation Association, Niagara River Greenway and New York State Parks,  Western New York’s bird population will take center stage through guided birding tours, hands-on workshops and demonstrations, as well as a special keynote speaker to help create a better awareness for our winged wildlife from Buffalo to Youngstown. On Friday, there will be a 3 p.m. birding tour out of Buffalo Harbor State Park and from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m., there will be a celebration kickoff at Tifft Nature Preserve. On Saturday, Jan. 26, open birding will be available at nine different sites along the Niagara River Corridor from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. From noon to 5 p.m. there will be workshops, vendors, demonstrations and speakers at the Bird Hub located at St. Vincent’s Hall of Niagara University. Keynote speaker for the day will be Twan Leenders of the Roger Tory Peterson Institute, Jamestown starting at 4 p.m.  (Go to www.buffaloaudubon.org or www.facebook.com/events/339833690173613 for further details.)

25-27 - New York Sportsman’s Expo at the New York State Fairgrounds, 581 State Fair Blvd., Syracuse, NY (Fri - Noon to 7:00 pm/Sat – 9:00 am to 7:00 pm/Sun – 9:00 am to 5:00 pm) This year's show will include more than 40 new exhibits, including outfitters from across the globe  . The schedule also includes seminars, a kids' trout pond and more. (Admission: $10 ages 13-64; $5 for children 6 – 12; 5 and under no charge. Seniors are $7 and Military/Fire and Police are $7 with ID) (For information go to http://www.newyorksportsmansexpo.com/)

26 - Birding 101: Class #1 at the Reinstein Woods Environmental Education Center, 93 Honorine Drive, Depew, NY (Town of Cheektowaga) (2:30 pm) Join us for a bird identification adventure! Learn how to identify common birds and how to properly use binoculars. For adults and children ages 8 and older. (For information call 716-683-5959 or email einsteinwoods@dec.ny.gov)

26 - Owl Prowl at the Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savannah, NY (3:30 – 5:30 pm) Get up close to live owls during an indoor presentation by KrittrKris! You’ll find out what adaptations these birds have that allow them to survive during the winter season and be successful hunters of the night. Then, join the Montezuma Audubon Center staff to search for Snowy Owls and the endangered Short-eared Owls in the grasslands around Montezuma. It will be a real hoot! (Fee: $6/child, $8/adult, $25/family.) (For information or register call 315-365-3588 or e-mail montezuma@audubon.org)

26-27 - The IAC Wheatfield Gun Show at the Frontier Fire Hall, 2176 Liberty Drive, Wheatfield, NY (Sat 9:00 am – 4:00 pm/Sun 9:00 am – 3:00 pm) All federal, state and local firearm ordinances and laws must be obeyed. (Cost: $5.00) (For information call John Scozzafava at 716-694-7443 or email  janscozz12@gmail.com)

26-27 - 108th NYVI Brockport Gun Show at the Elks Lodge, 4400 Sweden Walker Road, Brockport, NY (Sat 9:00am - 4:00pm/Sun 9:00am - 3:00pm) 50 Tables. (Admission: $5.00) (For info call Michael Lindskoog  585-506-6529 or email 108gunshow@gmail.com)

27 - National Wild Turkey Federation – Wyoming County Gobblers Chapter Dinner at the Alexander Recreation Hall, 10505 Main Street, Alexander, NY. (5:00 pm) The NWTF banquets are where you can buy exclusive merchandise and have a great time with friends. All the while, you will be raising vital funds for wild turkey conservation and important programs that introduce the outdoors to women, children and the disabled. (For more information contact Marc Kern  585-815-9549  marckern@twc.com)

 

Until our next meeting in the Corner, have a great time in the outdoors. This is Ron Schroder for – “Your In on The Outdoors for Western New York.”

What Do You Think? Have something for other sportspeople? Let us know HERE.

 

 

*******************************

 

1 - 11 – 19

 

Welcome to this week’s Conservation Chatter Corner – little bits of happenings concerning our outdoors and you, the sportspeople who enjoy being part of that outdoors.

 

OUTGOING DEC COMMISSIONER CAUSES CHAOS PRIOR TO DEPARTURE: A letter from George La Point , the union President for the NYS Environmental Conservation Police.

January 4, 2019

Dear Sportsman’s Group,

New York’s Environmental Conservations Police Officers (ECOs) have been protecting the fish and wildlife of New York State since the first Game Protectors were appointed in 1880.  In more recent times, ECOs have taken on the responsibility of enforcing the environmental quality laws of New York.  These men and women are at the forefront of battling the effects of climate change in New York.  Protecting the environment goes hand in hand with a healthy population of wild animals and clean, open spaces.  

The ECO’s job duties includes long term police investigations, working in coordination with state and federal agencies while crossing state and international borders, and often result in felony arrests and remediation of the harm done to the environment. Their knowledge, specialized training, and dedication to protecting the environment make them uniquely qualified for this task.  In addition to these duties, ECOs are recognized across the state as Emergency Response specialists by outside agencies, often contacting them for manpower, specialized equipment, and the use of their highly trained Special Operation Groups. 

Outgoing Commissioner Basil Seggos of the Department of the Environmental Conservation has brokered a deal with Civil Service to reclassify New York State’s Forest Rangers as Environmental Conservation Police Officer (Forest Ranger).  While this is being sold as merely a name change, many of the traditional duties of the ECOs have been assigned to these newly titled Environmental Conservation Police Officer (Forest Rangers).  These duties would include investigating Hunter Related Shooting Incidents, enforcing Marine Resource violations, Salt Water Fish Identification, and Fresh Water Wetlands enforcement.  Currently, the ECOs proudly perform these duties and understand the serious nature of these investigations, the training required, and the time needed to complete them.  Time, that the Rangers themselves say they do not have. 

For years the Forest Rangers have been fighting Civil Service for a pay upgrade from SG14 to SG15.  They were ultimately denied this upgrade, lost two appeals, and had a lawsuit regarding the denial recently dismissed in court.  In a denial letter from 2016, Civil Service made it very clear that the Forest Ranger job duties have not changed enough to justify a pay raise.  Commissioner Seggos, looking to keep a promise to the Rangers that they would receive pay equality with the ECOs before he left Office, brokered this back-door deal.  Pay equality cannot be achieved merely by adding a few new duties.  Pay equality is achieved through equal training and equal work load. This deal to circumvent the Civil Service upgrade process will take effect on April 1, 2019, pending NYS Division of Budget approval.

Recently the Rangers have been campaigning to add more men and woman to their ranks as they feel they are not able to provide the level of service that the public demands with their current staffing levels.  This campaign of “40 more Rangers” and “#moreNYrangers” is being driven by the Forest Rangers themselves, and supported by the Adirondack Council, Adirondack Mountain Club and Adirondack Wild.  This campaign is an effort increase staffing in order to handle the traditional Ranger duties they are currently tasked with.  Adding new duties to their plate is contrary to this recent campaign.  As a matter of fact, this will force the Rangers to split their manpower between investigating police related matters (currently performed by the ECOs) and serving those who have come to rely on them for help.   The Environmental Conservation Police Officers support the traditional missions of the Forest Rangers- search and rescue, forest fire prevention, and state land management. Forest Rangers have served well the countless people who enjoy and use the millions of acres of state lands across New York. 

A duplication of duties, by two separate Divisions within the same Agency, is fiscally irresponsible and does not benefit the environment, residents of New York, or the millions of people who come here to enjoy all that this state has to offer.  This duplication is also in direct contrast to Governor Cuomo’s vision when he established the Spending and Government Efficiency (SAGE) Commission.  The unintended consequences of the actions taken by the out-going Commissioner will be felt long after he has left office. 

We are asking for your help in stopping this reclassification process as it is an injustice to hardworking taxpaying families across the state.  New York State Civil Service has addressed the Ranger pay issue. The out-going Commissioner’s attempt to circumvent the process is not only irresponsible, but unethical as well.  The Environmental Conservation Police Officers are, and will continue to be, the men and women on the front lines, protecting New York’s fish & wildlife as well as the environment we all have come to love and enjoy.  Let’s Keep it that way!

Please contact your elected State Assembly and Senate Officials, the DEC Commissioner’s Office, NYS Division of Budget, and Governor Cuomo’s Office in opposition to the proposed reclassification.  Help ensure that New York State’s ECOs continue to lead the way on all environmental crime investigations, and give them the critical attention they deserve!

 

$3 MILLION IN GRANTS AVAILABLE FOR INVASIVE SPECIES PROJECTS: The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) announced that $3 million is available in the first round of the State's newly consolidated Invasive Species Grant Program To support projects that target both aquatic and terrestrial invasive species across the state, DEC combined previous funding opportunities, including the Aquatic Invasive Species Spread Prevention and the Aquatic and Terrestrial Invasive Species Early Detection/Rapid Response grants, into a single grant program. DEC is accepting applications for these grants through Feb. 15, 2019.

The 2018-19 state budget included $13.3 million in the State's Environmental Protection Fund targeted specifically for invasive species related initiatives, $3 million of which was made available for these grants. Municipalities, academic institutions, and not-for-profits may submit applications for funding for eligible projects in up to two of the following categories:

>Aquatic invasive species spread prevention;

>Terrestrial and aquatic invasive species rapid response and control;

>Terrestrial and aquatic invasive species research; and

>Lake Management Plans.

Grant awards range from a minimum of $11,000 to a maximum of $100,000, with a required 25 percent match. Project locations must be located wholly within New York State and priority will be given to projects that include opportunities for public participation, are on or close to public lands or waterbodies, and emphasize long-term success. For full details about the grant opportunity including eligible projects and scoring criteria, visit the Request for Applications on DEC's website.

Applications are due by 3:00 p.m. on Feb. 15, 2019. All grant applicants must register in the NYS Grants Gateway System before applying. Not-for-profit applicants are required to prequalify in the Grants Gateway system, so DEC recommends that applicants start the process in advance of the grant application due date.

The New York State Invasive Species Council, comprising nine agencies, recently adopted a new Invasive Species Comprehensive Management Plan, with assistance from a 25-member Invasive Species Advisory Committee. The Invasive Species Grant Program will provide opportunities to implement various actions identified under the eight focal initiatives around which the Plan is framed.

 

THE GOOD GUYS AT WORK:

Illegally Guided Duck Hunt - Yates County: On Dec. 29, ECO Joshua Crain received multiple complaints about an individual posting guided waterfowl hunts on social media in the Yates County area. ECO Crain determined that this individual was not licensed to guide hunts in New York, and photos showed an over-the-limit take of waterfowl. Over the next several days, ECO Crain compiled more evidence and attempted to locate the subject. On Jan. 1, ECO Crain located the individual guiding a group of five hunters on Seneca Lake in the town of Torrey. Because of the size of the hunting party, ECO Ron Gross responded to the area to assist The hunting party was approached by the ECOs and the officers conducted a compliance check. One hunter was charged with possessing a shotgun capable of holding more than three rounds while waterfowl hunting, and a second hunter was charged with hunting wildlife without a valid license and possessing a shotgun capable of holding more than three rounds while waterfowl hunting. The guide, a resident of Elmira, was charged with two counts of guiding hunters without a guide's license and taking over the limit of redhead ducks. All of the tickets are returnable to the Town of Torrey Court.

Over the limit of ducks taken during illegally guided hunt
Over the limit of ducks taken
during illegally guided hunt

Unsafe Target Shooting - Onondaga County: On Dec. 29, ECO Don Damrath received a call from a couple hunting on the Three Rivers Wildlife Management Area in the town of Lysander. The hunters told Damrath they were pursuing pheasants with their Labrador Retriever when they heard gunshots and ricocheting bullets. The ricochets were close enough that the hunters ducked for cover and headed back to their vehicle. From the parking area, the couple observed two men shooting a handgun at a target hung on a tree. The only backstop was another group of trees, and the shots were being fired in the direction where the couple had been hunting. The couple were able to write down a vehicle registration before the two target shooters drove away. ECO Damrath called ECO Rick Head for assistance and after taking statements and collecting evidence, the officers tracked down the shooters in the city of Syracuse. The two men readily admitted to target shooting at the trees, using a permitted 9 mm handgun. The shooters also admitted that they did not consider the insufficiency of their backstop, nor that the bullets could ricochet or pose a danger to hunters using the property. ECO Damrath charged each shooter with unlawfully damaging vegetation on a Wildlife Management Area. In addition, ECO Damrath provided brief instruction on firearms safety and encouraged the shooters to join a gun club.

Multi-Agency Search for Missing Man - Orleans County: On Dec. 29 at 1:30 p.m., the Orleans County Sheriff's Department requested assistance from DEC Environmental Conservation Police Officers (ECOs) to help search for a missing 71-year-old male with Alzheimer's disease. The subject was last seen at his residence the night before at 7 p.m. Twelve ECOs responded with a DEC K-9 and six ATVs in order to help access the rural lands surrounding the man's home. Eight DEC Forest Rangers joined the search efforts later in the day. Unable to locate the subject on Saturday, the search effort regrouped and planned a larger response for the following morning. On DEC. 30, more than 20 Forest Rangers and ECOs from both Regions 8 and 9 continued in the search efforts. Just after 10 a.m., a New York State Police Dive Team located the missing man's body in a pond behind the residence. The Orleans County Sheriff's Office is continuing the investigation.

ECOs Charge Three Relatives in Hunting Related Shooting Incident - Orleans County: ECOs, working in conjunction with the Livingston County Sheriff's Office, arrested three individuals on Jan. 2, who were allegedly involved in a hunter related shooting incident (HRSI) that caused damage to a home on River Road in the town of Mount Morris. Robert R. Houseman, 35, of Greece, was charged with tampering with evidence, providing a false written statement, failing to carry tags afield while hunting, and discharging a firearm over a public highway. Richard A. Houseman, 65, and Richard R. Houseman, 35, both of Greece, were charged with tampering with evidence, providing a false written statement, and failing to carry tags afield while hunting. On Dec. 1, a homeowner contacted 911 after a bullet passed through a window and lodged in a wall of their residence. Orleans County Sheriff's Deputies and ECOs were able to identify and locate a group of hunters that had fired at some deer across the street from the address. An investigation alleges that Robert Houseman fired the shot that passed over River Road and struck the residence. In an effort to conceal their actions, the three subjects allegedly tampered with physical evidence at the scene and provided false statements to investigating deputies and ECOs. The subjects were arraigned at the Livingston County Jail Central Arraignment Part (CAP) and released to appear at a later date. In addition to the criminal charges, Robert Houseman is facing the loss of his hunting privileges for a five-year period.

DEC Investigators Arrest Man for Dumping Asbestos on Wildlife Management Area - Orleans County: On Jan. 3, ECOs charged a man for dumping asbestos-laden materials on state land after a seven-month-long investigation. Carl J. Rivers, 49, from Albion, was arrested on felony charges of endangering public health, safety, or the environment in the 3rd degree, a class "E" Felony, as well as a violation level charges of unlawfully disposing of solid waste in Tonawanda Wildlife Management Area in the town of Alabama. In May 2018, ECO Gary Wilson was notified of an illegal dumpsite on Klossen Road. ECO Wilson investigated the dump site and immediately notified the DEC Spills unit and investigators with DEC's Bureau of Environmental Crimes Investigation (BECI) unit. Investigators from DEC's Division of Law Enforcement's Environmental Forensics Unit (EFU) and the State Department of Labor's Asbestos Control Team assisted with the case. DEC Spills unit hired a contractor to clean up and remove the hazardous debris, which was brought to a registered facility. Rivers, already in custody on an unrelated charge, was transported to the Town of Alabama Court for arraignment. The felony charge carries a maximum penalty of up to four years in prison and/or a fine up to $150,000. The violation carries a penalty of up to 15 days in jail and/or a fine of $1,500 to $15,000. The subject is due back in court on March 7. DEC was assisted in this case by the State Department of Labor - Asbestos Control Bureau, the U.S. EPA, and the New York State Police.

Asbestos-laden materials at illegal dump site
Asbestos-laden materials at illegal dump site

 

SUMMER CAMP REGISTRATIONS OPEN JANUARY 23, 2019: Online registration for DEC's 2019 Summer Camps program will open Wednesday, January 23, 2019, at 10:00 a.m Applications should be submitted through the online registration program available through the Summer Camps webpage. Parents and guardians are encouraged to register early since some of the weeks fill up quickly.

Now in its 72nd year, the Summer Camps program offers week-long adventures in conservation education for children ages 11-17. DEC operates four residential camps for children: Camp Colby in Saranac Lake (Franklin County); Camp DeBruce in Livingston Manor (Sullivan County); Camp Rushford in Caneadea (Allegany County), and Pack Forest in Warrensburg (Warren County).

Introduced in 2017, camps Colby and DeBruce are offering two weeks of programing for children aged 14-17, and five weeks of programming for ages 11-13. Camp Pack Forest will continue to host children aged 14-17 for six weeks and ages 11-13 for two weeks. Camp Rushford will continue to offer two weeks of programming for children aged 14-17 and five weeks of programming for ages 11-13. The complete schedule of camp weeks and ages is available on the Summer Camps webpage.

Campers will have the opportunity to participate in a wide variety of outdoor adventures and are encouraged to try new things. Activities may include fishing, bird watching, fly-tying, archery, canoeing, hiking, camping, orienteering, and hunter safety education.

One hunter education program for either gun, bow, or trapping is offered at each camp each week. Class size is limited for hunter education programs and campers must sign up for it during registration and complete the homework in advance.

Along with adventure experiences, DEC campers engage in fun, hands-on activities and outdoor exploration focused on field, forest, stream, and pond ecological principles. Campers might collect insects in a field, use nets in a stream, investigate soil composition, measure tree sizes, or practice taking field notes and writing in journals. Trips to nearby state lands might include kettle bogs, state parks, fish hatcheries, or nature museums.

Camp Pack Forest will once again offer "Outdoor Adventure Week 2.0" during Week 5 (July 21-26). DEC encourages teens aged 14 to 17 who love being outdoors to sign up for this popular program that will help deepen their enjoyment and widen their horizons while exploring environmental careers at Camp Pack Forest. During this week, campers will develop hands-on outdoor skills that go above and beyond the traditional camp week. Alongside canoeing, fishing, and games, campers will engage in forestry, citizen science, conservation science, and more. Guest DEC, higher education, and natural resource professionals will provide opportunities for campers to consider career paths.

All four camps will operate for seven one-week sessions (Sunday to Friday) beginning June 30, 2019; Pack Forest operates for eight weeks. Drop-off time is 3:00 p.m. on Sunday, and the closing ceremony and pick-up time is Friday at 4:30 p.m. One week of camp remains $350 per child for the 2019 year, and includes meals, trips, and a camp t-shirt.

In addition to inviting parents to register their children to participate in the DEC environmental education Summer Camps program, sporting clubs, civic groups, and environmental organizations are encouraged to sponsor one or more children for a week at camp. Groups that deposit funds to sponsor six (6) paid campers in one transaction will receive a scholarship to send a seventh child to camp for free. The seventh camper will use a sponsorship code generated by the Albany Camps administration. Information about becoming a sponsor and managing sponsor accounts is available on DEC's website.

For more information, visit DEC's website, call 518-402-8014, visit "NYS DEC Summer Camps" on Facebook or write to DEC Camps, 3rd Floor, 625 Broadway, Albany, New York 12233-5256.

 

SCHEDULE  A WHITE DEER BUS TOUR:  25 and 14-passenger, air-conditioned and heated tour buses give all visitors a comfortable seat for a 90-minute, narrated trip behind the fences of the former Seneca Army Depot.

 


After more than 70 years, the public can finally see the world’s largest herd of white, white-tailed deer in the world, other wildlife, and the relics of 60 years of secret weapons storage. We will visit one of the 519 earth-covered concrete igloos that stored everything from pistol ammunition to tactical missiles, from conventional bombs to nuclear warheads.

We can never guarantee where the mystical white deer will be, but our tour guides know the best locations and will stop for pictures as they appear. Tour routes will vary according to the weather and season. This is your opportunity to see the hidden world and experience the magic of the white deer yourself.
All tours leave from our Welcome Center at 5479 State Route 96A, Romulus 14541, about 10 miles south of Geneva, NY.
Buses leave the John and Josephine Ingle Welcome Center regularly from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., Thursday through Sunday. Tours last between 1 ½ and 2 hours. See our online schedule for details.
Walking is limited to visiting one of the storage bunkers and boarding the buses. We now have a bus with a wheelchair lift to accommodate handicapped individuals. Be sure to let us know if you need to use that bus.
Photography is encouraged. Be sure to bring your camera for unforgettable photos and videos of the deer, other wildlife and military relics. Binoculars are often helpful, as well.
The tour fee is $30 for adults, $27 for military and seniors (65 and older), $15 for children (ages 5-17), and children under 5 are free.
BOOK A TOUR

 

WHAT DETERMINES A BUCK’S ANTLER COLOR? Several factors may be responsible. According to Dr. George Bubenik, world renowned antler growth expert and former professor of zoology at Guelph University in Ontario, antler color depends partly on the amount of oxidized blood on the antlers (from velvet shedding) and partly from a chemical reaction between the blood and juices from plants on which the antlers are rubbed. If a buck begins rubbing his antlers before the velvet and blood have completely dried, the blood stains the antler and gives it a darker color. The predominant species of trees in an area also influence the color. Pines allegedly cause darker antlers, likely from bucks rubbing on exposed sap after they break the tree’s cambium layer. A buck’s genetics may also influence color. Some bucks are predisposed to having lighter or darker antlers, and some rub more or fewer trees. A buck’s age can play a role as older bucks tend to rub more than younger animals. Finally, the time of year can influence color as antlers generally lighten over time due to the bleaching effect of moisture and sunlight. (For more information go to https://www.qdma.com/what-determines-a-bucks-antler-color/)

 

THIS WEEK’S EVENTS: (For complete future listings go to the Calendar Page - http://www.huntfishnyoutdoors.com/events.php)

JANUARY 2019

1-2/28 - NYS Winter Classic Fishing Tournament. There are 7 species categories to choose from – pike, perch, trout, crappie, pickerel, panfish and walleye. The prize structure will be based on how many anglers are competing across the state. Anglers can enter fish caught through the ice or in open water. The contest includes all state waterways. More than 65 weigh-in locations are available, which are also registration points. You can also register online at www.nyswinterclassic.com. That same website has other tournament information such as rules and a leaderboard once the contest is underway.  (For information go to www.nyswinterclassic.com.)

2-3/15 – Capt. Bob’s Outdoors Winter Fishing Derby (Entry fee is $20) 8 species divisions. (For information call 716-407-3021)

9-2/13 – Fly Tying Course for Beginners at the Field & Stream Store, Market Place Mall, 1200 Miracle Mile Drive, Rochester, NY. (6 Wednesdays at 6:00 pm) Visit store to register. Fly tying equipment will be provided for use during class. Learn a different fly each week. (For more information call 585-456-1964.)

11-12 - 2019 Annual Northeast Wildlife Management Seminar at the Embassy Suites Syracuse Destiny, 311 Hiawatha Blvd W, Syracuse, NY (Fri 12:00 – 5:30 pm/Sat 8:00 am – 5:00 pm) Sponsored by the New York State Wildlife Management Association. This is your chance to learn the latest research and techniques from experts in the field of Wildlife Damage Management. Tentative Topics: Ladder Safety, Wildlife Work in Electric Utilities, Tick Borne Diseases, Safe Roof Access Utilizing Ropes, Accounting - Paper or Paperless?, Beaver Control, Critter Calling and Much More!! (Cost: $200 advance/$275 at door)(For information go to go to http://www.nyswma.org Or Call Bob Meakin @ 315-495-5561)

12 - Fly Tying 101 at The Orvis Shop, 4545 Transit Road, Williamsville, NY. (Free.) (Call the store at 716-276-7200 information/register go to www.orvis.com/buffalo.)

12 – Ladies Shoot N’ Hoot Shooting Program at North Forest Rod and Gun Club, 6257 Old Niagara Road, Lockport, NY. (1:00 pm) (For information/register contact Colleen Gaskill at 716-628-9023.)        

12 - Winter Wildflowers at the Reinstein Woods Environmental Education Center, 93 Honorine Drive, Depew, NY (Town of Cheektowaga) (10:00 am) Explore the world of winter plants and see where next summer’s wildflowers will bloom. For adults and children ages 10 and older. (For information and register call 716-683-5959 or email reinsteinwoods@dec.ny.gov)

12 - National Wild Turkey Federation New York State Awards Dinner at the Embassy Suites Destiny USA, 311 Hiawatha Blvd., W. Syracuse, NY (5:00 pm) (For more information contact Bruce Bailey 315-695-5113 dinklepuss@hotmail.com)

12 - National Wild Turkey Federation New York State Awards Dinner at the Quality Inn and Suites, 8250 Park Road, Batavia, NY. (5:00 pm) (For more information contact Michael Cambareri at 315-481-4157
or email mcambare1@gmail.com)

12 - Orleans County Houndsmen Beaglers Beagle Event at their clubhouse at 13461 Phipps Road, Albion, NY (12:00 pm – Beagle Bench Show - $15.00/8:00 am Beagle Hunt - $20.00) (For information call Ed Roggen at 585-948-9483 or email moc.liamtoh@sabrll )

12 - Birds, Binocs, and Beers at the Fleur de Lis Brew Works 3630 NY-414, Seneca Falls, NY (12:00 pm – 3:00 pm) Enjoy a guided snowshoe hike through the brewery grounds, then warm up inside the brewery with beer tastings and light snacks. Krittr Kris and her birds will wrap up the event with a live bird of prey program. Fee: w/ snowshoe rental: $30/person. Fee: w/o snowshoe rental: $25/person. PRE-PAID RESERVATIONS REQUIRED. (For information or register call 315-365-3588 or e-mail montezuma@audubon.org)

12-13 - Rochester Gun Show at the Roc Dome at the Roc Dome Arena, 2695 E Henrietta Road, Henrietta, NY (Sat 9:00 am – 4:00 pm/Sun 9:00 am – 3:00 pm) The Rochester Gun Show is hosted by Empire State Arms Collectors. All federal, state and local firearm ordinances and laws must be obeyed. (Admission: $8.00) (For information call 585-226-6211 or go to http://www.esaca.us)

13 - End of Canada Goose Hunting Seasons – Part 3 – in the West Central Area and South Zone

13 - Learn To Cross-Country Ski at the Reinstein Woods Environmental Education Center, 93 Honorine Drive, Depew, NY (Town of Cheektowaga) (10:00 am) Learn the basics of cross-country skiing before going on a short guided ski tour.  Ski rental: $8/$5 for Friends members (For information and register call 716-683-5959 or email reinsteinwoods@dec.ny.gov)

13 - Tioga County Trappers Association Fur Sale at the Tioga County Sportsman's Association, 1141 Carmichael Road, Owego, NY.  (9:00 am to 12:00 pm.) (For information contact Bill Swagler at 607-222-8554 or Mike Verry 607-427-5589.) 

18-20 - Greater Niagara Fishing & Outdoor Expo 2019 The Expo will be offering plenty of other seminar opportunities for salmon from the likes of captains like Vince Pierleoni, Bob Songin, Lucas Faulkner, Mike Lavender, Scott Richardson, Mark Penner and many others focusing on salmon and trout for every level of expertise. There are similar offerings for walleye, bass, perch, streams, electronics and more. In fact, there will be nearly 200 free seminars this coming Expo, the most ever. (For information go to www.niagarafishingexpo.com.

19 - Cattaraugus County Trappers Association Fur Auction at the Hinsdale Volunteer Fire Department, Hinsdale, NY (For information call Brian Davis at 716-945-4223.)

19 - The Lake Ontario Trout and Salmon Association’s Salmon School at the Greater Niagara Fishing and Outdoor Expo at the Conference and Event Center, Niagara Falls, NY Offering Lake Ontario salmon fishermen an extensive salmon school – a full day of in-depth angling information. If you were planning on attending this special Chinook instruction, you are too late. According to LOTSA President Joe Yaeger, the Salmon School is already SOLD OUT. There is an opportunity to get on to a waiting list. Send an email to Alan Sauerland at lotsa1.org@gmail.com to be contacted should there be a cancellation. Check out the LOTSA website at www.lotsa1.org for more information.

19 - Woods Walk: What’s Out In The Winter? at the Reinstein Woods Environmental Education Center, 93 Honorine Drive, Depew, NY (Town of Cheektowaga) (1:00 pm) Join a guided nature walk through the woods to search for winter-active animals. No registration required. (For information call 716-683-5959 or email reinsteinwoods@dec.ny.gov)

19 - National Wild Turkey Federation – Lakeshore Longbeards Chapter Dinner at The Kosciuszko Club, 252 Nevins Street, Dunkirk, NY. (5:00 pm) The NWTF banquets are where you can buy exclusive merchandise and have a great time with friends. All the while, you will be raising vital funds for wild turkey conservation and important programs that introduce the outdoors to women, children and the disabled. (For more information contact Scott Dibble 716-595-3897 svdibble@yahoo.com )

19-20 - Niagara Frontier - Akron Gun Show at the Newstead Fire Hall, 5691 Cummings Road,  Akron, NY (9:00 am – 4:00 pm/9:00 am - 3:00pm) 85 tables. NICS background checks available. (Cost: $5.00/children under 12 free when accompanied by a paid adult) (For information call Bruce Johnston 716-542-9929 or email  nfgshows@aol.com)

19-20 - Greater Olean Area Outdoor & Recreational Sports Show at the Daniel A Carter Events Center, 2593 W 5 Mile Road, Allegany, NY (Sat 10:00 am – 5:00 pm/Sun 10:00 am – 3:00 pm) Hosted by the Greater Olean Chamber of Commerce. 60 booths. (Admission: $3.00/Seniors $2.00/Children 12 and under free) (For information call 716-372-4433 or email meme@oleanny.com or go to http://www.oleanny.com)

19-20 – Mid Atlantic - Watkins Glen Gun & Knife Show 2019 at the Clute Park Community Center, 521 East 4th Street, Watkins Glen, NY (Sat 9:00am - 5:00pm/Sun 9:00am - 3:00pm) 120 tables. (Cost: $7.00) (For information call 570-280-5450 or email maacpsse@echoes.net)

20 - National Wild Turkey Federation – Lakeshore Longbeards Chapter Dinner at The Kosciuszko Club, 252 Nevins Street, Dunkirk, NY. (5:00 pm) The NWTF banquets are where you can buy exclusive merchandise and have a great time with friends. All the while, you will be raising vital funds for wild turkey conservation and important programs that introduce the outdoors to women, children and the disabled. (For more information contact Scott Dibble 716-595-3897 svdibble@yahoo.com )

 

Until our next meeting in the Corner, have a great time in the outdoors. This is Ron Schroder for – “Your In on The Outdoors for Western New York.”

What Do You Think? Have something for other sportspeople? Let us know HERE.

 

 

*******************************

 

1 - 4 – 19

 

Welcome to this week’s Conservation Chatter Corner – little bits of happenings concerning our outdoors and you, the sportspeople who enjoy being part of that outdoors.

 

HAPPY NEW YEAR!!

HAPPY NEW YEAR!!!: Now, it’s a new year and time once again to think about resolutions. Hopefully you will make one to be a better sportsperson. This should not only include improving hunting, trapping and/or fishing skills, but more importantly behaving better, helping to create a finer image of your Sport. You might also, consider helping a young person get started - someone who might not have an adult around to teach them about the outdoors. If you do have this desire but no youngster to teach contact your DEC Regional Office and ask about being a mentor hunter or trapper. If fishing is your specialty check with your county 4-H office and ask about working with a club or two, or maybe starting a fishing club. If you want a more formal program check into becoming a certified sportsmen education instructor with DEC’s hunting, archery, trapping and/or waterfowl identification programs.

 

THE GOOD GUYS AT WORK:

Search: Town of Barre, Orleans County: On Dec. 29 at 1:30 p.m., the Orleans County Sheriff's Department requested assistance from Ranger Daniel Cordell to search for a 71-year-old male with Alzheimer's. The subject was last seen at his residence the night before at 7 p.m. Eight Forest Rangers assisted the search effort along with state, local, and volunteer groups. In addition, New York State Police Aviation, K-9, and dive teams were utilized, as well as drones from the Niagara County Sheriff's Office and DEC Forest Rangers. On Dec. 30 at 10 a.m., a State Police dive team found the missing man deceased in a pond 750 feet west of his residence. The Orleans County Sheriff's Office is continuing the investigation.

A Little Too Late - Niagara County: On Dec. 17, ECO George Scheer received a call from Lt. Nathan VerHague reporting that a deer had been shot after sunset in the town of Hartland. ECO Scheer was nearby and arrived at the scene to find a hunter attempting to drive away. ECO Scheer stopped the hunter, who admitted to shooting a deer but argued it wasn't too dark to shoot. When asked why the deer was left behind in the field, the individual stated that he was going to come back for it later. The individual showed VerHague and Scheer where he shot from, which was confirmed by the complainant. The deer was seized and donated, and the hunter was issued tickets for taking big game after sunset, illegal taking of protected wildlife, and failure to immediately tag deer as required.

Deceased buck on the ground with light shining on it
                                                         Buck shot after sunset in Hartland

Tracks in the Snow Tell the Tale - Cortland County: On Dec. 18, ECO Matt Burdick investigated a complaint of a deer killed with a crossbow from a roadway in the town of Cortlandville. The complainant saw the deer being dragged to a pickup truck and was able to provide the officer with the vehicle's license plate number. ECO Burdick found the drag marks leading across the road to a set of tire tracks and a single pair of footprints leading past a visible "no trespassing" sign. A short time later, the suspect drove by the scene and was stopped by the ECO. The driver stated he shot the deer after parking his truck and walking off the roadway. He said he had not seen the posted signs and admitted to not having permission to hunt the property. After being confronted with evidence, the driver admitted to taking the shot from the road. ECO Brett Armstrong and K-9 Phoenix responded and recovered the crossbow bolt from the field. The subject was charged with the illegal taking of big game, discharging a crossbow from the maintained portion of the roadway, trespassing for purposes of hunting, and possession of multiple licenses while afield. The deer was seized and donated.

 

PRESIDENT TRUMP SIGNS MODERN FISH ACT: With President Trump’s December 31 signing of the Modernizing Recreational Fisheries Management Act of 2018 (Modern Fish Act), saltwater recreational anglers just got a big leg up when it comes to the federal management of the nation’s fish stocks.

“The Modern Fish Act is a big step forward in recognizing the value of today’s recreational fishing,” said Boat Owners Association of The United States (BoatUS) Manager of Government Affairs David Kennedy. “It will help improve public access to America's federal waters and management of fish stock, promote conservation of natural marine resources, and spur economic growth by fixing key issues in the law governing marine fisheries.”

The act authorizes the use of management tools more appropriate for recreational fishing, and seeks out better and more accurate recreational harvest data. It will also study mixed-use fishery allocation and look at the impact and provide recommendations on catch share management programs.

“What the act does for saltwater anglers is to update critical public policy to help ensure fisheries management and oversight also works for recreational anglers,” added Kennedy.

BoatUS supported a coalition of groups pushing for passage of the legislation, including the American Sportfishing Association (the act’s champion), National Marine Manufacturers Association, Center for Sportfishing Policy, Theodore Roosevelt Conservation Partnership and Coastal Conservation Association.

 

BE PREPARED FOR WINTER: Do you know what the greatest threat to outdoorsmen is? I'll give you a couple hints. It doesn't involve firearms or falling from an elevated position. The leading cause of death among hunters and fishermen is hypothermia - exposure. If you're headed out to hunt or fish this winter you should be prepared.

                                                         NYSDEC Photo


Dress in layers - You can always remove clothes you don't need but can't put them on if you don't have them. Start with a base layer, and socks, made of a synthetic material that draws moisture away from your body. A wet body loses heat faster than a dry one. Add an insulating layer of fleece or wool in the middle and a protecting layer of waterproof/windproof breathable laminate on top.
Protect Your Extremities - If you're riding, you should already have at least ankle-high boots and gloves. Insulated ones are a better choice for wet and cold conditions. If you don't have a full face helmet and face shield, wear a face mask or light balaclava under your helmet.

Carry a Survival Kit - At the very least, include a compass - for finding your way if lost; waterproof matches - to start a fire; high energy food items, a knife and a whistle to signal for help. Other items to consider are some type of shelter (a space blanket), a length of cord, a flashlight and first aid supplies. You should also bring water, or some means of water purification. Dehydration can accelerate hypothermia. If you're riding on an ATV space is less of an issue so bring along anything else you might need should you get lost or injured and need to stay out overnight.
Have a Plan - Plan your route for the day. Stick to it and leave a map or description of where you are going and when you will return with someone else at home.
Cold, wet conditions may be intimidating to hunters and fishermen, but game often moves more and fish bite better with the falling barometer. Don't let bad weather keep you inside, but be prepared before you head out.

Yamaha Outdoors Tips – by Bob Humphrey

 

BALD EAGLE VIEWING IN WINTER: Winter is a great time to view bald eagles in New York State. Viewing from a safe distance and at planned observation sites can offer an exhilarating and memorable experience. Wintering eagles begin arriving in December and concentrations peak in January and February. Most are heading back to their nests by mid-March.

The Hudson River, the Upper Delaware River watershed, and sections of the St. Lawrence River are great places to view eagles in the winter. It has become a popular off-season activity in the Upper Delaware Valley. DEC maintains two well-marked viewing areas in the Mongaup Valley on the Rio and Mongaup Falls reservoirs.

                                       Photo by John Adamski

The following tips will help you to have the best possible experience:

>Use binoculars or spotting scopes instead of trying to get a little closer

>Don't do anything to try to make the bird fly

>Respect private property and avoid restricted areas

>Scan the tree line for eagles that are perched in the tree tops

>Look overhead for eagles soaring high in the sky

>Arrive early (7 a.m. - 9 a.m.) or stay late (4 p.m. - 5 p.m.), when eagles are most active

>Be patient – this is the key to successful viewing

Warning: Harassing, disturbing, or injuring a bald eagle is illegal.

If you want to help protect and manage bald eagles, sign up to participate in the Mid-Winter Bald Eagle Survey

 

THIS WEEK’S EVENTS: (For complete future listings go to the Calendar Page - http://www.huntfishnyoutdoors.com/events.php)

JANUARY 2019

1-2/28 - NYS Winter Classic Fishing Tournament. There are 7 species categories to choose from – pike, perch, trout, crappie, pickerel, panfish and walleye. The prize structure will be based on how many anglers are competing across the state. Anglers can enter fish caught through the ice or in open water. The contest includes all state waterways. More than 65 weigh-in locations are available, which are also registration points. You can also register online at www.nyswinterclassic.com. That same website has other tournament information such as rules and a leaderboard once the contest is underway.  (For information go to www.nyswinterclassic.com.)

2-3/15 – Capt. Bob’s Outdoors Winter Fishing Derby (Entry fee is $20) 8 species divisions. (For information call 716-407-3021)

5 - Christmas Bird Count For Kids at the Reinstein Woods Environmental Education Center, 93 Honorine Drive, Depew, NY (Town of Cheektowaga) (9:00 am) A great way to introduce kids to birding and escape the post-holiday blahs! Teams of kids will compete to see who can find the most birds during 90-minute hikes at Reinstein Woods and other nearby sites. Binocular instruction and refreshments provided. Register online at: http://reinsteinwoods.org/cbc4kids. (For information and register call 716-683-5959 or email reinsteinwoods@dec.ny.gov)

5-6 - Niagara Frontier - Hamburg Gun Show at the Hamburg Fairgrounds, 5820 S Park Avenue, Hamburg, New York ((9:00 am – 4:00 pm/9:00 am - 3:00pm) 300 tables. NICS background checks available. (Cost: $7.00/children under 12 free when accompanied by a paid adult) (90 Tables) (For information call Bruce Johnston 716-542-9929 or email nfgshows@aol.com)

5-6 – Mid Atlantic - Binghamton Area Gun & Knife Show at the Port Crane Fire Company, 844 Route 369, Port Crane, NY (Sat 9:00 am – 5:00 pm/Sun 9:00 am – 3:00 pm) 125 tables. (Cost: $7.00) (For information call 570-679-2250 or email maacpsse@echoes.net or go to http://www.maacpsse.com)

11-12 - 2019 Annual Northeast Wildlife Management Seminar at the Embassy Suites Syracuse Destiny, 311 Hiawatha Blvd W, Syracuse, NY (Fri 12:00 – 5:30 pm/Sat 8:00 am – 5:00 pm) Sponsored by the New York State Wildlife Management Association. This is your chance to learn the latest research and techniques from experts in the field of Wildlife Damage Management. Tentative Topics: Ladder Safety, Wildlife Work in Electric Utilities, Tick Borne Diseases, Safe Roof Access Utilizing Ropes, Accounting - Paper or Paperless?, Beaver Control, Critter Calling and Much More!! (Cost: $200 advance/$275 at door)(For information go to go to http://www.nyswma.org Or Call Bob Meakin @ 315-495-5561)

12 - Fly Tying 101 at The Orvis Shop, 4545 Transit Road, Williamsville, NY. (Free.) (Call the store at 716-276-7200 information/register go to www.orvis.com/buffalo.)

12 – Ladies Shoot N’ Hoot Shooting Program at North Forest Rod and Gun Club, 6257 Old Niagara Road, Lockport, NY. (1:00 pm) (For information/register contact Colleen Gaskill at 716-628-9023.)        

12 - Winter Wildflowers at the Reinstein Woods Environmental Education Center, 93 Honorine Drive, Depew, NY (Town of Cheektowaga) (10:00 am) Explore the world of winter plants and see where next summer’s wildflowers will bloom. For adults and children ages 10 and older. (For information and register call 716-683-5959 or email reinsteinwoods@dec.ny.gov)

12 - National Wild Turkey Federation New York State Awards Dinner at the Embassy Suites Destiny USA, 311 Hiawatha Blvd., W. Syracuse, NY (5:00 pm) (For more information contact Bruce Bailey 315-695-5113 dinklepuss@hotmail.com)

12 - National Wild Turkey Federation New York State Awards Dinner at the Quality Inn and Suites, 8250 Park Road, Batavia, NY. (5:00 pm) (For more information contact Michael Cambareri at 315-481-4157
or email mcambare1@gmail.com)

12 - Orleans County Houndsmen Beaglers Beagle Event at their clubhouse at 13461 Phipps Road, Albion, NY (12:00 pm – Beagle Bench Show - $15.00/8:00 am Beagle Hunt - $20.00) (For information call Ed Roggen at 585-948-9483 or email moc.liamtoh@sabrll )