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conservation chatter corner

with ron schroder

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YOUR IN ON THE OUTDOORS FOR WESTERN NEW YORK
www.huntfishnyoutdoors.com

10 – 20 – 17

 

Welcome to this week's Conservation Chatter Corner - little bits of happenings concerning our outdoors and you, the sportspeople who enjoy being part of that outdoors.

 

DEC PUBLIC MEETINGS ON TROUT STREAM: New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) announced today that it will hold two public meetings in Region 7 this fall as part of a series of statewide meetings on trout stream management. The meetings will provide an overview of the state's approach to trout stream management and elicit feedback from anglers regarding their preferences and expectations for the management of trout stream waters.

The meetings will feature a 30-minute presentation by DEC Fisheries staff describing current management practices for trout streams and will include key findings of a statewide study completed in 2015. Following the presentation, meeting attendees will have an opportunity a to provide input and feedback regarding their preferences and expectations for the management of trout streams.

The upcoming meetings are scheduled for:

Monday, October 23 6:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. (Doors open at 6:30 p.m. and the presentation begins at 7:00 p.m.)

NYSDEC Region 8 Office

6274 East Avon-Lima Rd. (Routes 5 and 20), Avon, NY 14414

Thursday, October 26 6:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. (Doors open at 6:30 p.m. and the presentation begins at 7:00 p.m.)
Whitney Point High School
10 Keibel Road Whitney Point, NY 13862

Since 1990, DEC has generally managed trout streams for a desired catch rate. DEC fisheries managers seek to examine how well the current management goal fits the purpose of satisfying the desires of today's recreational trout stream anglers. Understanding the fishery characteristics valued most by trout stream anglers will help DEC biologists to identify and develop effective future management strategies.

 

STATE PARKS GRAND ISLAND WATERFOWL BLIND LOTTERY: With the regular duck and goose seasons opening up on October 28, the New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation has announced the lottery drawing guidelines for Beaver Island State Park, West River Parkway, Strawberry Island and Motor Island. Waterfowl blind permits will be drawn every Monday, Wednesday and Friday beginning on Oct. 27 in the Beaver Island Club House basement at 6:30 p.m. sharp. Doors open at 6 p.m. Drawings will take place through Dec. 4 (duck season closes on Dec. 6). To participate in the lottery drawings, hunters must be present, show a valid hunting license with a signed duck stamp, proof of completion of a waterfowl ID course and proof of registration in the Harvest Information Program (HIP). Since Canada goose season continues through Dec. 17, blinds will be conducted through call-ins starting Wednesday, Dec. 6 from 9 a.m. to noon at 773-2010 (also every Monday, Wednesday and Friday through Dec. 15).

 

THE GOOD GUYS AT WORK: New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) Environmental Conservation Police Officers (ECOs) enforce the 71 Chapters of NY Environmental Conservation Law, protecting fish and wildlife and preserving environmental quality across New York.

Injured Bald Eagle - Orleans County: On Sept. 19, ECO Kevin Holzle responded to a report of an injured immature bald eagle in a field in the town of Kendall. The concerned farmer had viewed the eagle the previous day feeding in the squash field and became concerned with the bird's condition the next morning, when he was able to walk right up to it. ECO Holzle arrived on scene and determined that the eagle needed medical attention. DEC Wildlife staff arrived to assist in the capture and transport of the eagle to a licensed rehabilitator for treatment, recovery, and future release.

Lost and Found - Genesee County: On Sept. 15, ECO Fay Fuerch was contacted by a Genesee County Sheriff's Deputy concerning a convicted felon who accidentally shot himself in the leg the night before in the town of Darien. The Deputy requested ECO Fuerch's partner, K-9 Handley, to help locate a .22 caliber rifle that was missing. The victim initially explained that he was holding a .22 round with a pair of pliers and hit the primer end with a hammer causing the round to discharge and enter his leg above his knee and exit near his ankle while he was in a garage on his grandfather's property. This story did not make sense and the grandfather advised that there was a .22 rifle missing from an abandoned vehicle on the property. The victim asked for a lawyer when questioned about the rifle, so its location remained unknown. The grandfather was fully cooperative and gave consent to search the property, including the garage. A quick search of the garage didn't locate the rifle and when K-9 Handley searched the woods and surrounding property, he didn't locate the rifle. ECO Fuerch returned the following day and took a closer look in the garage, locating the rifle hidden among pieces of rebar and other long, slender objects. The grandfather confirmed it was the missing rifle. All of the evidence was turned over to the Sheriff's Department and charges are pending.

Opening Day Hunting Over Bait - Monroe County: Late in the day on Sept. 30, ECO Kevin Holzle received information from ECO Eoin Snowden concerning a complaint of a baited tree stand in the town of Webster. The complainant wanted to remain anonymous and shared little information for ECOs to investigate. The following morning, the opening day of the early archery season for deer, ECO Holzle spent an hour moving slowly through thick brush toward a tree stand, attempting to locate the hunter and the illegal bait. ECO Holzle spotted the location within 40 yards of the hunter and found him hunting over two freshly laid piles of corn. The hunter was issued a summons for hunting deer with the aid of bait returnable to the Town of Webster Court.

 

DEC DUCK HUNTER SURVEY: DEC is seeking your opinion on waterfowl season dates!

Each year, DEC selects waterfowl hunting season dates in four of New York’s waterfowl hunting zones (Western, Northeastern, Southeastern, and Long Island). The season dates are based on U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) limits, which include maximum number of days earliest possible opening date, and latest possible closing date.

DEC, with Cornell University and the Waterfowl Hunter Task Forces around the state, have developed a survey to ensure that the perspectives of a cross-section of waterfowl hunters are considered when season dates are selected.

If you are one of the 6,000 duck hunters who receive this survey via e-mail or U.S. Postal Service, please take a few minutes to complete the questionnaire. Your opinion matters and will help shape future duck hunting seasons in the area you hunt!

 

PENNSYLVANIA: LEAD POISONING IN BALD EAGLES ON THE RISE: An increasing number of bald eagles have been admitted to wildlife-rehabilitation centers across Pennsylvania exhibiting signs of illness such as weakness, lethargy, emaciation, labored respiration and drooping wings. Blood tests often reveal that the eagles are suffering from lead toxicity. Lead poisoning occurs when toxic levels of lead are absorbed into the body. Raptors are particularly susceptible to lead poisoning because when they ingest lead particles, the acidic nature of their stomach causes rapid absorption of the metal, said Pennsylvania Game Commission Wildlife Veterinarian Justin Brown.
"Lead poisoning is a debilitating disease in bald eagles," said Brown. "You have this powerful bird and you find it in the field – limp and weak. You can pick it up and it doesn't even know you are there. "
After a blood test reveals that a bald eagle has lead toxicity, intensive treatments can begin. Drugs treatments can take the metal out of the body's tissue and blood. And if metal is detected in an eagle's digestive system, it can be flushed out and removed. But treatment often is unsuccessful because the eagles have already absorbed too much lead.
In the past year, Red Creek Wildlife Center has treated 12 bald eagles with lead toxicity and only one of those eagles survived, said center director Peggy Hentz.
"As there are more eagles in the wild, we are getting more eagles in the wildlife-rehabilitation centers and the problem has become evident," Hentz said.
Since 2006, the Game Commission has been conducting necropsies on bald eagles that die to monitor causes of death and potential diseases. The data from 2006 to 2016 reveals that approximately one-third of the state's known bald-eagle mortalities are associated with a toxin, with lead being the most common. In fact, lead toxicity is a significant cause of death in all raptors, not just eagles.
Lead is a heavy, relatively inexpensive, malleable metal, which often is used in fishing lures, ammunition and other materials. Research has shown that fragments of lead can be found as far as 18 inches from a bullet's point of impact. In addition, 30 to 40 percent of the lead can remain in the target after the bullet has passed through. Small-game carcasses and big-game entrails that remain in the field could contain lead that might be ingested by opportunistic scavenging eagles and other wildlife.
The main source of ingested lead has not been clearly identified. However, hunters can help to reduce the potential that bald eagles ingest lead fragments from the remains of harvested game animals by burying the carcasses and gutpiles, or by covering them with branches. Doing so will make it less likely that aerial scavengers will find and consume the remains, which might contain lead particles. Hunters also could consider eliminating lead from their harvests by using non-lead ammunition.
Although lead toxicity has been identified as a leading cause of mortality among the state's eagles, the eagle population continues to thrive and increase in number. In the early 1980s, there were only three active bald eagle nests in Pennsylvania. Today, thanks to the restoration efforts of the Pennsylvania Game Commission and partners, there are more than 250 active bald eagle nests in the state. Bald eagles met the requirements for removal from the state threatened species list in 2014 and are now classified as a protected species.

 

BIRD BAND REPORTING MOVES TO ONLINE ONLY: Waterfowl hunters who find bands on harvested game birds or have recovered a band are now asked to report it online to the National Bird Banding Laboratory. The toll-free 1-800-327-BAND system was discontinued in June of 2017.

The website reporting system: streamlines data collection / reduces error / is mobile-friendly /

provides the hunter with instant information about the bird

Biologists place these uniquely numbered bands on many species of birds. These birds may be recaptured in the future by biologists, may be found dead by the public, or harvested by hunters. Data from the bird banding program helps biologists understand how birds are impacted by environmental conditions and is used to set annual migratory game bird regulations, including season lengths and bag limits.

 

THIS WEEK'S EVENTS: (For complete future listings go to the Calendar Page - http://www.huntfishnyoutdoors.com/events.php)

OCTOBER 2017

20 - End of Northern Zone Deer & Bear Bowhunting and Crossbow Seasons

20 - Montezuma’s Home School Nature Series: Owls at the Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savannah, NY (10:00 am – 12:00 pm) When you hear the word “owl,” what comes to mind? Do you picture a mysterious big-eyed bird of the night? Maybe you think about a symbol of wisdom or a character in books. Clearly, people are fascinated by owls and the best way to understand them is to learn as much as possible about them.  Homeschooled children ages 5-12 will explore owl habitat, their unique characteristics and conservation projects at Montezuma. (Fee: $8/student) (For information or register call 315-365-3588 or e-mail montezuma@audubon.org) 

20 - Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge Nature Storytime Walk at the Refuge Visitor Center, 3395 U.S. Route 20 East, Seneca Falls, NY. Led by Librarian and The Lodge Nature Store Manager, Gayle James, Nature Storytime Story Walk is recommended for children in pre-K through 3rd grade.  There is no fee for this program. Participants will take a walk with Miss Gayle along the Seneca Trail to see how the story of Little Boo unfolds!  Each page from the book is stationed along the trail, along with an activity. Parents are required to stay with their children during the program.  Please come prepared for the weather; the majority of the program is outside on the trail. Program is rain or shine (If it’s too rainy, we will move the program to inside the Visitor Center). For information, email andrea_vanbeusichem@fws.gov or call 315-568-5987.)

20 - Chemung County Coon Hunters Association Inc Coonhound Event at their clubhouse on Rumsey Hill Road, Van Etten, NY. (5:00pm – Coonhound Event Field Trial - $12.00/6:30pm – Coonhound Bench Show-Poor Boy – $12.00/8:00pm Coonhound Event Nite Hunt - $15.00) (For information call Herschel Burt at 570-596-2149)

21 - Start of Pheasant Hunting Season in Western New York (>12/31 north or >2/28/18 south)

21 - Start of Turkey Hunting Season (>11/3) 

21 - Start of Northern Zone Regular Deer and Bear Hunting Season (>12/3)

21 - Montezuma’s Happy Owl-ween at the Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savannah, NY (6:00 - 8:00 pm) We are happy to welcome back Jean Soprano, of Kindred Kingdoms Wildlife Rehabilitation, who will have live owls on display during her presentation about the silent hunters of the night. Then, join the Montezuma Audubon Center staff for an owl prowl around the woods and grasslands to search for Montezuma’s wild owls and other nighttime wildlife. (Fee: $6/child, $8/adult, $25/family.) (For information or register call 315-365-3588 or e-mail montezuma@audubon.org) 

21 - Birding 101: Class #10 at the Reinstein Woods Environmental Education Center, 93 Honorine Drive, Depew, NY (Town of Cheektowaga) (2:30 pm) Learn which birds will be in the area for the winter season. For adults and children ages 8 and older. (For information and register call 716-683-5959 or email reinsteinwoods@dec.ny.gov)

21 - Steuben County Coon Hunters, Inc. Coonhound Event at their clubhouse at 4082 Depot Street, Cameron, NY (4:30 pm - Coonhound Bench Show - $20.00/8:00 pm - Coonhound Nite Hunt - $25.00) (For information call Roger Barney at 607-695-9024 or email ten.sehguh@yenrab_jr)

21 - Whitney Point Sportsman Association Coonhound Event at the club on NY Route 206, Whitney Point, NY (4:00 pm - Coonhound Water Race-Poor Boy - $12.00/Coonhound Bench Show- Poor Boy - $12.00/7:00 pm Coonhound Event Nite Hunt-Poor Boy - $15.00) (For information call Ralph Canniff at 607-240-1129)

21 - Becoming an Outdoors-Woman (BOW) Workshop - Become Skilled with Map & Compass at Tupper Lake, NY (Cost: $50.00) (For information/register contact Adirondack Foothills Guide Service, LLC  518-359-8194  adkfoothills@yahoo.com  or go to www.adkfoothills.com)   

21 -  Letchworth Region Friends of NRA Event at the Firemens Exempt, 5939 Stone Hill Road, Lakeville, NY (5:00 pm) (Cost: $40.00) (For information call Janet Green 585-451-4988 or email jgreen102161@gmail.com )

21 - Southern Tier Bassmasters (Open) Tournament on Conesus Lake at the State Launch (ENTRY FEE: -$25/Angler --$5/optional lunker) (For information Call 585-314-7142 or email tournaments@southerntierbass.com)

21 - Whitney Point Sportsman Association Coonhound Event at the club on NY Route 206, Whitney Point, NY (4:00 pm - Coonhound Event Water Race - $12.00/6:00 pm – Coonhound Bench Show - $12.00/8:00 pm Coonhound Event Nite Hunt - $15.00) (For information call Ralph Canniff at 607-240-1129 or John Marshall 607-345-5366)

21 - Friends of NRA Event at the Lakeville Exempt Club, 5939 Stone Hill Road, Lakeville , NY. (For information contact Janet Green at 585-451-4988 or email jgreen102161@gmail.com)

21 - Owl Prowl at Klydell Wetlands, North Tonawanda, NY (6:30 – 8:00 pm) (Cost: $7.00) Space is limited. (For information/pre-register call 585-457-3228.)

21-31 – “Halloween” Event at Bass Pro Shops. Bass Pro Shops in the Finger Lakes Mall, 1579 Clark Street Road, Auburn, NY. The free event will feature activities including fun crafts for kids, a Halloween costume parade, trick-or-treating and much more. The event schedule includes: Saturday, Oct. 21, and Sunday, Oct. 22: - Noon to 5:00 pm  – Free 4x6 photo with life-size cutouts of Peanuts characters, Charlie Brown, Snoopy, Linus, Sally and Lucy (photo packages also available for sale). First 100 kids to have a photo taken will receive a free LED flashing necklace; Free crafts for kids.  Kids will have the opportunity to color a free garden tips booklet on Saturday and to decorate a felt jack-o-lantern on Sunday. Friday, Oct. 27 – 5:00–7:00 pm – FREE 4x6 photo with the Peanuts gang and decorate a Halloween bat craft. Oct. 28, Saturday – Noon-5:00 pm FREE 4x6 photo with the Peanuts gang, Decorate a Halloween pumpkin craft and Pumpkin Toss game – play for a chance to win a prize; 3:00–5:00 pm – Trick-or-Treating; 4:00 pm - Costume parade; participants receive a free jack o’ lantern tote. Sunday, Oct. 29 - Noon – 5 p.m. – FREE 4x6 photo with the Peanuts gang; Decorate a Halloween pumpkin craft; Pumpkin Toss game – play for a chance to win a prize. Oct. 30, Monday – 5:00–7:00 pm – FREE 4x6 photo with the Peanuts gang; Decorate a Halloween bat craft. Tuesday, Oct. 31 – 4:00–8:00 pm – FREE 4x6 photo with the Peanuts gang; Decorate a Halloween treat bag: Pumpkin Toss game – play for a chance to win a prize; 5:00 pm – Trick-or-treating; 6:00 pm – Costume parade; participants receive a free jack o’ lantern tote.For more information on the grant and how to enter, visit www.basspro.com/halloween. (For information call 315-258-2700 or email Manager_Finger_Lakes_NY@basspro.com)

23 - Trout Stream Management in New York at the NYSDEC Region 8 Office, 6274 East Avon-Lima Road, (Routes 5 and 20), Avon, NY (6:30 – 9:00 pm) To provide a convenient opportunity for trout stream anglers and other interested members of the public to discuss these questions with NYSDEC biologists, a series of public meetings will be held in each NYSDEC region. The meetings will feature a 30-minute presentation describing how DEC currently manages trout streams and will summarize key findings of a statewide study completed in 2015 (PDF, 2.6 MB). This will be followed by a 90-minute discussion period aimed at identifying the measures of trout stream angling quality most important to this segment of New York's the angling public. (For information call 585-226-2466)

25 – Start of Hunting & Trapping Seasons for Weasel, Skunk, Opossum, Raccoon, Red Fox and Gray Fox (>2/15/17)

25 – Start of Hunting & Trapping Seasons for Bobcat(Southern portion of Western New York (>11/17)

25 – Start Of Trapping Seasons for Coyote (>2/15/18)

25 - Start Of Trapping Season for Fisher (>10/30)

25 - Montezuma’s Bird Watching Tour at the Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savannah, NY (9:00 - 11:00 am) The peak of the waterfowl migration is upon us. Join our education staff and we’ll drive you in our van to visit several Montezuma birding hotspots where thousands of ducks, geese and swans rest and feed during their long and impressive journey. Binoculars and field guides will be provided. (Fee: $8/child; $15/adult, $40/family.) (For information or register call 315-365-3588 or e-mail montezuma@audubon.org) 

26 - Trout Stream Management in New York at the Whitney Point High School, 10 Keibel Road Whitney Point, NY (6:30 – 9:00 pm) To provide a convenient opportunity for trout stream anglers and other interested members of the public to discuss these questions with NYSDEC biologists, a series of public meetings will be held in each NYSDEC region. The meetings will feature a 30-minute presentation describing how DEC currently manages trout streams and will summarize key findings of a statewide study completed in 2015 (PDF, 2.6 MB). This will be followed by a 90-minute discussion period aimed at identifying the measures of trout stream angling quality most important to this segment of New York's the angling public. (For information call 607-753-3095)

27 – Ruffed Grouse Society Central New York Chapter 37th Annual Conservation & Sportsmen’s Banquet at The Whitetail At Woodcrest Golf Course, 6200 Old Cheese Factory Road, (Route 173 & Cheese Factory Road) , Manlius, NY. (Social – 6:00 pm/Dinner – 7:30 pm) Must pre-register by October 20th.(For further information contact Bob Papworth  315-471-0914 email rppwrth@verizon.net or Tim McCarthy 315-696-8987 email tmac@twcny.rr.com )

27 - Clymer Coonhunters Club Coonhound Event at their clubhouse on 8023 Ravlin Hill Road, Panama, NY (8:00 pm – Coonhound Event Nite Hunt - $20.00) (For information call Willis Miller  716-355-4540)

27 - Concealed Carry Class presented by Legal Heat at the Cabela’s Cheektowaga Store, 2003 Walden Avenue, Cheektowaga, NY (5:00 – 9:00 pm) This course is designed to meet the qualifying requirements and documentation to obtain the Utah and Arizona concealed carry permits in a fun, informative, non-intimidating class. These permits will allow combined carry reciprocity in approximately 30+ states. Legal Heat's concealed carry class covers firearms safety, handling, transportation, storage, ammunition, self-defense and firearms laws, concealed carry techniques and much more. Legal Heat's firearm training instructors are all NRA and Utah BCI certified, insured and among the most highly experienced in the industry and can answer your CCW questions. This course typically runs approximately 4 hours. This Legal Heat course does not have a 'test' or range requirement. The Utah and Arizona permits are open to residents of any state and can be applied for by mail. You do NOT have to reside in the state of UT or AZ to qualify to apply for their concealed carry permits. Register TODAY for this fun and informative class. Seating may be limited.This class may qualify you for the NY permit in several NY counties but has not been formally approved by any NY counties yet. (Reservations can be made at www.MyLegalHeat.com or by calling 877-252-1055.)

28 – Start of Hunting Seasons for Ducks, Coots and Mergansers – Part 1 - in Western Zone (>12/6)

28 - Start of Canada Goose Seasons - Part 2 - in the West Central (>11/26) and South Zones (>12/17) of Western New York

28 - Cabela’s Sportsman’s Seminars - at Cabela’s Cheektowaga Store, 2003 Walden Avenue, Cheektowaga, NY. (11:00 am – 12:00 pm) - Preparedness: Woods Pack for Survival - When you venture into the deep outdoors, are you carrying the items you might need to survive?  Whether it's a hunting trip, remote fishing expedition, long hike or any other activity in the backwoods, come learn about the essential items you'll need to include in your woods pack to be fully prepared for almost anything. (12:00 – 2:00 pm)Wild Game Processing - So you shot a big-game animal.  Now what?  In this seminar, you'll learn the basics of butchering wild game and where each cut of meat comes from.  After watching this demonstration, you'll be able to take your newfound skills to the field and do it yourself. (12:00 – 1:00 pm) - Camouflage: Technologies and Patterns - Don't be lost in the mix of camouflage options.  Head in to our camo department to learn the features, advantages, and benefits of the various camo patterns and types of apparel. We'll test some technologies out and have you walking away with the knowledge on what camo rightly suits your hunting needs. (2:00 – 3:00 pm) - Pick the Right Knife - Knives range from no-nonsense, fixed blades to compact pocket knives, and specialized knives for scenarios such as quartering your elk or deer in the field.  Since no one knife will suit every task, some people carry multiple knives.  However, with some careful consideration you can select a single knife that will handle most of your needs. (For information call 716-608-4770)

28 – The Beauty of Bats at The Portville Free Library, 1 North Main Street, Portville, NY (10:00 – 11:30 am) While it is a fact that bats rank very high on the list of most disliked species, it is also a fact bats are greatly misunderstood. Bats are not the creepy, scary and vicious animals they are sometimes made out to be. Folks who love animals know that all animals deserve to be treated with kindness and bats are no exception. Join us for this entertaining and enlightening talk as we explore the world of bats. We will discover how necessary, beneficial and wonderful bats are to have as friends and neighbors. (Cost: Free for members, $5.00 for non-members and free for children 13 and under. Minors must be accompanied by an adult.) Register by 4:00 pm October 26. (For information/register call 716-933-0187.)

28 - Whitney Point Sportsman Association Coonhound Event at the club on NY Route 206, Whitney Point, NY (4:00 pm - Coonhound Water Race-Poor Boy - $12.00/Coonhound Bench Show- Poor Boy - $12.00/7:00 pm Coonhound Nite Hunt-Poor Boy - $15.00) (For information call Ralph Canniff at 607-240-1129)

28 – Aliens at the Reinstein Woods Environmental Education Center, 93 Honorine Drive, Depew, NY (Town of Cheektowaga) (2:30 pm) Are there visitors from outer space in Reinstein Woods? No, just plants and animals introduced from other parts of the world. Join a guided tour to meet some of these alien invaders. (For information and register call 716-683-5959 or email reinsteinwoods@dec.ny.gov)

29 - KTBA Bass Club 8th Annual "STONE COLD" Tournament on Oneida Lake (6:00 am – 2:00 pm) (Cost: $80.00 boat for Members/$100.00 boat for Non-Members) (For information contact Tom Testa - tuzzytny@yahoo.com )

30 – Close Of Trapping Season for Fisher

31 - Status of Brook Trout in WNY at the WNY Chapter of Trout Unlimited’s October meeting at the Donovan American Legion Post, 3210 Genesee Street, Cheektowaga, NY. (7:30 pm)  Speakers are Scott Cornett of the Allegany Office of DEC and Tom Hoffman of the US Fish & Wildlife Service. Open to the public.

 

Until our next meeting in the Corner, have a great time in the outdoors. This is Ron Schroder for Your In on The Outdoors for Western New York.

What Do You Think? Have something for other sportspeople? Let us know HERE.

 

 

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10 – 13 – 17

Welcome to this week's Conservation Chatter Corner - little bits of happenings concerning our outdoors and you, the sportspeople who enjoy being part of that outdoors.


ARBY’S – WE GOT THE VENISON: Good news that’s sure to spruce up any deer camp, Arby’s has announced it will continue the success it had with venison sandwiches last year, and they’re even taking it up a notch this hunting season.
According to USA Today, venison sandwiches will be back on the menu in all 3,300 restaurants in the U.S. starting Saturday, October 21. That’s not all, either . . .
If you live in Colorado, Wyoming or Montana, you get a special wild game surprise!
This hunting season, Arby’s is rolling out a special limited-edition Elk Sandwich that will only be available in the three states mentioned above.
If you remember from last year, Arby’s venison sandwiches sold out in minutes, and will likely sell out again quickly this year, Arby’s Chief Marketing Officer Jim Taylor says.
“If people are interested in trying the sandwich, the only way to guarantee they can get one is to get there when we open or a little before and make sure they are in line, just like folks last year,” Taylor said.
Just like last year, the restaurant chain uses a New Zealand supplier that sells grass-fed free-range venison. Jim says it took a little over a year to set up an arrangement with suppliers in order to secure enough product for what he calls “the biggest venison promotion in the world and restaurant has ever done.”
“We took a look at what hunters and wild game enthusiasts love to talk about eating, and elk was something that kept popping up, and we said, ‘this is another great tasting game meat we think our guests would enjoy,'” he continued.
Taylor sure hit the nail on the head with his remarks, because elk meat might very well just be the best-tasting meat on the planet, and it’s about time someone said it!
For those lucky enough to feast their lips on an elk sandwich, they will be available at the following restaurants:
200 East 144th Ave., Thornton, Colorado 80023
2607 CY Ave., Casper, Wyoming 82604
2834 King Ave. W, Billings, Montana 59102

DEC PUBLIC MEETINGS ON TROUT STREAM: New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) announced today that it will hold two public meetings in Region 7 this fall as part of a series of statewide meetings on trout stream management. The meetings will provide an overview of the state's approach to trout stream management and elicit feedback from anglers regarding their preferences and expectations for the management of trout stream waters.
The meetings will feature a 30-minute presentation by DEC Fisheries staff describing current management practices for trout streams and will include key findings of a statewide study completed in 2015. Following the presentation, meeting attendees will have an opportunity a to provide input and feedback regarding their preferences and expectations for the management of trout streams.
The upcoming meetings are scheduled for:
Wednesday, October 18 - 6:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. (Doors open at 6:30 p.m. and the presentation begins at 7:00 p.m.)
Paul V. Moore High School
44 School Drive Central Square, NY 13036
Thursday, October 19 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. (Doors open at 6:30 p.m. and the presentation begins at 7:00 p.m.)
Hammondsport High School
8272 Main Street, Hammondsport, NY 14840
Monday, October 23 - 6:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. (Doors open at 6:30 p.m. and the presentation begins at 7:00 p.m.)
NYSDEC Region 8 Office
6274 East Avon-Lima Rd. (Routes 5 and 20), Avon, NY 14414
Thursday, October 26 - 6:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. (Doors open at 6:30 p.m. and the presentation begins at 7:00 p.m.)
Whitney Point High School
10 Keibel Road Whitney Point, NY 13862
Since 1990, DEC has generally managed trout streams for a desired catch rate. DEC fisheries managers seek to examine how well the current management goal fits the purpose of satisfying the desires of today's recreational trout stream anglers. Understanding the fishery characteristics valued most by trout stream anglers will help DEC biologists to identify and develop effective future management strategies.

DUCKS UNLIMITED NEW YORK LICENSE PLATE: Show your DU pride on your vehicle! Here’s your chance to show your support of Ducks Unlimited in New York! A Ducks Unlimited custom license plate from the New York State Department of Motor Vehicles is now available to motorists in both passenger and commercial class.
More than 16,000 Ducks Unlimited members in New York support conservation with waterfowling. To date, DU has protected, restored or enhanced 54,000 acres and has invested nearly $37 million in the state.

Help promote Ducks Unlimited, anywhere you drive!
ORDER YOURS TODAY!
To order online: Visit the New York Department of Motor Vehicles website
By mail: Download an order form at the New York DMV site.
Call: (518) 402-4838, Monday through Friday between 8 a.m. and 4 p.m.
Cost: A standard Ducks Unlimited plate can be purchased for an initial fee of $85. The annual fee is $56.25, which is in addition to the standard registration renewal fee. The plate can be personalized with up to six characters, including spaces, for an initial fee of $116.25. The annual fee for a personalized plate is $87.50, which is in addition to the standard registration renewal fee.
Questions? Contact the New York Department of Motor Vehicles.

THE GOOD GUYS AT WORK:
Scrap Metal Burn - Wayne County:
ECO Kevin Thomas was driving down a back country road on patrol in the town of Rose and saw blue and black smoke coming from behind a trailer. When he investigated, ECO Thomas found an individual standing over a burn barrel with numerous pieces of scrap metal laying around the barrel and in his pickup truck. Most of the metal pieces were small engine starters with a copper interior. The man said he burned the machinery to obtain the copper and then planned to sell it back to the scrap yard. In all, more than 50 engine starters were discovered, allegedly violating open burning laws. ECO Thomas issued the subject a ticket for illegal open burn.
Zurich Bog Search and Rescue -- Wayne County: While on patrol, ECO Kevin Thomas heard a call over the radio that a hiker and two small children were lost in Zurich Bog in the town of Arcadia. Zurich Bog is a 600-acre sphagnum swamp in Wayne County that has been designated a National Natural Historic Landmark by the National Park Service. ECO Thomas met New York State Troopers and Wayne County Sheriff's deputies at the head of the trail into the bog and spoke with the hiker's husband. Using her cell phone, the hiker said she had gotten lost more than two hours earlier, didn't know where she was, and that her cell phone battery was running low. She also had her seven and 10-year-old sons with her, trying to help them earn a Cub Scout badge. ECO Thomas had a trooper turn on his siren to see if the lost hiker could hear it, but she could not. A team of six officers then ventured into the bog, dividing into two teams when the trail split. A short time later, ECO Thomas' group heard a response from the lost hiker after calling out for her. Soon after, the officers found the family, tired but uninjured. They were escorted out of the bog through a marked trail.
One-Stop Shopping - Cayuga County: On Sept. 8, ECO Mark Colesante spotted a Craigslist ad listing native snakes for sale in the city of Auburn. Initially, ECOs planned to arrange a purchase, but when officers learned the alleged salesman was only 16 years old, they decided to simply interview the subject. The young man said he had not sold any of the 75 native snakes in his possession, including northern water snakes, eastern ribbon snakes, eastern garter snakes, and brown snakes. He also had 25 leopard frogs and three black bass in an aquarium. The subject was educated about the laws of wildlife possession and charged with possessing protected wildlife without a permit. The entire menagerie was released back to the wild.



Native frogs offered for sale on Craigslist

Marijuana Eradication - Allegany and Cattaraugus Counties: From Sept. 13 to Sept. 22, DEC Division of Law Enforcement personnel participated in a multi-agency marijuana eradication detail focusing on locating and removing marijuana plants throughout Allegany and Cattaraugus counties. New York State Police, the Allegany County Sheriff's Department, and the Southern Tier Drug Task Force participated in the effort along with ECOs Jason Powers, Jamie Powers, Russell Calanni, Dustin Oliver, Sean Rockefeller, Max Woyton, Darci Dougherty, Chris Freeman, Michael Wozniak, and Lt. Don Pleakis. The officers conducted work both on the ground and by air from a State Police helicopter and checked approximately 30 sites over the course of 10 days.
Cub Scouts Score Fishing Merit Badge - Schuyler County: On August 12, ECO Josh Crain participated in a fishing event with Cub Scouts from Penn Yan that were obtaining their fishing merit badges. The event was well attended, with the excited scouts collectively catching more than 100 bluegill and bass with their families. After the event, ECO Crain spoke to the scouts about the duties of an ECO, fishing regulations, and the importance of fish, wildlife, and environmental conservation laws.
Lost and Found - Genesee County: On Sept. 15, ECO Fay Fuerch was contacted by a Genesee County Sheriff's Deputy concerning a convicted felon who accidentally shot himself in the leg the night before in the town of Darien. The Deputy requested ECO Fuerch's partner, K-9 Handley, to help locate a .22 caliber rifle that was missing. The victim initially explained that he was holding a .22 round with a pair of pliers and hit the primer end with a hammer causing the round to discharge and enter his leg above his knee and exit near his ankle while he was in a garage on his grandfather's property. This story did not make sense and the grandfather advised that there was a .22 rifle missing from an abandoned vehicle on the property. The victim asked for a lawyer when questioned about the rifle, so its location remained unknown. The grandfather was fully cooperative and gave consent to search the property, including the garage. A quick search of the garage didn't locate the rifle and when K-9 Handley searched the woods and surrounding property, he didn't locate the rifle. ECO Fuerch returned the following day and took a closer look in the garage, locating the rifle hidden among pieces of rebar and other long, slender objects. The grandfather confirmed it was the missing rifle. All of the evidence was turned over to the Sheriff's Department and charges are pending.

OSWEGO COUNTY TRIBUTARIES WILL BE SATURATED WITH STEELHEAD THIS FALL: A steady stream of mature kings and cohos ranging from 8 to 40 pounds has been ascending the Salmon River since the middle of September, drought conditions notwithstanding. With all that spawning going on, the river is being carpeted with salmon eggs, the favorite food of Oswego County’s most popular cold weather fish, steelhead. Aka chromers, steelhead, like the salmon mentioned above, are indigenous to the Pacific Ocean. Both anadromous (they spend most of their adult lives in open water and return to streams to spawn) they were introduced into the Great Lakes in the second half of the last century to help control blooms of baitfish while offering anglers trophy fishing opportunities.
But the similarities end there. Steelhead are a strain of rainbow trout, and instead of dying after spawning, they return to the lake to feast on its cornucopia and return to tributaries to spawn again.
Their greatest difference, however, is in taste. Salmon indulge in gluttonous lives, pigging out on Lake Ontario’s massive schools of bait fish like there’s no tomorrow, putting on incredible weight in their 3 ½ years of life. Steelies, on the other hand are a little more fastidious, feeding on the same baitfish, but also on a host of insects…and caviar.
Like a siren’s song, red caviar draws them out of the safe depths of Lake Ontario each fall and into the dangerous rapids of the big pond’s tributaries. And while just about every other fish in the feeder stream dives for cover, cowering in the shadow of the salmon, steelhead run with them, picking off the eggs right after they’re dropped, sometimes even while the parents, often big enough to bite the chromer in half, are watching.
This noble courage, combined with their gentle dietary habits (they’ll take a tiny fly, too), incredible beauty (their color ranges from proof silver in fresh run fish to every shade of the rainbow in fish that have been in the river for a couple weeks) and physical stamina (when hooked, their spectacular leaps and sizzling runs in the battle for freedom are legendary) endear them in the hearts of their fans, from purist fly-fishermen to bottom dragging bait anglers.
Come mid-late November, when the salmon runs are nothing but fond memories and the crowds of anglers who stood shoulder to shoulder just a few days earlier go deer hunting or settle into winter mode, sinking into armchairs to watch college sports, fresh waves of steelies charge the streams to take advantage of their warmer temperatures and the steady source of caviar swept out from under the rocks all winter long by endlessly shifting currents.
Spring gathers the lake’s holdouts and sends them running upstream, too. You see, when snowmelt swells the tributaries, sending their plumes two to three times deeper into the lake than normal, the fresh scent hooks the steelies’ hormones, drawing them upstream to spawn. Their bellies loaded with eggs or milt, they have little room in their stomachs for food, right when they need it most to climb the raging rapids. Again, their needs are met by protein rich salmon caviar.
The action begins this month. October’s cooler nights will lower water temperatures to levels trout find comfortable, and they’ll rush in like college freshmen to their first party away from home. The Salmon River will see the first schools, followed by the Oswego River. Skinny creeks like Little Sandy and Grindstone will get their fair share immediately after heavy rains.
So if you’ve ever dreamt of hooking a rainbow, now’s the time to do it. You won’t find a pot of gold at the end. What you will get, provided you’re skilled with rod and reel, is the light-tackle fight of your life from one of nature’s most beautiful fish, set against a backdrop of quivering autumn colors.
(For year-round fishing conditions in Oswego County and visitor information, call 1-800-248-4FUN (4386) or go to www.visitoswegocounty.com.)

THIS WEEK'S EVENTS: (For complete future listings go to the Calendar Page)

OCTOBER 2017
13 - End of Northern Zone Early Bear Season
13&14 - New York Houndsmen Conservation Association Inc. New York State Championship Coonhound Event
at 10491 Rte. 240, West Valley, NY. (10/13 6:00 pm – Coonhound Bench Show-Purina Event - $20.00/8:00 pm – Coonhound Nite Hunt-Purina Event - $30.00 and 10/14 6:00 pm – Coonhound Bench Show-Purina Event - $20.00/8:00 pm - Coonhound Nite Hunt-Purina Event - $30.00) (For information call Jason Muckey 607-589-4710)
14 - Heritage Maker Food & Craft Fair at the Cumming Nature Center, 6472 Gulick Road, Naples, NY (9:00 am – 3:00 pm) Join us this fall for a celebration of heritage food and craft as we showcase the Cumming Nature Center's Heritage Maker Workshop Series. Enjoy mini-workshops, demos and informational booths including: Kombucha; Blacksmithing; Mushrooms; Stained Glass; Storytelling; Soapmaking; Woodworking And more! (Cost: Suggested donation at the door $3/person or $10/family) (For information call 585-374-6160)
14 - Rod & Gun Auction at Hessney Auction Center, 2741 Route 14N, Geneva, NY (9:30 am) Shotguns, rifles, handguns, military, decoys, knives, mounts, fishing, ammo and swords. (For more information call 315-789-9349 or 585-734-6082 or go to www.hessney.com)
14 - Montezuma’s 10th Annual Robert F. DeRoo Memorial Youth Waterfowl and Pheasant Hunts at the Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savannah, NY. Youth ages 12 to 15 and their adult mentors are welcome to celebrate conservation through sportsmen activities. Youth hunters must possess a NYS issued Hunter Safety Certificate, a current NYS 2017-2018 Junior Hunting License, an appropriate firearm and should attend with an adult hunting mentor with a current 2017-2018 hunting license. Pre-registration is required. (For more information, please call Donna Richardson at 315-365-3588.) (Fee: FREE.)
14 - Cabela’s Sportsman’s Seminar - Firearms Safety Depends On You at Cabela’s Cheektowaga Store, 2003 Walden Avenue, Cheektowaga, NY. (11:00 am – 12:00 pm) - Owning firearms is your Second Amendment right, but with that comes responsibility. Learn how to properly store firearms and ammunition in your home from this informative seminar sponsored by Cabela's and the National Shooting Sports Foundation. (For information call 716-608-4770)
14 - Cabela’s Sportsman’s Seminars - at Cabela’s Cheektowaga Store, 2003 Walden Avenue, Cheektowaga, NY. (1:00 – 2:00 pm) - Cabela's Cup - Combine your love for shooting and competition with the excitement of laser guns for a chance to win the Cabela's Cup! (2:00 – 3:00 pm) - Kids' Cabela's Cup - Bring the kids out to try their aim in our safe, portable BB gun range. First-time shooters and seasoned shooters alike are welcome and will get to keep their targets! (For information call 716-608-4770)
14 - Spey Casting on the Water Demo. Meet at Orvis Buffalo, 4545 Transit Road, Williamsville, NY. (9:45 am) Caravan to the creek for a demonstration on spey fishing. Bring your own waders and gear for some tips. (Free) (For information/register call 716-276-7200 or go on line at https://goo.gl/EbQXYd)
14 - Steelhead Fly Fishing 101 at Orvis Buffalo, 4545 Transit Road, Williamsville, NY (12:00 – 2:00 pm) with Fishing Manager Drew Disbet. (Free) (For information/register call 716-276-7200 or go on line at https://goo.gl/EbQXYd)
14 - Steelhead Fly Tying from Simple to Complex at Orvis Buffalo, 4545 Transit Road, Williamsville, NY (3:00 - 4:00 pm) (Free) (For information/register call 716-276-7200 or go on line at https://goo.gl/EbQXYd)
14-15 - Western New York Youth Waterfowl Hunt (Saturday-Sunday) Young hunters age 12 to 15 years, possessing a junior hunting license may hunt ducks, coots, mergansers, and Canada geese on 2 special days in each zone. Daily bag limits are the maximum allowed during the regular duck season, and 2 per day for Canada geese. Young hunters MUST be accompanied by a licensed adult hunter (including current HIP registration and duck stamp). Adult hunter may not shoot any birds.
14-15 - Western New York Youth Pheasant Hunt Weekend
14 - Ed Warnick Memorial Youth Pheasant Hunt
at John White WMA, Basom, NY (Genesee County). The Region 8 North Instructors Association (RENIA) and the Reg 8 SpEd office will be holding the annual youth pheasant hunt. This year, it is the weekend AFTER Columbus Day, so there is no conflict (for attention or time) with the Youth Deer season as in the past. (For information call 585-226-5457 or
e-mail Frank.Phillips@DEC.NY.gov )
14 - NWTF Wheelin Sportsmen Muzzleloader Deer Hunt on private property in Sandy Creek, NY (For information contact William Wilbur 315-440-4351 wwilbur551@aol.com)
14 - Fun Guy’s Guide To Fungi at the Reinstein Woods Environmental Education Center, 93 Honorine Drive, Depew, NY (Town of Cheektowaga) (10:30 am) Our knowledge of fungi has mushroom for improvement to say the yeast. Come learn about these mysterious organisms with former intern Marcus Rosten and by the end we’re sure you’ll be lichen them! (For information and register call 716-683-5959 or email reinsteinwoods@dec.ny.gov)
14-15 - 11th Annual Southern Tier Outdoor Show at the Steuben County Fairgrounds, Bath, NY (Sat - 9:00 am – 5:00 pm/Sun – 10:00 am – 4:00 pm) Free seminars on bass fishing, NY black bear, fishing from shore, trout streams of NY, river recreation, invasive insects, food plots, women and archery, retriever training and tracking wounded deer. For youth – fishing, archery, turkey calling and petting zoo. (For information call 607-664-2300 or go to www.SouthernTierOutdoorShow.com)
15 - Regular State Trout Season Closes (See fishing regulation guide. Great Lakes and tributaries as well as some inland waters are open all year)
15 - Hunting Musky With a Fly by author Rick Kustich at Orvis Buffalo, 4545 Transit Road, Williamsville, NY (1:00 - 3:00 pm) Rick will go through what you need, finding fish and all about the flies.. (Free) (For information/register call 716-276-7200 or go on line at https://goo.gl/EbQXYd)
15 - SUP on the Fly by Damon Newpher at Orvis Buffalo, 4545 Transit Road, Williamsville, NY (3:00 – 4:00 pm) Damon will be talking about using the paddle board to fly fish new waters. (Free) (For information/register call 716-276-7200 or go on line at https://goo.gl/EbQXYd)
15 - Southern Tier Outdoor Show Wild Turkey Calling Contest at the Steuben County Fairgrounds, 15 E. Washington Street, Bath, NY (For information call Jim McGlynn at 607-776-6263 or email elkmcg@wildblue.net )
16 - Start of Catch and Release (Artificial Lures Only) Season for Trout in Salmon Creek (Cayuga County), East Branch Owego Creek, East and West Branchs Tioughnioga River and the Otselic River (Cortland County), Owego Creek and East & West Branches of Creek (Tioga County), Salmon Creek Above Ludlow Falls & West Branch Owego Creek (Tompkins County), Spring Creek except Caledonia State Fish Hatchery Property, Hatchery Property - 8:00 am B 3:30 pm (Livingston County), Oatka Creek from Bowerman Road Upstream to Union Street and from the Wheatland Center Road Upstream to the Mouth of Spring Creek, and Spring Creek (Monroe County), East Koy & Wiscoy Creeksand Chenunda Creek (Allegany County), Lime Lake Outlet, McKinstry, Elm Creek, Elton Creek, Mansfield Creek, (Cattaraugus County), Hosmer Brook and Cattaraugus Creek upstream of Springville Dam (Erie County), Clear Creek from the mouth to the Wyoming-Cattaraugus County line, Wiscoy Creek 0.5 mile upstream and downstream from the East Hillside Road bridge, East Koy Creek, Chenunda Creek, Cattaraugus Creek upstream of Springville Dam, Clear Creek (Ellington), Fenton Brook and Oatka Creek (Wyoming County) (>3/31/18)
16 - Start of Catch and Release (Artificial Lures Only) Season for Trout in Clear Creek and Prendagast Creek (Chautauqua County) (>3/31/18)
18 - Teachers In Nature: Professional Development Series – Aquatic WILD
at the Reinstein Woods Environmental Education Center, 93 Honorine Drive, Depew, NY (Town of Cheektowaga) (4:00 – 7:00 pm) Learn how to connect your students to nature! CTLE credit hours may be available for select programs. (For information and register call 716-683-5959 or email reinsteinwoods@dec.ny.gov)
18 - Trout Stream Management in New York at the Paul V. Moore High School, 44 School Drive, Central Square, NY (6:30 – 9:00 pm) To provide a convenient opportunity for trout stream anglers and other interested members of the public to discuss these questions with NYSDEC biologists, a series of public meetings will be held in each NYSDEC region. The meetings will feature a 30-minute presentation describing how DEC currently manages trout streams and will summarize key findings of a statewide study completed in 2015 (PDF, 2.6 MB). This will be followed by a 90-minute discussion period aimed at identifying the measures of trout stream angling quality most important to this segment of New York's the angling public. (For information call 607-753-3095)
18-20 - St. Mary’s Archer’s Club Catch and Release Tournament - For fishermen of all ages this great event features fantastic tributary fishing on the World Famous Oak Orchard River by the St. Mary’s Archer’s Club. Entry fee includes parking and meals. (For information contact John Denniston at 585-682-3067.)
19 - Trout Stream Management in New York at the Hammondsport High School, 8272 Main Street, Hammondsport, NY (6:30 – 9:00 pm) To provide a convenient opportunity for trout stream anglers and other interested members of the public to discuss these questions with NYSDEC biologists, a series of public meetings will be held in each NYSDEC region. The meetings will feature a 30-minute presentation describing how DEC currently manages trout streams and will summarize key findings of a statewide study completed in 2015 (PDF, 2.6 MB). This will be followed by a 90-minute discussion period aimed at identifying the measures of trout stream angling quality most important to this segment of New York's the angling public. (For information call 585-226-2466)
20 - End of Northern Zone Deer & Bear Bowhunting and Crossbow Seasons
20 - Montezuma’s Home School Nature Series: Owls
at the Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savannah, NY (10:00 am – 12:00 pm) When you hear the word “owl,” what comes to mind? Do you picture a mysterious big-eyed bird of the night? Maybe you think about a symbol of wisdom or a character in books. Clearly, people are fascinated by owls and the best way to understand them is to learn as much as possible about them. Homeschooled children ages 5-12 will explore owl habitat, their unique characteristics and conservation projects at Montezuma. (Fee: $8/student) (For information or register call 315-365-3588 or e-mail montezuma@audubon.org)
20 - Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge Nature Storytime Walk at the Refuge Visitor Center, 3395 U.S. Route 20 East, Seneca Falls, NY. Led by Librarian and The Lodge Nature Store Manager, Gayle James, Nature Storytime Story Walk is recommended for children in pre-K through 3rd grade. There is no fee for this program. Participants will take a walk with Miss Gayle along the Seneca Trail to see how the story of Little Boo unfolds! Each page from the book is stationed along the trail, along with an activity. Parents are required to stay with their children during the program. Please come prepared for the weather; the majority of the program is outside on the trail. Program is rain or shine (If it’s too rainy, we will move the program to inside the Visitor Center). For information, email andrea_vanbeusichem@fws.gov or call 315-568-5987.)
20 - Chemung County Coon Hunters Association Inc Coonhound Event at their clubhouse on Rumsey Hill Road, Van Etten, NY. (5:00pm – Coonhound Event Field Trial - $12.00/6:30pm – Coonhound Bench Show-Poor Boy – $12.00/8:00pm Coonhound Event Nite Hunt - $15.00) (For information call Herschel Burt at 570-596-2149)
21 - Start of Pheasant Hunting Season in Western New York (>12/31 north or >2/28/18 south)
21 - Start of Turkey Hunting Season (>11/3)
21 - Start of Northern Zone Regular Deer and Bear Hunting Season (>12/3)
21 - Montezuma’s Happy Owl-ween
at the Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savannah, NY (6:00 - 8:00 pm) We are happy to welcome back Jean Soprano, of Kindred Kingdoms Wildlife Rehabilitation, who will have live owls on display during her presentation about the silent hunters of the night. Then, join the Montezuma Audubon Center staff for an owl prowl around the woods and grasslands to search for Montezuma’s wild owls and other nighttime wildlife. (Fee: $6/child, $8/adult, $25/family.) (For information or register call 315-365-3588 or e-mail montezuma@audubon.org)
21 - Birding 101: Class #10 at the Reinstein Woods Environmental Education Center, 93 Honorine Drive, Depew, NY (Town of Cheektowaga) (2:30 pm) Learn which birds will be in the area for the winter season. For adults and children ages 8 and older. (For information and register call 716-683-5959 or email reinsteinwoods@dec.ny.gov)
21 - Steuben County Coon Hunters, Inc. Coonhound Event at their clubhouse at 4082 Depot Street, Cameron, NY (4:30 pm - Coonhound Bench Show - $20.00/8:00 pm - Coonhound Nite Hunt - $25.00) (For information call Roger Barney at 607-695-9024 or email ten.sehguh@yenrab_jr)
21 - Whitney Point Sportsman Association Coonhound Event at the club on NY Route 206, Whitney Point, NY (4:00 pm - Coonhound Water Race-Poor Boy - $12.00/Coonhound Bench Show- Poor Boy - $12.00/7:00 pm Coonhound Event Nite Hunt-Poor Boy - $15.00) (For information call Ralph Canniff at 607-240-1129)
21 - Becoming an Outdoors-Woman (BOW) Workshop - Become Skilled with Map & Compass at Tupper Lake, NY (Cost: $50.00) (For information/register contact Adirondack Foothills Guide Service, LLC 518-359-8194 adkfoothills@yahoo.com or go to www.adkfoothills.com)
21 - Letchworth Region Friends of NRA Event at the Firemens Exempt, 5939 Stone Hill Road, Lakeville, NY (5:00 pm) (Cost: $40.00) (For information call Janet Green 585-451-4988 or email jgreen102161@gmail.com )
21 - Southern Tier Bassmasters (Open) Tournament on Conesus Lake at the State Launch (ENTRY FEE: -$25/Angler --$5/optional lunker) (For information Call 585-314-7142 or email tournaments@southerntierbass.com)
21 - Whitney Point Sportsman Association Coonhound Event at the club on NY Route 206, Whitney Point, NY (4:00 pm - Coonhound Event Water Race - $12.00/6:00 pm – Coonhound Bench Show - $12.00/8:00 pm Coonhound Event Nite Hunt - $15.00) (For information call Ralph Canniff at 607-240-1129 or John Marshall 607-345-5366)
21 - Friends of NRA Event at the Lakeville Exempt Club, 5939 Stone Hill Road, Lakeville , NY. (For information contact Janet Green at 585-451-4988 or email jgreen102161@gmail.com)

Until our next meeting in the Corner, have a great time in the outdoors. This is Ron Schroder for Your In on The Outdoors for Western New York.

What Do You Think? Have something for other sportspeople? Let us know HERE.

 

 

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10 – 6 – 17

 

Welcome to this week's Conservation Chatter Corner - little bits of happenings concerning our outdoors and you, the sportspeople who enjoy being part of that outdoors.

 

DEC PUBLIC MEETINGS ON TROUT STREAM: New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) announced today that it will hold two public meetings in Region 7 this fall as part of a series of statewide meetings on trout stream management. The meetings will provide an overview of the state's approach to trout stream management and elicit feedback from anglers regarding their preferences and expectations for the management of trout stream waters.

The meetings will feature a 30-minute presentation by DEC Fisheries staff describing current management practices for trout streams and will include key findings of a statewide study completed in 2015. Following the presentation, meeting attendees will have an opportunity a to provide input and feedback regarding their preferences and expectations for the management of trout streams.

The upcoming meetings are scheduled for:

Wednesday, October 18 6:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. (Doors open at 6:30 p.m. and the presentation begins at 7:00 p.m.)
Paul V. Moore High School
44 School Drive Central Square, NY 13036

Thursday, October 19 6:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. (Doors open at 6:30 p.m. and the presentation begins at 7:00 p.m.)

Hammondsport High School

8272 Main Street, Hammondsport, NY 14840

Monday, October 23 6:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. (Doors open at 6:30 p.m. and the presentation begins at 7:00 p.m.)

NYSDEC Region 8 Office

6274 East Avon-Lima Rd. (Routes 5 and 20), Avon, NY 14414

Thursday, October 26 6:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. (Doors open at 6:30 p.m. and the presentation begins at 7:00 p.m.)
Whitney Point High School
10 Keibel Road Whitney Point, NY 13862

Since 1990, DEC has generally managed trout streams for a desired catch rate. DEC fisheries managers seek to examine how well the current management goal fits the purpose of satisfying the desires of today's recreational trout stream anglers. Understanding the fishery characteristics valued most by trout stream anglers will help DEC biologists to identify and develop effective future management strategies.

 

TICKS AND LYME DISEASE: Hunters, trappers and anglers are urged to protect themselves and their families against ticks and tick-borne illnesses while afield this fall. Not all ticks can cause disease and not all bites will make you sick, but it's important to be informed and to follow a few simple steps to reduce your chances of being infected by a tick bite.  In tick-infested areas, your best protection is to avoid contact with soil, leaf litter and vegetation. However, if you hike, camp, hunt, work or otherwise spend time in the outdoors, you can still take steps to protect yourself.   

  • Dress to repel – Wear light colored clothing so you can easily spot ticks; wear long sleeves and pants, and tuck pants into socks or boots
  • Use insect repellant – Follow label directions and apply repellant carefully
  • Remove a tick as soon as you find it – Removing immediately will reduce the likelihood of contracting any disease that a tick may be carrying.  

For additional information on ticks, tick removal and Lyme Disease prevention, please see the Ticks and Lyme Disease brochure from the NYS Department of Health or visit their website at  https://www.health.ny.gov/diseases/communicable/lyme/

 

COMMON SENSE GUIDELINES FOR AVOIDING EXPOSURE TO RABIES: (Two rabid deer have been encountered in the last few weeks; one in North Carolina and one in Troy, NY.) Do not take any extraordinary risks if you do see a potentially rabid animal – the presence of a potentially rabid animal should be reported to the proper authorities. If it is necessary to kill the animal before the proper authorities can be contacted or can arrive, avoid killing the animal by a head shot or causing any trauma to the animal's head – the brain must be intact for rabies to be confirmed. Do not handle any potentially rabid animals without proper protection (such as gloves), and avoid any contact with the animal's mouth, eyes and nose.

If you are bitten or come into physical contact (scratches or direct contact with the brain or saliva) with a potentially rabid animal, immediately wash the area with soap and water. Contact your physician immediately; rabies is almost always fatal if not treated immediately. Also contact the local or state health department.

General precautions

• Do not eat any part of a deer that appears sick.

• Do not eat the eyes, brain, spinal cord, spleen, tonsils or lymph nodes of any deer.

Field dressing

• Wear rubber or latex gloves when field dressing.

• Minimize contact with the brain, spinal cord, spleen and lymph nodes as you work.

• Use only knives or utensils selected for the purpose of field dressing.

• Remove all internal organs.

• Clean knives and equipment of residue and disinfect with a 50/50 solution of household chlorine bleach and water.

Cutting and processing

• Wear rubber or latex gloves.

• Minimize handling brain or spinal tissues.

• Do not cut through the spinal column except to remove the head. Use a knife designated only

for this purpose.

• Bone out the meat from the deer and remove all fat and connective tissue. This will also remove lymph nodes.

• Dispose of brain and spinal cord, eyes, spleen, tonsils, bones, and head as instructed by the State you are hunting in.

• Thoroughly clean and sanitize equipment and work areas with bleach water after processing.

 

DEC SURVEYS ENDANGERED MUSSEL POPULATION IN WESTERN NY: In early September, DEC Region 9 staff surveyed Cassadaga Creek for the federally and NYS-endangered  clubshell mussel (Pleurobema clava). This is a small to medium size mussel, up to three inches long. The shell exterior is yellow to brown with bright green blotchy rays. The shell interior is typically white. The shell is wedge shaped and solid, with a pointed, and fairly high umbo. The breeding season appears to be initiated by seasonal changes, such as water temperature. Reproduction requires a stable, undisturbed habitat and a sufficient population of fish hosts to complete the mussel's larval development. When the male discharges sperm into the current, females downstream siphon in the sperm in to fertilize their eggs, which they store in their gill pouches until the larvae hatch. The females then expel the larvae. Those larvae which manage to attach themselves by means of tiny clasping valves to the gills of a host fish, grow into juveniles with shells of their own. At that point they detach from the host fish and settle into the streambed, ready for a long (possibly up to 50 years) life as an adult mussel. Its New York Range is the Allegheny River and its tributaries.

Freshwater mussels are sedentary filter-feeders, and as such, they are vulnerable to substrate disturbance, silt deposition, scouring, sensitive to water quality degradation, changes in channel morphology, and alterations of river hydrology. Sedimentation from development, nutrients (nitrates and phosphates) and chemicals from agricultural runoff and potassium, zinc, copper, cadmium and other elements from industrial pollution and extensive impoundments for navigation are some of the main threats to this species. The clubshell is long lived, and annually has low juvenile survival rates. This species, like many mussels, is susceptible to both temporary and periodic environmental degradation, as well as more permanent effects. Reduced populations may take several decades to recover, even if no further degrading events occur.

DEC staff had stocked the mussels in 2015 and 2016 as part of a project with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission to bolster the population in western New York. The survey turned up 175 tagged mussels and revealed a preliminary survival rate of 50-75%.

 

SHOOTING FOR A SAFE DEER SEASON:

Opening day for most hunters is right around the corner, and that means deer season preparations are well under way. Some of you have been preparing since last season ended, while others are just getting started. To ensure we’re ready for the big day, we carve out time to shoot our bows and firearms, hang stands, trim shooting lanes and run as many trail cameras as our budget will allow. Countless hours go into preparing for a successful deer season. But have you put in the hours to ensure a safe deer season? More important than bringing home that buck of a lifetime is returning home safe and sound at the end of every day afield. Here are four ways to make sure you do just that.

1) Check Your Stands -  Whether you pack a climber in with you each time you hunt or use hang-on stands that have been in place since last season, be sure to check your equipment thoroughly. On the stand itself, be on the lookout for any cracks in the metal or the welds and any bolts or clips that may need replacing. If you use a climbing stand, you’ll also want to check the band or cable that attaches the stand to the tree for any wear or damage that could potentially cause it to fail. On hang-ons and ladder stands, pay careful attention to the straps or chains that hold the stand to the tree. This is especially true if you leave your stands out year-round. If the straps appear even the least bit stretched, frayed or dry-rotted, replace them with new ones. The cost of a few ratchet straps is a small price to pay to prevent a treestand fall.

2) Always Use A Safety Harness and Lifeline - Despite the fact that most every hunter has either fallen from a treestand or knows someone who has, many still refuse to wear a safety harness when they hunt. It’s reckless, and there is no excuse for it. With today’s access to a variety of affordable safety harnesses, there’s no reason we — as deer hunters — shouldn’t be able to get through an entire season without a single treestand fatality nationwide. I hope I live to see that day. If you don’t already have one, get a good, comfortable full-body harness that can be used with a lineman’s belt for hanging stands and steps. If you hunt from hang-ons or ladder stands that you leave out, be sure to invest in some Hunter Safety System Lifelines that allow you to remain connected to the tree from the time you leave the ground until the time you return. It’s not enough just to strap in once you get into your stand, because most falls occur climbing into or out of the stand (for more statistics, see the excellent infographic below, courtesy of the TSSA).

3) Hang Your Stands With Care - Where and how you hang your stands can also play a role in keeping you safe this deer season.  Start by choosing a tree that’s safe. First and foremost make sure the tree is alive! Check for any sign of rot or any cavities that may indicate the tree is at least partially hollow. Also look for any dead limbs above that could come down during a hunt. If there is any question at all about the reliability of the tree, find another one.

Once you’ve found a safe tree, make sure you are attached to that tree the entire time you are hanging a new stand. This can be done with a lineman’s-style belt attached to your safety harness.

When hanging a lock-on stand, I always make sure the stand is hung well below the top of my climbing sticks so I can easily step over and onto the stand without having to lift my leg up or stretch, which could result in a fall. And while many hang-on stands only come with one strap to hang the stand, I always add a second near the bottom of the stand to stabilize the platform and avoid any potential for the stand to shift while I’m on it. (A locked security cable can provide extra fall-prevention as well as theft-prevention.)

4) Let Someone Know Where You’ll Be - After turning 40 and hearing numerous stories of guys falling from stands or having heart attacks in the woods, I decided it would be a good idea for someone to know where I am and when I plan to be home every time I hit the woods. For me, that someone is my wife. Since I mainly hunt public land, my potential hunting spot can quickly change if someone is hunting where I was planning to go. As soon as I get to where I’m going, I use Google Maps on my smartphone to drop a pin at my location, which I then text to my wife. If something were to happen to me, she could provide emergency responders with the corresponding GPS coordinates, and they could walk right to me. It only takes a few seconds of my time and gives both me and my wife some peace of mind about my safety. If you aren’t tech savvy or if you hunt the same area every time, then a simple hand-drawn map to your location will work just fine.

I truly hope each of you has a successful season this fall. May your freezer end up full of fresh venison and your taxidermist stay busy mounting that buck of a lifetime. But more importantly than that, I hope each of you has a safe hunting season. Let’s make this the year that no one has to bury a spouse, child or parent because of a preventable hunting mistake.

(By Brian Grossman from Quality Deer Management Association (QDMA) https://www.qdma.com/shooting-safe-deer-season/)

 

THIS WEEK'S EVENTS: (For complete future listings go to the Calendar Page)

                                         

OCTOBER 2017

7 - Southern Tier Bassmasters (Open) Tournament on Honeoye Lake at the State Launch (ENTRY FEE: -$25/Angler --$5/optional lunker) (For information Call 585-314-7142 or email tournaments@southerntierbass.com)

7 - Southern Tier Cha Inc. Coonhound Event at the clubhouse at 7359 Rood Road, Sinclairville NY (3:00 pm – Coonhound Event Bench Show - $15.00/4:30 pm – Coonhound Field Trial - $10.00/4:30 pm – Coonhound Water Race - $10.00/8:00 pm - Coonhound Nite Hunt - $20.00) (For information call Kevin Noody at 716-595-2053 or email moc.oohay@ydoonnivek)

7-9 - Youth Firearms Deer Hunt Weekend

8 - Midstate Arms Collectors Lisle Gun Show at the Lisle Fire Co., Route 79 North, Lisle, NY (9:00 am – 3:00 pm) (For information call Sandy Ackerman at 607-748-1010 (1-6 p.m.)

8 -  Deer Hair Bass and Musky Fly-tying Demo  at Orvis Buffalo, 4545 Transit Road, Williamsville, NY. (1:00 – 3:00 pm) (Free) (For information/register call 716-276-7200 or go on line at https://goo.gl/EbQXYd

8-9 - KTBA Bass Club Classic Tournament on Oneida Lake (6:00 am – 2:00 pm) (Cost: $80.00 boat for Members/$100.00 boat for Non-Members) (For information contact Tom Testa - tuzzytny@yahoo.com )

11 - Start of Northern Zone Deer & Bear Crossbow Seasons (>10/20)

11 - Montezuma’s Sunset Bird Watching Walk at the Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savannah, NY (4:30 – 6:30 pm) The peak of the waterfowl migration is here. Join us for a casual, 1-mile stroll through our grasslands and wetlands to see dozens of duck, goose, swan species as they settle into Montezuma for a good night’s rest. Binoculars and field guides will be provided. (Fee: $5/child; $7/adult, $20/family.) (For information or register call 315-365-3588 or e-mail montezuma@audubon.org)

11 - Teachers In Nature: Professional Development Series - Schoolyard Habitat at the Reinstein Woods Environmental Education Center, 93 Honorine Drive, Depew, NY (Town of Cheektowaga) (4:00 – 7:00 pm) Learn how to connect your students to nature! CTLE credit hours may be available for select programs. (For information and register call 716-683-5959 or email reinsteinwoods@dec.ny.gov)

13 - End of Northern Zone Early Bear Season

13&14 - New York Houndsmen Conservation Association Inc. New York State Championship Coonhound Event at 10491 Rte. 240, West Valley, NY. (10/13 6:00 pm – Coonhound Bench Show-Purina Event - $20.00/8:00 pm – Coonhound Nite Hunt-Purina Event - $30.00 and 10/14 6:00 pm – Coonhound Bench Show-Purina Event - $20.00/8:00 pm - Coonhound Nite Hunt-Purina Event - $30.00) (For information call Jason Muckey  607-589-4710)

14 - Heritage Maker Food & Craft Fair at the Cumming Nature Center, 6472 Gulick Road, Naples, NY (9:00 am – 3:00 pm) Join us this fall for a celebration of heritage food and craft as we showcase the Cumming Nature Center's Heritage Maker Workshop Series. Enjoy mini-workshops, demos and informational booths including: Kombucha; Blacksmithing; Mushrooms; Stained Glass; Storytelling; Soapmaking; Woodworking And more! (Cost: Suggested donation at the door $3/person or $10/family) (For information call 585-374-6160)

14 - Rod & Gun Auction at Hessney Auction Center, 2741 Route 14N, Geneva, NY (9:30 am) Shotguns, rifles, handguns, military, decoys, knives, mounts, fishing, ammo and swords. (For more information call 315-789-9349 or 585-734-6082 or go to www.hessney.com)

14 - Montezuma’s 10th Annual Robert F. DeRoo Memorial Youth Waterfowl and Pheasant Hunts at the Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savannah, NY. Youth ages 12 to 15 and their adult mentors are welcome to celebrate conservation through sportsmen activities. Youth hunters must possess a NYS issued Hunter Safety Certificate, a current NYS 2017-2018 Junior Hunting License, an appropriate firearm and should attend with an adult hunting mentor with a current 2017-2018 hunting license. Pre-registration is required. (For more information, please call Donna Richardson at 315-365-3588.) (Fee: FREE.)

14 - Cabela’s Sportsman’s Seminar - Firearms Safety Depends On You at Cabela’s Cheektowaga Store, 2003 Walden Avenue, Cheektowaga, NY. (11:00 am – 12:00 pm) - Owning firearms is your Second Amendment right, but with that comes responsibility.  Learn how to properly store firearms and ammunition in your home from this informative seminar sponsored by Cabela's and the National Shooting Sports Foundation. (For information call 716-608-4770)

14 - Cabela’s Sportsman’s Seminars - at Cabela’s Cheektowaga Store, 2003 Walden Avenue, Cheektowaga, NY. (1:00 – 2:00 pm) - Cabela's Cup -  Combine your love for shooting and competition with the excitement of laser guns for a chance to win the Cabela's Cup! (2:00 – 3:00 pm) - Kids' Cabela's Cup - Bring the kids out to try their aim in our safe, portable BB gun range.  First-time shooters and seasoned shooters alike are welcome and will get to keep their targets! (For information call 716-608-4770)

14 - Spey Casting on the Water Demo. Meet at Orvis Buffalo, 4545 Transit Road, Williamsville, NY. (9:45 am) Caravan to the creek for a demonstration on spey fishing. Bring your own waders and gear for some tips. (Free) (For information/register call 716-276-7200 or go on line at https://goo.gl/EbQXYd)   

14 - Steelhead Fly Fishing 101 at Orvis Buffalo, 4545 Transit Road, Williamsville, NY (12:00 – 2:00 pm) with Fishing Manager Drew Disbet. (Free) (For information/register call 716-276-7200 or go on line at https://goo.gl/EbQXYd

14 - Steelhead Fly Tying from Simple to Complex at Orvis Buffalo, 4545 Transit Road, Williamsville, NY (3:00 - 4:00 pm) (Free) (For information/register call 716-276-7200 or go on line at https://goo.gl/EbQXYd

14-15 - Western New York Youth Waterfowl Hunt (Saturday-Sunday) Young hunters age 12 to 15 years, possessing a junior hunting license may hunt ducks, coots, mergansers, and Canada geese on 2 special days in each zone. Daily bag limits are the maximum allowed during the regular duck season, and 2 per day for Canada geese. Young hunters MUST be accompanied by a licensed adult hunter (including current HIP registration and duck stamp). Adult hunter may not shoot any birds.

14-15  - Western New York Youth Pheasant Hunt Weekend

14 - Ed Warnick Memorial Youth Pheasant Hunt at John White WMA, Basom, NY (Genesee County). The Region 8 North Instructors Association (RENIA) and the Reg 8 SpEd office will be holding the annual youth pheasant hunt.  This year, it is the weekend AFTER Columbus Day, so there is no conflict (for attention or time) with the Youth Deer season as in the past. (For information call 585-226-5457 or

e-mail Frank.Phillips@DEC.NY.gov )

14 - NWTF Wheelin Sportsmen Muzzleloader Deer Hunt on private property in Sandy Creek, NY (For information contact William Wilbur  315-440-4351  wwilbur551@aol.com)

14 - Fun Guy’s Guide To Fungi at the Reinstein Woods Environmental Education Center, 93 Honorine Drive, Depew, NY (Town of Cheektowaga) (10:30 am) Our knowledge of fungi has mushroom for improvement to say the yeast. Come learn about these mysterious organisms with former intern Marcus Rosten and by the end we’re sure you’ll be lichen them! (For information and register call 716-683-5959 or email reinsteinwoods@dec.ny.gov)

14-15 - 11th Annual Southern Tier Outdoor Show at the Steuben County Fairgrounds, Bath, NY (Sat - 9:00 am – 5:00 pm/Sun – 10:00 am – 4:00 pm) Free seminars on bass fishing, NY black bear, fishing from shore, trout streams of NY, river recreation, invasive insects, food plots, women and archery, retriever training and tracking wounded deer. For youth – fishing, archery, turkey calling and petting zoo. (For information call 607-664-2300 or go to www.SouthernTierOutdoorShow.com)

15 - Regular State Trout Season Closes (See fishing regulation guide. Great Lakes and tributaries as well as some inland waters are open all year)

15 - Hunting Musky With a Fly by author Rick Kustich at Orvis Buffalo, 4545 Transit Road, Williamsville, NY (1:00 - 3:00 pm) Rick will go through what you need, finding fish and all about the flies.. (Free) (For information/register call 716-276-7200 or go on line at https://goo.gl/EbQXYd

 15 - SUP on the Fly by Damon Newpher at Orvis Buffalo, 4545 Transit Road, Williamsville, NY (3:00 – 4:00 pm) Damon will be talking about using the paddle board to fly fish new waters. (Free) (For information/register call 716-276-7200 or go on line at https://goo.gl/EbQXYd

 15 - Southern Tier Outdoor Show Wild Turkey Calling Contest at the Steuben County Fairgrounds, 15 E. Washington Street, Bath, NY (For information call Jim McGlynn at 607-776-6263 or email elkmcg@wildblue.net )

 

Until our next meeting in the Corner, have a great time in the outdoors. This is Ron Schroder for Your In on The Outdoors for Western New York.

What Do You Think? Have something for other sportspeople? Let us know HERE.

 

 

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9 – 29 – 17

 

Welcome to this week's Conservation Chatter Corner - little bits of happenings concerning our outdoors and you, the sportspeople who enjoy being part of that outdoors.

 

START OF SMALL GAME HUNTING SEASONS:

Season dates, bag limits, and other hunting regulations can be found in the New York Hunting and Trapping Regulations Guide, which can be obtained from a license issuing agent and on the DEC website (see links below)

Wild Turkey Hunting

In 2015, DEC updated the fall turkey hunting season structure in response to declines in turkey populations and to ensure that harvest opportunities are sustainable and in line with current environmental conditions. With good production in summer 2015 followed by two mild winters, there are more birds on the landscape than in previous years. However, this increase in numbers may be offset by poor reproductive success this summer due to above-average rainfall in the spring.

Hunters should also keep in mind that in areas with good hard and soft mast production, turkeys do not have to roam far and wide in search of food, so hunters may have to work harder to locate a flock.

Season dates for fall 2017:

October 1 - 14, in the Northern Zone

October 21 - November 3, in the Southern Zone

November 18 - December 1, in Suffolk County, Long Island

The statewide, season bag limit is one bird of either sex.

Waterfowl Hunting and Youth Waterfowl Days

Hunting seasons for waterfowl, ducks, geese, and brant, begin in early October in many parts of the state, but there are also special opportunities for junior hunters 12 to 15 years old prior to the regular season. Junior hunters must be accompanied by a licensed adult hunter, and both the junior hunter and adult must be registered with the Harvest Information Program (HIP). Adult hunters must also have a federal migratory bird stamp. Youth waterfowl days this fall are:

September 23 and 24, Northeast and Lake Champlain zones

October 14 and 15, Western Zone

November 11 and 12, Long Island Zone

Pheasant Hunting

Approximately 30,000 adult pheasants will be released on lands open to public hunting for the upcoming fall pheasant hunting season. The pheasant hunting season begins:

October 1, northern and eastern portions of New York

October 21, central and western portions of the state

November 1, Long Island

Since 2007, DEC has offered a special youth-only season to provide junior hunters the opportunity to hunt pheasants during the weekend prior to the regular pheasant hunting season. In northern and eastern New York, the youth pheasant hunt weekend is September 23 and 24. In western New York, the youth pheasant hunt weekend is October 14 and 15, and on Long Island it is October 28 and 29. Both the junior hunter and their adult mentor must have a hunting license. Only the junior hunter is allowed to carry a firearm and harvest birds on these dates.

All release sites for pheasants are provided by state-funded programs and are open to public hunting. Pheasants will be released on state-owned lands prior to and during the fall hunting season, and at a number of sites on New York City Watershed lands thanks to a partnership with New York City Department of Environmental Protection. Pheasant hunting opportunities have also been augmented by private landowners that have opened their land to public hunting. DEC is grateful for their help in providing high quality hunting experiences for New York's sportsmen and sportswomen. A list of statewide pheasant release sites and sites receiving birds for the youth-only pheasant hunt weekends can be found on DEC's website.

Squirrel, Ruffed Grouse, Rabbit, and Hare

The hunting season for squirrels began September 1, and for ruffed grouse in the Northern Zone the season began September 20. Seasons for ruffed grouse, rabbit, and hare begin October 1, in many regions. Dates and season maps can be found on the DEC website and in the annual Hunting and Trapping Regulations Guide.

Citizen Science

"Citizen science" efforts such as the Grouse and Woodcock Hunting Log, Bow Hunter Sighting Log, and the Furbearer Sighting Survey provide hunters with the opportunity to partner with DEC to monitor game species. To learn more about how to participate in these efforts, visit DEC's website Citizen Science: Wildlife Observation Data Collection.

Additional hunting and wildlife observation information for the following links can be found on DEC's website:

Turkey Hunting

Waterfowl Hunting & Youth Waterfowl Days

Pheasant Release Sites

Small Game Hunting Seasons

New York Hunting and Trapping Regulations Guide

 

FINAL PLAN TO RESTORE WILDLIFE HABITAT AND RECREATION ON ONONDAGA LAKE RELEASED: The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USF&WS) today released the final plan outlining projects to restore wildlife habitat and recreation on Onondaga Lake. The Onondaga Lake Natural Resource Damage Assessment Restoration Plan and Environmental Assessment Final Report is a significant milestone in the revitalization of Onondaga Lake.

The final plan increases habitat quality and quantity, promotes habitat connectivity, creates new and improves existing public use opportunities, and benefits natural resources within the ecosystem. The final plan and additional information on the Natural Resource Damage Assessment and Restoration process can be found online at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service website.

The agencies selected 20 restoration projects in the final restoration plan. These projects, in total, will:

Extend the Erie Canalway Trail from Camillus to the Loop the Lake Trail (3.2 miles) and from the Honeywell Visitor Center to Harbor Brook (1.2 miles);

Improve preservation efforts, bolster habitat restoration, and increase public access to more than 1,400 acres along Ninemile and Onondaga creeks in the Onondaga Lake watershed, including public fishing rights and parking areas;

Install structures within over 275 acres of Onondaga Lake to provide habitat for fish, amphibians, and invertebrates;

Provide 15 years of funding to identify and remove invasive species within approximately 1,700 acres of wetlands, lake/river littoral zone, and riparian habitat;

Restore wetland and fish habitat within and adjacent to Onondaga County parklands;

Restore 100 acres of warm season grassland;

Construct a new deepwater fishing pier on Onondaga Lake;

Enhance jetties at the Onondaga Lake outlet to improve access;

Construct a new boat launch along the Seneca River;

Transfer the Honeywell Visitor Center to a public agency; and

Include a new Future Projects Fund.

The selected restoration alternative is the result of significant public contribution including several years of input from partner organizations, community representatives, and existing documents and plans, culminating in four public information sessions, one public hearing, and more than 230 public comments on the draft plan submitted during the extended comment period. A Responsiveness Summary is included with the final plan, which summarizes public comments on the Restoration Plan, grouped by categories, and provides the Trustees' responses to those comments.

Specifically, the Trustees changed the Restoration Plan in response to public comments to include information on the proposed projects, as well as those projects that were not proposed for implementation. All project suggestions submitted in response to the Trustees' request for project suggestions are included, and additional text was added to clarify assessment methodologies, explain the public participation process, and discuss the role of the Onondaga Nation. Alternative B was clarified as the preferred alternative of a suite of projects that best meet the regulatory criteria.

The Plan acknowledges that certain geographic areas (e.g. Onondaga Creek) are not represented in Alternative B, but the Trustees will consider projects in those areas, as appropriate, as planning for additional projects under the Future Projects Fund proceeds. The Trustees will continue stakeholder outreach and public participation to solicit additional restoration projects and develop proposed projects that satisfy all relevant criteria.

David Stilwell, the USF&WS Field Supervisor at the New York Field Office, commented "The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service looks forward to restoring and conserving the natural resources of Onondaga Lake and its watershed, in partnership with the local community."

Next Steps

Implementation of projects in the Restoration Plan is contingent upon settlement of the Trustees' Natural Resource Damages claims. This settlement will involve the preparation of a Consent Decree subject to additional public comment. The settlement will be combined with the $2.3 million in proceeds from a settlement reached as part of the General Motors bankruptcy in 2012, so that numerous additional restoration projects can be implemented using the Future Projects Fund.

About NRDAR

As part of the Onondaga Lake Natural Resource Damage Assessment and Restoration (NRDAR) process, DEC and USF&WS assessed contaminant-related injuries to natural resources such as waterfowl and turtles, and quantified the lost use of natural resources to the public, such as fishing. The agencies then solicited restoration project ideas from stakeholders to identify the types and scale of restoration needed to compensate for those injuries. The ultimate goal of the process is to replace, restore, rehabilitate, or acquire the equivalent of injured natural resources and resource services lost due to the release of hazardous substances-at no cost to the taxpayer.

Under federal law, federal and state agencies and Native American tribes are authorized to act as trustees on behalf of the public for natural resources they own, manage or control. In this role, trustees assess and recover damages or implement restoration projects to compensate for injuries to natural resources due to hazardous substance releases (e.g. mercury). The natural resource damage assessment regulations encourage the participation of potentially responsible parties (PRPs) in the assessment process, and Honeywell agreed to cooperatively assess natural resource damages and identify restoration projects at Onondaga Lake with the trustees. Read more information on this process at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service website.

 

MESSAGE FROM CHAUTAUQUA COUNTY: Fish-on! The drag sounds off with a gentle scream. Line begins to quickly peel away and a flashy, silvery, figure of a fish leaps above the lake surface in the distance behind the boat. Exciting? YES! This is only the beginning of an electrifying Chautauqua County fishing season as the calendar turns toward the end of summer and the evolving Lake Erie fishery rotates to a new season of fishing thrills. 

Steelhead stage in the deep water off the larger Chautauqua County tributaries as they prepare for their seasonal fall run.  Walleye trollers targeting fish in the thermocline (60-90 feet of water) catch a good number of these high-flying, hard-fighting, steelhead. 

Walleye anglers use a variety of lures and baits, but one new tactic involves spinner/worm rigs dressed with a brightly-colored plastic worm.  The combo will entice deep water steelhead to strike, often fooling walleye on the same rigs. 

Trolling spoons are also effective. The deep water steelhead bite will last through September, but as morning temperatures lower with the change of seasons, creek temperatures drop. Trolling and casting for steelhead moves to areas adjacent to our major tributary outflow areas. Starting in mid-September and through October, fishing these areas will offer peak, fish-catching fun. 

From shore, anglers in waders use spinning tackle to cast for steelhead looking to swim upstream in the trib’s. Casting #2 and #3 size spinners such as the Blue Fox and Mepps Aglia, or ½-3/4 ounce spoons such the Luhr-Jensen Krocodile and Johnson Sprite, will often yield frequent hook-ups with fresh run fish. Sunrise and sunset periods are best.

As colorful autumn leaves come into view, October fishing appeals an increasingly large group of anglers looking to catch stream steelhead. It’s quiet, it’s peaceful and it’s simply fun.  Every stream that has any outflow to Lake Erie may offer a steelhead run, even the tiniest streams, especially after a heavy rain  Anglers use fly tackle, float fishing tackle and spinning tackle with success - so pack your favorite fishing gear and head for the water.

The major Lake Erie tributaries among steelhead anglers in Chautauqua County include Cattaraugus Creek, Canadaway Creek and Chautauqua Creek. Steelhead runs in these trib’s are consistent with lots of fish and there is adequate public access in these streams.  Two special hotspots include the Westfield Waterworks Dam on Chautauqua Creek and the waterfalls near Laona on Cassadaga Creek. 

Other smaller Chautauqua tributaries include Silver Creek and Walnut Creek, and many other smaller streams, these also receive good runs of steelhead, but offer little public access. Anglers can check in with property owners for landowner permission. With permission, the waterfalls below Route 39 on Walnut Creek and the waterfalls near Hanover and King Roads on Silver Creek are true hotspots on these smaller streams.

Barcelona Harbor and Dunkirk Harbor each offer excellent fishing for steelhead, brown trout and an occasional pink salmon from October through April. Anglers don’t have to walk far from their vehicles and can cast from shore locations to catch sizeable fish all through winter.

Come over and join us for this exciting late summer fishing adventure. Tight lines.  

I BIRD NY CHALLENGE ENGAGES YOUNG PEOPLE IN BEGINNING BIRDING: The Spring 2017 I BIRD NY program launch encouraged New Yorkers to engage in birding all summer. New, improved signage has been added to 38 priority Bird Conservation areas across the state near urban and suburban areas to better identify opportunities for the public to bird watch.

From Montauk to Buffalo, New York is home to a vast array of habitat that supports more than 450 different bird species. Bird watching is one of the fastest growing outdoor recreational activities that can be enjoyed by people of all ages and experiences in any community.

New York State is part of the Atlantic Flyway, which runs along the Eastern coast of the U.S. Each Fall, migrating birds can be seen flying south to their wintering grounds. This is the ideal time of year for New York residents and visitors to head to Bird Conservation Areas (BCAs) across the state for great bird watching opportunities. Visitors can search fields and forests for warblers, sparrows, and other songbirds and explore lakes, ponds, and beaches to see waterfowl and shorebirds. While exploring, visitors can hawk watch (http://www.hmana.org/) to witness the amazing spectacle of raptor migration.

Accessible state lands, parks, and facilities can promote physical activity, an important element of overall wellness. I BIRD NY is one of several initiatives aimed at ensuring New Yorkers have access to green spaces, including focus on unique opportunities close to urban and suburban areas.

In addition, the state launched a website portal, I Bird NY, with information on where and how to bird watch, including upcoming bird walks and additional resources. I BIRD NY also provides a I BIRD NY kids booklet available at DEC Environmental Education Centers and official I BIRD NY bird walks and other events. The website provides user-friendly information for New Yorkers and visitors to find information about how to get started in birding, links to events and walks, and information on bird species.

More information on I BIRD NY, including upcoming events, can be found on DEC's website.

 

BASS PRO SHOPS AND CABELA'S TOGETHER:

Frequently Asked Questions

What are the customer benefits of uniting these companies? This is an opportunity to create a "best of the best" shopping experience for all outdoor enthusiasts. It means more selection as we are bringing together the best in fishing with Bass Pro Shops, the best in Hunting with Cabela's and the best in boating with Tracker Boats. Increased buying power will also help us deliver greater value to our customers. At the same time, it means continuing to provide unmatched expert service. In general, we plan to retain and grow everything customers love about both brands. As a bonus, we also plan to be a powerful, unified voice for conservation and become a stronger advocate for the outdoors and sportsmen's rights.

Will the company's name change? We will continue celebrating and promoting both the Bass Pro Shops and Cabela's brands as we bring our two great companies together.

Will Bass Pro Shops gift cards be honored at Cabela's locations and vice versa?

Customers can exchange a Bass Pro Shops gift card to a Cabela's gift card for an equal amount and vice versa. Gift cards are exchanged at the customer service counter in either store or by contacting our online customer service centers. To exchange a Cabela's gift card that you would like to use at Bass Pro Shops, call 1-800-211-6440 to have it exchanged. To exchange a Bass Pro Shops gift card that you would like to use at Cabela's, call 1-800-237-4444 to have it exchanged. We are working to improve this process moving forward.

Will I be able to return Cabela's purchases to Bass Pro Shops locations and vice versa?

Yes, Cabela's purchases can be returned to our customer service counters at Bass Pro Shops and vice versa or by contacting our online customer service centers.

Will existing exclusive brands and products still be available at Bass Pro Shops and Cabela's? Bass Pro Shops and Cabela's have strong national proprietary brands in several categories. Our goal is to continue developing and growing our brands to ensure we provide the same exceptional quality, service and value that customers have come to know and trust from Bass Pro Shops and Cabela's exclusive products.

Will Cabela's CLUB Visa cardholders earn points at Bass Pro Shops locations? Yes, Cabela's CLUB Visa holders will earn 1% back on all purchases made at Bass Pro Shops and all locations that accept Visa. In addition, Cabela's CLUB Visa members will still earn 2%, 3% or 5% back on qualifying purchases at all Cabela's locations, earning points for free gear and incredible outdoor experiences. We are working on solutions to better connect the programs.

Will Bass Pro Shops Outdoor Rewards Mastercard cardholders earn points at Cabela's locations? Yes, Bass Pro Shops Outdoor Rewards Mastercard holders will earn 1% back on all purchases made at Cabela's and all locations that accept Mastercard. In addition, you will still earn 3% or 5% back on qualifying purchases at all Bass Pro Shops locations, earning points for free gear and unique experiences. We are working on solutions to better connect the programs.

 

THIS WEEK'S EVENTS: (For complete future listings go to the Calendar Page)

                                         

SEPTEMBER 2017

29 - Ducks Unlimited – North Shore Oneida Lake Chapter Banquet at the Greenview Country Club, West Monroe, NY. (5:00 pm) Waterfowl conservation is facing important challenges as wetlands and other habitats are being degraded and destroyed across the continent. Ducks Unlimited has a vision to reverse this trend. (Cost: $60 Single, $85 Couple) (For information call Chris Sanson 315-225-7988 or Katie Long 623-696-5597) 

29 - Becoming an Outdoors-Woman (BOW) Workshop - High Peak Jaunt: Views from the Summit at Tupper Lake, NY (Cost: $50.00 plus option of canoe/kayak rental) (For information/register contact Adirondack Foothills Guide Service, LLC  518-359-8194  adkfoothills@yahoo.com  or go to www.adkfoothills.com)

29 - National Wild Turkey Federation – Enchanted Mountain Chapter Dinner at the Bartlett Country Club, 32 Euclid Avenue, Olean, NY. (5:00 pm) The NWTF banquets are where you can buy exclusive merchandise and have a great time with friends. All the while, you will be raising vital funds for wild turkey conservation and important programs that introduce the outdoors to women, children and the disabled.  (For more information contact Randy Opferbeck  (716) 373-3322  gobbler648@verizon.net )

29 - Clymer Coonhunters Club Coonhound Event at their clubhouse on 8023 Ravlin Hill Road, Panama, NY (7:00 pm - Coonhound Event Bench Show - $15.00/8:00 pm – Coonhound Event Nite Hunt - $20.00) (For information call Chester Bricker at 716-355-6442

29-30 - Grape Country Coonhunters Association Coonhound Event at their clubhouse on Williams Hill Road, Branchport, NY (9/29 7:00 pm - Coonhound Bench Show - $15.00/9:00 pm - Coonhound Nite Hunt - $20.00 and 9/30 6:00 pm – Coonhound Bench Show - $15.00/8:00 pm coonhound Nite Hunt - $20.00) (For information call Josh Wood at 315-729-4773)

30 – Close of Frog & Snapping Turtle Seasons

30 - End of Bow Fishing for Carp Season
30 – Close of Fishing Season on Lake Ontario, the Lower Niagara River and Tributaries for Lake Trout

30 – Alabama Gunslingers Shoot at the Alabama Hunt Club, Lewiston Road, Alabama, NY (9:00 am start) (For information call John Szumigala at 716-714-5514.)

30 - Cabela’s Sportsman’s Seminars at Cabela’s Cheektowaga Store, 2003 Walden Avenue, Cheektowaga, NY. Sessions include: Scent Control Secrets (11:00 am – 1:00 pm) - Learn about scent control from a pro.  We'll demystify all of our products and options, so you can leave with your senses tuned for fall hunts.; Footwear For Hunting Season (11:00 am – 12:00 pm) - Our Footwear Outfitters will help you choose the right footwear specs for your hunting needs.; Antler Scoring with Pope & Young (12:00 – 2:00 pm) - There's a method to the antler scoring process.  Bring your antlers in and we'll break it down from point to point and provide a score!; Survival Strategies (12:00 – 1:00 pm) - Should you ever become lost in the woods, we'll focus on the signals, gadgets and survival kits that could be lifesavers.; Long-Range Optics (1:00 – 2:00 pm) - our optics Outfitter will demonstrate new fall options and provide tips for you to consider when purchasing optics for long-range shooting.; Intro to Bowhunting: Women Only (1:00 – 2:00 pm) - We'll provide tips on the basic necessitites to get started with insight from the field to make your hunt more enjoyable. (For information call 716-608-4770)

30 - Family Nature Quest: Turtles at the Reinstein Woods Environmental Education Center, 93 Honorine Drive, Depew, NY (Town of Cheektowaga) (10:30 am) Explore the world of turtles at Reinstein Woods, and meet our captive wood and painted turtles. (For information and register call 716-683-5959 or email reinsteinwoods@dec.ny.gov)

30 - Birding 101: Class #9 at the Reinstein Woods Environmental Education Center, 93 Honorine Drive, Depew, NY (Town of Cheektowaga) (2:30 pm) Learn how to identify the different raptors (birds of prey) found in Reinstein Woods. For adults and children ages 8 and older. (For information and register call 716-683-5959 or email reinsteinwoods@dec.ny.gov)

30 - Cattaraugus County Houndsmen and Conservation Club Inc. Coonhound Event at their clubhouse at 10491 Route 240, West Valley, NY (6:00 pm - Coonhound Bench Show - $15.00/8:00 pm - Coonhound Event Nite Hunt - $20.00) (For information call Chris Deperro  716-570-6798)

30 – Whitetails Unlimited - Finger Lakes Chapter Hunters Night Out at American Legion Hall, 71 Old Ithaca Road, Horseheads, NY. (Cost: $50.00 Single/$30.00 Spouse or Youth) WTU provides grants to local projects and activities that advance our mission. Proceeds from this event will benefit Chemung County youth and habitat programs. (Deadline for sign-up 9/27/17) (For information go to http://www.whitetailsunlimited.com/events/banquets/horseheads-ny-finger-lakes-chapter-hunters-night-out/)

30 - National Wild Turkey Federation – Enchanted Mountain Chapter Hunting Heritage Banquet at the Bartlett Country Club, 32 Euclid Avenue, Olean, NY (5:00 pm) The NWTF banquets are where you can buy exclusive merchandise and have a great time with friends. All the while, you will be raising vital funds for wild turkey conservation and important programs that introduce the outdoors to women, children and the disabled.  (For more information contact Randy Opferbeck   gobbler648@verizon.net   716-373-3322)

30 - New York State Trapper Education at the Wyoming Conservation Association, 2091 Dale Road, Warsaw, NY (8:00 am - 4:00 pm) Trapper Education is required for all new trappers. This course covers how to trap responsibly and selectively and how to handle pelts to produce marketable furs. All courses require the completion of homework prior to attending the course. If you do not complete the homework you cannot complete the course. (Instructed by Neil A. Parmerter)  

30 - New York State Trapper Education at the West Falls Conservation Society, 55 Bridge Street, West Falls, NY 14170 (8:30 am - 5:00 pm) Trapper Education is required for all new trappers. This course covers how to trap responsibly and selectively and how to handle pelts to produce marketable furs. All courses require the completion of homework prior to attending the course. If you do not complete the homework you cannot complete the course. (Instructed by Arthur F. Segool)

OCTOBER 2017

1 – Falconry Season Opens (>3/31/18)

1 - Start of Southern Zone Deer and Bear Bowhunting Seasons (>11/17)

1 – Start of Hunting Seasons for Cottontail Rabbit, Ruffed Grouse (>2/28/18) & Coyote (3/25/18)

1 – Start of Woodcock Hunting Season (11/14)

1 - Start of Hunting Season for Snow Geese (>4/15/17) and Brant (>11/29) in the Western Zone

1 – Cabela’s Sportsman’s Seminars at Cabela’s Cheektowaga Store, 2003 Walden Avenue, Cheektowaga, NY. Sessions include: Calls of the Wild: Big-Game Tactics (11:00 am – 12:00 pm) - Listen to the calls of the wild and learn how to duplicate them so you will get closer to your quarry this fall. (For information call 716-608-4770)

3 - Trout Stream Management in New York at the Reinstein Woods Nature Center, 93 Honorine Drive, Depew, NY. (6:30 – 9:00 pm) To provide a convenient opportunity for trout stream anglers and other interested members of the public to discuss these questions with NYSDEC biologists, a series of public meetings will be held in each NYSDEC region. The meetings will feature a 30-minute presentation describing how DEC currently manages trout streams and will summarize key findings of a statewide study completed in 2015 (PDF, 2.6 MB). This will be followed by a 90-minute discussion period aimed at identifying the measures of trout stream angling quality most important to this segment of New York's the angling public. (For information call 716-683-5959)

3 – NY State Pistol Permit Safety Class at Calvary Baptist Church, 3515 Galloway Road, Batavia, NY (6:00 pm start) Hosted by the Genesee County Chapter of SCOPE. (For information/preregister call Jim Carr at 716-778-9431.)

5 - Trout Stream Management in New York at the NYSDEC Region 9 Sub-office, 182 East Union Street, Allegany, NY. (6:30 – 9:00 pm) To provide a convenient opportunity for trout stream anglers and other interested members of the public to discuss these questions with NYSDEC biologists, a series of public meetings will be held in each NYSDEC region. The meetings will feature a 30-minute presentation describing how DEC currently manages trout streams and will summarize key findings of a statewide study completed in 2015 (PDF, 2.6 MB). This will be followed by a 90-minute discussion period aimed at identifying the measures of trout stream angling quality most important to this segment of New York's the angling public. (For information call 716-372-0645)

7 - Southern Tier Bassmasters (Open) Tournament on Honeoye Lake at the State Launch (ENTRY FEE: -$25/Angler --$5/optional lunker) (For information Call 585-314-7142 or email tournaments@southerntierbass.com)

7 - Southern Tier Cha Inc. Coonhound Event at the clubhouse at 7359 Rood Road, Sinclairville NY (3:00 pm – Coonhound Event Bench Show - $15.00/4:30 pm – Coonhound Field Trial - $10.00/4:30 pm – Coonhound Water Race - $10.00/8:00 pm - Coonhound Nite Hunt - $20.00) (For information call Kevin Noody at 716-595-2053 or email moc.oohay@ydoonnivek)

7-9 - Youth Firearms Deer Hunt Weekend

8 - Midstate Arms Collectors Lisle Gun Show at the Lisle Fire Co., Route 79 North, Lisle, NY (9:00 am – 3:00 pm) (For information call Sandy Ackerman at 607-748-1010 (1-6 p.m.)

8-9 - KTBA Bass Club Classic Tournament on Oneida Lake (6:00 am – 2:00 pm) (Cost: $80.00 boat for Members/$100.00 boat for Non-Members) (For information contact Tom Testa - tuzzytny@yahoo.com )

 

Until our next meeting in the Corner, have a great time in the outdoors. This is Ron Schroder for Your In on The Outdoors for Western New York.

What Do You Think? Have something for other sportspeople? Let us know HERE.

 

 

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9 – 22 – 17

 

Welcome to this week's Conservation Chatter Corner - little bits of happenings concerning our outdoors and you, the sportspeople who enjoy being part of that outdoors.

 September 23, 2017

Scheduled Events:

23 - Erie County Federation of Sportsmen's Clubs 46th Annual NHF Day Celebration at the Elma Conservation Club, 600 Creek Road, Elma, NY (10:00 am – 4:00 pm) Open to everyone of all ages. Come join the Erie County Federation of Sportsmen's Clubs in celebrating National Hunting and Fishing Day celebration. Learn from the local experts on how to hunt, fish, trap, shoot, and much more. Free event, rain or shine! (For information contact Rich Davenport 716-510-7952 rich@weloveoutdoors.org or go to www.eriectyfsc.org/events.htm)

23 – 21st Annual Salmon River Hatchery Open House and Family Day at The Salmon River Hatchery, 2133 County Route 22, Altmar, NY (Oswego County). (9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m) Admission is free. Tours of the facility will be given throughout the day, providing attendees with behind-the-scenes access to the inner workings of the hatchery. In addition, the fish ladder will be on display, offering the opportunity to view salmon as they migrate. Children will have the opportunity to learn to cast a fishing rod, tie flies, participate in a laser shooting range, observe the aquatic life of Beaverdam Brook, and learn about rare and threatened fish species in New York State. (For information contact Fran Verdoliva, NYSDEC Salmon River Coordinator, at 315-298-7605.) 

23 – National Hunting & Fishing Day Celebration at the NYS Game Farm, 8 Game Farm Road, Ithaca, NY (9:00 am) Connect with local sporting clubs and organizations for a family friendly day celebrating our outdoor heritage. Activities will include waterfowl and upland bird hunting demonstrations, fly casting instruction, kids archery range, and much more. (For information contact Cosmo Genova at 607-972-7088 or email cosmogenova@gmail.com) 

23 – Tompkins County Federation of Sporting Clubs’ National Hunting and Fishing Day Celebration at the NYSDEC Reynolds Game Farm 81 Game Farm Road, Ithaca, NY (9:00 am - ) There will be demonstrations all day, including a waterfowl and upland game hunting demonstration, small game processing class, kids archery range, fly casting instruction, Cornell Raptor showcase, DEC K9 demo, etc. (For information call 607-273-2768)

23-24 - Honeywell Sportsmen’s Days at Carpenter’s Brook Fish Hatchery, Route 321, Elbridge, NY. (11:00 am - 5:00 pm) Created as a tribute to National Hunting and Fishing Day, this annual festival is a terrific opportunity for all ages to try their hand at a variety of outdoor pursuits, including skeet shooting, waterfowl identification, axe/knife throwing, turkey calling, archery, 3-D laser big game hunting, crossbow, BB gun, fly fishing, jig tying, canoeing, muzzle loading, Conservation Officers, Forest Rangers and Smokey Bear, woodsmen demonstrations, local wildlife artists and authors and trout fishing. Activities subject to change. (Cost: $5.00 per vehicle) (For information call 315-689-9367) 

23-24 - 32th Annual Wildlife Festival in Celebration of National Hunting and Fishing Day at the New York Power Authority’s Power Vista, 5777 Lewiston Road (adjacent to Niagara University), Lewiston, NY (10:00 am – 5:00 pm) Catch a fish at the Niagara River Anglers fishing pond or shoot pellet guns at the Niagara County Federation of Conservation Club’s shooting trailer. Loads of fun for the whole family! Kids fishing contest for youngsters age 15 and under in the public waters of Niagara County. Two ages classes. Weigh in will be at the Wildlife Festival between noon and 2 p.m. both days. Awards on Sunday at 3 p.m. Largest fish caught out of the NYPA reservoir and from the NYPA fishing platform will also receive a prize. (For information call 866-697-2386 or visit their website at www.nypa.gov.)

 

 

DEER URINE COMMENTS FROM DEC: As wildlife managers, conservationists, and hunters, our primary concern should be the health and sustainability of the wildlife populations we manage, weighing those concerns over our own personal interests and practices.

Given current limitations there is no way to ensure that natural urine-based scents are prion free. Presently, the only guaranteed prion-free scent is one that doesn’t contain natural urine or other deer excretions. The fact remains that numerous studies have documented CWD prions in urine of infected and pre-symptomatic deer. Further, there is no accurate CWD test of live deer, and there is no rapid, cost-effective test to determine whether commercial deer urines are prion-free. Even if scent manufacturers claim that commercial urine is collected from “CWD-free” herds, we know that in recent years CWD has been detected in captive herds that were previously thought to be “CWD-free” according to the USDA certification standards. The deer on these herds could have been shedding prions for many months prior to detection, all the while potentially contaminating any urine products produced from those herds and the ground upon which those products were distributed.

We do not know exactly what the risk level is for CWD transmission via urine scents, but the research clearly suggests that there is some risk. As thousands of hunters repeatedly use natural urine-based products (often in the exact same location from one hunt to the next), the risk is additive. CWD prions remain in the environment and potentially infectious for years. Models have demonstrated that risk of CWD transmission from the environment increases over time as prions accumulate. Therefore, repeatedly applying deer urine at the same place over time could potentially build a reservoir of prions, increasing the probability of transmission. In tests, healthy deer have contracted CWD when exposed to water bowls, feed, and bedding of infected deer and when held in a paddock that previously (2 years) held infected deer. There is no safe does of prions for deer. Should CWD be introduced to NY via infected urine products, the consequences are severe, and in all likelihood, permanent. The risk is not quantifiable but not zero.

Undoubtedly enforcement will be challenging, as unscrupulous individuals will always seek to skirt the law. Just as hunters intent on violating rules or uncaring about the health and welfare of wildlife can buy and illegally use lead shot for waterfowl or barbed broadheads for deer, dishonest hunters may continue to buy urine online or in other states or put natural urine in a bottle labeled synthetic. If we were to propose a partial ban on natural deer urine products (e.g., allow deer urine only from NY producers or allow use of urine/tarsals collected by hunters), that would exacerbate enforcement challenges and not adequately reduce risks.

Hunters and retailers have a safe alternative through synthetic attractants. Too, research on deer attractants, though limited, has found similar visitation rates to mock scrapes treated with buck urine, doe urine, human urine, and “new car” scent. This raises significant question to the perceived benefit of urine-based attractants for hunters and whether continued use of urine-based lures is remotely justified relative to the associated potential risks.

Our responsibility as wildlife managers is to recommend every measure available to prevent the introduction of CWD to the NY deer herd. Prohibiting the use of urine and scents containing urine is one preventative measure based on our knowledge of prions and exposure of CWD susceptible animals to prions. If future research reveals that urine is definitively not associated with CWD transmission or provides an effective and robust mechanism to test commercial urine products, we will be able to amend regulations to be more flexible. Until that time, I don’t believe that any controllable risk is acceptable.

Jeremy Hurst, Big Game Unit Leader, Division of Fish & Wildlife, NYSDEC

2017 WATERFOWL FORECAST: This year's waterfowl survey results were released in mid-August, and once again the report contained good news for hunters and other waterfowl enthusiasts. According to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), duck numbers in the traditional survey area were statistically similar to the 2016 estimate. The total population was estimated at 47.3 million breeding ducks, which was 34 percent above the 1955−2016 average and the fifth largest estimate on record. With the exception of northern pintails and scaup, populations of the 10 most abundant duck species were near or above their long-term averages (see chart). In addition, the projected mallard fall flight index is 12.9 million birds, similar to the 2016 estimate of 13.5 million birds.

When ducks and geese returned to the breeding grounds this past spring, they found improved wetland conditions on many important waterfowl breeding areas. May ponds—the unit of measure for wetland abundance on the prairies—increased 22 percent, from just over 5 million ponds in 2016 to almost 6.1 million ponds this spring. The total May pond count was 17 percent above the long-term average, largely due to carryover water stored in wetland basins from the previous summer and fall.

"The surveys indicate that wetland conditions and populations of most frequently harvested ducks remain above the long-term average. There were some declines in several species from last year, but generally hunters are not likely to notice that annual variation out in the field, especially if timely cold winter weather develops in northern and mid-latitude areas of the continent," said DU Chief Scientist Dr. Tom Moorman. "This is great news for waterfowlers, who can now turn their attention to preparing habitat, tuning up dogs, and relentlessly watching the weather forecasts for the onset of fall and winter weather that will push the birds on their annual southward migration."

Although annual changes in duck and goose numbers have important implications for waterfowlers, they do not necessarily influence individual hunting success. Weather and local habitat conditions often affect the fortunes of waterfowlers more than the size of the fall flight, especially in migration and wintering areas. With that in mind, the following is an overview of waterfowl populations in each flyway, based on reports from biologists in the field.

The majority of Atlantic Flyway waterfowl are raised in the northeastern United States and Canada, although this flyway also receives large numbers of dabbling ducks and divers from the prairies. In 2017, the total breeding duck population estimate for the six most abundant species in the eastern survey area (covering eastern Ontario, Quebec, Atlantic Canada, Maine, and northern New York) was 2.6 million birds. This year's estimate of approximately 500,000 American black ducks was similar to last year's, but was 12 percent below the 1990−2016 average. Populations of mallards, American green-winged teal, and goldeneyes were similar to last year's estimates and their long-term averages. And ring-necked ducks were down 19 percent from last year's estimate, but remained near the long-term average. Approximately 1.3 million breeding ducks were surveyed in the northeastern United States, similar to last year's total and the long-term average.

DU Canada biologist Nic McLellan reports that wetland conditions were generally favorable for waterfowl production in Atlantic Canada (New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, and Prince Edward Island), a key breeding area for black ducks and many other waterfowl species. "Although waterfowl nesting efforts were delayed this spring due to high water levels, observations from the field indicate that brood sizes appear to be large this year," McLellan says. "Summer precipitation has been near average across much of this region, and water levels are currently stable, providing favorable habitat for brood rearing."

The forecast for Atlantic Flyway goose populations is variable. The breeding pair estimate for Atlantic Population Canada geese was similar to last year's estimate and the long-term average, and these birds were expected to have fair to good production this summer. Just over 930,000 resident Canada geese were surveyed in the Atlantic Flyway, and production was expected to be good to excellent for this population. In the eastern Canadian Arctic, greater snow goose numbers were down 18 percent this year, and average production was expected. Atlantic brant numbers were similar to those of 2016, and surveys indicate that breeding success was variable for these birds.

About the Survey

Each year, biologists with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Canadian Wildlife Service, state and provincial wildlife agencies, and nonprofit conservation organizations including Ducks Unlimited take part in the Waterfowl Breeding Population and Habitat Survey—the world's longest-running and most comprehensive wildlife population survey. These dedicated men and women physically count ducks and geese by air and on foot along thousands of miles of standardized survey transects from South Dakota to Alaska. The information collected during this survey has been the cornerstone of waterfowl harvest management in North America for more than 60 years. For more information about this year's survey results, visit flyways.us.

 

CORNELL LAB OF ORNITHOLOGY PROJECT FEEDERWATCH:

What is Project FeederWatch?

Project FeederWatch is a winter-long survey of birds that visit feeders. You simply identify and count the birds outside your window. You can count every week between November and April, or you can count once all season—the time you spend is up to you. Using our easy online data entry, you can see all of your counts and view colorful tables, graphs, and summaries.
Who can participate?

Anyone interested in birds can participate; you don’t have to be an expert. If you attract birds to your yard with food or habitat, then you just need a window to watch and an interest in who shows up. We will send you all that you need to get started identifying the visitors.

New participants will receive:

FeederWatch Handbook & Instructions

Full-color poster of common feeder birds

Bird-Watching Days Calendar

Our annual report, Winter Bird Highlights

Digital access to Living Bird magazine

This September only: Hummingbirds poster!

Why participate?

You will learn about your backyard birds and contribute to a 30-year-and-running dataset of bird population changes. With FeederWatch, you become a scientist in your own backyard. Explore the millions of FeederWatch sightings on our website and make your own discoveries.

Sign up now for $18 ($15 for current Lab Members) and enjoy the limited print of our favorite hummingbird poster. Your participation fee keeps the project running; without it, Project FeederWatch wouldn't be possible.

OUTDOOR NEWS, INC., PARTNERS WITH CABELA'S FOR YOUTH WRITING CONTEST:

Outdoor News, Inc., publisher of locally written fishing and hunting outdoor newspapers in seven Great Lake states, has partnered with Cabela's, the World's Foremost Outfitter of hunting, fishing and outdoor gear, for the annual Youth Writing Contest for students in Minnesota, Wisconsin, Michigan, Pennsylvania, New York, Ohio and Illinois.
Outdoor News, Inc. has promoted the writing contest since 1998, which encourages youths to submit an outdoors-oriented essay or poem.
"This contest, which combines youth with topics such as hunting, fishing, camping and other outdoor adventures, makes this multi-year partnership with Outdoor News a natural fit," said Christine Wamsley, Director of Communications and Partnerships for Cabela's.
Cabela's sponsorship enables the awarding of cash prizes for each of the two age categories for students in grades 6-12 through the contest.
"Each year, more than 1,000 entries are received from youth sharing their first hunting experiences, fishing adventures or memorable time spent in the field," said Rob Drieslein, managing editor for Outdoor News publications and one of the judges who selects the winning entries.
For students in grades 9-12, who qualify in the Senior Division, and 6-8 grade students entered in the Junior Division, the chance to win a $100 first place prize or $50 second place award is just part of the incentive to participate. Winning entries are printed in Outdoor News publications, and the winners are also presented plague to honor their winning submissions. But this isn't the end of their story. Winning entries in the Outdoor News contest will then be forwarded for entry into the Outdoor Writers Association of America annual writing contest. The OWAA contest offers the chance for youth writers to earn additional cash prizes and recognition.
Contest submissions and information on the 2017 Outdoor News Youth Writing Contest can be found online at
http://www.outdoornews.com/youthwritingcontest/

 

THIS WEEK'S EVENTS: (For complete future listings go to the Calendar Page.

                                         

SEPTEMBER 2017

22 – Ducks Unlimited – Webster-Penfield Chapter’s Sportsman’s Night Out at the Outlet Gun Club, Penfield, NY. (5:30 pm) Waterfowl conservation is facing important challenges as wetlands and other habitats are being degraded and destroyed across the continent. Ducks Unlimited has a vision to reverse this trend. (Cost: $40) (For information call Gabe Speranza  585-313-1643)

23 – NATIONAL HUNTING AND FISHING DAY

23 - Erie County Federation of Sportsmen's Clubs 46th Annual NHF Day Celebration at the Elma Conservation Club, 600 Creek Road, Elma, NY (10:00 am – 4:00 pm) Open to everyone of all ages. Come join the Erie County Federation of Sportsmen's Clubs in celebrating National Hunting and Fishing Day celebration. Learn from the local experts on how to hunt, fish, trap, shoot, and much more. Free event, rain or shine! (For information contact Rich Davenport 716-510-7952 rich@weloveoutdoors.org or go to www.eriectyfsc.org/events.htm)

23 – 21st Annual Salmon River Hatchery Open House and Family Day at The Salmon River Hatchery, 2133 County Route 22, Altmar, NY (Oswego County). (9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m) Admission is free. Tours of the facility will be given throughout the day, providing attendees with behind-the-scenes access to the inner workings of the hatchery. In addition, the fish ladder will be on display, offering the opportunity to view salmon as they migrate. Children will have the opportunity to learn to cast a fishing rod, tie flies, participate in a laser shooting range, observe the aquatic life of Beaverdam Brook, and learn about rare and threatened fish species in New York State. (For information contact Fran Verdoliva, NYSDEC Salmon River Coordinator, at 315-298-7605.) 

23 – National Hunting & Fishing Day Celebration at the NYS Game Farm, 8 Game Farm Road, Ithaca, NY (9:00 am) Connect with local sporting clubs and organizations for a family friendly day celebrating our outdoor heritage. Activities will include waterfowl and upland bird hunting demonstrations, fly casting instruction, kids archery range, and much more. (For information contact Cosmo Genova at 607-972-7088 or email cosmogenova@gmail.com) 

23 – Tompkins County Federation of Sporting Clubs’ National Hunting and Fishing Day Celebration at the NYSDEC Reynolds Game Farm 81 Game Farm Road, Ithaca, NY (9:00 am - ) There will be demonstrations all day, including a waterfowl and upland game hunting demonstration, small game processing class, kids archery range, fly casting instruction, Cornell Raptor showcase, DEC K9 demo, etc. (For information call 607-273-2768)

23 - 3rd Annual Savannah Art Festival at the Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savannah, NY. (10:00 am – 4:00 pm) Savannah is alive with color! There will be something for everyone this year including art from local artists, an art/photography contest, great food, live music, bird of prey demonstrations, art workshops, prizes and so much more! (Admission is $5/person or $10/family.) Artists and vendors are encouraged to register by calling Steve Moore at (585) 424-0256 or Chris Lajewski at (315) 365-3588. (For more information, call 315-365-3588 or email montezuma@audubon.org.)

23 - FREE FISHING DAY in New York State. No license required.

23 - Early Gun & Military Auction at Hessney Auction Center, 2741 Route 14N, Geneva, NY (9:15 am) Over 350 guns - Pre-1900 guns, shotguns, rifles, handguns, pre-1900 military guns & memorabilia, swords, knives, bayonets, books, photos, paper, Military Includes Spanish-American War, Indian Wars, Civil War, War of 1812 (For more information call 315-789-9349 or 585-734-6082 or go to www.hessney.com)

23 - Introduction To Geo-Caching at the Reinstein Woods Environmental Education Center, 93 Honorine Drive, Depew, NY (Town of Cheektowaga) (10:00 am) You will learn how to use a handheld Global Positioning System (GPS) unit, then search for hidden clues to solve nature mysteries. (For information and register call 716-683-5959 or email reinsteinwoods@dec.ny.gov)

23 - Concealed Carry Class presented by Legal Heat at the Cabela’s Cheektowaga Store, 2003 Walden Avenue, Cheektowaga, NY (9:00 am -1:00 pm) This course is designed to meet the qualifying requirements and documentation to obtain the Utah and Arizona concealed carry permits in a fun, informative, non-intimidating class. These permits will allow combined carry reciprocity in approximately 30+ states. Legal Heat's concealed carry class covers firearms safety, handling, transportation, storage, ammunition, self-defense and firearms laws, concealed carry techniques and much more. Legal Heat's firearm training instructors are all NRA and Utah BCI certified, insured and among the most highly experienced in the industry and can answer your CCW questions. This course typically runs approximately 4 hours. This Legal Heat course does not have a 'test' or range requirement. The Utah and Arizona permits are open to residents of any state and can be applied for by mail. You do NOT have to reside in the state of UT or AZ to qualify to apply for their concealed carry permits. Register TODAY for this fun and informative class. Seating may be limited.This class may qualify you for the NY permit in several NY counties but has not been formally approved by any NY counties yet. (Reservations can be made at www.MyLegalHeat.com or by calling 877-252-1055.)

23 – Cabela’s Sportsman’s Seminars at Cabela’s Cheektowaga Store, 2003 Walden Avenue, Cheektowaga, NY. Sessions include: Archery Fitting and Shoot (9:00 am – 2:00 pm) - Stop by the Archery Range and get fitted for a bow and test your archery skills!; Fish Preparation, Freezing, Cooking (11:00 am – 12:00 pm) - Learn about the basics of filleting a fish, preparing them for the freezer, and cooking tips.; Flip and Pitch (1:00 - 2:00 pm) - Learn how to flip and pitch cast for fish with one of our expert Outfitters.  We'll have a combo set up for you try test your casting! (For information call 716-608-4770)

23 - Chemung County Coon Hunters Association Inc Coonhound Event at their clubhouse on Rumsey Hill Road, Van Etten, NY. (3:00 – Coonhound Water Race $15.00/5:00pm – Coonhound Field Trial - $15.00/6:30pm – Coonhound Bench Show – $15.00/8:00pm - Coonhound  Nite Hunt - $20.00) (For information call Herschel Burt at 570-596-2149)

23 - Southern Tier Bassmasters (Open) Tournament on Silver Lake at the State Park Launch (ENTRY FEE: -$25/Angler --$5/optional lunker) (For information Call 585-314-7142 or email tournaments@southerntierbass.com)

23 - Wild Game Dinner at Grace Bible Church, 6023 Dutton Place, Newfane, NY (5:30 pm) (RSVP John Syracuse at 716-778-5064)

23-24 - Honeywell Sportsmen’s Days at Carpenter’s Brook Fish Hatchery, Route 321, Elbridge, NY. (11:00 am - 5:00 pm) Created as a tribute to National Hunting and Fishing Day, this annual festival is a terrific opportunity for all ages to try their hand at a variety of outdoor pursuits, including skeet shooting, waterfowl identification, axe/knife throwing, turkey calling, archery, 3-D laser big game hunting, crossbow, BB gun, fly fishing, jig tying, canoeing, muzzle loading, Conservation Officers, Forest Rangers and Smokey Bear, woodsmen demonstrations, local wildlife artists and authors and trout fishing. Activities subject to change. (Cost: $5.00 per vehicle) (For information call 315-689-9367) 

23-24 - 32th Annual Wildlife Festival in Celebration of National Hunting and Fishing Day at the New York Power Authority’s Power Vista, 5777 Lewiston Road (adjacent to Niagara University), Lewiston, NY (10:00 am – 5:00 pm) Catch a fish at the Niagara River Anglers fishing pond or shoot pellet guns at the Niagara County Federation of Conservation Club’s shooting trailer. Loads of fun for the whole family! Kids fishing contest for youngsters age 15 and under in the public waters of Niagara County. Two ages classes. Weigh in will be at the Wildlife Festival between noon and 2 p.m. both days. Awards on Sunday at 3 p.m. Largest fish caught out of the NYPA reservoir and from the NYPA fishing platform will also receive a prize. (For information call 866-697-2386 or visit their website at www.nypa.gov.)

23-24 - Niagara Frontier Gun Show - Hamburg at the Hamburg Fairgrounds, Hamburg, NY (9:00 am) (For more information call 716-542-9929 or go to http://nfgshows.com)

23-24 - A Youth And Women's Mentored Goose Hunt in Oneida and Madison Counties.  Participants must be 12 years of age and older and must have a valid NYS small game license. In addition, those age 16 and up must also have a valid Federal Duck Stamp. (To register, go to www.cnymyhunts.org and click on Event Registration on the left side. For more information contact Scott Faulkner at 315-225-0192, ECO Steve Lakeman at 315-734-0648 or ECO Ric Grisolini at 315-240-6966.)

24 – End of Southern Zone Early Bear Season

24 – 3-D Archery Shoot at West Falls Conservation Society, 55 Bridge Street, West Falls, NY (7:00 am – 2:00 pm) (For information call Mike Cummings at 716-655-5030)

24 - Barge Canal Bassmasters’ Keuka Lake Fishing Derby – Launch Location: Penn Yan (For information contact Bill Terry  607-962-6920    sliderwrom@yahoo.com)

24 - KTBA Bass Club Cayuga Lake Tournament at Long Point (6:00 am – 2:00 pm) (Cost: $80.00 boat for Members/$100.00 boat for Non-Members) (For information contact Tom Testa - tuzzytny@yahoo.com )

24 - Becoming an Outdoors-Woman (BOW) Workshop - Wilderness First Aid, 9-hour Certification Program at Tupper Lake, NY (Cost: $120.00 plus option of canoe/kayak rental) (For information/register contact Adirondack Foothills Guide Service, LLC  518-359-8194  adkfoothills@gmail.com  or go to www.adkfoothills.com)   9-hour Certification Program at Tupper Lake, NY (Cost: $120.00 plus option of canoe/kayak rental) (For information/register contact Adirondack Foothills Guide Service, LLC  518-359-8194  adkfoothills@gmail.com  or go to www.adkfoothills.com)  

25 - End of Canada Goose Seasons in the West Central and South Zones of Western New York

26 - WNY Chapter of Trout Unlimited Meeting at the Donovan American Legion Post, 3210 Genesee Street, Cheektowaga, NY (6:00 pm fly tying/7:30 meeting) The guest speaker is Jim Markham with DEC’s Lake Erie Unit. He will be discussing the state of Lake Erie steelhead in the tributaries and share information on an experiment involving steelhead. (For information email secretary@wnytroutunlimited.org;)

27 - Start of Northern Zone Deer & Bear Bowhunting Seasons (>10/20)

28 – Ducks Unlimited – Owasco Lake Chapter Banquet at Dryden Veteran's Memorial Home, 2272 Dryden Road, Dryden,, NY. (6:00 pm) Waterfowl conservation is facing important challenges as wetlands and other habitats are being degraded and destroyed across the continent. Ducks Unlimited has a vision to reverse this trend. (Cost: $60 Single, $80 Couple) (For information call Jerry Relyea  at  607-216-2321  or  Jim Miller  607-898-4701  or  Kate Hudson  607-591-2520.)  

28 – 3-D Archery Shoot at West Falls Conservation Society, 55 Bridge St., West Falls, NY (4:00 pm start) (For information call Mike Cummings at 716-655-5030)

29 - Ducks Unlimited – North Shore Oneida Lake Chapter Banquet at the Greenview Country Club, West Monroe, NY. (5:00 pm) Waterfowl conservation is facing important challenges as wetlands and other habitats are being degraded and destroyed across the continent. Ducks Unlimited has a vision to reverse this trend. (Cost: $60 Single, $85 Couple) (For information call Chris Sanson 315-225-7988 or Katie Long 623-696-5597) 

29 - Becoming an Outdoors-Woman (BOW) Workshop - High Peak Jaunt: Views from the Summit at Tupper Lake, NY (Cost: $50.00 plus option of canoe/kayak rental) (For information/register contact Adirondack Foothills Guide Service, LLC  518-359-8194  adkfoothills@yahoo.com  or go to www.adkfoothills.com)

29 - National Wild Turkey Federation – Enchanted Mountain Chapter Dinner at the Bartlett Country Club, 32 Euclid Avenue, Olean, NY. (5:00 pm) The NWTF banquets are where you can buy exclusive merchandise and have a great time with friends. All the while, you will be raising vital funds for wild turkey conservation and important programs that introduce the outdoors to women, children and the disabled.  (For more information contact Randy Opferbeck  (716) 373-3322  gobbler648@verizon.net )

29 - Clymer Coonhunters Club Coonhound Event at their clubhouse on 8023 Ravlin Hill Road, Panama, NY (7:00 pm - Coonhound Event Bench Show - $15.00/8:00 pm – Coonhound Event Nite Hunt - $20.00) (For information call Chester Bricker at 716-355-6442

29-30 - Grape Country Coonhunters Association Coonhound Event at their clubhouse on Williams Hill Road, Branchport, NY (9/29 7:00 pm - Coonhound Bench Show - $15.00/9:00 pm - Coonhound Nite Hunt - $20.00 and 9/30 6:00 pm – Coonhound Bench Show - $15.00/8:00 pm coonhound Nite Hunt - $20.00) (For information call Josh Wood at 315-729-4773)

30 – Close of Frog & Snapping Turtle Seasons

30 - End of Bow Fishing for Carp Season
30 – Close of Fishing Season on Lake Ontario, the Lower Niagara River and Tributaries for Lake Trout

30 – Alabama Gunslingers Shoot at the Alabama Hunt Club, Lewiston Road, Alabama, NY (9:00 am start) (For information call John Szumigala at 716-714-5514.)

30 - Cabela’s Sportsman’s Seminars at Cabela’s Cheektowaga Store, 2003 Walden Avenue, Cheektowaga, NY. Sessions include: Scent Control Secrets (11:00 am – 1:00 pm) - Learn about scent control from a pro.  We'll demystify all of our products and options, so you can leave with your senses tuned for fall hunts.; Footwear For Hunting Season (11:00 am – 12:00 pm) - Our Footwear Outfitters will help you choose the right footwear specs for your hunting needs.; Antler Scoring with Pope & Young (12:00 – 2:00 pm) - There's a method to the antler scoring process.  Bring your antlers in and we'll break it down from point to point and provide a score!; Survival Strategies (12:00 – 1:00 pm) - Should you ever become lost in the woods, we'll focus on the signals, gadgets and survival kits that could be lifesavers.; Long-Range Optics (1:00 – 2:00 pm) - our optics Outfitter will demonstrate new fall options and provide tips for you to consider when purchasing optics for long-range shooting.; Intro to Bowhunting: Women Only (1:00 – 2:00 pm) - We'll provide tips on the basic necessitites to get started with insight from the field to make your hunt more enjoyable. (For information call 716-608-4770)

30 - Family Nature Quest: Turtles at the Reinstein Woods Environmental Education Center, 93 Honorine Drive, Depew, NY (Town of Cheektowaga) (10:30 am) Explore the world of turtles at Reinstein Woods, and meet our captive wood and painted turtles. (For information and register call 716-683-5959 or email reinsteinwoods@dec.ny.gov)

30 - Birding 101: Class #9 at the Reinstein Woods Environmental Education Center, 93 Honorine Drive, Depew, NY (Town of Cheektowaga) (2:30 pm) Learn how to identify the different raptors (birds of prey) found in Reinstein Woods. For adults and children ages 8 and older. (For information and register call 716-683-5959 or email reinsteinwoods@dec.ny.gov)

30 - Cattaraugus County Houndsmen and Conservation Club Inc. Coonhound Event at their clubhouse at 10491 Route 240, West Valley, NY (6:00 pm - Coonhound Bench Show - $15.00/8:00 pm - Coonhound Event Nite Hunt - $20.00) (For information call Chris Deperro  716-570-6798)

30 – Whitetails Unlimited - Finger Lakes Chapter Hunters Night Out at American Legion Hall, 71 Old Ithaca Road, Horseheads, NY. (Cost: $50.00 Single/$30.00 Spouse or Youth) WTU provides grants to local projects and activities that advance our mission. Proceeds from this event will benefit Chemung County youth and habitat programs. (Deadline for sign-up 9/27/17) (For information go to http://www.whitetailsunlimited.com/events/banquets/horseheads-ny-finger-lakes-chapter-hunters-night-out/)

30 - National Wild Turkey Federation – Enchanted Mountain Chapter Hunting Heritage Banquet at the Bartlett Country Club, 32 Euclid Avenue, Olean, NY (5:00 pm) The NWTF banquets are where you can buy exclusive merchandise and have a great time with friends. All the while, you will be raising vital funds for wild turkey conservation and important programs that introduce the outdoors to women, children and the disabled.  (For more information contact Randy Opferbeck   gobbler648@verizon.net   716-373-3322)

30 - New York State Trapper Education at the Wyoming Conservation Association, 2091 Dale Road, Warsaw, NY (8:00 am - 4:00 pm) Trapper Education is required for all new trappers. This course covers how to trap responsibly and selectively and how to handle pelts to produce marketable furs. All courses require the completion of homework prior to attending the course. If you do not complete the homework you cannot complete the course. (Instructed by Neil A. Parmerter)  

30 - New York State Trapper Education at the West Falls Conservation Society, 55 Bridge Street, West Falls, NY 14170 (8:30 am - 5:00 pm) Trapper Education is required for all new trappers. This course covers how to trap responsibly and selectively and how to handle pelts to produce marketable furs. All courses require the completion of homework prior to attending the course. If you do not complete the homework you cannot complete the course. (Instructed by Arthur F. Segool)

OCTOBER 2017

1 – Falconry Season Opens (>3/31/18)

1 - Start of Southern Zone Deer and Bear Bowhunting Seasons (>11/17)

1 – Start of Hunting Seasons for Cottontail Rabbit, Ruffed Grouse (>2/28/18) & Coyote (3/25/18)

1 – Start of Woodcock Hunting Season (11/14)

1 - Start of Hunting Season for Snow Geese (>4/15/17) and Brant (>11/29) in the Western Zone

1 – Cabela’s Sportsman’s Seminar at Cabela’s Cheektowaga Store, 2003 Walden Avenue, Cheektowaga, NY. Sessions include: Calls of the Wild: Big-Game Tactics (11:00 am – 12:00 pm) - Listen to the calls of the wild and learn how to duplicate them so you will get closer to your quarry this fall. (For information call 716-608-4770)

 

Until our next meeting in the Corner, have a great time in the outdoors. This is Ron Schroder for Your In on The Outdoors for Western New York.

 

What Do You Think? Have something for other sportspeople? Let us know HERE.

 

 

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9 – 15 – 17

 

Welcome to this week's Conservation Chatter Corner - little bits of happenings concerning our outdoors and you, the sportspeople who enjoy being part of that outdoors.

 

September 23, 2017

Scheduled Events:

16 – National Hunting & Fishing Day Celebration at Empire Tractor, Inc., 3800 MacDougall Road, Waterloo, NY (10:00 am – 5:00 pm) Event will include: merchandise; demonstration of fly tying/fishing; nra rep and the boy scout troop will be present; free shooting/archery/fishing instructions; retrievers; activities/goodies; various info; raffles; refreshments. (For information contact Kathy Larsen  at 315-585-2293 or email mrsmouse64@hotmail.com)

23 - Erie County Federation of Sportsmen's Clubs 46th Annual NHF Day Celebration at the Elma Conservation Club, 600 Creek Road, Elma, NY (10:00 am – 4:00 pm) Open to everyone of all ages. Come join the Erie County Federation of Sportsmen's Clubs in celebrating National Hunting and Fishing Day celebration. Learn from the local experts on how to hunt, fish, trap, shoot, and much more. Free event, rain or shine! (For information contact Rich Davenport 716-510-7952 rich@weloveoutdoors.org or go to www.eriectyfsc.org/events.htm)

23 – 21st Annual Salmon River Hatchery Open House and Family Day at The Salmon River Hatchery, 2133 County Route 22, Altmar, NY (Oswego County). (9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m) Admission is free. Tours of the facility will be given throughout the day, providing attendees with behind-the-scenes access to the inner workings of the hatchery. In addition, the fish ladder will be on display, offering the opportunity to view salmon as they migrate. Children will have the opportunity to learn to cast a fishing rod, tie flies, participate in a laser shooting range, observe the aquatic life of Beaverdam Brook, and learn about rare and threatened fish species in New York State. (For information contact Fran Verdoliva, NYSDEC Salmon River Coordinator, at 315-298-7605.) 

23 – National Hunting & Fishing Day Celebration at the NYS Game Farm, 8 Game Farm Road, Ithaca, NY (9:00 am) Connect with local sporting clubs and organizations for a family friendly day celebrating our outdoor heritage. Activities will include waterfowl and upland bird hunting demonstrations, fly casting instruction, kids archery range, and much more. (For information contact Cosmo Genova at 607-972-7088 or email cosmogenova@gmail.com) 

23 – Tompkins County Federation of Sporting Clubs’ National Hunting and Fishing Day Celebration at the NYSDEC Reynolds Game Farm 81 Game Farm Road, Ithaca, NY (9:00 am - ) There will be demonstrations all day, including a waterfowl and upland game hunting demonstration, small game processing class, kids archery range, fly casting instruction, Cornell Raptor showcase, DEC K9 demo, etc. (For information call 607-273-2768)

23-24 - Honeywell Sportsmen’s Days at Carpenter’s Brook Fish Hatchery, Route 321, Elbridge, NY. (11:00 am - 5:00 pm) Created as a tribute to National Hunting and Fishing Day, this annual festival is a terrific opportunity for all ages to try their hand at a variety of outdoor pursuits, including skeet shooting, waterfowl identification, axe/knife throwing, turkey calling, archery, 3-D laser big game hunting, crossbow, BB gun, fly fishing, jig tying, canoeing, muzzle loading, Conservation Officers, Forest Rangers and Smokey Bear, woodsmen demonstrations, local wildlife artists and authors and trout fishing. Activities subject to change. (Cost: $5.00 per vehicle) (For information call 315-689-9367) 

 

HUNTER NUMBERS DECREASE?: The U.S. Department of the Interior announced a new report by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service that shows that 101.6 million Americans—40 percent of the U.S. population 16 years old and older—participated in wildlife-related activities in 2016, such as hunting, fishing and wildlife-watching.

The survey illustrates gains in wildlife watching—particularly around the home—and fishing, with moderate declines in the number of hunters nationally. The findings reflect a continued interest in engaging in the outdoors. These activities are drivers behind an economic powerhouse, where participants spent $156 billion—the most in the last 25 years, adjusted for inflation.

“This report absolutely underscores the need to increase public access to public lands across the United States,” said U.S. Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke. “Hunting and fishing are a part of the American heritage. As a kid who grew up hunting and fishing on public lands who later took my own kids out on the same land, I know how important it is to expand access for future generations. Many folks east of the Mississippi River rely on friends with large acreages or pay high rates for hunting and fishing clubs. This makes access to wildlife refuges and other public lands more important.”

The survey, the 13th in a series conducted nearly every five years since 1955, shows that the most substantial increases in participation involve wildlife-watching—observing, feeding and photographing wildlife. The report indicates these activities surged 20 percent from 2011 to 2016, from 71.8 million to 86 million participants during that time. Expenditures by wildlife watchers also rose sharply—28 percent—between 2011 and 2016, from $59.1 billion to $75.9 billion. Around-the-home wildlife-watching increased 18 percent from 2011, from 68.6 million in 2011 to 81.1 million participants in 2016. More modest gains were made for away-from-home wildlife watchers: 5 percent increase from 2011 to 2016, from 22.5 million to 23 million participants.

More Americans also went fishing. The report indicates an 8 percent increase in angling participation since 2011, from 33.1 million anglers to 35.8 million in 2016. The greatest increases in participation—10 percent—were seen in the Great Lakes area. Total expenditures by anglers nationwide rose 2 percent from 2011 to 2016, from $45 billion to $46.1 billion.

Hunting participation dropped by about 2 million participants but still remained strong at 11.5 million hunters. Total expenditures by hunters declined 29 percent from 2011 to 2016, from $36.3 billion to $25.6 billion. However, expenditures for related items such as taxidermy and camping equipment experienced a 27-percent uptick, and hunting trip-related expenses increased 15 percent.?

This year’s survey also gathered two new categories of data: archery and target shooting. Findings show there are more than 32 million target shooters using firearms and 12.4 million people engaged in archery, not including hunting.

As a partnership effort with states and national conservation organizations, the survey has become one of the most important sources of information on fish and wildlife recreation in the United States. Federal, state and private organizations use this detailed information to manage wildlife, market products, and look for trends. Conducted by the U.S. Bureau of the Census, the survey is based on a 22,416-household sample surveyed through computer-assisted telephone and in-person interviews. 

For more information about the survey and to view the preliminary report, please visit https://wsfrprograms.fws.gov/Subpages/NationalSurvey/National_Survey.htm

 

DEC RELEASES THIRD DRAFT MUTE SWAN MANAGEMENT PLAN: The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) announced the completion of a revised draft state management plan for mute swans. DEC made significant changes to the plan in response to public comments received over the past three years. The plan should limit the potential future impacts of mute swans on native wildlife as well as human enjoyment of the state's aquatic resources. At the same time, the plan emphasizes non-lethal management techniques, in direct response to public concerns about how and where management is accomplished."

The mute swan (Cygnus olor) is a non-native, invasive species brought to North America in the late 1800s to beautify estates in the Lower Hudson Valley and on Long Island. Over the past century, swans that escaped or were released established wild populations in downstate New York that now number close to 2,000 birds. A separate population of mute swans became established near Rochester in the late 1980s, but past control efforts by DEC and other agencies have helped to limit their numbers. In August, DEC conducted a large-scale summer population survey to obtain a current statewide population estimate and will have the results tallied in the next few weeks.

Mute swans compete with native wildlife for aquatic food plants and nesting areas. In addition, people are unable to use some water areas where the highly territorial birds nest. The goal of the draft plan is to prevent any further mute swan population growth to minimize impacts to native wildlife and habitats, as well as minimize conflicts with property owners and other outdoor enthusiasts. Property owners will be allowed to implement control measures where necessary to alleviate site-specific conflicts caused by mute swans.

The draft plan outlines DEC's strategies to contain and minimize the impacts of free-ranging mute swans. It describes a three-part, regionalized approach that emphasizes non-lethal management both upstate and downstate. The plan includes public education and outreach to inform the public about the status and ecological impacts of mute swans, efforts to foster responsible possession and care of mute swans, and strategies for managing feral mute swan populations.

Mute swan populations in other states, such as Maryland and Michigan, have shown tremendous ability to grow from a relatively small number of birds to several thousand over time. DEC is committed to preventing this growth from happening in upstate New York. In downstate areas, the mute swan population has leveled off and overwhelming public support for allowing these birds to remain caused the DEC to reconsider its plans for swans in that part of the state.

Mute swans are likely to remain in most areas of Long Island, New York City, and the lower Hudson Valley where they have been seen for many years, but DEC will encourage non-lethal population controls to protect local wildlife and habitats and will authorize control measures to ensure that mute swans do not interfere with human interests.

The draft Mute Swan Plan is available on DEC's website, along with an assessment of public comments received on previous drafts of the plan released in January 2014 and in March 2015.

DEC will hold three public hearings in areas affected by mute swans during September and October. These hearings will give the public an opportunity to provide feedback on the revised plan. A hearing will be held Tuesday, October 3, 2017 at 6 p.m. at Braddock Bay Pavilion
199 E. Manitou Road, Hilton, NY 14468.

In addition, the public is encouraged to provide written comments on the revised management plan by writing to: Bureau of Wildlife - Mute Swan Plan, 625 Broadway, Albany, NY 12233-4754; or e-mailing Wildlife@dec.ny.gov (subject line - "Mute Swan Plan"). The public comment period will close on December 3, 2017.

 

FEDERAL GRANTS FOR GREAT LAKES PROJECTS: NYSDEC would like to share recent announcements of the availability of federal funding that can be leveraged by stakeholders to advance goals identified in NY's Great Lakes Action Agenda. GLAA and sub basin work plan goals that can be advanced include reducing non point source pollution, enhancing community resiliency and ecosystem integrity, and conserving and restoring fish and wildlife biodiversity and habitats. If you are interested in learning more about partnering with other stakeholders and developing collaborative project proposals, please email us at greatlakes@decny.gov.

The following federal grants have been announced:

The US Endowment for Forestry and Communities, a partnership of the US Environmental Protection Agency and the Natural Resource Conservation Service, announced the availability of funding through the 2018 Healthy Watersheds Consortium Grant Program. Priority for funding is given to projects that maximize measurable outcomes for watershed protection. Up to 3 Million in funding is available. Awards are considered in the following 3 categories:

1) Watershed Action Projects - projects that fulfill components of an established watershed plan - 50,000 to 250,000 award size,

2) Building watershed protection capacity - grows the organizational capacity and partnerships needed for long term watershed protection - maximum of 150,000 per year,

3) Advancing the state of practice - Awards new experimental technologies, methods, strategies, or approaches to incentivize watershed protection that can be scaled to a broader level. 50,000 to 200,000 award size.

Eligible applicants include not for profit organizations, for profit communities, tribes, state and local government agencies, colleges and universities. Public- private partnerships are desirable. Awards may not be used for lobbying or political advocacy. At least a 25% in- kind match is required. An informational webinar will be held on October 11th at 2pm. Proposals are due by February 1st, 2018. For more information, visit: http://www.usendowment.org/healthywatersheds.html

Also

The US Fish and Wildlife Service Lower Great Lakes Fish and Wildlife Conservation Office announced the availability of funding for Fish Passage and Aquatic Habitat Restoration in New York and Pennsylvania's Great Lakes watershed. Between 10,000 and 100,000 is available per project, and focus areas include:

1)  removing/bypassing dams and/or replacing/retrofitting culverts,

2)  restoring riparian and in stream habitat,

3)  protecting, restoring and managing coastal wetlands,

4)  completing road stream crossing assessments and prioritizing barrier removal projects.

Eligible organizations include states, tribes, local governments, and not for profits. Proposals are due by October 13th, 2017. Please refer to the attached RFP for more information.

LGLFWCO+Habitat+Program+RFP2017.pdf

 

DMA PERMITS AVAILABLE FOR BULLY HILL STATE FOREST IN ALLEGANY COUNTY: Hunters can mail or drop off applications at DEC Lands and Forest Office in West Almond

New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) announced today that the DEC Forestry Office in West Almond, New York, will have Deer Management Assistance Permits (DMAPs) available for use this hunting season on Bully Hill State Forest in Allegany County. These permits can only be used by hunters to harvest antlerless deer on Bully Hill State Forest. Individuals with a valid state hunting license are eligible to apply.

Bully Hill State Forest consists of approximately 3,506 acres of sustainably managed forest in the towns of Almond and Birdsall in Allegany County. Persistent over-browsing from high numbers of deer has negatively impacted forest regeneration at Bully Hill State Forest. As a result, desirable tree species and herbaceous plants are lacking or severely deformed across much of the forest understory. DEC Foresters have determined that additional hunting opportunities, in combination with forest management activities, will help to ensure that forest vegetation can be regenerated.

 

CORNELL LAB OF ORNITHOLOGY SCHOOL GARDEN GRANTS: The Cornell Lab of Ornithology and Alaska® Organic Fertilizer are once again teaming up to support school gardens around the United States. BirdSleuth, the Cornell Lab's K-12 education program, is building on last year's successful School Garden Grant Program by distributing $25,000 in grants to 20 schools that create or revitalize a garden that supports local wildlife, healthy living, environmental education, and Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) learning. Grants range from $500 to $2,000 and will include BirdSleuth's popularHabitat Connections unit as well as gardening supplies from Alaska® Fertilizer.

Research shows that students who participate in school gardens and spend time outside are not only happier and healthier but also score significantly higher on science achievement tests. However, many educators struggle to find the necessary funding and support to establish a school garden. The deadline for submitting grant applications is October 8, 2017 at 11:59 pm Eastern Time.
For more information on BirdSleuth's Garden Grant program, please visit:
www.birdsleuth.org/garden-grants or email birdsleuth@cornell.edu with any questions.

 

THIS WEEK'S EVENTS: (For complete future listings go to the Calendar Page)

                                         

SEPTEMBER 2017

15 - Whitetails Unlimited – Tioga County Chapter Hunters Night Out at Red Roof Inn Owego Treadway, 1100 NY 17C, Owego, NY (Cost: $60.00 Single/$40.00 Spouse or Youth) WTU provides grants to local projects and activities that advance our mission. Proceeds from this event will benefit local youth and habitat programs. (Deadline for sign-up 9/12/17) (For information go to http://www.whitetailsunlimited.com/events/banquets/owego-ny-tioga-county-chapter-hunters-night-out/)

15-16 - 21th Annual Montezuma Muckrace at the Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savannah, NY. (5:00 – 7:00 pm) The 21th Annual Montezuma Muckrace will be on September 15-16, 2017. This Big Day competition begins at 7:00 p.m. Friday runs for 24 hours. Teams will compete to see who can see the most species within the Montezuma Wetlands Complex in Cayuga, Wayne, and Seneca counties. The Complex includes the Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge, the NYSDEC Montezuma Wildlife Management Area and the Montezuma Audubon Center. The higher purpose behind the fun is raising funds for the Friends of the Montezuma Wetlands Complex Last year 29 teams raised $10,200. There will be six categories in which to compete: Collegiate, Competitive, Low-carbon (no cars used), Recreational, Family/Mentor, and Photo. Come join the fun!   See more at: http://friendsofmontezuma.org/projects-programs/muckrace/.  (For more information, call 315-365-3588 or email montezuma@audubon.org.)

15-17 - Becoming an Outdoors-Woman Workshop at the Silver Bay YMCA on Lake George, Hague, NY. The workshop is focused on learning outdoor skills - skills usually associated with hunting and fishing, but useful for many other outdoor pursuits. Designed for women, it is an

opportunity for anyone 18 years of age or older, and is for you if: • You have never tried these activities, but have always wanted to learn. • You are a beginner who wants to improve your skills. • You know how to do some of these activities, but would like to try new ones. • You are looking for the camaraderie of like-minded individuals. • You would like to become more self-sufficient. You can earn a NYS Hunter Education Certificate or a Trapper Education Certificate as part of the workshop. (Home study is required.) Enrollment limit 125. Minimum age is 18 years old. (For information contact Kelly Stang  kelly.stang@dec.ny.gov  518-402-8862.)

16 – National Hunting & Fishing Day Celebration at Empire Tractor, Inc., 3800 MacDougall Road, Waterloo, NY (10:00 am – 5:00 pm) Event will include: merchandise; demonstration of fly tying/fishing; nra rep and the boy scout troop will be present; free shooting/archery/fishing instructions; retrievers; activities/goodies; various info; raffles; refreshments. (For information contact Kathy Larsen  at 315-585-2293 or email mrsmouse64@hotmail.com)

16 - 17TH Annual Fall Festival at the Reinstein Woods Environmental Education Center, 93 Honorine Drive, Depew, NY (Town of Cheektowaga) (10:00 am - 4:00 pm) Kick off the fall season by spending a day in the woods. Enjoy crafts for kids, live animals, hands-on activities, food, live music by Mama Earth and more! (For information and register call 716-683-5959 or email reinsteinwoods@dec.ny.gov)

16 - Three-F Youth Conservation Mentor Day at the Three-F Club, 904 Swann Road, Youngstown, NY. Enrollment is now open for a limited number of slots available for kids 12 to 18. This is an intensive day of learning that will include turkey calling instruction, conservation ethics, dog handling, archery, safe gun handling, skeet and trap shooting and more. The day culminates with a pheasant hunt on the club grounds as well. Cost is $35 and you must be accompanied by an adult or guardian. (For more information on how to reserve a spot, contact Dale Shank at 791-3809.)

16 - Steuben County Coon Hunters, Inc. Coonhound Event at their clubhouse at 4082 Depot Street, Cameron, NY (5:30 pm - Coonhound Bench Show - $15.00/8:00 pm - Coonhound Nite Hunt - $20.00) (For information call Roger Barney at 607-695-9024 or email ten.sehguh@yenrab_jr)

16 - Whitetails Unlimited – Southern Tier Chapter Hunters Night Out at Howard Community Center 7481 Hopkins Road, Howard, NY (Cost: $60.00 Single/$40.00 Spouse or Youth) WTU provides grants to local projects and activities that advance our mission. Proceeds from this event will benefit local youth and habitat programs. (Deadline for sign-up 9/13/17) (For information go to http://www.whitetailsunlimited.com/events/banquets/howard-ny-southern-tier-chapter-hunters-night-out/)

16 - New York State Trapper Education at Northern Chautauqua Conservation Club, 1 Mullett Steet, Dunkirk, NY (9:00 am – 5:30 pm) Trapper Education is required for all new trappers. This course covers how to trap responsibly and selectively and how to handle pelts to produce marketable furs. All courses require the completion of homework prior to attending the course. If you do not complete the homework you cannot complete the course. (For information call Gary Dudek  716-366-3397)

16 - Youth Mentor Pheasant Hunt at the Three-F Club, 904 Swann Road, Youngstown, NY. For youth 12 to 18 years of age. (For information call Dale Shank at 716-791-3809.)

16-17 - Fall Public Blackpowder Shoot at the Alabama Hunt Club, 1854 Lewiston Road, Alabama, NY (Starting at 8:30 am each day.) (For information call John Szumigala at 716-714-5514.)

16-17 - New York State Arms Collectors Association Gun Show at the NYS Fairgrounds Expo Center, 581 State Fair Boulevard, Syracuse , NY (Sat., 9 am-5 pm; Sun., 9 am-3 pm) 1,000 tables. (Admission: $7.00/seniors $5.00/children under 12 free) (For information contact Sandy Ackerman Klinger, 346 Paul Street, Endicott, NY 13760, 607-748-1010 email sandynysac@yahoo.com)

17 - Start of Northern Zone Early Bear Season (>10/14)

19 – Identifying Invasive Plants at Baltimore Woods Nature Center, 4007 Bishop Hill Rd, Marcellus, NY. At our next meeting, we will vote on making changes to our membership bylaws.  Speaking of the next meeting, it will be September 19 at Baltimore Woods which is located a few miles southwest of Syracuse.  The theme will be recognizing invasive plants.  The plan is to have three presentations.  Most importantly we hope to have this event co-sponsored with a dozen or more other organizations.

20 – Ducks Unlimited – Genesee County (Batavia) Chapter Banquet at Terry Hills Banquet Facility, 5122 Clinton Street,
Batavia,, NY. (6:00 pm) Waterfowl conservation is facing important challenges as wetlands and other habitats are being degraded and destroyed across the continent. Ducks Unlimited has a vision to reverse this trend. (Cost: $70 Single, $95 Couple) (For information call Mindy Kilby 585-344-1262 or Paul Hess  585-944-2371  or Mark Woodward  585-344-1262)  

20&22 - New York State Trapper Education at the Falconer Rod & Gun Club, Rod and Gun Club Road, Falconer, NY (Wed 5:00 - 10:00 pm/Fri 5:00 10:00 pm)Trapper Education is required for all new trappers. This course covers how to trap responsibly and selectively and how to handle pelts to produce marketable furs. All courses require the completion of homework prior to attending the course. If you do not complete the homework you cannot complete the course. (Instructed by Timothy C. Mullard 716-664-3379 or 716-485-3376)  

21 – Ducks Unlimited – BC (Broome County-Binghamton) Chapter Banquet at Holiday Inn Arena, Hawley Street, Binghamton, NY. (6:00 pm) Waterfowl conservation is facing important challenges as wetlands and other habitats are being degraded and destroyed across the continent. Ducks Unlimited has a vision to reverse this trend. (Cost: $75 Single, $115 Couple) (For information call Ethan Cook 607-725-9118  or  Lorne Brooks 607-240-9200  or  Jay O'Brien  607-343-5409.)  

22 – Ducks Unlimited – Webster-Penfield Chapter’s Sportsman’s Night Out at the Outlet Gun Club, Penfield, NY. (5:30 pm) Waterfowl conservation is facing important challenges as wetlands and other habitats are being degraded and destroyed across the continent. Ducks Unlimited has a vision to reverse this trend. (Cost: $40) (For information call Gabe Speranza  585-313-1643)

23 – NATIONAL HUNTING AND FISHING DAY

23 - Erie County Federation of Sportsmen's Clubs 46th Annual NHF Day Celebration at the Elma Conservation Club, 600 Creek Road, Elma, NY (10:00 am – 4:00 pm) Open to everyone of all ages. Come join the Erie County Federation of Sportsmen's Clubs in celebrating National Hunting and Fishing Day celebration. Learn from the local experts on how to hunt, fish, trap, shoot, and much more. Free event, rain or shine! (For information contact Rich Davenport 716-510-7952 rich@weloveoutdoors.org or go to www.eriectyfsc.org/events.htm)

23 – 21st Annual Salmon River Hatchery Open House and Family Day at The Salmon River Hatchery, 2133 County Route 22, Altmar, NY (Oswego County). (9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m) Admission is free. Tours of the facility will be given throughout the day, providing attendees with behind-the-scenes access to the inner workings of the hatchery. In addition, the fish ladder will be on display, offering the opportunity to view salmon as they migrate. Children will have the opportunity to learn to cast a fishing rod, tie flies, participate in a laser shooting range, observe the aquatic life of Beaverdam Brook, and learn about rare and threatened fish species in New York State. (For information contact Fran Verdoliva, NYSDEC Salmon River Coordinator, at 315-298-7605.) 

23 – National Hunting & Fishing Day Celebration at the NYS Game Farm, 8 Game Farm Road, Ithaca, NY (9:00 am) Connect with local sporting clubs and organizations for a family friendly day celebrating our outdoor heritage. Activities will include waterfowl and upland bird hunting demonstrations, fly casting instruction, kids archery range, and much more. (For information contact Cosmo Genova at 607-972-7088 or email cosmogenova@gmail.com) 

23 – Tompkins County Federation of Sporting Clubs’ National Hunting and Fishing Day Celebration at the NYSDEC Reynolds Game Farm 81 Game Farm Road, Ithaca, NY (9:00 am - ) There will be demonstrations all day, including a waterfowl and upland game hunting demonstration, small game processing class, kids archery range, fly casting instruction, Cornell Raptor showcase, DEC K9 demo, etc. (For information call 607-273-2768)

23 - 3rd Annual Savannah Art Festival at the Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savannah, NY. (10:00 am – 4:00 pm) Savannah is alive with color! There will be something for everyone this year including art from local artists, an art/photography contest, great food, live music, bird of prey demonstrations, art workshops, prizes and so much more! (Admission is $5/person or $10/family.) Artists and vendors are encouraged to register by calling Steve Moore at (585) 424-0256 or Chris Lajewski at (315) 365-3588. (For more information, call 315-365-3588 or email montezuma@audubon.org.)

23 - FREE FISHING DAY in New York State. No license required.

23 - Early Gun & Military Auction at Hessney Auction Center, 2741 Route 14N, Geneva, NY (9:15 am) Over 350 guns - Pre-1900 guns, shotguns, rifles, handguns, pre-1900 military guns & memorabilia, swords, knives, bayonets, books, photos, paper, Military Includes Spanish-American War, Indian Wars, Civil War, War of 1812 (For more information call 315-789-9349 or 585-734-6082 or go to www.hessney.com)

23 - Introduction To Geo-Caching at the Reinstein Woods Environmental Education Center, 93 Honorine Drive, Depew, NY (Town of Cheektowaga) (10:00 am) You will learn how to use a handheld Global Positioning System (GPS) unit, then search for hidden clues to solve nature mysteries. (For information and register call 716-683-5959 or email reinsteinwoods@dec.ny.gov)

23 - Concealed Carry Class presented by Legal Heat at the Cabela’s Cheektowaga Store, 2003 Walden Avenue, Cheektowaga, NY (9:00 am -1:00 pm) This course is designed to meet the qualifying requirements and documentation to obtain the Utah and Arizona concealed carry permits in a fun, informative, non-intimidating class. These permits will allow combined carry reciprocity in approximately 30+ states. Legal Heat's concealed carry class covers firearms safety, handling, transportation, storage, ammunition, self-defense and firearms laws, concealed carry techniques and much more. Legal Heat's firearm training instructors are all NRA and Utah BCI certified, insured and among the most highly experienced in the industry and can answer your CCW questions. This course typically runs approximately 4 hours. This Legal Heat course does not have a 'test' or range requirement. The Utah and Arizona permits are open to residents of any state and can be applied for by mail. You do NOT have to reside in the state of UT or AZ to qualify to apply for their concealed carry permits. Register TODAY for this fun and informative class. Seating may be limited.This class may qualify you for the NY permit in several NY counties but has not been formally approved by any NY counties yet. (Reservations can be made at www.MyLegalHeat.com or by calling 877-252-1055.)

23 – Cabela’s Sportsman’s Seminars at Cabela’s Cheektowaga Store, 2003 Walden Avenue, Cheektowaga, NY. Sessions include: Archery Fitting and Shoot (9:00 am – 2:00 pm) - Stop by the Archery Range and get fitted for a bow and test your archery skills!; Fish Preparation, Freezing, Cooking (11:00 am – 12:00 pm) - Learn about the basics of filleting a fish, preparing them for the freezer, and cooking tips.; Flip and Pitch (1:00 - 2:00 pm) - Learn how to flip and pitch cast for fish with one of our expert Outfitters.  We'll have a combo set up for you try test your casting! (For information call 716-608-4770)

23 - Chemung County Coon Hunters Association Inc Coonhound Event at their clubhouse on Rumsey Hill Road, Van Etten, NY. (3:00 – Coonhound Water Race $15.00/5:00pm – Coonhound Field Trial - $15.00/6:30pm – Coonhound Bench Show – $15.00/8:00pm - Coonhound  Nite Hunt - $20.00) (For information call Herschel Burt at 570-596-2149)

23 - Southern Tier Bassmasters (Open) Tournament on Silver Lake at the State Park Launch (ENTRY FEE: -$25/Angler --$5/optional lunker) (For information Call 585-314-7142 or email tournaments@southerntierbass.com)

23-24 - Honeywell Sportsmen’s Days at Carpenter’s Brook Fish Hatchery, Route 321, Elbridge, NY. (11:00 am - 5:00 pm) Created as a tribute to National Hunting and Fishing Day, this annual festival is a terrific opportunity for all ages to try their hand at a variety of outdoor pursuits, including skeet shooting, waterfowl identification, axe/knife throwing, turkey calling, archery, 3-D laser big game hunting, crossbow, BB gun, fly fishing, jig tying, canoeing, muzzle loading, Conservation Officers, Forest Rangers and Smokey Bear, woodsmen demonstrations, local wildlife artists and authors and trout fishing. Activities subject to change. (Cost: $5.00 per vehicle) (For information call 315-689-9367) 

23-24 - Niagara Frontier Gun Show - Hamburg at the Hamburg Fairgrounds, Hamburg, NY (9:00 am) (For more information call 716-542-9929 or go to http://nfgshows.com)

23-24 - A Youth And Women's Mentored Goose Hunt in Oneida and Madison Counties.  Participants must be 12 years of age and older and must have a valid NYS small game license. In addition, those age 16 and up must also have a valid Federal Duck Stamp. (To register, go to www.cnymyhunts.org and click on Event Registration on the left side. For more information contact Scott Faulkner at 315-225-0192, ECO Steve Lakeman at 315-734-0648 or ECO Ric Grisolini at 315-240-6966.)

24 - Barge Canal Bassmasters’ Keuka Lake Fishing Derby – Launch Location: Penn Yan (For information contact Bill Terry  607-962-6920    sliderwrom@yahoo.com)

24 - KTBA Bass Club Cayuga Lake Tournament at Long Point (6:00 am – 2:00 pm) (Cost: $80.00 boat for Members/$100.00 boat for Non-Members) (For information contact Tom Testa - tuzzytny@yahoo.com )

24 - Becoming an Outdoors-Woman (BOW) Workshop - Wilderness First Aid, 9-hour Certification Program at Tupper Lake, NY (Cost: $120.00 plus option of canoe/kayak rental) (For information/register contact Adirondack Foothills Guide Service, LLC  518-359-8194  adkfoothills@gmail.com  or go to www.adkfoothills.com)   9-hour Certification Program at Tupper Lake, NY (Cost: $120.00 plus option of canoe/kayak rental) (For information/register contact Adirondack Foothills Guide Service, LLC  518-359-8194  adkfoothills@gmail.com  or go to www.adkfoothills.com)  

 

Until our next meeting in the Corner, have a great time in the outdoors. This is Ron Schroder for Your In on The Outdoors for Western New York.

 

What Do You Think? Have something for other sportspeople? Let us know HERE.

 

 

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9 – 8 – 17 (Sorry. Hospital stay delay.)

 

Welcome to this week's Conservation Chatter Corner - little bits of happenings concerning our outdoors and you, the sportspeople who enjoy being part of that outdoors.

 

September 23, 2017

 

LAKE ONTARIO FISHERIES MEETINGS: Anglers interested in the current state of Lake Ontario's trout and salmon population should plan to attend one of the three meetings to be held from 6:30 pm to 9:00 pm at the following locations:

September 11 - Donald Schleiter Lodge and Pavillion, 199 East Manitou Road in Braddock Bay Park, Rochester, NY

September 12 - Pulaski High School, 4624 Salina Street, Pulaski, NY

September 13 - Cornell Cooperative Extension, 4487 Lake Avenue, Lockport, NY

DEC staff will be providing an update on the status of the alewife population in the lake and the actions they intend to take to keep the lake's trout and salmon population in balance with their primary prey fish. Background information can be found on the DEC website. Those unable to attend the meeting can email their comments or questions.

 

EARLY BEAR HUNTING SEASONS BEGIN SOON: Bear Hunting Seasons Begin September 9 in Portions of Southeastern New York and September 16 in Northern New York. In southeastern New York, the early bear season runs from Sept. 9 to Sept. 24 in Wildlife Management Units (WMUs) 3A, 3C, 3H, 3J, 3K, 3M, 3P, 3R, 4P, and 4R. The early bowhunting season for bears opens in all of the Southern Zone on Oct. 1, followed by the regular firearms season beginning Nov. 18.

In northern New York, the early bear season runs from Sept. 16 to Oct. 13 in WMUs 5A, 5C, 5F, 5G, 5H, 5J, 6C, 6F, 6H, and 6J. Bowhunting season for bears also begins on Sept. 16 in the other Northern Zone units (WMUs 6A, 6G, 6K and 6N). Muzzleloader season opens in all northern WMUs on Oct. 14, followed by the regular firearms season for bears on Oct. 21.

During the Early Season, bear hunters may use a bow (with appropriate bowhunting eligibility), crossbow, muzzleloader, handgun, shotgun, or rifle (where allowed). Because of the likelihood of warm weather, hunters should be prepared to skin and cool harvested bears as soon as possible to protect the quality of the meat. Hunters may opt to skin and quarter the bear in the field, then pack out the meat in game bags to a waiting cooler of ice.

From roasts, stews, burger, and sausage to barbequed ribs, bear meat makes excellent table fare. Also, many hunters render bear fat into grease or lard, which is a great oil for cooking or baking. It can also be used to waterproof leather or lubricate patches for muzzleloaders.

DEC regulates black bear hunting to manage populations levels and limit the frequency of human-bear conflicts. Information about black bear hunting in New York, including season dates regulations, is available on DEC's website. Additionally, DEC's booklet Hunting the Black Bear in New York (PDF, 800 KB), includes tips on bear hunting and proper care of harvested bears.

Hunters are reminded that reporting their harvest helps DEC better manage New York's wildlife populations and hunting opportunities: TAKE IT, TAG IT, REPORT IT.

                                        File Photo

 

PUBLIC COMMENT PERIOD ON DRAFT CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE PLAN:  The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) will accept written comments on the draft New York State Interagency Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) Risk Minimization Plan for an additional two weeks through September 15, 2017.

The plan describes potential regulatory changes and actions that DEC and the NYS Department of Agriculture and Markets believe are necessary and appropriate to minimize the risk of CWD entering or spreading in New York. The plan was designed to protect both wild white-tailed deer and moose, as well as captive cervids, including deer and elk held at enclosed facilities.

The New York State Interagency CWD Risk Minimization Plan has had extensive outreach and vetting by stakeholder groups in the state to address concerns while maintaining the goals of protecting wildlife resources, the public, and the environment. The plan updates reporting and testing requirements of captive cervid owners, improves communication to stakeholders, and simplifies regulations to reduce confusion while protecting natural resources.

The draft Chronic Wasting Disease plan is available for review on DEC's website. Written comments on the draft plan will be accepted through September 15, 2017. Comments can be submitted by e-mail (wildlife@dec.ny.gov, subject: "CWD Plan") or by writing to NYSDEC, Bureau of Wildlife, 625 Broadway, Albany, NY 12233-4754.

 

DEC TO HOST PUBLIC INFORMATION SESSION ON HABITAT MANAGEMENT PLAN FOR CONNECTICUT HILL WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT AREA: The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) will host a public information session to provide information and answer questions about a recently completed habitat management plan for the Connecticut Hill Wildlife Management Area (WMA) located in the towns of Catherine, Cayuta and Hector, Schuyler County, and towns of Enfield and Newfield, Tompkins County.

The session will take place on Thursday, September 14th, from 6:00 - 8:00 p.m. at the Newfield Fire Department, 77 Main St, Newfield, NY 14867. DEC staff will be available for questions from 6:00 to 6:30 p.m. A formal presentation will follow.

Active habitat management to benefit wildlife populations is fundamental to wildlife management and has been an important component of New York’s efforts for decades. DEC launched the Young Forest Initiative in 2015. The initiative was the catalyst for starting an in-depth planning process for wildlife habitat management projects. Habitat management plans are being developed for all WMAs and other DEC properties, including select Multiple Use and Unique Areas. These plans guide land use management for a 10-year period, after which time DEC will assess implementation progress and modify the plans as needed.

DEC's Young Forest Initiative aims to establish a minimum of 10 percent of the forested acreage on WMAs as young forest over the next 10 years, and to manage for young forests in perpetuity. Young forests are an important part of the forest landscape that have declined during the last 50 years along with the wildlife that depend on this type of habitat. While DEC has been managing forests on WMAs to improve wildlife habitat for many years, with this initiative DEC is increasing its efforts and raising awareness about this type of habitat management.

In addition to incorporating aspects of the Young Forest Initiative, the habitat management plan incorporates recommendations from various sources, including unit management plans, existing WMA habitat management guidelines, best management practices, the New York Natural Heritage Program's WMA biodiversity inventory reports, and bird conservation area guidelines.

DEC will continue active management on Connecticut Hill WMA to benefit wildlife abundance and diversity, promote best management practices for targeted wildlife and habitats, and provide opportunities for wildlife-dependent recreation, such as hunting and bird watching.

The meeting will include a presentation about Connecticut Hill WMA, including specific activities and locations for planned management actions, a brief overview of the Young Forest Initiative, and a question and answer period.

 

DEC ENCOURAGES OUTDOOR ENTHUSIASTS TO PURCHASE A HABITAT/ACCESS STAMP: The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) encourages outdoor enthusiasts to consider purchasing a $5.00 Habitat/Access Stamp, an optional stamp that helps support the DEC's efforts to conserve habitat and increase public access for fish and wildlife-related recreation.

New York's habitat serves a vital role in maintaining healthy and sustainable fish and wildlife resources for all to enjoy. Created in 2002, the Habitat/Access Stamp helps supply financial support towards DEC's efforts in improving and conserving fish and wildlife habitat, as well as increasing access to public and private lands for fish and wildlife recreation.

Revenues from the sale of habitat/access stamps are deposited into the Habitat Conservation and Access Account (HCAA). The HCAA was created in 2015 as part of the young forest initiative and to foster on-the-ground habitat management and enhancement efforts and public access improvement. Since its inception, the stamp has generated $430,000, but sales have decreased over the last two years.

With funds resulting from sales of habitat and access stamps, some of the projects completed by DEC and partners include:

*Improved angler access and parking areas on Otego Creek (Town of Oneonta), Snyders Lake (Town of North Greenbush) and Fishkill Creek (Town of Beekman).

*Constructed accessible fishing site with parking area on Kayderosseras Creek (Town of Milton).

*Improved accessible access at Eighteen Mile Creek (Town of Evans)

*Constructed parking area and accessible fishing platform on Salmon River (Franklin County).

*Stream habitat improvement projects on Batten Kill (Washington County) and Wiscoy Creek (Wyoming County).

*New fishing platform on Buttonwood Creek (Town of Greece).

*Grassland habitat improvement at Upper Lisle Wildlife Management Area and several Wildlife Management Areas in Schuyler and Seneca counties.

A stamp is not required to hunt, fish or trap, nor is an individual required to buy a sporting license to donate for a stamp. A Habitat & Access Stamp can be purchased at a state license issuing agent location available on DEC's website or through the New York's online license issuing system on DEC's website.

 

9th Annual Arbor Day Poster Contest for Fifth Graders: The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) is now accepting submissions for the 9th annual 5th Grade Arbor Day Poster Contest. Students can showcase their artistic talents and help increase public awareness about trees in New York by participating in the contest.

The annual 5th Grade Arbor Day Poster Contest is sponsored by DEC, the State Department of Agriculture and Markets, and the State Education Department. The theme for this year's contest is, "Trees for Bees." Students are asked to create an original poster depicting this theme.

The winner will have his or her artwork replicated as DEC's official 2018 New York State 5th Grade Arbor Day Poster and the winning poster will be presented at the annual Arbor Day Celebration in Albany. Last year, New York printed more than 200,000 Arbor Day posters for distribution at schools, libraries, government offices, nursery and landscaping businesses, and environmental organizations throughout the state.

Posters must be submitted by January 5, 2018, to any local DEC regional office. The contest is open to all New York students enrolled in fifth grade. For more information, please contact Mary Martin, DEC Arbor Day 5th Grade Poster Contest coordinator, at (518) 402-9428, or visit 5th Grade Arbor Day Poster Contest on DEC's website.

 

 

THIS WEEK'S EVENTS: (For complete future listings go to the Calendar Page)

                                         

SEPTEMBER 2017

1 - Start of Canada Goose Seasons in the West Central and South Zones of Western New York (>9/25)

1 – Start of Hunting Seasons for Squirrels (>2/28/15), Snipe, Rails, Gallinules(>11/9) & Crows (Friday – Monday only)(>3/31/15)

9 - Barge Canal Bassmasters’ Chautauqua Lake Fishing Derby – Launch Location: We Wan Chu (For information contact Bill Terry  607-962-6920    sliderwrom@yahoo.com)

9 - Kids Fishing Derby Cole Park, 1674 Colesville Road, Harpursville, NY (10:30 am – 2:00 pm) Sponsored by the Broome County Federation of Sportsmen’s Clubs and Broome County Parks for kids ages 1-15. This is a free event. (For information contact Bill Holmes at 607-797-6670.)

9 - Monarch Butterfly Tagging Workshop at the Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge’s Visitor Center (3395 US Route 20 East, Seneca Falls, NY (9:00 am – 12:00 pm) This workshop will help participants understand the importance of conserving and studying monarch butterflies.  The purpose of the tagging is to associate the location of capture with the point of recovery for each butterfly. The data from these recaptures are used to determine the pathways taken by migrating monarchs, the influence of weather on the migration, the survival rate of the monarchs, etc. During this free workshop, participants will: Learn about the monarch ‘s life cycle; how to identify monarchs and their look-alikes; about the national monarch butterfly tagging program; how to net and tag butterflies and go Out “In the Field” with our team of monarch butterfly experts to put their new skills to practice! Reconvene at the Visitor Center for a Question & Answer Period; turn in data sheets. This event is free and space is limited to twenty participants. (For information and to register, call (315) 568-5987.)

10 – Trappers Rendezvous at Solon Gun Club, Solon, NY (follow the signs for the Solon Sportsmens Club at Solon.) (10:00 am – 4:00 pm) There will be raffles for a fur handling table, crossbow, miniature pack basket and a hooped tanned beaver.  Several items will be at the Chinese auction.  There will be trap supply vendors, fur handling, trapping and knife sharpening demos. (For more information call Les Wedge  (607) 749-3292.)

10 – Preregistration Deadline for 9/24 Wilderness First Aid Certification Class near Saranac Lake, NY. (9 hours) Sheila and Sonny Young, NYSDEC Licensed Outdoors Guides and Becoming an Outdoors-Woman (BOW) instructors, are offering the course full of valuable skills necessary for anyone who spends time in the outdoors. (Cost - $120) (For information/registration contact Sheila and Sonny at 518-359-8194 or adkfoothillsgs@gmail.com)

10 - KTBA Bass Club Oneida Lake Double Shot Tournament at Brewerton (6:00 am – 2:00 pm) (Cost: $80.00 boat for Members/$100.00 boat for Non-Members) (For information contact Tom Testa - tuzzytny@yahoo.com )

11 - LAKE ONTARIO FISHERIES MEETING at the Donald Schleiter Lodge and Pavillion, 199 East Manitou Road in Braddock Bay Park, Rochester, NY (6:30 – 9:00 pm) Anglers interested in the current state of Lake Ontario's trout and salmon population should plan to attend. DEC staff will be providing an update on the status of the alewife population in the lake and the actions they intend to take to keep the lake's trout and salmon population in balance with their primary prey fish. Background information can be found on the DEC website. Those unable to attend the meeting can email their comments or questions.

12 - LAKE ONTARIO FISHERIES MEETING at the Pulaski High School, 4624 Salina Street, Pulaski, NY (6:30 – 9:00 pm) Anglers interested in the current state of Lake Ontario's trout and salmon population should plan to attend. DEC staff will be providing an update on the status of the alewife population in the lake and the actions they intend to take to keep the lake's trout and salmon population in balance with their primary prey fish. Background information can be found on the DEC website. Those unable to attend the meeting can email their comments or questions.

13 -  LAKE ONTARIO FISHERIES MEETING at the Cornell Cooperative Extension, 4487 Lake Avenue, Lockport, NY (6:30 – 9:00 pm) Anglers interested in the current state of Lake Ontario's trout and salmon population should plan to attend. DEC staff will be providing an update on the status of the alewife population in the lake and the actions they intend to take to keep the lake's trout and salmon population in balance with their primary prey fish. Background information can be found on the DEC website. Those unable to attend the meeting can email their comments or questions.

14 - Montezuma Birdwatching Van Tour at the Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savannah, NY. (5:00 – 7:00 pm) The autumn migration continues as waterfowl, shorebirds and songbirds continue to use Montezuma during their long journey. Join Montezuma Audubon Center’s Director Chris Lajewski as he leads a birding tour of Montezuma's birding hotspots where dozens of species can be seen and heard! Binoculars and field guides will be provided. (Fee: $10/child; $15/adult, $40/family.) (For more information, call 315-365-3588 or email montezuma@audubon.org.)

14 – Ducks Unlimited – Skaneateles Chapter Banquet at the Lodge at Welch Allyn, Skaneateles, NY. (6:00 pm) Waterfowl conservation is facing important challenges as wetlands and other habitats are being degraded and destroyed across the continent. Ducks Unlimited has a vision to reverse this trend. (Cost: $70 Single, $105 Couple) (For information call DR. Mike Schummer 585-319-6763) 

14-18 – Women’s Adventure Kayak Training Trip in the ADK. Participants will be working on Level 2 & Level 3 skills whilst enjoying a beautiful setting with our own private launch access. Food will be sourced locally from organic farms. 'Pamper activities' for 'off the water' time can also be arranged for additional cost. NDK sea kayaks are available (Cost: $750.00/Canoe rental: $125) The four days include training, 4 evening meals and comfortable accommodations in beds at authentic Northpoint Camp at the edge of 6 million protected acres of Adirondack forest. Wifi (For information call 716-392-2708 or email seabird.ava@gmail.com)

15 - Whitetails Unlimited – Tioga County Chapter Hunters Night Out at Red Roof Inn Owego Treadway, 1100 NY 17C, Owego, NY (Cost: $60.00 Single/$40.00 Spouse or Youth) WTU provides grants to local projects and activities that advance our mission. Proceeds from this event will benefit local youth and habitat programs. (Deadline for sign-up 9/12/17) (For information go to http://www.whitetailsunlimited.com/events/banquets/owego-ny-tioga-county-chapter-hunters-night-out/)

15-16 - 21th Annual Montezuma Muckrace at the Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savannah, NY. (5:00 – 7:00 pm) The 21th Annual Montezuma Muckrace will be on September 15-16, 2017. This Big Day competition begins at 7:00 p.m. Friday runs for 24 hours. Teams will compete to see who can see the most species within the Montezuma Wetlands Complex in Cayuga, Wayne, and Seneca counties. The Complex includes the Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge, the NYSDEC Montezuma Wildlife Management Area and the Montezuma Audubon Center. The higher purpose behind the fun is raising funds for the Friends of the Montezuma Wetlands Complex Last year 29 teams raised $10,200. There will be six categories in which to compete: Collegiate, Competitive, Low-carbon (no cars used), Recreational, Family/Mentor, and Photo. Come join the fun!   See more at: http://friendsofmontezuma.org/projects-programs/muckrace/.  (For more information, call 315-365-3588 or email montezuma@audubon.org.)

15-17 - Becoming an Outdoors-Woman Workshop at the Silver Bay YMCA on Lake George, Hague, NY. The workshop is focused on learning outdoor skills - skills usually associated with hunting and fishing, but useful for many other outdoor pursuits. Designed for women, it is an

opportunity for anyone 18 years of age or older, and is for you if: • You have never tried these activities, but have always wanted to learn. • You are a beginner who wants to improve your skills. • You know how to do some of these activities, but would like to try new ones. • You are looking for the camaraderie of like-minded individuals. • You would like to become more self-sufficient. You can earn a NYS Hunter Education Certificate or a Trapper Education Certificate as part of the workshop. (Home study is required.) Enrollment limit 125. Minimum age is 18 years old. (For information contact Kelly Stang  kelly.stang@dec.ny.gov  518-402-8862.)

16 - 17TH Annual Fall Festival at the Reinstein Woods Environmental Education Center, 93 Honorine Drive, Depew, NY (Town of Cheektowaga) (10:00 am - 4:00 pm) Kick off the fall season by spending a day in the woods. Enjoy crafts for kids, live animals, hands-on activities, food, live music by Mama Earth and more! (For information and register call 716-683-5959 or email reinsteinwoods@dec.ny.gov)

16 - Three-F Youth Conservation Mentor Day at the Three-F Club, 904 Swann Road, Youngstown, NY. Enrollment is now open for a limited number of slots available for kids 12 to 18. This is an intensive day of learning that will include turkey calling instruction, conservation ethics, dog handling, archery, safe gun handling, skeet and trap shooting and more. The day culminates with a pheasant hunt on the club grounds as well. Cost is $35 and you must be accompanied by an adult or guardian. (For more information on how to reserve a spot, contact Dale Shank at 791-3809.)

16 - Steuben County Coon Hunters, Inc. Coonhound Event at their clubhouse at 4082 Depot Street, Cameron, NY (5:30 pm - Coonhound Bench Show - $15.00/8:00 pm - Coonhound Nite Hunt - $20.00) (For information call Roger Barney at 607-695-9024 or email ten.sehguh@yenrab_jr)

16 - Whitetails Unlimited – Southern Tier Chapter Hunters Night Out at Howard Community Center
7481 Hopkins Road, Howard, NY (Cost: $60.00 Single/$40.00 Spouse or Youth) WTU provides grants to local projects and activities that advance our mission. Proceeds from this event will benefit local youth and habitat programs. (Deadline for sign-up 9/13/17) (For information go to http://www.whitetailsunlimited.com/events/banquets/howard-ny-southern-tier-chapter-hunters-night-out/)

16 - New York State Trapper Education at Northern Chautauqua Conservation Club, 1 Mullett Steet, Dunkirk, NY (9:00 am – 5:30 pm) Trapper Education is required for all new trappers. This course covers how to trap responsibly and selectively and how to handle pelts to produce marketable furs. All courses require the completion of homework prior to attending the course. If you do not complete the homework you cannot complete the course. (For information call Gary Dudek  716-366-3397)

16 - Youth Mentor Pheasant Hunt at the Three-F Club, 904 Swann Road, Youngstown, NY. For youth 12 to 18 years of age. (For information call Dale Shank at 716-791-3809.)

16-17 - Fall Public Blackpowder Shoot at the Alabama Hunt Club, 1854 Lewiston Road, Alabama, NY (Starting at 8:30 am each day.) (For information call John Szumigala at 716-714-5514.)

16-17 - New York State Arms Collectors Association Gun Show at the NYS Fairgrounds Expo Center, 581 State Fair Boulevard, Syracuse , NY (Sat., 9 am-5 pm; Sun., 9 am-3 pm) 1,000 tables. (Admission: $7.00/seniors $5.00/children under 12 free) (For information contact Sandy Ackerman Klinger, 346 Paul Street, Endicott, NY 13760, 607-748-1010 email sandynysac@yahoo.com)

17 - Start of Northern Zone Early Bear Season (>10/1)

 

Until our next meeting in the Corner, have a great time in the outdoors. This is Ron Schroder for Your In on The Outdoors for Western New York.

What Do You Think? Have something for other sportspeople? Let us know HERE.

 

 

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9 – 1 – 17

 

Welcome to this week's Conservation Chatter Corner - little bits of happenings concerning our outdoors and you, the sportspeople who enjoy being part of that outdoors.

SEPTEMBER 23, 2017

 

DEC TO HOST PUBLIC INFORMATION SESSION ON HABITAT MANAGEMENT PLAN FOR CONNECTICUT HILL WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT AREA: The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) will host a public information session to provide information and answer questions about a recently completed habitat management plan for the Connecticut Hill Wildlife Management Area (WMA) located in the towns of Catherine, Cayuta and Hector, Schuyler County, and towns of Enfield and Newfield, Tompkins County.

The session will take place on Thursday, September 14th, from 6:00 - 8:00 p.m. at the Newfield Fire Department, 77 Main St, Newfield, NY 14867. DEC staff will be available for questions from 6:00 to 6:30 p.m. A formal presentation will follow.

Active habitat management to benefit wildlife populations is fundamental to wildlife management and has been an important component of New York’s efforts for decades. DEC launched the Young Forest Initiative in 2015. The initiative was the catalyst for starting an in-depth planning process for wildlife habitat management projects. Habitat management plans are being developed for all WMAs and other DEC properties, including select Multiple Use and Unique Areas. These plans guide land use management for a 10-year period, after which time DEC will assess implementation progress and modify the plans as needed.

DEC's Young Forest Initiative aims to establish a minimum of 10 percent of the forested acreage on WMAs as young forest over the next 10 years, and to manage for young forests in perpetuity. Young forests are an important part of the forest landscape that have declined during the last 50 years along with the wildlife that depend on this type of habitat. While DEC has been managing forests on WMAs to improve wildlife habitat for many years, with this initiative DEC is increasing its efforts and raising awareness about this type of habitat management.

In addition to incorporating aspects of the Young Forest Initiative, the habitat management plan incorporates recommendations from various sources, including unit management plans, existing WMA habitat management guidelines, best management practices, the New York Natural Heritage Program's WMA biodiversity inventory reports, and bird conservation area guidelines.

DEC will continue active management on Connecticut Hill WMA to benefit wildlife abundance and diversity, promote best management practices for targeted wildlife and habitats, and provide opportunities for wildlife-dependent recreation, such as hunting and bird watching.

The meeting will include a presentation about Connecticut Hill WMA, including specific activities and locations for planned management actions, a brief overview of the Young Forest Initiative, and a question and answer period.

 

THE GOOD GUYS AT WORK:

Nice, Not Naughty, Raccoons - Genesee County: On August 14, ECO Gary Wilson received a call from a concerned citizen in Batavia who had encountered what he described as a "vicious raccoon." The man stated that on the previous day, a raccoon in his driveway would not let him get out of his truck. He captured the raccoon in a cage trap and reported that it was still acting aggressively. ECO Wilson responded and found there were actually two raccoons in separate cage traps, both appearing to be in good health. The ECO also found a large amount of cat food. The complainant and his acquaintance explained that they feed the local feral cats and set cage traps for them. The subjects' intention is to capture the strays and have them sterilized for reintroduction back to the wild. ECO Wilson explained to the duo that cat food provides an easy meal for raccoons, and that the trapped raccoons were acting as wild animals typically would when confined or cornered. Both raccoons were returned to the wild.

                         Photo by John Adamski

 

EHD CONFIRMED IN WHITE-TAILED DEER AND CATTLE IN OHIO: The first confirmed case of epizootic hemorrhagic disease (EHD) was recently confirmed in both white-tailed deer and cattle in Ohio. The virus was diagnosed by the Ohio Department of Agriculture’s

(ODA) Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory (ADDL). The positive diagnoses were from a cow from Jefferson County and a wild white-tailed deer buck from Lorain County. The discovery is not unusual, as cases of this infection have been detected in both wild and captive white-tailed deer in Ohio in the summer and fall of each of the last several years. In fact, significant disease outbreaks in Ohio have occurred every five years, the last in 2012.

The Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR) Division of Wildlife (DOW) reports numerous dead deer from Columbiana and Jefferson counties. EHD virus has also been confirmed in neighboring counties of both Pennsylvania and Kentucky. The EHD virus is

not infectious to people and is not spread from animal to animal. It is transmitted by the

bite of small midges, so infections are often seen in Ohio in late summer and early fall.

EHD-associated deaths can occur up through the first frost of the year. Once infected, deer show symptoms within five to ten days and many deer die within 36 hours of the onset of symptoms. People should always avoid touching or handling sick or dead wild animals.

White-tailed deer, along with mule deer, elk, bighorn sheep and pronghorn antelope are susceptible to the disease. Deer infected with this virus may show symptoms including lethargy, head hung down, loss of fear of humans, swelling of the tongue and head and neck, difficulty breathing and excess salivation due to tongue swelling or ulcers in the mouth. Affected deer are often found in or near bodies of water, likely due to fever and dehydration.

Cattle may show signs including swelling of the muzzle, oral erosions, salivation, off feed condition and fever. Affected cattle and sheep may also show signs as described for deer as described above. Such cases in cattle and sheep may mimic other reportable diseases such as foot and mouth disease, bluetongue and vesicular stomatitis. Producers and animal owners are strongly encouraged to report such cases to their veterinarian.

 

FROM NDA: DID YOU KNOW?: Although little evidence exists regarding the benefits of selectively removing bucks with "inferior" antlers from wild, free-ranging whitetail populations in an effort to improve buck quality, it's still a hotly debated topic. Did you know antlers are among the fastest growing structures in nature? This also makes them a prime subject of human medical research on cancer, osteoporosis and limb regeneration. Click here to learn more about the practice of culling, antler growth, and how abnormalities can arise. 

(From NDA On Watch – The official newsletter of the National Deer Alliance.)

 

KUDOS: NEW YORK STATE OUTDOOR WRITERS TO CELEBRATE 50TH ANNIVERSARY!:

A concept spawned by two outdoor writers in 1967 has grown into a viable organization of nearly 100 professional communicators and dozens of supporting members—businesses and organizations in the outdoor industry—and that group, the New York State Outdoor Writers Association, will be celebrating its 50th anniversary in Lake George, N.Y., Oct. 11-15.

Bill Hilts of Sanborn, N.Y., and Hans Paller of Massena, N.Y. combined on an idea that both independently had begun to act on—that is, contacting New York members of the national Outdoor Writers Association of America to see if they would be interested in forming a statewide organization. NYSOWA’s first formal meeting was held in Lake George in the fall of 1967, so the group is returning to that village to meet for its golden anniversary celebration.

The membership will base itself at Dunham’s Bay Resort, but events also will take place at other venues, including North Creek/Gore Mountain, SUNY Adirondack, where students of the community college’s culinary program will prepare a game dinner, Glen Lake and on Lake George itself.

Today, the organization provides its members with the opportunity to attend annual spring and fall gatherings at sites around the state, allowing members to experience outdoor recreation in those areas and attend newsmaker and craft improvement workshops as well. Members also get the benefits of a quarterly newsletter, a polished website, www.nysowa.org, with much of it open to public viewing, a membership directory and a very prestigious communicating and photo awards program. That awards program is sponsored by Ducks Unlimited, the Sportsman Channel, Redding Reloading Equipment and the National Shooting Sports Foundation.

Hilts, the surviving member of the founding duo, says that what he is perhaps most proud of is NYSOWA’s scholarship program that aids college students pursuing outdoor-related majors and youth attending DEC summer camps and, this past year, a father and son, both very ill, going on a big-game hunt at a New York shooting preserve.

NYSOWA encourages the public, as well as prospective members, both individual and supporting, to learn more about the association at www.nysowa.org.

 

THIS WEEK'S EVENTS: (For complete future listings go to the Calendar Page)

AUGUST 2017

18-9/4 - Lake Ontario Counties (LOC) Fall Trout and Salmon Derby - The $25,000 Grand Prize is part of the over $50,000 in cash that will be offered for this event.  (For information go to www.loc.org or call 888-733-5246.)

31-9/2 - 2017 New York State Trappers Association Convention & Sportsman Show at the Herkimer County Fairgrounds, 135 Cemetery Street, Frankfort NY. (Admission: $10 for the weekend/Free to under 16) (for information contact Jack Spriggs  315-529-8248 or email Spriggsfamfarm@gmail.com or go to www.nystrappers.org/conventions)

                                         

SEPTEMBER 2017

1 - Start of Canada Goose Seasons in the West Central and South Zones of Western New York (>9/25)

1 – Start of Hunting Seasons for Squirrels (>2/28/15), Snipe, Rails, Gallinules(>11/9) & Crows (Friday – Monday only)(>3/31/15)

1 - Deadline to Apply for DEC-Sponsored Pheasant Hunts. The new program enables experienced hunters and others to obtain state-reared pheasants for use in sponsored hunts for youth, women, novices, veterans and people with disabilities. The Reynolds Game Farm in Ithaca raises an additional 2,000 pheasants annually to be used in sponsored hunts. Anyone interested in obtaining an application to hold a sponsored pheasant hunt can contact the local DEC regional office for an application (a list of DEC regional offices is provided below). Program requirements and applications can be downloaded from DEC’s website. Successful applicants will be notified via phone. If an application has been accepted, the applicant will be required to make arrangements with the Reynolds Game Farm located in Ithaca to coordinate a delivery time, date and location.

2 - New York State Trapper Education at the Herkimer County Fairgrounds, 135 Cemetery Street, Frankfort, NY (7:30 am – 4:00 pm) Trapper Education is required for all new trappers. This course covers how to trap responsibly and selectively and how to handle pelts to produce marketable furs. All courses require the completion of homework prior to attending the course. If you do not complete the homework you cannot complete the course. (Instructed by Nathan L. Brock) This course is held in conjunction with the New York State Trapper's Convention, please let the gate know you are here for the course, you DO NOT have to pay to get in the gate.

2 - Poisonous Plants In Your Backyard at the Reinstein Woods Environmental Education Center, 93 Honorine Drive, Depew, NY (Town of Cheektowaga) (2:00 pm) Some plants that grow in your yard or garden can be toxic if you eat the wrong part or prepare them the wrong way. Learn about these common plants, and about some poisonous plants and animals here at Reinstein Woods. For adults and children ages 12 and older. (For information and register call 716-683-5959 or email reinsteinwoods@dec.ny.gov)

3 - 4th Annual King of the Oak Tournament - This is the fourth and final leg of the 4 part series to crown the King of the Oak. (For information contact Paul Czarnecki at 716-309-0085/ tri0900@gmail.com or Rick Hajecki at 585-704-7996/ crazyyankeesportfishing@yahoo.com.

4&6 – Bow Hunters Education Course at Hideaway Archery in Dayton, NY (4:30 -9:30 pm each day) Two-day attendance mandatory for certification. No charge for the course. Participants should be 12 or older, however students age 11 must be accompanied by a parent both days. Class is limited to 35 students. Bring identification, pen or pencil, snacks and a beverage. Mandatory pre-registration at www.register-ed.com. (For more information contact the DEC at 716-372-0645) Pick up the course material at Hideaway Archery, or the Sheriff’s Office or print online.

7 - Home School Nature Series:  Duck Banding at the Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savannah, NY. (10:00 am – 12:00 pm) Montezuma is an important stopover area for thousands of migrating ducks. Homeschooled children ages 5-12 are invited to join Montezuma’s wildlife biologists to band ducks and gather data that helps scientists learn more about waterfowl populations, their health and distribution. (Fee: $8/student.) (For more information, call 315-365-3588 or email montezuma@audubon.org.)

8 - Cattaraugus County Houndsmen and Conservation Club Inc. Coonhound Event at their clubhouse at 10491 Route 240, West Valley, NY (6:00 pm - Coonhound Bench Show - $15.00/8:00 pm - Coonhound Event Nite Hunt - $20.00) (For information call Chris Deperro  716-570-6798) 

8&9 - New York State Trapper Education at Towlesville Craft And Shaft, 7001 Snell Hill Road, Bath, NY (Fri 6:00 - 9:00 pm/Sat 8:00 am – 4:00 pm)Trapper Education is required for all new trappers. This course covers how to trap responsibly and selectively and how to handle pelts to produce marketable furs. All courses require the completion of homework prior to attending the course. If you do not complete the homework you cannot complete the course. (Instructed by Jerry Gamet)

9 - WNY Kayak Anglers Bass on the Oak Tournament from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. $20 entry fee. Weigh in at the Black North Inn, 14352 Ontario Street, Kent, NY

9 - Women Conquering Outdoor Adventures Day at North Forest Rod & Gun Club in conjunction with the Ladies Shoot N’ Hoot Program. (8:30 am – 5:00 pm) Choose four workshops out of 13 possible sessions. RSVP by Sept. 1. (Registration is $65.) (For information/preregister call Colleen Gaskill at 716-628-9023.)

9 - Fields of Gold, Getting to Know Goldenrod at the Pfeiffer Nature Center, Eshelman Property, 1420 Yubadam Rd., Portville, NY (10:00 am – 12:00 pm) As fall approaches, yellow graces the roadsides and fields. The predominate yellow flower is Goldenrod…not one, but up to fifteen different species of Goldenrod in our area. They contribute to the rich summer ecosystem. Take a walk with Pfeiffer Nature Center and explore this important and beautiful plant. The walk will include an introduction to basic botanical terms, how to use a plant identification key, hands-on experience identifying several species of Goldenrods, and a bit of fact, folklore, and fiction about this summertime beauty. (Fee: Free for members and children under 13, $5 for non-members.) Minors must be accompanied by an adult. Register by 4pm Thursday, September 7th. (For information/register contact the office at 716-933-0187 or Register here.)

9 - Utah-Florida-Arizona Multi-State Pistol Permit Class at Calvary Baptist Church, 3515 Galloway Road, Batavia. NY (Starting at 9:00 am) Course sponsored by with the Genesee Co. Chapter of SCOPE. (For information/preregister contact Jim Carr at 716-778-9431.)

9 - High Power Rifle Tournament at East Aurora Fish and Game Club, Luther Road, East Aurora, NY. (Starting at 10:00 am) (For information call Dave Romanczak at 716-652-8577.

9 – Cabela’s Sportsman’s Seminars at Cabela’s Cheektowaga Store, 2003 Walden Avenue, Cheektowaga, NY. Sessions include: Daisy BB Gun Range (11:00 am – 1:00 pm) - Bring the family to our Daisy BB Gun Range where we'll have instructors show you how to properly and safely aim and shoot a BB gun!  It's fun for all ages and you can even take home your target to show off!; New Shooter Guide (11:00 am -12:00 pm) - If you're new to shooting or simply looking for tips and tricks, you won't want to miss this class led by a seasoned NRA instructor who will guide you through the need-to-knows of firearms.  Plus, you'll learn about firearms safety, home safety and storage as well as proper care and cleaning.; Shotgun Cleaning Tips (1:00 – 2:00 pm) - If you've ever wanted to learn how to properly care for and clean your shotgun, this free seminar is for you.  Our Cabela's Outfitter will show you the proper techniques of cleaning and caring for your shotgun, and help get you acquainted with cleaning kits that make the process easier. (For information call 716-608-4770)

9 - Wyoming County Houndsmen and Conservation Club Coonhound Event at their clubhouse Sage Road, Warsaw, NY (6:00 pm - Coonhound Bench Show - $12.00/8:00 pm - Coonhound Event Nite Hunt - $15.00) (For information call Nick Jennings  585-993-0145)

9 - .22 Caliber Pistol Or Rifle “Spinner Target” Course at the Bear Lake Rod & Gun Club, 4391 Cassadaga-Stockton Road, Stockton, NY (10:00 am – 2:00 pm) (Cost is $10 per person and includes lunch) (For information call Rob at 716-485-3773, Tom at 716-680-0209 or the Club at 716-595-3334.)

9 - Southern Tier Bassmasters (Points) Tournament on Cayuga Lake at the Dean’s Cove Launch (ENTRY FEE: -$25/Angler --$5/optional lunker) (For information Call 585-314-7142 or email tournaments@southerntierbass.com)

9 – Trapper Training Course at Seymore Pound, Green, NY. On line course work must be completed prior to the course. To preregister go to www.dec.ny.gov/outdoor/92274.html

9 - Barge Canal Bassmasters’ Chautauqua Lake Fishing Derby – Launch Location: We Wan Chu (For information contact Bill Terry  607-962-6920    sliderwrom@yahoo.com)

9 - Kids Fishing Derby Cole Park, 1674 Colesville Road, Harpursville, NY (10:30 am – 2:00 pm) Sponsored by the Broome County Federation of Sportsmen’s Clubs and Broome County Parks for kids ages 1-15. This is a free event. (For information contact Bill Holmes at 607-797-6670.)

9 - Monarch Butterfly Tagging Workshop at the Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge’s Visitor Center (3395 US Route 20 East, Seneca Falls, NY (9:00 am – 12:00 pm) This workshop will help participants understand the importance of conserving and studying monarch butterflies.  The purpose of the tagging is to associate the location of capture with the point of recovery for each butterfly. The data from these recaptures are used to determine the pathways taken by migrating monarchs, the influence of weather on the migration, the survival rate of the monarchs, etc. During this free workshop, participants will: Learn about the monarch ‘s life cycle; how to identify monarchs and their look-alikes; about the national monarch butterfly tagging program; how to net and tag butterflies and go Out “In the Field” with our team of monarch butterfly experts to put their new skills to practice! Reconvene at the Visitor Center for a Question & Answer Period; turn in data sheets. This event is free and space is limited to twenty participants. (For information and to register, call (315) 568-5987.)

10 – Trappers Rendezvous at Solon Gun Club, Solon, NY (follow the signs for the Solon Sportsmens Club at Solon.) (10:00 am – 4:00 pm) There will be raffles for a fur handling table, crossbow, miniature pack basket and a hooped tanned beaver.  Several items will be at the Chinese auction.  There will be trap supply vendors, fur handling, trapping and knife sharpening demos. (For more information call Les Wedge  (607) 749-3292.)

10 – Preregistration Deadline for 9/24 Wilderness First Aid Certification Class near Saranac Lake, NY. (9 hours) Sheila and Sonny Young, NYSDEC Licensed Outdoors Guides and Becoming an Outdoors-Woman (BOW) instructors, are offering the course full of valuable skills necessary for anyone who spends time in the outdoors. (Cost - $120) (For information/registration contact Sheila and Sonny at 518-359-8194 or adkfoothillsgs@gmail.com)

10 - KTBA Bass Club Oneida Lake Double Shot Tournament at Brewerton (6:00 am – 2:00 pm) (Cost: $80.00 boat for Members/$100.00 boat for Non-Members) (For information contact Tom Testa - tuzzytny@yahoo.com )

 

Until our next meeting in the Corner, have a great time in the outdoors. This is Ron Schroder for Your In on The Outdoors for Western New York.

What Do You Think? Have something for other sportspeople? Let us know HERE.

 

 

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8 – 25 – 17

 

Welcome to this week's Conservation Chatter Corner B little bits of happenings concerning our outdoors and you, the sportspeople who enjoy being part of that outdoors.

 

FISHING, HUNTING LICENSE HOLDERS GET IN FREE TO NYS FAIR ON AUG. 27

 

WATERFOWL HUNTING PERMITS NEEDED FOR DUCK SEASON OPENING WEEKEND AT OAK ORCHARD AND TONAWANDA WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT AREAS: special permits will be issued for the opening weekend of duck season to hunt waterfowl at two popular state-managed locations. The permit requirement applies to waterfowl hunting at the Oak Orchard and Tonawanda Wildlife Management Areas (WMAs) located primarily in Genesee and Niagara counties, with small portions in Orleans and Erie counties. The special permits promote hunter safety and increase the quality of hunting on days when the areas receive the greatest use.

A special permit is required to hunt waterfowl (ducks and geese) at Oak Orchard and Tonawanda WMAs on the first two days of duck season, October 28 and 29, 2017. These days are the only times the special permits are needed. Waterfowl may be hunted without a special permit during the remainder of the season. The permit system has been used successfully at both wildlife management areas for many years. No special permits are required to hunt other game species at Oak Orchard or Tonawanda WMAs.

Opening weekend waterfowl hunting permits for the two Wildlife Management Areas will be distributed by a random lottery. For each of the two days, DEC typically issues 100 permits for Tonawanda WMA and 50 permits for Oak Orchard WMA.

To apply for the lottery, hunters must send in a postcard with their name, address, and their first three choices, in order of preference, clearly indicated. Hunters must choose from four options: Oak Orchard first Saturday; Oak Orchard first Sunday; Tonawanda first Saturday; and Tonawanda first Sunday.

Applicants must also complete a Waterfowl Identification Course and their course certificate number must be indicated on the postcard. Applications will be accepted through September 15, 2017, and must be mailed to the New York State Bureau of Wildlife, 1101 Casey Road, Box B, Basom, New York 14013. Each permittee will be allowed to bring one companion over the age of 18 and an additional companion 18 years old or younger.

Duplicate permits will not be issued to hunters already issued a permit to hunt on the Iroquois National Wildlife Refuge. Any cards submitted by hunters selected to hunt on Iroquois on the first Saturday will be excluded from the lottery for that day at both Oak Orchard and Tonawanda.
Issued permits are nontransferable and are not valid for companion(s) unless the permittee is present and hunting within 50 yards. The permittee is responsible for completing and returning the questionnaire portion of the permit to the New York State Bureau of Wildlife by November 15, 2017. If the completed questionnaire is not received by November 15, the permittee will be ineligible for next year's (2018) lottery.

 

PREPARATION FOR THE MONTEZUMA MUCKRACE: Birdwatchers from all over New York State and beyond will descend on the Montezuma Wetlands Complex for the 21st Annual Montezuma Muckrace on Friday, September 15th and Saturday, September 16th. The Muckrace, organized by the Friends of the Montezuma Wetlands Complex, is a 24-hour bird watching competition that raises funds for bird conservation and environmental education programs in this birding hotspot. 

Mid-September is a great time to be birding at the Montezuma Wetlands Complex, one of New York's most exciting birding destinations. The Complex has been designated as a globally significant Important Bird Area by Audubon New York, and serves as a critical stopover for millions of migratory waterfowl, songbirds, shorebirds and birds of prey, including many threatened and endangered species including the Bald Eagle, Pied-billed Grebe, Black Tern and Short-eared Owl.  The 242-square mile Montezuma Focus Area, which was highlighted under the North American Waterfowl Management Plan as critical migratory bird habitat, serves as the boundary for the Montezuma Muckrace. 

Registration is now open and birding teams can register under several categories (Collegiate, Competitive, Youth, Low-Carbon, Photo, Family/Mentor, or Recreational) and bird together from 7:00 p.m. Friday, September 15th until 7:00 pm Saturday, September 16th trying to locate as many bird species as possible  Winning teams over the past several years have identified as many as 148 species, and collectively, as many as 192 species have been seen in a single day. 

This event, now in its 21st year, has grown in popularity and set records for participation in each of the past 5 years.  It is made possible by over 25 generous sponsors, including perennial top sponsor: Wild Birds Unlimited at Sapsucker Woods.  Prizes are awarded to all participants with those teams that record the most species getting first crack at the prize table.  Besides funds and prizes donated by sponsors, money is also raised through pledges sought by participants. The Muckrace teams that raise the most money and locate the most bird species get their name engraved on custom-made trophies which are on display at the Montezuma Audubon Center. 

Event organizers include the Friends of the Montezuma Wetlands Complex, N.Y.S. Department of Environmental Conservation, Audubon NY and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.  The Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 Route 89, Savannah, NY, will serve as the event headquarters, with participants returning to the Center at the end of the Muckrace to compile their checklists, grab a bite to eat, and enjoy recapping highlights of the day. 

In the 20-year Muckrace history, over $125,000 has been donated in support of bird habitat restoration, research or public access. Recent Montezuma Muckrace donations have supported interpretive exhibits at the Montezuma Audubon Center highlighting habitat restoration, removal of invasive plants and replacement with wildflowers for pollinators at the Refuge Visitor Center, improvement of water level management on a 448-acre impoundment, construction of the Deep Muck observation deck, and support for American Black Duck banding.

For more information, including 2017 Montezuma Muckrace registration and sponsorship details, visit the Friends of the Montezuma Wetlands Complex website at www.friendsofmontezuma.org

 

MONTEZUMA NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE MONARCH BUTTERFLY TAGGING WORKSHOP: Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge will host a Monarch Butterfly Tagging Workshop, Saturday, September 9, 2017, 9:00 AM – 12:00 PM, beginning at the Refuge’s Visitor Center (3395 US Route 20 East, Seneca Falls, NY 13148).  There is no fee for this program. 

                                                           Photo by John Adamski

The monarch butterfly is one of the most recognizable species in North America and it’s in trouble. Habitat loss and fragmentation has occurred throughout the monarch’s range. Pesticide use can destroy the milkweed monarchs need to survive. A changing climate has intensified weather events which may impact monarch populations (https://www.fws.gov/savethemonarch/ )

Numbers of monarchs have decreased significantly over the last 20 years, but together we can save the monarch. In the United States, there is a massive effort to provide habitat for monarch butterflies, imperiled bumble bees and other pollinators. There is no one group or agency responsible for providing habitat needed for monarch conservation. All organizations, agencies and individuals must work together to improve, restore and create grassland habitats to save monarchs. (https://www.fws.gov/savethemonarch/ )

At Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge, we have designated an area along the Seneca Trail as a Monarch Waystation (http://wwwmonarchwatch.org/waystations/ ), adjusted our mowing schedule to better promote milkweed  growth (monarch caterpillars only eat milkweed!), have a graduate student studying monarch butterfly habitat use, and are lucky to have a monarch expert on site each summer as a volunteer.

This workshop will help participants understand the importance of conserving and studying monarch butterflies.  The purpose of the tagging is to associate the location of capture with the point of recovery for each butterfly. The data from these recaptures are used to determine the pathways taken by migrating monarchs, the influence of weather on the migration, the survival rate of the monarchs, etc.

During this free workshop, participants will:

*Learn about the monarch ‘s life cycle; how to identify monarchs and their look-alikes; about the national monarch butterfly tagging program; how to net and tag butterflies

*Go Out “In the Field” with our team of monarch butterfly experts to put their new skills to practice!

*Reconvene at the Visitor Center for a Question & Answer Period; turn in data sheets

Space is limited to twenty participants. To register, please call (315) 568-5987.

 

THE GOOD GUYS AT WORK:

Fox Pup for Sale - Erie County: On August 3, ECO Mark Mazurkiewicz received a call regarding an ad on Buffalo's Craigslist for an eight-week-old female Arctic Fox Pup being sold for $600 in Kenmore. ECO Mazurkiewicz contacted a permitted wildlife rehabilitator that operates a sanctuary for foxes and they met with the Kenmore woman offering the fox pup for sale. It is illegal to possess, barter, or offer for sale a wild animal as a pet in New York. The fox pup was seized and taken to the permitted facility where it will be cared for pending a court disposition. The woman posting the pup for sale had bought it in Michigan and brought it into New York. She was ticketed for offering a wild animal for sale as a pet, returnable to Tonawanda Court, and faces up to a $250 fine. Officer Mazurkiewicz subsequently contacted a U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Special Agent to follow up on the sale of the pup in Michigan and possible violations of the Lacey Act, which regulates the interstate sale and transportation of wildlife.

 


Arctic Fox offered for sale on Craigslist

 

THREE SAFETY TIPS FOR STAND UP PADDLERS WHEN BOATS ARE AROUND:  When it comes to enjoying the outdoors, stand up paddleboarding (SUP) has led the nation in growth with a 38 percent increase in participation from 2013 to 2014, according to the Outdoor Foundation’s 2015 Outdoor Recreation Participation Topline Report. But as these human-powered watercraft become more common in crowded harbors, busy waterfronts and other navigable waterways, sharing the water with both recreational boats and commercial vessels requires paddlers to up their safety game. With many of its half-million members owning both boats and paddlecraft, BoatUS offers its unique look at the issue with three easy to remember safety rules for stand up paddlers.

When is a paddleboard a boat? According to the US Coast Guard an SUP is considered a “vessel,” so it’s important to understand certain boating responsibilities. Follow all local navigation rules and use common sense when paddling around other vessels that may not be as maneuverable or are restricted by their draft or size. Generally, a paddleboard is more easily able to turn and stop whereas larger craft take time and distance to stop. Typically, it is safest to pass astern of other vessels and let them cross in front of you. Try to avoid heavy boat traffic and pick a route away from congestion.

Practice defensive paddling: Defensive paddling is preventing collisions and mishaps in spite of the actions of others around you. Remember boats may travel faster than you do and can carry a large wake. Some boats have awkward blind spots that prevent good visibility at certain trim angles so don’t assume a boater can always see you, especially at dawn or dusk. Wear bright colors and wear your life jacket with a whistle attached. Falling in, or swimming in heavily trafficked areas can lead to the start of a bad chain of events. In narrow channels stay as far right as possible and avoid crossing busy lanes. If you must, cross perpendicular to the lane so you get across quickly. If in a group, cross as a compact group – spreading out in a line like a bunch of baby ducks hinders traffic and increases the chance for a collision.

Don’t leave home without it: A life jacket is the minimum gear – but it only works if you wear it so don’t leave it strapped to the board. If you’re concerned about comfort, take a look at high-tech, low-maintenance belt-pack inflatables or the newest vest designs that offer complete freedom of movement. Add a whistle - it will always beat yelling at the top of your lungs. Avoid paddling at night, but if you must, you’ll have to show a white light in sufficient time to avoid a collision. A flashlight or headlamp meets this requirement; a glow stick does not. And finally, a safety leash is most helpful in preventing an awkward and potentially dangerous separation from your board.

If you’d like to learn more about boating safely, visit the BoatUS Foundation for Boating Safety and Clean Water at www.BoatUS.org.

 

 

THIS WEEK'S EVENTS: (For complete future listings go to the Calendar Page)

AUGUST 2017

18-9/4 - Lake Ontario Counties (LOC) Fall Trout and Salmon Derby - The $25,000 Grand Prize is part of the over $50,000 in cash that will be offered for this event.  (For information go to www.loc.org or call 888-733-5246.)

25-27 – The Genesee Valley Flint Knappers Association’ Annual Stone Tool Craftsman Show at Letchworth State Park, Castile, NY. (Fri/Sat 10:00 am – 5:00 pm/Sun 10:00 am – 2:00 pm) Event will include flintnapping demonstrations; living history encampment – fur trade & civil war era; eastern seaboard atlatl competition; primitive skills demonstrations and prehistoric artifact identification (free). (For information go to http://gvknappers.tripod.com)

26 - The Innovative Outdoors Walleye Challenge from Chadwick Bay in Dunkirk Harbor. This is a 1-day tourney with an optional Big-Fish Friday derby. Limited to 65 boats, $500 entry fee, 6-fish weigh-in. Part of Lake Erie King-Of-The-Lake Series (http://www.kotl.ca/walleye.html). Registration deadline: August 1. (For information call Jim Steel at 716-983-7867 or go to https://lakeeriewalleyetournament.com/.)

26 - Monarch Tag And Release at the Reinstein Woods Environmental Education Center, 93 Honorine Drive, Depew, NY (Town of Cheektowaga) (10:30 am) Learn how monarch butterflies are tagged and recorded for research, then release them for their journey south. For adults and children ages 10 and older. (For information/register call 716-683-5959 or email reinsteinwoods@dec.ny.gov)

26 - Birding 101: Class #8 at the Reinstein Woods Environmental Education Center, 93 Honorine Drive, Depew, NY (Town of Cheektowaga) (2:30 pm) Why do birds migrate? Learn which species to look for as they prepare for their long journey south. For adults and children ages 8 and older. (For information/register call 716-683-5959 or email reinsteinwoods@dec.ny.gov)

26 - National Wild Turkey Federation B Guns 'n' Lobsters event at Turkey Trot Acres, 188 Tubbs Hill Road, Candor, NY (1:00 pm) (For information contact Langevin Sean  607-427-5795   slangevin@nwtf.net)
27 - Barge Canal Bassmasters’ Oneida Lake Fishing Derby – Launch Location: Briggs Bay DEC Launch (For information contact Bill Terry  607-962-6920    
sliderwrom@yahoo.com)

27 - Women In Nature Skeet Clinic at the Camillus Sportsmen’s Club sponsored by the Onondaga County Federation of Sportsmen’s Clubs (9:00 am - ?? pm) This event is open to women 12 yrs. and older. Participants ages 12 to 17 MUST be accompanied by an adult at all times. Attendence is limited to 18 participants. Priority will be given to 1st time participants and Onondaga County residents. Instructors will teach the basics of skeet shooting through demonstration and hands on experience. (Fee--$20.00) (For information/register, contact Bob Dankiw at (315) 487-7892 or e-mail at bdankiw@verizon.net. Directions to Club available at http://www.camillussportsmensclub.com)

27 - New York State Trapper Education at the Solon Gun Club, 4475 Sportsman Road,Solon, NY(9:00 am – 6:00 pm)Trapper Education is required for all new trappers. This course covers how to trap responsibly and selectively and how to handle pelts to produce marketable furs. All courses require the completion of homework prior to attending the course. If you do not complete the homework you cannot complete the course. (Instructed by Joshua Kisner 607-863-3211)

31-9/2 - 2017 New York State Trappers Association Convention & Sportsman Show at the Herkimer County Fairgrounds, 135 Cemetery Street, Frankfort NY. (Admission: $10 for the weekend/Free to under 16) (for information contact Jack Spriggs  315-529-8248 or email Spr