t

 
 
Home Fish News Youth Photos Humor Clubs Contact
Your ?? Hunt Trap Calendar Links Web Extras Bios Join us on Facebook
 

       

 

http://www.fotosearch.com/bthumb/DNV/DNV225/052F0505PM.jpg

 

conservation chatter corner

with ron schroder

************************************************

YOUR IN ON THE OUTDOORS FOR WESTERN NEW YORK
www.huntfishnyoutdoors.com

 

10 - 11 – 19

 

Welcome to this week’s Conservation Chatter Corner – little bits of happenings concerning our outdoors and you, the sportspeople who enjoy being part of that outdoors.

 

HELP: The Venison Donation Coalition needs your help more than ever with less state funding.

The Venison Donation Legislation was enacted in 1993 authorizing the donation of big game to charitable organizations. Sportsmen’s groups were largely responsible for these programs in the early years. The Venison Donation Coalition got its start in 1999 when Chemung and Steuben County sportsmen’s federations backed up the effort with funds to pay 2 processors.

The program’s growth since then has been exciting. The Venison Donation Coalition consists of representatives from sportsmen’s clubs, non-profit organizations, regional food banks, local food pantries as well as local, state and federal agencies whose objective is to secure funding for the processing and distribution of venison to families in need. With the help of its partners, the Venison Donation Coalition secured funds to pay the meat processors for their services. In 1999, the Venison Donation Coalition processed and distributed 1000 lbs of highly nutritious ground venison in 2 counties.

In the spring of 2000, the New York State Dept. of Environmental Conservation (DEC) hosted statewide public meetings on the future of deer management and hunting in New York. Participants requested a Venison Donation Program which made the “top ten” list of needs.

DEC’s Bureau of Wildlife assigned the Venison Donation Program as a pilot project to the Bath Wildlife staff. Partnering began with the Sullivan Trail Resource Conservation & Development Council, which is a non-profit organization assisting groups with wise use of our natural resources. FOODLINK in Rochester and Food Bank of the Southern Tier in Elmira also became partners. These food banks reported an all-time high demand for their services and a desperate need for meat, which is why venison donation is so important.

In 2001, a public relations campaign was started to help increase the visibility of the program. The Coalition’s goal was to expend the program to 20,000 lbs in 16 counties. With the help of the entire organization and a few additional sportsmen’s federation, that goal was exceeded by 40%, 28,000 lbs of venison was processed and distributed throughout Western New York.Today the Venison Donation Coalition has 85 processors in 52 counties throughout New York State. The nine regional food banks support the entire state with the distribution of the meat to those in need.

Since 1999, the Venison Donation Coalition has been highly successful in its goal to feed the hungry throughout New York State. We have processed and average of 38 tons of venison each year and in 2012 we surpassed 4 million servings of highly nutritious meat was served to individuals and children in need!

You can also help by donating $1 or more when you purchase your hunting license. One dollar will feed four people. Financial donations are appreciated and tax deductible. For every dollar that is donated to the Venison Donation Coalition, $.90 is used towards processing the venison. With approximately 500,000 deer hunters in New York State, imagine if every one of them donates just $1 how financially sound the program would be. Venison could be processed and the hungry would be able to have meat on their tables.

Donations can be made at your Town Clerk’s office or anywhere hunting and fishing licenses are sold. Just inform the D.E.C.A.L.S. licensing agent that you wish to make a donation to support the Venison Donation Program. All donations through D.E.C.A.L.S. are deposited directly into the Venison Donation Fund. Donations can also be accepted through our secure website, www.venisondonation.org or send a check payable to: Venison Donation Coalition, Inc., 3 East Pulteney Sq., Bath, NY 14810. Please help to keep the Venison Donation Coalition successful in your neighborhood. Donate today! One dollar goes a long way to help curb hunger throughout New York State.

 

SPORTSMAN'S WAREHOUSE TO BUY 8 FIELD & STREAM STORES: Sportsman’s Warehouse will reportedly pay Dick’s Sporting Goods $28m for eight Field & Stream outlets.

Sportsman’s Warehouse Holdings says it expects to pay Dick’s Sporting Goods $28 million for eight Field & Stream stores later this month.

Sportsman's Warehouse Morgantown No. 180

Dick’s is known to have been evaluating the future of its Field & Stream operation, comprising 35 stores, after falling sales had been attributed in part to the retailer’s decision to pull back on gun sales.

Sportsman’s Jon Barker, CEO of the Utah sporting goods chain, describes the move as an ‘opportunistic expansion’ of its current 95-store base. “Each of these stores operates in strong markets with well-established customer bases,” he said.

The outlets involved in the deal are located in Washington, Altoona and Camp Hill (Pennsylvania), Horseheads and Rochester (New York), Greensboro and Asheville (North Carolina) and Troy (Michigan).

The acquisition appears to fit with the strategies of both companies. Dick’s has been moving away from the challenging and low margin hunting business since it stopped selling sporting rifles at Field & Stream stores after the Parkland, Florida high school massacre.

It has also removed hunting products from a reported 125 Dick’s stores. However, hunting and firearms constitute approaching 50% of revenue at Sportsman’s Warehouse and the company has said it wants to increase its share of the firearms market. Dick’s, a Fortune 500 chain with around 850 stores, is reputed to have around 10% of the retail fishing market in the US.

 

MOTORISTS SHOULD WATCH FOR DEER AND MOOSE ON OR NEAR ROADWAYS:

The New York State Department of Motor Vehicles and DEC are reminding drivers that deer and moose become more active and are more likely to enter public roadways in the fall. During the months of October, November, and December, it is breeding season and the animals are more visible. Two-thirds of the crashes between deer and vehicles occur during this three-month span. Motorists should also be alert for moose on roadways in the Adirondacks and surrounding areas this time of year.

Motorists should be aware animals are especially active at dawn and dusk when visibility may be reduced and commuter traffic may be heavy. DEC recommends these precautions motorists can take to reduce the chance of hitting a deer or moose:

>Decrease speed when you approach deer near roadsides. Deer can "bolt" or change direction at the last minute.

>If you see a deer go across the road, decrease speed and be careful. Deer travel in groups so expect other deer to follow.

>Use emergency lights or a headlight signal to warn other drivers when deer are seen on or near the road.

>Use caution on roadways marked with deer crossing signs.

>Use extreme caution when driving at dawn or dusk, when animal movement is at its highest and visibility is reduced.

 

DEC ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR URBAN FORESTRY PROJECTS: DEC announced up to $1.2 million in grant funding is available for urban forestry projects across New York. Grants are available for tree planting, maintenance, tree inventory, community forest management plans, and for educating those who care for public trees.

Eligible applicants include municipalities, public benefit corporations, public authorities, soil and water conservation districts, community colleges, not-for-profit organizations, and Indian Nations or tribes. Awards will range from $11,000 to $75,000, depending on municipal population. Tree inventories and community forest management plans do not require a match. Tree planting, maintenance, and education projects have a 25 percent match.

Funding for these projects is provided by the State's Environmental Protection Fund (EPF) and is administered by the Urban and Community Forestry Program in DEC's Division of Lands and Forests. Supported by the State and partnerships with communities, environmental groups, and civic organizations, New York has significantly improved the health of community forests.

DEC regional urban foresters are available to provide applicants with technical assistance. DEC staff will review completed grant applications and select recipients based on established rating criteria, including cost-effectiveness, projected benefits, use of recommended standards in implementation, community outreach, education, support, and economic impact.

Interested applicants must apply for the grant in Grants Gateway. Instructions and application information about the Oct. 10 webinar are available online at the New York State Grants Gateway website. Not-for-profit applicants are required to prequalify in the Grants Gateway system. DEC recommends that applicants start the process well in advance of the grant application due date. Paper or hand delivered grant applications will not be accepted.

The deadline for applications in Grants Gateway is Dec. 4, 2019 at 2:00 p.m. For more information, call DEC's Division of Lands and Forests at (518) 402-9428 or visit DEC's website and search for "urban forestry."

 

THE GOOD GUYS AT WORK:

Emergency Response: Town of Humphrey, Cattaraugus County: On Oct. 5 at 4 p.m., Forest Ranger Wayne Krulish was flagged down by a motorist who stated that his girlfriend was stung by a bee and was experiencing a severe allergic reaction. The patient was experiencing difficulty breathing with shallow respirations and had hives breaking out on her arm. The pair were heading to a local hospital but were not sure of the exact route. Forest Ranger Krulish led the way with lights and siren, advising Cattaraugus County 911 Dispatch about the severe anaphylactic reaction. The Ranger requested a rescue squad meet the hikers along the route with epinephrine. On Buffalo Road, ALS ambulance personnel met the patient and administered epinephrine and transported her to the hospital for additional treatment.

The Case of the Wolf Dogs From West Virginia - Nassau County: On Oct. 4, ECO Zachary Prentice received a call from a Nassau County Police Officer concerning an individual in Hempstead that possessed two wolves. ECO Prentice met the officer at the residence, and once inside they found two large steel cages containing canines that resembled wolves. ECO Prentice contacted ECO Robert Kaufherr for assistance and the ECOs interviewed the owner. After examining documentation, the ECOs determined the canines were wolf hybrids that had been purchased in West Virginia, where it is currently legal to possess them, but possession of a wolf dog hybrid as a pet is prohibited in New York State. The wolves were seized and safely transported to Holtsville Ecology Center. A DNA test will be administered to find the percentage of wolf hybridization. The owner was issued an appearance ticket for possession of wild animals without a permit, and the incident remains under investigation.

the wolf hybrids in large dog crates

 

NEW MAPPING RESOURCES AND HELPFUL HUNTING INFORMATION NOW AVAILABLE ON 'DECINFO LOCATOR': New additions to the recently launched DECinfo Locator, is making new resources and information available to help hunters plan their outings this fall and throughout the year. DECinfo Locator has added two data layers -- Hunting on DEC-Managed Lands and Wildlife Management Units - that will help provide detailed mapping functions for hunters and other outdoor enthusiasts.

The hunting mapping layers are among several enhancements to DECinfo Locator since the application debuted in July, with additional data layers expected in coming months. The new layers can be found in the "Land-related Activities" category under the "Outdoor Activity" tab. The Wildlife Management Units data layer is visible at all zoom levels. To view data from the hunting layer, zoom in on the map until the "Hunting on DEC-Managed Lands" legend label turns from gray to black.

Clicking on a hunting icon brings up links to information specific to that parcel. There are also links to general hunting regulations, a hunting season map summary, and a link to help hunters report harvests.

DECinfo Locator offers other layers that can be helpful to hunters planning excursions, including Lean-tos, Primitive Campsites, Parking Areas (all visible under the "DEC Recreational Assets" layer), and Trails (a separate category). The application's measurement tools can help hunters further evaluate an area of interest, and the "Near Me" tool organizes map information into an interactive list of assets within a radius (one to 10 miles) from a point the user sets on the map.

With more than 55 interactive data layers, DECinfo Locator lets users see and download permits, former industrial site cleanup plans, water quality reports, and more based on where they live, work, or play. Selecting a map feature can bring up links to database records for petroleum bulk storage facilities, oil wells, or permitted mines. Users can also view potential Environmental Justice areas and Climate Smart Communities or find out what local wastewater facilities are doing to reduce their impact on New York's waterbodies. Several information layers can be activated at the same time, allowing users to see the many ways DEC is working to protect and enhance the state's environment and recreational opportunities. Additional information about how to use DECinfo Locator, including a YouTube tutorial, can be found on DEC's website.

 

YOUTH BIG GAME HUNT: New York's annual Youth Big Game Hunt is scheduled for Columbus Day weekend, Oct. 12-14. During this special opportunity, licensed 14- and 15-year-olds may use a firearm to hunt big game while accompanied by an experienced, licensed adult hunter. All eligible junior hunters may take one deer (either sex) and one bear. During the youth hunt, antlerless deer taken with a firearm may be tagged with a regular season tag, DMP, or Deer Management Assistance Program tags. Antlered deer may only be tagged with the regular season tag. Though junior hunters may have multiple deer tags, they may only take one deer with a firearm during the Youth Big Game Hunt.

This Youth Big Game Hunt takes place throughout the state, except in Suffolk County and in bowhunting-only areas. Additional rules that apply to junior hunters and their adult mentors can be found on pages 36 and 37 of the Hunting & Trapping Guide or through the Junior Hunter Mentoring Program.

image of junior bowhunter

 

YOUTH PHEASANT HUNTING WEEKEND FOR WESTERN NEW YORK: A special youth-only pheasant hunting weekend will be held in Western New York on Oct. 12 and 13. The hunt will occur one week prior to the regular pheasant hunting season and provide junior hunters (ages 12 to 15 years old) with the opportunity to hunt pheasants with a licensed adult companion when fewer hunters are afield. The 2019-2020 regular pheasant season opens Oct. 19. Junior hunters must be accompanied by a licensed adult hunter during the youth pheasant hunt. Accompanying adults will not be allowed to possess a firearm or take a pheasant during this special season. During the two-day youth hunt, junior hunters will be allowed to take two birds per day, as allowed during the regular season. Pheasant hunting boundary descriptions can be found on DEC's website or on page 43 of the 2019-2020 Hunting and Trapping Regulation Guide. All other pheasant hunting regulations remain in effect.

Additional information about pheasant hunting is available on DEC’s website.

For information about 2019 Region 9 Youth Hunt Pheasant Stocking, contact DEC’s Buffalo office at (716) 851-7010 or DEC’s Allegany office at (716) 372-0645.

 

INLAND TROUT STREAM MANAGEMENT MEETINGS: Inland trout streams are an important component of New York State's diverse fishery resource. An abundance of trout fishing opportunity is available to New York anglers. To get a rough idea of the extent of the resource, consider that trout have been documented in over 3,000 New York streams and over 80% of these streams supported wild trout. In 2016, hatchery-reared trout were stocked in 444 streams to enhance trout fishing opportunity. Additionally, New York anglers rank inland trout streams second only to warmwater lakes among their preferred water bodies for recreational fishing (2007 New York Statewide Angler Survey).

Rainbow trout

Streams with the ecological characteristics necessary to support brown trout, rainbow trout and native brook trout are not uniformly distributed across the state and the productive capacity of these streams varies widely. Trout stream management means maintaining and, where possible, increasing the value of this resource to the recreational users and to the general public. A wide variety of tools are available to fisheries managers to achieve this goal; notably fishing regulations, access and information, habitat protection and improvement, and stocking hatchery-reared trout. As a public agency founded on scientific principles, NYSDEC places great importance on measuring the outcome of management strategies against well-defined objectives.

Fall 2019 Public Meetings on a New Approach to Inland Trout Stream Management

The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation is developing a new plan for inland trout stream management based on updated scientific information and the desires expressed by trout anglers. Prior to completing the draft plan, DEC fisheries managers would like to meet with trout stream anglers to explain the proposed approach, answer questions, and solicit feedback. Ten public meetings around the State are scheduled between October 1st and November 12th to facilitate these discussions.

Remaining Meetings Scheduled in central/western New York are:

October 16, 2019 - Avoca Central School Auditorium, 17 Oliver Street, Avoca, NY

October 17, 2019 - Concord Town Hall, 86 Franklin Street, Springville, NY

Note: Doors will open at 6:30 PM, and meetings will run from 7 PM to 8:30 PM.

 

THIS WEEK’S EVENTS: (For complete future listings go to the Calendar Page - http://www.huntfishnyoutdoors.com/events.php)

 

OCTOBER 2019

1-31 -  Celebrate Cayuga Lake Month at the Finger Lakes Museum & Aquarium, 3369 Guyanoga Road, Branchport, NY. The Museum focuses attention on the lake, 37.9 miles makes this the longest Finger Lake! (Free) (For information email mail@fingerlakesmuseum.org.) 

12 - National Wild Turkey Federation – Southern Tier Local Chapter Youth Pheasant Hunt at Molyneaux Tree Farm, 219 Shreder Road, Endicott, NY. (9:00 am) (For more information contact Larry Shutts 607-642-8609) 

12 - Rod & Gun Auction at Hessney Auction Center, 2741 Lyons Road (Route 14N), Geneva, NY (9:15 am) over 400 guns •  shotguns • rifles • handguns • knives • ammo • scopes • gun safes • hunting & fishing items • reloading & accessories  (For more information call 315-789-9349 or 585-734-6082 or go to www.hessney.com)

12 - Natural Products Workshop Part 1: Green Cleaning at the Reinstein Woods Environmental Education Center, 93 Honorine Drive, Depew, NY (Town of Cheektowaga) (10:30 am) Learn to make natural cleaning products for your home and how to select safer products for cleaning your body. Make your own natural cleaner to take home. Materials fee: $5/$3 for Friends members. (For information and register call 716-683-5959 or email reinsteinwoods@dec.ny.gov)

12 - Birding 101: Class #9 at the Reinstein Woods Environmental Education Center, 93 Honorine Drive, Depew, NY (Town of Cheektowaga) (2:30 pm) Learn how to identify the different raptors (birds of prey) found in Reinstein Woods. For adults and children ages 8 and older.  (For information and register call 716-683-5959 or email reinsteinwoods@dec.ny.gov)

12 - Bushcraft Workshop - Fire Workshop I: All About Fire at Cumming Nature Center, 6472 Gulick Road, Naples, NY. (9:00 am – 12:00 pm) Bushcraft at Cumming Nature Center is a combination of wilderness skills, wildcrafting, and creative nature awareness. These programs teach participants the skills and knowledge to thrive in nature. The origin of the phrase "bushcraft" comes from skills used in the bush country of Australia. From cooking a meal to warming our toes on a frosty day, the hearth has been a welcome addition to homes across the ages. Join us for a day focused around the resource that makes us human—fire! Learn how to build and light a fire from local materials with a variety of methods during an action-packed day of stories, games, and even a challenge or two! Spend an afternoon among the trees learning to understand fire, including how to start one with a single match, general fire safety, the chemistry of flame, and the many natural materials humans have used as fuel for fire throughout history. Alex Szuba, experienced primitive skills and Forest School educator, will be the instructor and guide for this three hour, fire-filled day. Space is limited to 15 participants, so don’t wait to sign up! Appropriate for: Families, Children 8 or older.  Adults are welcome to stay, but may drop their child off after filling out appropriate paperwork. (Cost: $25/person - Adults accompanying a child do not have to pay.) (For information call 585-374-6160.) 

12 - Bushcraft Workshop - Fire Workshop II: Methods of Fire at Cumming Nature Center, 6472 Gulick Road, Naples, NY. (12:30 – 3:30 pm) Fire as a tool, in history, and even in the rain. If either of these topics peak your interest, then this is an opportunity for you and your family! Join us in the forest of Cumming Nature Center for an afternoon honing your fire skills and learning more advanced methods like using flint and steel, fire by friction, and how to light a fire in wet weather. In addition, we will also use fire as a tool to create a bowl as a group project, cook a tasty treat, and learn how the use of fire has changed throughout human history. There are a total of 20 spots available for this three-hour program led by Alex Szuba, a wilderness skills instructor and nature educator with a passion for fire skills. Appropriate for: This program has been built with families in mind. Children under the age of 12 must come accompanied by an adult, and children 12 and up may be signed in and dropped off at the start of the program by filling out a medical release form. (Cost: $25/person - Adults accompanying a child do not have to pay.) (For information call 585-374-6160.)

12 - Make Your Own Leather Pouch at Cumming Nature Center, 6472 Gulick Road, Naples, NY. (12:30 – 3:30 pm) Make a pouch for storing tinder, medicine, or special treasures using leather materials.  Participants will work with leather to create a drawstring pouch, sewing with sinew or leather cord, and personalizing with bones, beads, and more. Appropriate for:  ages 8 and up. (Cost: $25/person - Adults accompanying a child do not have to pay.) (For information call 585-374-6160.)

12-13 - 13th Annual Southern Tier Recreation & Sportsman Show at the Steuben County Fairgrounds, Bath, NY (Sat - 9:00 am – 5:00 pm/Sun – 10:00 am – 4:00 pm) Free seminars on bass fishing, NY black bear, fishing from shore, trout streams of NY, river recreation, invasive insects, food plots, women and archery, retriever training and tracking wounded deer. For youth – fishing, archery, turkey calling and petting zoo. (For information call 607-664-2300 or go to www.SouthernTierOutdoorShow.com)

12-13 - Niagara Frontier – Akron Gun Show at the Newstead Fire Hall, 5691 Cummings Road, Akron, NY (Sat 9:00 am – 4:00 pm /Sun 9:00 am - 3:00pm) 85 tables.(Cost: $5.00/children under 12 free when accompanied by a paid adult) (For information contact Bruce Johnston 716-542-9929 or email guns@nfgshows.com)

12-13  - Western New York Youth Pheasant Hunt Weekend

12-14 - Youth Firearms Deer Hunt Weekend

13 - Midstate Arms Collectors Lisle Gun & Knife Show at the Lisle Fire Co., 9990 Main Street, Route 79 North, Lisle, NY (9:00 am – 3:00 pm) (85 tables.) (Cost: $5.00.) (For information call Sandy Ackerman at 607-748-1010 (1-6 p.m.)

14 -  Birds Take Flight Over The Border Wall: Linking Winter Events to Migration Timing and Speed in a Migratory Passerine at the Cayuga Bird Club Meeting, at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology auditorium,   (7:30 – 9:00 pm) Given technological limitations in tracking most of the world’s migratory animals, our knowledge of the ecology of migration itself is severely limited. It is known that the quality of non-breeding habitats can result in seasonal interactions, or carryover effects, whereby individual survival or performance are impacted in subsequent breeding seasons. However, an understanding of how events during breeding and non-breeding periods directly influence events during migration is still lacking. Bryant's research seeks to tackle these knowledge gaps, making use of a long-term demographic study of American Redstart (25+ years) on the non-breeding grounds in Jamaica with a proposed large-scale automated radio telemetry array spanning across the Caribbean and through Florida, overlapping the migratory route of this population of redstarts. Doors open at 7:00 p.m. and there will be cookies and conversation starting at 7:15. Bird club business begins at 7:30 p.m. followed by the presentation. All are welcome. (For information go to http://www.birds.cornell.edu.)

15 – Close of Regular State Seasons for Brook, Brown & Rainbow Trout, Hybrids of these Species and Splake, Lake Trout, Landlocked/Atlantic Salmon and Kokanee Trout

16 - Start of Catch and Release (Artificial Lures Only) Season for Trout in Salmon Creek (Cayuga County), East Branch Owego Creek, East and West Branchs Tioughnioga River and the Otselic River (Cortland County), Salmon Creek Above Ludlow Falls & West Branch Owego Creek (Tompkins County), Spring Creek except Caledonia State Fish Hatchery Property, Hatchery Property - 8:00 am B 4:00 pm (Livingston County), Oatka Creek from Bowerman Road Upstream to Union Street and from the Wheatland Center Road Upstream to the Mouth of Spring Creek, and Spring Creek (Monroe County), East Koy & Wiscoy Creeksand Chenunda Creek (Allegany County), Lime Lake Outlet, McKinstry, Elm Creek, Elton Creek, Mansfield Creek, (Cattaraugus County), Hosmer Brook and Cattaraugus Creek upstream of Springville Dam (Erie County), Clear Creek from the mouth to the Wyoming-Cattaraugus County line, Wiscoy Creek 0.5 mile upstream and downstream from the East Hillside Road bridge, East Koy Creek, Chenunda Creek, Cattaraugus Creek upstream of Springville Dam, Clear Creek (Ellington), Fenton Brook and Oatka Creek (Wyoming County) (>3/31/20)

16 - Start of Catch and Release (Artificial Lures Only) Season for Trout in Clear Creek and Prendagast Creek (Chautauqua County) (>3/15/20)

16 - Start of Northern Zone Deer & Bear Crossbow Seasons (>10/25)

16 - Trout Stream Management in New York - Inland Trout Stream Management Public Meeting at the Avoca Central School Auditorium, 7 Oliver Street, Avoca, NY. (6:30 – 8:30 pm) DEC is developing a new plan for inland trout stream management based on updated scientific information and the desires expressed by trout anglers. Prior to completing the draft plan, DEC fisheries managers would like to meet with trout stream anglers to explain the proposed approach, answer questions, and solicit feedback.

16 - Pruning Workshop at the Rochester Academy of Medicine, 1441 East Avenue. Rochester NY (7:30 am 3:30 pm) Join the Western Finger Lakes ReLeaf Committee for a Pruning Workshop with Guy Meilleur of Historic Tree Care and the Veteran Tree Network. This comprehensive and in-depth full-day workshop will provide pruning training for green industry professionals and municipal employees. The morning will cover National and International tree pruning standards. Structural pruning from Pediatrics to Geriatrics, as well as Storm Damage and Hollow Tree Regeneration. Outside we will inspect and assess trees and develop specifications together. The afternoon will cover the most recent A300 and BMP updates to pruning in the industry as well as additional outdoor pruning presentations. This presentation has recently been given by Guy in both Germany and Estonia. (For more information and to register, please download the workshop brochure from the Urban and Community Forestry Program Activities page: https://www.dec.ny.gov/lands/30859.html)

17 - Trout Stream Management in New York - Inland Trout Stream Management Public Meeting at the Concord Town Hall, 86 Franklin Street, Springville, NY. (6:30 – 8:30 pm) DEC is developing a new plan for inland trout stream management based on updated scientific information and the desires expressed by trout anglers. Prior to completing the draft plan, DEC fisheries managers would like to meet with trout stream anglers to explain the proposed approach, answer questions, and solicit feedback.

17 - Educator Workshop: Project Wild at the Reinstein Woods Environmental Education Center, 93 Honorine Drive, Depew, NY (Town of Cheektowaga) (4:00 – 7:00 pm) Project WILD is an award-winning program to help teachers use wildlife to teach a variety of subjects, including math, English language arts, and more. Participants receive a guide with more than 100 lesson plans. 3 CTLE Hours provided. For educators of students in grades K to 12..  (For information and register call 716-683-5959 or email reinsteinwoods@dec.ny.gov)

18 - End of Northern Zone Early Bear Season

19 - Start of Pheasant Hunting Season in Western New York (>12/31 north or >2/29/18 south)

19 - Start of Southern Zone Turkey Hunting Season (>11/1)

19 – Start of Hunting Seasons for Ducks, Coots and Mergansers – Part 1 - in Western Zone (>11/10)

19 - National Wild Turkey Federation – Southern Tier Local Chapter Women in the Outdoors Pheasant Hunt at Molyneaux Tree Farm, 219 Shreder Road, Endicott, NY. (9:00 am) (For more information contact Larry Shutts 607-642-8609) 

19 - Autumn Colors at the Reinstein Woods Environmental Education Center, 93 Honorine Drive, Depew, NY (Town of Cheektowaga) (10:00 am) Fall foliage is a blaze of color, from flaming oranges and reds to subtle yellows. Enjoy the beauty of autumn’s trees on this guided walk. (For information and register call 716-683-5959 or email reinsteinwoods@dec.ny.gov)

19 - Happy Owl-ween at the Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savannah, NY (6:00 - 8:00 pm) We are happy to welcome back Jean Soprano, of Kindred Kingdoms Wildlife Rehabilitation, who will have live owls on display during her presentation about the silent hunters of the night. Then, join our staff for a hike through the forest and grassland to explore the night sights and sounds. (Fee: $5/child, $10/adult, $25/family.) (For information/register call 315-365-3588 or e-mail montezuma@audubon.org)

 

Until our next meeting in the Corner, have a great time in the outdoors. This is Ron Schroder for – “Your In on The Outdoors for Western New York.”

What Do You Think? Have something for other sportspeople? Let us know HERE.

 

 

*******************************

 

10 - 4 – 19

 

Welcome to this week’s Conservation Chatter Corner – little bits of happenings concerning our outdoors and you, the sportspeople who enjoy being part of that outdoors.

 

FREE BOATUS GUIDE TO WINTERIZING AVAILABLE: Boaters across much of the country are getting ready to put their boats to bed for a long winter’s nap, but not every boat owner knows all the secrets of winterizing a recreational boat. Boat Owners Association of The United States (BoatUS) shares some quick tips to ensure safe storage until next season.

1.  California, Florida and Texas have the most engine winterizing claims. Boaters in northern climates know to winterize but all it takes is one deep freeze in a normally balmy state to cause major damage to your boat. Unless you’re in an area that never freezes (like Key West or Hawaii) you probably need to winterize.

2.  Water expands almost 10% by volume. That expansion means that any water left in your engine, potable water system, or refrigeration system can do some major damage over the winter. Even an engine block can crack open during cold weather. The key is making sure all water gets drained out or replaced by antifreeze.

3.  Batteries are happier at home. If you live where you never boat in winter, remove your batteries, bring them to the garage or basement and use a trickle charger to keep them topped off to protect them and extend their life.

4.  It’s easier to prevent mold than to stop it. Without some air circulation, your boat’s interior can build up condensation, which can lead to a moldy mess next spring. Solar-powered vents and boat covers that lets air circulate can help keep mold at bay.

5.  Waxing the hull now makes spring clean-up much easier. The grunge of sitting all winter at a boatyard comes off a lot quicker if you apply a coat of wax before you put your boat to bed.

6.  There are two types of antifreeze. Ethylene glycol – the kind in your boat’s cooling system works fine for engines, but it’s very toxic. Propylene glycol is safe for potable water systems and is also fine to use for the raw side of engine cooling systems – check the label. Make sure antifreeze is rated to protect down to the lowest possible expected temperatures.

7.  Add fuel stabilizer before you fill your tank. That helps mix the stabilizer so it protects all of the gas. Running your engine for a few minutes after mixing it up will get some stabilized gas in the engine’s fuel system, protecting it over the winter.

8. If enough water enters your fuel tank, gas with ethanol can phase separate over the long winter storage period. For boats with portable gas tanks, try to use up fuel now. Any remainder can be used (if unmixed with two-stroke oil) in your vehicle. If your boat has a built-in gas tank, fill the tank almost to the top, leaving a little room for expansion. This will minimize condensation on tank walls, stopping phase separation in its tracks. Never plug a fuel tank vent.

9. Write down what you did or had your shop do. That way, next spring you won’t wonder if the lower unit lube was changed or the spark plugs replaced.

10. Take home any removable electronics, small outboards and even alcohol. The dark days of winter are when boats are most frequently broken in to. Not every thief is a professional – some may just want to raid your boat’s liquor cabinet.

11. Remove all food. Not only might it spoil, but it can attract rodents and other pests, leaving you with a nasty spring surprise.

12. Using a heater as alternative to winterizing is a really bad idea. Not only can the power go out during a big winter storm leaving the boat unprotected, the heater, extension cord or connections can (and do) overheat and cause a fire.

13. In addition to snowstorms knocking-out power to heated indoor boat storage facilities, do-it-yourselfers sometimes make mistakes when winterizing. Either way, for boaters who live in northern states, protecting yourself with ice and freeze coverage insurance may be a smart option. It’s often very affordable, but there’s a deadline to purchase, typically by the end of October.

For more information on how to properly store a boat over the winter, including how to cover a boat, winterize plumbing, store ashore or in the water, and to get a free downloadable BoatUS Boater’s Guide to Winterizing checklist, go to BoatUS.com/seaworthy/winter.

 

YOUTH BIG GAME HUNT: New York's annual Youth Big Game Hunt is scheduled for Columbus Day weekend, Oct. 12-14. During this special opportunity, licensed 14- and 15-year-olds may use a firearm to hunt big game while accompanied by an experienced, licensed adult hunter. All eligible junior hunters may take one deer (either sex) and one bear. During the youth hunt, antlerless deer taken with a firearm may be tagged with a regular season tag, DMP, or Deer Management Assistance Program tags. Antlered deer may only be tagged with the regular season tag. Though junior hunters may have multiple deer tags, they may only take one deer with a firearm during the Youth Big Game Hunt.

This Youth Big Game Hunt takes place throughout the state, except in Suffolk County and in bowhunting-only areas. Additional rules that apply to junior hunters and their adult mentors can be found on pages 36 and 37 of the Hunting & Trapping Guide or through the Junior Hunter Mentoring Program.

image of junior bowhunter

 

YOUTH PHEASANT HUNTING WEEKEND FOR WESTERN NEW YORK: A special youth-only pheasant hunting weekend will be held in Western New York on Oct. 12 and 13. The hunt will occur one week prior to the regular pheasant hunting season and provide junior hunters (ages 12 to 15 years old) with the opportunity to hunt pheasants with a licensed adult companion when fewer hunters are afield. The 2019-2020 regular pheasant season opens Oct. 19. Junior hunters must be accompanied by a licensed adult hunter during the youth pheasant hunt. Accompanying adults will not be allowed to possess a firearm or take a pheasant during this special season. During the two-day youth hunt, junior hunters will be allowed to take two birds per day, as allowed during the regular season. Pheasant hunting boundary descriptions can be found on DEC's website or on page 43 of the 2019-2020 Hunting and Trapping Regulation Guide. All other pheasant hunting regulations remain in effect.

Additional information about pheasant hunting is available on DEC’s website.

For information about 2019 Region 9 Youth Hunt Pheasant Stocking, contact DEC’s Buffalo office at (716) 851-7010 or DEC’s Allegany office at (716) 372-0645.

 

INLAND TROUT STREAM MANAGEMENT MEETINGS: Inland trout streams are an important component of New York State's diverse fishery resource. An abundance of trout fishing opportunity is available to New York anglers. To get a rough idea of the extent of the resource, consider that trout have been documented in over 3,000 New York streams and over 80% of these streams supported wild trout. In 2016, hatchery-reared trout were stocked in 444 streams to enhance trout fishing opportunity. Additionally, New York anglers rank inland trout streams second only to warmwater lakes among their preferred water bodies for recreational fishing (2007 New York Statewide Angler Survey).

Rainbow trout

Streams with the ecological characteristics necessary to support brown trout, rainbow trout and native brook trout are not uniformly distributed across the state and the productive capacity of these streams varies widely. Trout stream management means maintaining and, where possible, increasing the value of this resource to the recreational users and to the general public. A wide variety of tools are available to fisheries managers to achieve this goal; notably fishing regulations, access and information, habitat protection and improvement, and stocking hatchery-reared trout. As a public agency founded on scientific principles, NYSDEC places great importance on measuring the outcome of management strategies against well-defined objectives.

Fall 2019 Public Meetings on a New Approach to Inland Trout Stream Management

The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation is developing a new plan for inland trout stream management based on updated scientific information and the desires expressed by trout anglers. Prior to completing the draft plan, DEC fisheries managers would like to meet with trout stream anglers to explain the proposed approach, answer questions, and solicit feedback. Ten public meetings around the State are scheduled between October 1st and November 12th to facilitate these discussions.

Remaining Meetings Scheduled in central/western New York are:

October 9, 2019 - Gillette Road Middle School, 6150 South Bay Road, Cicero, NY

October 16, 2019 - Avoca Central School Auditorium, 17 Oliver Street, Avoca, NY

October 17, 2019 - Concord Town Hall, 86 Franklin Street, Springville, NY

Note: Doors will open at 6:30 PM, and meetings will run from 7 PM to 8:30 PM.

 

TRAPPING PERMITS AVAILABLE ON OAK ORCHARD, TONAWANDA, AND JOHN WHITE WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT AREAS: As of October 1, trapping permits are being issued for these WMAs for the 2019-2020 license year. Permit applications can be obtained weekdays from Oct. 1 to Nov. 30 at the Iroquois National Wildlife Refuge Office on Casey Road between 8 a.m. and 4 p.m., or by writing to the DEC Bureau of Wildlife, 1101 Casey Road, Box B, Basom, New York 14013.

Trappers who obtain a permit will be required to report their harvest and trapping efforts on each area.

The Western New York trapping season for fox, raccoon, coyote, and other upland furbearing animals opens Oct. 25, 2019, and closes Feb. 15, 2020. However, the start of upland trapping will be delayed until Nov. 1 on John White WMA.

Trapping season for mink, muskrat, and beaver in western New York will run from Nov. 25, 2019, until Feb. 15, 2020. However, trapping of muskrat and mink is restricted on these three WMAs to a shorter season starting Dec. 7, 2019 and running to Feb. 15, 2020.

Trappers can set a maximum of 25 traps for muskrat and mink on the three areas. DEC issues 25 numbered tags to each trapper that obtains a permit. The tags must be attached to each trap used. Traps without tags are considered illegal. In addition, an individual trapper can only operate traps tagged with their assigned numbers. Traps set for upland trapping and beaver will not require numbered tags and will not be considered in the trap limit. The trap limit provides a more equitable distribution of the harvest and prevents trappers from monopolizing better trapping areas.

Management of the muskrat population promotes prime emergent marsh habitats used by waterfowl and uncommon marsh birds such as the black tern and least bittern. The trap limit also allows Bureau of Wildlife personnel to better regulate the muskrat harvest according to water availability, habitat needs and population.

Hunters and trappers are reminded that no gas or electric motor boats are allowed on Oak Orchard or Tonawanda WMAs.

 

DEC ACQUIRES CLEVELAND ELEMENTARY SCHOOL FOR FUTURE HOME OF TRAINING ACADEMY: The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) has acquired the former Cleveland Elementary School in Oswego County to serve as the future home of the basic training academy for DEC’s Forest Rangers and Environmental Conservation Police Officers (ECOs), and be utilized by other department divisions and staff for DEC-led programs. DEC purchased the facility from the Central Square School District at a cost of $199,000.

Located within view of Oneida Lake on Rt. 49, the building features 53,700 square feet of space and sits on 13 acres with multiple athletic fields. The school was constructed in 1952, updated with additions in 1992, and was closed in 2014 due to declining enrollment. It features 23 classrooms, a large gymnasium, and a commercial quality kitchen and cafeteria area.

The location is roughly 30 miles from the current DEC training facility in Pulaski, Oswego County.

DEC is currently training 30 ECO and 14 Forest Ranger recruits at the 22nd Basic School in Pulaski, with graduation set for Dec. 6. The academy runs for 28 weeks and covers environmental conservation law, criminal procedure, vehicle and traffic laws, physical conditioning, firearms training, wildlife identification, emergency vehicle operations, search and rescue missions, land navigation, boating, and wildfire suppression.

In 2018, the 135 Forest Rangers across the state conducted 346 search and rescue missions, extinguished 105 wildfires that burned a total of 845 acres, participated in 24 prescribed fires that burned and rejuvenated 610 acres, and worked on cases that resulted in 2,354 tickets or arrests. In 2018, the 288 ECOs across the state responded to 21,668 calls and worked on cases that resulted in 20,665 tickets or arrests for crimes ranging from deer poaching to solid waste dumping, illegal mining, the black market pet trade, and excessive emissions violations.

 

THE GOOD GUYS AT WORK:

A Lightly Toasted Breakfast - Monroe County: On the morning of Sept. 12, ECO John Lutz responded to Rush-Henrietta Senior High School for a complaint of a nuisance raccoon on school grounds. Upon arrival, ECO Lutz met with school security who had located a raccoon sleeping outside an entrance door. School was in session at the time, so the ECO quickly and quietly worked with school security personnel to trap the animal. Using a lightly toasted bagel from the school cafeteria as bait, ECO Lutz was able to coax the raccoon safely into the trap without further incident. Once secured in the trap, the healthy raccoon enjoyed a free breakfast before being relocated to a less populated area.

Raccoon in a live trap made of metal with a bagel inside also
The Raccoon and the bagel

Annual Conservation Field Days - Monroe County: ECOs John Lutz, Evan McFee, and Eoin Snowdon participated in the annual Monroe County Conservation Field Days from Sept. 17 to 19, at Ellison Park in the town of Penfield. The interactive environmental education event draws classes of 5th graders from schools across Monroe County. ECO Lutz challenged the students with a conservation experiment and each officer gave six, 20-minute presentations to students focusing on issues regarding the environment, conservation, wildlife, and extinct animals.

Kids under a pavilion while an ECO shows them different animal hides
ECO Lutz with students at the Field Days event

 

THIS WEEK’S EVENTS: (For complete future listings go to the Calendar Page - http://www.huntfishnyoutdoors.com/events.php)

 

OCTOBER 2019