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conservation chatter corner

with ron schroder

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YOUR IN ON THE OUTDOORS FOR WESTERN NEW YORK
www.huntfishnyoutdoors.com

 

2 - 21 – 20

 

Welcome to this week’s Conservation Chatter Corner – little bits of happenings concerning our outdoors and you, the sportspeople who enjoy being part of that outdoors.

 

CRITICAL WNY FOREST, NIAGARA RIVER HEADWATERS PRESERVED IN PERPETUITY: With the aid of a $655,000 Water Quality Improvement Project (WQIP) grant from DEC, the Western New York Land Conservancy – a regional, not-for-profit land trust – secured its $1.6 million fundraising goal to purchase Mossy Point in Buffalo’s rural Southtowns.

Mossy Point, a 222-acre forested parcel in the town of Wales, abuts the Land Conservancy’s Kenneglenn property and Hunters Creek County Park. Together, the three properties will form a 1,100 acre (1.7 square mile) protected area – one of the largest in the Niagara River watershed.

The Land Conservancy said it expects to complete the purchase of Mossy Point in the early spring. Then, a walking trail along with cross-country and snowshoeing hiking trails are expected to be built later this year.

DEC’s WQIP program is a competitive, reimbursement grant program that funds projects that directly address documented water quality impairments or protect a drinking water source.

For more information, visit DEC’s WQIP web page.

 

USF&W SEEKS PUBLIC INPUT ON BETTER ACCESS TO FEDERAL LANDS: As part of its ongoing effort to increase public access on federal lands, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service recently announced it is seeking the public’s assistance to develop a list of its managed lands that would benefit from new or increased access routes.

On March 12, 2019, President Donald Trump signed into law the John D. Dingell Jr. Conservation, Management, and Recreation Act (S.47, the Dingell Act), which directs the Service and other federal land management agencies to develop a priority list of lands that have significantly restricted or no public access where that access could be improved. The public is encouraged to identify national wildlife refuges, fish hatcheries and other lands managed by the Service that meet the complete criteria.

Comments will be accepted over a 30-day comment period from February 10-March 11, 2020.

Some of the criteria for nominated lands include: public lands must be managed by the Service and 640 contiguous acres; have significantly restricted or no public access; and be open under federal or state law to hunting, fishing, or use of the land for other public recreational purposes.

For additional information and a full list of required criteria for consideration as specified by the Dingell Act, visit: https://www.fws.gov/refuges/realty/Public-Access-Nominations.html.

 

NEW YORK CROSSBOW COALITION 2020 LEGISLATIVE SESSION: The Coalition is working on showing the support for Bills A7627 and S5818 to the legislators in Albany. These bills are back in their respective EnCon Committees.  

On Wednesday January 29th the Coalition delivered 3764 crossbow support letters to both the Senate and Assembly. This is a great number, but more are needed to be sent. If you already submitted one since January 2019, Thank You. There is no need to submit another one. If we do not have one on file, please download and send it to us to be included in the next batch delivered to Albany. 

 

Delivering 3764 crossbow support letters for bill # A7627 to the bill

sponsor, Assemblywoman Carrie Woerner.     January 29, 2020

This is how grass roots works and will go a long way to gain support from additional legislators. 
 Click to download Crossbow Support Letter.

 

RECORD WALLEYE HARVEST FOR LAKE ERIE FISHING REPORTED IN 2019: Walleye harvests from Lake Erie broke records in 2019, according to data from DEC’s Lake Erie Fisheries Research Unit in Dunkirk. In all, anglers harvested 175,000 walleye in 2019, up more than 40 percent from 2018. The catch shattered the previous yearly high mark of 129,000 fish harvested in 1989. The data also shows anglers spent more hours fishing in 2019. They logged 404,000 angler hours; the highest they’ve been in New York’s Lake Erie waters since 2001. Lake Erie’s walleye fishery has been incredible in recent years. It accounted for nearly three-quarters of anglers’ efforts on Lake Erie in 2019. Anglers harvested 0.57 walleye per hour of fishing in 2019. The 30-year average is 0.18 walleye per hour. And, given data from other parts of the lake, the forecast for walleye in 2020 is also strong.

 

5 STEPS IN RESPONDING TO ANTI-HUNTER HARASSMENT IN THE FIELD

1. Avoid confronting the antagonist

This is the most important step. The last thing you want to do is get in a screaming match with a complete stranger in the middle of nowhere. Nothing good will come of it. You will not be able to change their viewpoint on the matter. Instead, argue as little as possible and try to remain calm. Officials say that you should inform the person confronting you that what you’re doing is legal, while what they are doing is breaking the law. If they persist, it may be worth leaving rather than let the situation get worse. Sure, you may lose a day of hunting, but it may be better than the alternative.

2. Observe proper gun safety

If you are hunting with a firearm—or really, any weapon—make sure you observe all the proper safety rules. You may be in a tense situation, but it’s no time to forget about the basics.

3. Don’t do anything that can be considered threatening

A popular tactic by anti-hunters is to record the encounter. Some groups encourage this as a way of “exposing hunters” and creating adverse media exposure. Therefore, it is important to consider your every move and how it will look on video. Threatening gestures, language, or even the re-positioning of a firearm could cause a misunderstanding. Worse yet, it may turn a situation where you had the legal advantage into a case where you are now under scrutiny.

4. It is not your job to enforce the law

This is an important point to remember. Although hunters should of course protect their belongings and well-being as best as possible, it is important to understand the law, and what you can do and cannot do. As frustrating as it may be to have a camera pointed in your face or to have someone yell at you, remember that they are breaking the law, not you.

Leave the enforcement of the law to game wardens, which leads to our next point.

5. Contact law enforcement as soon as possible

Hunter harassment can carry some stiff penalties, but the burden of proof is on you. Remember to make a note of when, where, who, and what occurred. Hunters should pay attention to details and remember as much information as possible. It is not always possible for the warden to arrive quickly, so you should make sure that you have plenty of information for officials to begin an investigation. Wildlife agencies take hunter harassment very seriously.

Remember, how you act not only impacts you, but also reflects on all hunters. If you do have the chance to engage in a civil discussion with anti-hunters however, perhaps in a more relaxed environment, then that’s a different case.

 

DUCK STAMP CHANGE PROPOSAL: The anti-hunters are fighting against a Trump administration change to the duck stamp that would require the art to be hunting related. It's time to take action if you have an opinion!
To support the change and speak up go to:
https://www.regulations.gov/document?D=FWS-HQ-MB-2019-0105-0001&fbclid=IwAR1VBUjrXYEf_cEso3SNRu_IFw749bxdhKJBnVa7JYj0W0TjOOpfu4fZpJ0

 

THIS WEEK’S EVENTS: (For complete future listings go to the Calendar Page - http://www.huntfishnyoutdoors.com/events.php)

 

FEBRUARY 2020

22 – NYS Pistol Permit Safety Course at the Weber VFW Post 898, 2909 South Park Avenue, Lackawanna, NY. (Class starts promptly at 9 a.m.) (Cost: $40.00.) (For information/pre-register call Carl Leas at 716-656-0350.)

22 - Pistol Permit Course at the Northern Chautauqua Conservation Club, 8455 Fredonia-Stockton Road (County Route 73), Fredonia, NY (2:30-7:30 pm) (Cost: $80.00) (For information contact Gary Dudek at 716-366-3397.)

22 - Fly Tying 101 at The Orvis Shop, 4545 Transit Road, Williamsville, NY. (10:00 am – Noon) (Free.) (Call the store at 716-276-7200 information/register go to www.orvis.com/buffalo.)

22 - Owl Prowl at the Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savannah, NY (3:30 – 5:30 pm) Get up close to live owls during an indoor presentation by KrittrKris! You’ll find out what adaptations these birds have that allow them to survive during the winter season and be successful hunters of the night. Then, join the Montezuma Audubon Center staff to search for Snowy Owls and the endangered Short-eared Owls in the grasslands around Montezuma. It will be a real hoot! (Fee: $5/child, $10/adult, $25/family.) (For information or register call 315-365-3588 or e-mail montezuma@audubon.org)

22 - The Niagara River Anglers Association’s Roger Tobey Memorial Steelhead Contest. (Sunrise – 2:00 pm) Tournament boundaries include Lake Ontario and its tributaries, as well as the Lower Niagara River. Fish can be caught from boat or shore. Sign up at Creek Road Bait and Tackle, Lewiston, the Slippery Sinker in Olcott or at the launch ramp in Lewiston the morning of the contest. (For more information check out www.niagarariveranglers.com or call Paul Jackson at 731-4780. Entry forms should also be available at Creek Road Bait and Tackle in Lewiston and The Slippery Sinker in Olcott. (Entry fee is $20 with $5 brown trout division.) This is a date change. You must be a NRAA member. (For information contact Ken Jackson at 716-946-6810.)

22 - Whitetails Unlimited - Central New York Deer Camp at the Holiday Inn Syracuse/Liverpool, 441 Electronics Parkway, Liverpool, NY. (5:00 pm) The deadline online ticket purchase date is February 18, 2019. Tickets may be ordered online at www.whitetailsunlimited.com or by phone - 1-800-274-5471. (Cost $45.00/$35.00 spouse/$30.00 youth.) Everyone goes home with a Deer Camp Tour 2019 Shirt! (For information, call Bill Bailey 413-244-2304)

23 – Niagara Region Winter 3D Shoot at Wood and Brook Sportsmen’s Club, 14038 Genesee Street, ¼ mile east of Crittenden, NY. Registration from 7:30 a.m. to noon. Walk on shooters welcome. For a complete 12-week schedule, contact John Floriano at 725-5822.

27 - Cayuga Lake Birding Van Tour meet at the Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savannah, NY (10:00 am – 12:30 pm) Cayuga Lake is an Audubon designated Important Bird Area because of the incredible number of waterfowl that use the lake during the winter and migration seasons. Hop in our van for an excursion to the northern part of the lake where up to 30 species of ducks, geese and swans can be seen. Bald Eagles and other raptors are a possibility too. Binoculars and bird guides will be provided. (Fee: $8/child, $15/adult, $40/family. PRE-PAID RESERVATIONS REQUIRED.) (For information or register call 315-365-3588 or e-mail montezuma@audubon.org)

27-28 - Wildlife-Human Interaction/Conflict at the New York Chapter of TWS 2020 annual meeting at The Craftsman Inn & Suites, 7300 E Genesee Street, Fayetteville, NY. (For information email nytws.pres@gmail.com)

27-3/1 - The World Fishing and Outdoor Exposition at the Rockland Community College Field House, Suffern, NY(Thur 2 – 9 pm/Fri 1 – 9 pm/Sat 9:30 am – 7 pm/Sun 9:30 am – 5 pm) This show  is the sport fishing super show and is the only sport show in the metro New York area.  The show features all of the major fishing tackle manufacturers displaying fishing gear, fishing tackle, bait, hunting gear, trailers, clothing plus information on sportfishing charters, whale watching and fishing tours, camps, lodges, clubs and guide services.  The show also offers daily seminars and demonstrations given by the pros and activities for the kids. (Admissions: Adults: $13.00/Children (6-11): $3.00/Children (5 and under): Free) (For Information call 603-431-4315; E-mail ASA/Eastern Fishing & Outdoor Exposition, LLC or visit the World Fishing and Outdoor Expo - Suffern, NY Website.)

28 - Ten X Shooting Club Youth Rifle Shooting Program at the club, 853 Ransom Road, Lancaster NY. (6:00 pm) This program is for ages 9 through 20. New and first-time shooters should arrive at 6 p.m for safety and orientation training. Shooting begins at 6:30 p.m. Membership is not required. (Cost is $3 per night but no shooter is turned away.) (For information call Matt Giansante at 716-622-0705.)

28-29 – 2020 Annual Northeast Wildlife Management Seminar at the Embassy Suites Syracuse Destiny, 311 Hiawatha Blvd West 6646 Old Collamer Rd S, East Syracuse, NY. (8:00 am – 5:00 pm both days) Sponsored by the New York State Wildlife Management Association. This is your chance to learn the latest research and techniques from experts in the field of Wildlife Damage Management. (Cost: $250 advance/$300 at door)(For information go to go to http://www.nyswma.org)

29 - End of Hunting Seasons for Squirrels, Grouse, Cottontail Rabbits, Pheasant (in the Southern Tier Portion of Western New York) & Varying Hare (Snowshoe Rabbit) (in Central and Eastern New York)

29 - Chautauqua County Friends of NRA Banquet at the Samuel Derby Post 556 American Legion, 9 Meadow Lane, Frewsburg, NY (4:30 pm) (Cost: $35.00) (For information contact Jennifer Schmitt 716-487-2487, email: jschmitt1452@yahoo.com.)

29 - Family Outdoor Time: Bird Migration at the Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savannah, NY (2:00 – 4:00 pm) Winter is a great time to explore wetlands and the wildlife that live there.  Families will discover how wildlife survive in these delicate areas by exploring the frozen marshes and swamps and conducting scientific experiments.  If there is snow on the ground, plan on snowshoeing. (Fee w/ snowshoe rental:  $7/person, $20/family Fee: w/o snowshoe rental:  $5/person, $15/family.) Pre-registration is required as snowshoes are limited. (For information or register call 315-365-3588 or e-mail montezuma@audubon.org)

29 - Fly Tying 101 at The Orvis Shop, 4545 Transit Road, Williamsville, NY. (10:00 am – Noon) (Free.) (Call the store at 716-276-7200 information/register go to www.orvis.com/buffalo.)

29 - Chautauqua County Friends of NRA Banquet at the Samuel Derby Post 556 American Legion, 9 Meadow Lane, Frewsburg, NY (4:30 pm) (Cost: $35.00) (For information contact Jennifer Schmitt 716-487-2487 or go to chautauquacountyfriendsofnra@yahoo.com)

29-3/1 - Catteraugus County Sportsman Show at Seneca Allegany Event Center, 777 Seneca Allegany Blvd., Salamanca, NY (Sat 10:00 am – 5:00 pm/Sun 9:00 am – 4:00 pm) Hosted by York-Penn Shows of New York. All federal, state and local firearm ordinances and laws must be obeyed. 400 tables. (Cost: $8.00) (For information call James Buck at 716-569-6810 or email topdrake@yahoo.com)

MARCH 2020

1 - Start of Fishing Ban (No Fishing) on North McMillan Creek and Conesus Inlet WMA from Conesus Lake South to the Dam (Livingston County) except the canal west of the inlet and that portion of the north of the canal. (>5/3)

 

Until our next meeting in the Corner, have a great time in the outdoors. This is Ron Schroder for – “Your In on The Outdoors for Western New York.”

What Do You Think? Have something for other sportspeople? Let us know HERE.

 

 

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2 - 14 – 20

 

Welcome to this week’s Conservation Chatter Corner – little bits of happenings concerning our outdoors and you, the sportspeople who enjoy being part of that outdoors.

 

2019 BEAR HARVEST TOTALS:  New York State bear hunters took 1,505 black bears during the 2019 hunting seasons. The 2019 bear harvest played out differently across the state. Hunters took a record 1,179 bears in the Southern Zone, while hunters in the Northern Zone took only 326 bears, the fewest since 2011. In part, the great success hunters enjoyed in the Southern Zone was a consequence of below average harvest in 2018 due to early snowfall and early denning by bears that year. Hunters were able to capitalize on the availability of more bears in 2019.

Bear harvest in the Northern Zone tends to alternate between strong harvests during the early season if natural foods are lacking and strong harvests during the regular season if natural foods are abundant. In 2019, soft mast (cherries, berries, and apples) and hard mast (acorns and beech nuts) crops were abundant and hunters were most successful during the regular season, taking 213 bears. Only 64 bears were taken during the early season. Additionally, the overall bear harvest in the Northern Zone generally follows a high-low pattern from year to year, and the 2019 harvest fit that pattern as a low year.

Bear Harvest Totals:

                                        2019                    2018                    Past 5 year Average

Northern Zone                 326                      491                      498

Southern Zone                1,179                   804                      1,022

Statewide                        1,505                   1,295                   1,519

Notable Numbers

2.9: the number of bears harvested per 10 square miles in Wildlife Management Unit (WMU) 3K, which includes southern Sullivan County and a portion of Orange County. WMU 3K had the greatest bear harvest density of any unit, but the town of Tusten in Sullivan County yielded 4.0 bears for every 10 square miles.

157: the greatest number of bears reported taken on any one day. It happened on November 16 - the opening day of the regular firearms season in the Southern Zone.

643 pounds: the heaviest dressed-weight bear reported to DEC in 2019, taken in the town of Thompson, Sullivan County. Scaled weights of dressed bears were submitted for 30 percent of bears taken in 2019

17: the number of tagged bears reported in the 2019 harvest. These included six bears originally tagged in Pennsylvania, one from Massachusetts, and one from New Jersey. The remainder were originally tagged in New York for a variety of reasons, including research, nuisance response, relocated urban bears, or released rehabilitated bears.

855: the number of hunter-killed bears from which DEC collected teeth for age analysis in 2019. Hunters who reported their harvest and submitted a tooth for age analysis will receive a 2019 Black Bear Management Cooperator Patch. Results of the age analysis is expected to be available by September 2020.

13 percent: the proportion of bears taken by non-resident hunters. Successful non-resident bear hunters hailed from 19 states.

DEC's harvest estimates rely on successful hunters reporting their harvest. For more information on game harvest reporting, visit DEC's website.

2019 Bear Take Summary Report

A complete summary of the 2019 bear harvest with results and maps by county, town, and WMU is available on DEC's website.

 

DEC ANNOUNCES PUBLIC INFORMATION SESSION ON HABITAT MANAGEMENT PLAN FOR HONEOYE INLET WMA: The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) will host a public information session on March 9, in Honeoye to provide details and answer questions about the recently completed habitat management plan for Honeoye Inlet Wildlife Management Area (WMA). Honeoye Inlet WMA is located in the towns of Canadice, Naples, Richmond, and South Bristol in Ontario County and the town of Springwater in Livingston County.

Honeoye Inlet WMA consists of 1,977 acres directly south of Honeoye Lake. The WMA includes much of the valley bottom around Honeoye Inlet and extends up onto the hillsides to the east and west. The WMA's diverse habitats include forested wetland, emergent wetland, upland forest, grassland, and shrubland.

Habitat management goals for the Honeoye Inlet WMA are to maintain a diversity of wetland and upland habitats that benefit a wide range of resident and migrating wildlife species, including several rare and declining species. DEC will continue to actively manage this WMA to benefit wildlife, while using best management practices that protect water quality. Planned management activities include measures to control invasive plant species, timber harvests to improve forest health and habitat quality, mowing and enhancing grassland fields, and increasing shrubland areas. The habitat management plan for Honeoye Inlet WMA can be found on DEC's website.

The public information session will be held on Monday, March 9, from 6:30 to 8 p.m., at the Richmond Town Hall, 8690 Main Street, Honeoye. This building is wheelchair accessible; please contact DEC Biologist Michael Palermo at (585) 226-5383 with any specific requests for accommodations.

The session will begin with an informal open house from 6:30 to 7 p.m., and DEC staff will be available for discussion. A presentation will begin at 7 p.m., to review the history of this WMA, specific activities and locations for planned management actions, an overview of forest habitat management, and a question and answer period. For more information about this event, please call (585) 226-5383.

 

FALCONRY, WILDLIFE REHABILITATOR AND LEASHED TRACKING DOG EXAMINATIONS: Examinations for individuals seeking a license to practice the sport of falconry, become a volunteer wildlife rehabilitator, or use leashed tracking dogs to find wounded or injured big game animals are scheduled for Friday, April 3, the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) announced.

The exams are scheduled for 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. at most DEC Regional Offices across the state. A list of DEC Regional Offices can be found on DEC's website. The deadline for registering to take these free exams is Friday, March 13, and exam registration forms can be found on DEC's website.

Apprentice Falconry License

Falconry has a rich history and tradition throughout the world and requires a significant commitment in time and effort. Apprentices are limited to possessing one bird, either an American kestrel or a red-tailed hawk A falconry study guide and examination manual are available at no cost from DEC's website. The cost of a five-year falconry license is $40.

To qualify for the Apprentice Falconry license, applicants must:

score 80 percent or higher on the written exam;

be at least 14 years of age;

possess a valid New York State hunting license; and

maintain DEC-approved facilities for housing falconry raptors.

Wildlife Rehabilitator License

Wildlife rehabilitators provide for the care of injured, sick and orphaned wild animals for the purpose of returning rehabilitated animals to the wild. Prospective applicants are encouraged to gain experience by serving as an assistant to a licensed wildlife rehabilitator. A wildlife rehabilitator study guide and examination manual are available at no cost from DEC's website. There is no cost for the license, which is good for five years.

To qualify for the Wildlife Rehabilitator License, applicants must:

score 80 percent or higher on the written exam;

be at least 16 years of age; and

be interviewed by DEC Regional wildlife staff.

Leashed Tracking Dog Handler

Leashed tracking dog handlers use their dogs to track and recover dead, wounded or injured big game. Leashed tracking dog handlers provide a valuable service in aiding hunters in locating wounded big game that otherwise may go unrecovered. A leashed tracking dog study guide is available at no cost from DEC's website. There is a $50 license fee for the five-year license and a $25 non-refundable application fee.

To qualify for a Leashed Tracking Dog Handler License, applicants must:

score 80 percent or higher on the written exam; and

possess a valid New York State hunting license.

To apply for any of these exams, visit the DEC Special Licenses Unit website and complete an exam registration form. Applicants can mail, fax, or email the completed form to: NYS DEC Special Licenses Unit, 625 Broadway, Albany, NY 12233-4752 Phone: 518-402-8985, Fax: 518-402-8925, Email: SpecialLicenses@dec.ny.gov.

 

CONTROLLING SEA LAMPREY IN THE GREAT LAKES: For decades the Great Lakes Fishery Commission and New York have partnered to control sea lamprey populations in the Great Lakes. Without sea lamprey control, the world-class sport fisheries that anglers continue to enjoy wouldn’t exist. The latest adult lamprey population estimates for 2019 are in and provide a good example of effective control efforts.

Lake Ontario - Numbers of adult lampreys have been at or below target levels for the past seven years.

Lake Erie - Adult sea lamprey abundance is above the target, but decreasing. Recent, strong walleye reproduction may be helping reduce sea lamprey abundance through walleye predation on juvenile lamprey, and estimated adult sea lamprey abundance declined markedly in 2018 and 2019.

 

 

TAKE STEPS TO AVOID CONFLICTS WITH COYOTES: It’s that time of year again when many of New York's resident coyotes are setting up dens for pups that will arrive this spring. Coyotes are well adapted to suburban and even some urban environments, and for the most part they will avoid contact with people. However, conflicts with people and pets may result as coyotes tend to be territorial around den sites during the spring through mid-summer. They need to search almost constantly to provide food for their young.

Coyotes are found throughout the state and are an integral part of our natural ecosystem. Incidents with people or pets are rare, but it is important to be aware of the presence of coyotes so you can take steps to reduce the chance that a negative interaction occurs. 

Awareness is key to minimizing potential conflicts. To reduce or prevent conflicts with coyotes, DEC encourages New Yorkers to take the following steps:

> Remove sources of food in your yard including pet food and birdseed.

> Do not allow coyotes to approach people or pets—make loud noises and wave your arms if one comes near.

> Supervise pets while outdoors—do not let them roam free.

> Contact your local police department and DEC regional office for assistance if coyotes are exhibiting "bold" behaviors and have little or no fear of people.

 

 

SCI HAS OFFICIALLY "TRIGGERED" ANTI-HUNTERS WITH THEIR NEW COMMERCIAL

SCI

No wonder the anti-hunting crowd hates the SCI. There's no one more pro-hunting than them.

There's nothing like a little triggering to give a protestor a piece of their own medicine. Safari Club International, the organization that does more for hunting than any other, is going all in with their new commercial spot, which you can see below and on Outdoor Network and Sportsman Channel in the coming weeks.

It's already garnered viral-level views since debuting Tuesday on Facebook.

Watch this video, and you'll see pretty quickly how SCI is getting its message across.

Think that will have an impact?

As the 48th annual SCI Convention kicked off in Reno, Nevada, Safari Club International took advantage of the timing to spearhead their recent marketing campaign.

There's no doubt about it: They are taking their battle against the anti-hunting agenda seriously.

SCI, like a lot of those trying to conserve hunting's history and heritage, knows there's no reasoning with the extremist anti-hunting movement. But if you consider that support for SCI, by becoming a member and learning more about what they do. Even the name, Safari Club International, doesn't give the full idea of what they've been able to accomplish here, in America, for everyday average hunters.

It's not just about the exotic African hunting trips or the money raised via high-dollar auctions.

It's the public land they've helped Americans access, the judicial support they've given hunters and hunting's cause, and the rights they've worked to protect for everyone in the hunting community.

In other words, they're supporting you as a hunter, no matter where, when, or how you do it.

The new commercial is just the beginning of an overall campaign that should continue to stir up the antis, cause some debate and discussion, and ultimately push forth the pro-hunting agenda to continue fighting for its survival and future.

Facebook: Safari Club International - SCI  Posted by Eric Pickhartz.

 

PROPERLY DISPOSE OF USED FISHING LINE: Fishing is a favorite outdoor activity. However, fishing line and other tackle can cause problems when they enter the aquatic environment. Monofilament is the most common type of fishing line and is not biodegradable, lasting up to 600 years depending on environmental conditions. Because it is thin and often clear, it is very difficult for birds and animals to see. This can lead to them easily becoming entangled, resulting in different types of injuries and death.

 

THIS WEEK’S EVENTS: (For complete future listings go to the Calendar Page - http://www.huntfishnyoutdoors.com/events.php)

 

FEBRUARY 2020

14 - Ten X Shooting Club Youth Rifle Shooting Program at the club, 853 Ransom Road, Lancaster NY. (6:00 pm) This program is for ages 9 through 20. New and first-time shooters should arrive at 6 p.m for safety and orientation training. Shooting begins at 6:30 p.m. Membership is not required. (Cost is $3 per night but no shooter is turned away.) (For information call Matt Giansante at 716-622-0705.)
14-15 – Birds on the Niagara Festival at the New York Power Authority Niagara Power Vista, 5777 Lewiston Road, Lewiston, NY. (For information Contact Buffalo Audubon at 585-457-3228/For event schedule go to www.birdsontheniagara.org.)

15 - End of Hunting & Trapping Seasons for Weasel, Skunk, Opossum, Raccoon & Fox.

15 - End of Trapping Seasons for Coyote, Mink and Muskrat.

15 - End of Trapping Seasons for Beaver in most of Western New York

15 - Scouts BSA Merit Badge: Plant Science at the Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savannah, NY (12:00 – 3:00 pm)  Scouts are invited to complete the requirements for the Plant Science Merit Badge during a fun and interactive program. Scouts will need to complete a few requirements prior to the program. As always, please be prepared to go outside. All scouts must be accompanied by a parent, leader, or chaperone.  Fee: $8/Scout. Pre-paid reservations required. (For information/register call 315-365-3588 or e-mail montezuma@audubon.org) 

15 - Walking in a Winter Wineryland at the Buttonwood Grove Winery, 5986 State Route 89, Romulus, NY (12:00 – 4:00 pm) Join us for this fun and delicious event. Enjoy a guided snowshoe hike along the gorge trail, award-winning wine and food pairings, and a live bird of prey presentation featuring Daena Ford from Braddock Bay Raptor Research and her hawks, owls and falcons. Must be 21+ to taste. If there is no snow, participants will explore the grounds on a guided nature hike. (Fee: w/ snowshoe rental: $30/adult, $20/child. Fee: w/o snowshoe rental: $25/adult, $15/child. Pre-paid reservations required.) (For information/register call 315-365-3588 or e-mail montezuma@audubon.org)

15 - Cattaraugus County Trappers Association Fur Auction at the Hinsdale Volunteer Fire Department, 3832 Main Street, Hinsdale, NY (Check-in 7:00 am, auction 10:00 am) (For information call Brian Davis at 716-945-4223.)

15-16 - FREE FISHING WEEKEND in New York State. No license required.

15-16 - Westons Mills Fire Dept Gun Show at Kinney Hose Co Inc, 1300 Olean-Portville Road, Olean, NY (Sat 9:00 am – 4:00 pm/Sun 9:00 am – 3:00 pm) Hosted by Kinney Hose Co. All federal, state and local firearm ordinances and laws must be obeyed. (Cost: $5.00) (For information call Tony Everetts 716-258-8145 or Dan Jenkins 716-790-1906 djenks_14788@yahoo.com)

15-16 - Niagara Frontier - Medina Gun Show at the Ridgeway VFW, 11392 Ridge Road, Rte 104, Medina, NY (Sat. 9:00 am – 4:00 pm/Sun. 9:00am – 3:00 pm) (Cost: $5.00/12 and under free) (65 Tables) (For information call 716-542-9929, email guns@nfgshows.com or go to http://nfgshows.com)

15-16 – 8th Annual Twin Tiers Outdoor Expo  at the Grand Central Plaza, 1020 Center Street, Horseheads, NY (Sat 9:00 am – 5:00 pm/Sun 10:00 am – 4:00 pm) (Admission: $5.00/Military Discount $1 off/ 12 Years and Under Free) (For information call 607-937-5000 or go to http://www.twintiersoutdoorexpo.com/)

16 – Niagara Region Winter 3D Shoot at Alden Rod and Gun, County Road (south of Broadway), Alden, NY. (Registration from 7:30 a.m. to noon.) Walk on shooters welcome. For a complete 12-week schedule, contact John Floriano at 716-725-5822.

15-23 - Animal Week - Animals as Superheroes at the Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. Rochester NY. (11:00 am – 3:00 pm) Explore and discover the amazing world of the animal kingdom. From insects to mammals and beyond, join us to learn about how creatures have many ways and "superpowers" that help them survive in different environments. Get hands-on while learning about amazing animals big and small and how their adaptations have helped inspire technical innovations. Come back each day to meet different live animals from the Wildlife Rockstars, the Seneca Park Zoo, and more! There will be a variety of different animals visiting the museum each day of the week, including: Coypus; ring tailed lemurs; Red eared slider turtles; porcupines; bearded dragons; geckos; toads; stick bugs; Russian tortoises; silver foxes; Eastern kangaroos; and plenty of other interesting creatures! (The animals listed may not be at the museum every day of the week, and appearances will vary. Animals need a break too!)(Cost: $16.00 - $18.00 depending on age.) (For information call 585-271-4320)

16 - Genesee Valley Trappers Association Fur Auction at the Clubhouse, 4462 County Road 32 (3 miles east of Honeoye, south of 20A), Honeoye, NY (6:30 am fur checkin/10:00 am auction) ($10.00 charge for non-members) (For information call Tom Miller, 585-229-4759)

19 - Scouts BSA Merit Badge: Mining in Society at the Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savannah, NY (9:00 am - 12:00 pm) Scouts are invited to complete the requirements for the Mining in Society Merit Badge led by retired regional geologist, Fred Hayes. Scouts will learn the history of mining while exploring the status of mining in the 21st century. Scouts will need to complete a few requirements prior to the program. All scouts must be accompanied by a parent, leader, or chaperone. (Fee: $8/Scout. Pre-requisites/pre-registration is required.) (For information/register call 315-365-3588 or e-mail montezuma@audubon.org)

22 – NYS Pistol Permit Safety Course at the Weber VFW Post 898, 2909 South Park Avenue, Lackawanna, NY. (Class starts promptly at 9 a.m.) (Cost: $40.00.) (For information/pre-register call Carl Leas at 716-656-0350.)

22 - Pistol Permit Course at the Northern Chautauqua Conservation Club, 8455 Fredonia-Stockton Road (County Route 73), Fredonia, NY (2:30-7:30 pm) (Cost: $80.00) (For information contact Gary Dudek at 716-366-3397.)

22 - Fly Tying 101 at The Orvis Shop, 4545 Transit Road, Williamsville, NY. (10:00 am – Noon) (Free.) (Call the store at 716-276-7200 information/register go to www.orvis.com/buffalo.)

22 - Owl Prowl at the Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savannah, NY (3:30 – 5:30 pm) Get up close to live owls during an indoor presentation by KrittrKris! You’ll find out what adaptations these birds have that allow them to survive during the winter season and be successful hunters of the night. Then, join the Montezuma Audubon Center staff to search for Snowy Owls and the endangered Short-eared Owls in the grasslands around Montezuma. It will be a real hoot! (Fee: $5/child, $10/adult, $25/family.) (For information or register call 315-365-3588 or e-mail montezuma@audubon.org)

22 - The Niagara River Anglers Association’s Roger Tobey Memorial Steelhead Contest. (Sunrise – 2:00 pm) Tournament boundaries include Lake Ontario and its tributaries, as well as the Lower Niagara River. Fish can be caught from boat or shore. Sign up at Creek Road Bait and Tackle, Lewiston, the Slippery Sinker in Olcott or at the launch ramp in Lewiston the morning of the contest. (For more information check out www.niagarariveranglers.com or call Paul Jackson at 731-4780. Entry forms should also be available at Creek Road Bait and Tackle in Lewiston and The Slippery Sinker in Olcott. (Entry fee is $20 with $5 brown trout division.) This is a date change. You must be a NRAA member. (For information contact Ken Jackson at 716-946-6810.)

22 - Whitetails Unlimited - Central New York Deer Camp at the Holiday Inn Syracuse/Liverpool, 441 Electronics Parkway, Liverpool, NY. (5:00 pm) The deadline online ticket purchase date is February 18, 2019. Tickets may be ordered online at www.whitetailsunlimited.com or by phone - 1-800-274-5471. (Cost $45.00/$35.00 spouse/$30.00 youth.) Everyone goes home with a Deer Camp Tour 2019 Shirt! (For information, call Bill Bailey 413-244-2304)

23 – Niagara Region Winter 3D Shoot at Wood and Brook Sportsmen’s Club, 14038 Genesee Street, ¼ mile east of Crittenden, NY. Registration from 7:30 a.m. to noon. Walk on shooters welcome. For a complete 12-week schedule, contact John Floriano at 725-5822.

 

Until our next meeting in the Corner, have a great time in the outdoors. This is Ron Schroder for – “Your In on The Outdoors for Western New York.”

What Do You Think? Have something for other sportspeople? Let us know HERE.

 

 

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2 - 7 – 20

 

Welcome to this week’s Conservation Chatter Corner – little bits of happenings concerning our outdoors and you, the sportspeople who enjoy being part of that outdoors.

 

HUNTERS EXPERIENCE SAFEST YEAR ON RECORD!: During 2019, hunters in New York had the fewest incidents and safest hunting season on record! There were 12 personal injury incidents during 2019. Of those 12, one was a fatal injury caused by a shooter failing to properly identify the target while participating on a deer drive.  

This year, 5 incidents were self inflicted and 7 were two-party firearm incidents. Of the two-party firearm incidents, 2 of those victims were not participating in any type of hunting activity and were passerby’s in vehicles. The remaining 4 victims were not wearing hunter orange while hunting with others. Wearing hunter orange while afield and ensuring it is visible decreases your risk of being injured while hunting. The one individual that had hunter orange in their possession (hat and gloves) was fatally injured during a deer drive. This reinforces why properly identifying your target and what is beyond is of critical importance.

The number of hunters is declining, but the hunting incident rate (incidents per 100,000 hunters) is falling much faster. Since the 1960s, the number of hunters has declined about 20%, while the incident rate has declined almost 80%. The current 5-year average is 1.8 incidents per 100,000 hunters, compared to 19 per 100,000 hunters in the 1960s.

Thanks largely to the dedicated efforts of thousands of volunteer Hunter Education Program over more than 60 years, New York hunting is now safer than ever. We cannot become complacent however, as every hunting-related shooting incident is preventable. The DEC highly recommends that hunters participating in any firearm season follow standard firearm safety rules and wear hunter orange while afield.

This report includes only shooting related incidents involving firearms, bows or crossbows. It does not include all incidents and fatalities related to hunting (such as heart attacks that occur while hunting). Incidents involving tree stands are included in a separate report. 

                                                                 2019                  15 Year Average

TOTAL INCIDENTS                                 12                        15.8

              Fatal                                              1                          1.8

              Non-Fatal                                      11                        14

              Self-Inflicted                                  5                          6.6

              Two-Party                                     7                          9.2

SPECIES HUNTED:

              Bear                                                0                          0

              Deer                                                7                          8.2

              Turkey – Spring                             1                          1.4

                            - Fall                                  0                          0

              Rabbits                                          0                          0.2

              Squirrels                                        0                          1.2

              Upland Birds                                 1                          0.8

              Raccoon                                       0                          0.4

              Fox & Coyote                                1                          0.6

              Waterfowl                                      2                          1.8

              Woodchuck                                   0                          0.2

              Other                                             0                          0.8

              Unknown                                       0                          0.2

TYPE OF IMPLEMENT

              Shotgun                                         8                          7

              Rifle                                               3                          7.2

              Handgun                                       1                          0.8

              Muzzleloader                                 0                          0.4

              Crossbow                                      0                          0.2

              Bow                                                0                          0.2

              Air Gun                                           0                          0

 

STATE-FISH ART CONTEST CASTING FOR ENTRIES: The deadline is fast approaching for the 2020 State-Fish Art Contest, supported by Title Sponsor Bass Pro Shops. This free contest is open to youth in grades K-12 from across the globe. The deadline to enter is March 31st, start your entry today!
Students from across the globe can win top honors, international recognition and prizes while learning about fish, fishing and aquatic conservation. The Art of Conservation® inspires young people to get involved in the great outdoors and ignites a passion to become lifelong activists for the natural world.
“The State-Fish Art Contest connects young people to the world of fishing and teaches the importance of conserving the great outdoors. This contest reaches every corner of our world, impacting thousands each year and inspiring young people to spend more time outside,” remarked Bob Ziehmer, Senior Director of Bass Pro Shops.
To enter, artists create an original illustration of their chosen fish from the Official Fish List. Students in 4th grade and above should also submit a one-page creative writing piece based on the behavior, habitat or conservation needs of their species. Artwork and Essays will both be judged and awarded. The Guy Harvey Ocean Foundation is a sponsor of the 2020 State-Fish Art Contest and will be providing prizes such as a year-long magazine subscription, books and artwork by scientist, artist, and conservationist Dr. Guy Harvey.
Greg Jacoski, Executive Director of the Guy Harvey Ocean Foundation said “We are proud to expand our mission through the Art of Conservation and State-Fish Art program. Healthy, balanced ocean ecosystems are important to all people, we hope the Guy Harvey Award will inspire our young people to learn more and get involved.”
Winners will be awarded in four grade categories, K-3, 4-6, 7-9, and 10-12. Entries must be postmarked by Tuesday, March 31st, 2020. Judging will occur in April and winners will be announced in May. See our 2019 winners and learn more at StateFishArt.org.

2019 Art of Conservation Winner by Edward B., Gr11, Virginia

 

ONEIDA LAKE ADULT WALLEYE POPULATION HITS ONE MILLION FISH: New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) announced that anglers have at least one million reasons to fish for walleye in Oneida Lake, according to a study with Cornell University researchers who have been tracking the lake's walleye population for more than 60 years. The population of adult walleye was estimated to be one million fish in 2019, a level that has not been reached since the 1980s.

The DEC and Cornell study results represent a remarkable recovery of the adult population of walleye, which declined through the 1990s and has remained steady at around 400,000 fish since 2000. To rebuild the walleye population, DEC implemented special regulations and managed a growing population of cormorants on the lake. Large year classes of walleye in 2010 and 2014 have contributed to the walleye population increase, and another strong year class from 2016 is anticipated to push the adult population even higher next year. DEC will continue to work with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to develop an approach for cormorant management to safeguard our fisheries from over-predation by these fish-eating birds.

To help manage the Oneida Lake walleye fishery, more than 150 million walleye fry (newly hatched fish only a few millimeters long) are annually stocked in the lake. The legal minimum size for walleye in the lake is 15 inches, and there is a reduced daily possession limit of three walleye. Walleye season runs from the first Saturday in May through March 15. For tips on fishing for walleye visit DEC's Fishing for Walleye webpage.

For additional walleye fishing destinations in New York, visit DEC's Statewide Walleye Fishing Opportunities webpage.

 

THE GOOD GUYS AT WORK: Wilderness Rescue: Town of Camillus, Onondaga County:
While on patrol on Jan. 31 at 3:15 p.m., Forest Ranger Mike Chappell overheard a radio call for assistance with a wildland search. A 35-year-old male from Camillus had reportedly left a supervised facility that borders the Camillus Forest Unique Area and could not be found. Forest Ranger Chappell responded, and once on scene, coordinated with the Camillus Police Department and Onondaga County Sheriff's Deputies to search the area for the missing man. At 3:50 p.m., Forest Ranger Chet Lunt responded, along with the Sheriff's Air-1 helicopter. As Ranger Chappell searched one of the hiking trails in the Camillus Forest, deputies with Air-1 reported they had located the man in a field in the state unique area. Forest Ranger Chappell responded to that location along with deputies and confirmed it was the missing man. They walked the subject out of the woods and turned him over to WAVES ambulance personnel for evaluation.

 

PENNSYLVANIA FBC REMOVES REQUIREMENT FOR FISHING LICENSE DISPLAY:

During its formal quarterly business meeting, the Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission (PFBC) Board of Commissioners approved the removal of a long-standing regulation that requires anglers to display their fishing license on an outer garment while fishing.

Under the amendment to Section 63.2 (PA Title 58), the outer garment display requirement will be replaced with a general possession requirement, which would require only that an angler carry the license on their person while fishing and present the license to a PFBC law enforcement officer upon request.

 

LESS WORRY FOR SNOW BIRDS: Competition to remove invasive pythons from America’s Everglades was a big success. Participants in the Florida Python Challenge™ 2020 Python Bowl removed 80 invasive Burmese pythons from the Everglades while simultaneously helping to raise awareness about this important conservation issue. Today the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) and the South Florida Water Management District announced the results and winners of the Python Removal Competition at the 2020 Python Bowl award ceremony at the Super Bowl Live event in Miami.

Here are the official Florida Python Challenge™ 2020 Python Bowl results:

Most Pythons

Pro grand prize winner Mike Kimmel won a TRACKER 570 Off Road ATV for removing eight pythons.

Rookie grand prize winner Kristian Hernandez won a TRACKER 570 Off Road ATV for removing six pythons.

Longest Python

Pro grand prize winner Tom Rahill won $2,000 for a 12-foot, 7.3-inch

Rookie grand prize winner Kristian Hernandez won $2,000 for an 11-foot, 6.5-inch python.

Heaviest Python

Pro grand prize winner Tom Rahill won $2,000 for a 62-pound python.

Rookie grand prize winner Dave Mucci won $2,000 for a 49.4-pound python.

More than 750 people from 20 states registered to take part in the 10-day competition to remove Burmese pythons, which are decimating native wildlife populations in the Everglades. Everyone who registered passed a mandatory online training. Another 550 people took part in hands-on, optional safe-capture trainings that taught them how to identify, locate, and safely and humanely capture Burmese pythons.

In addition to the Python Challenge™, there are several ways the general public can continue to help control nonnative species such as Burmese pythons. Anyone can hunt pythons any time on private lands with landowner permission and on 22 public lands throughout south Florida. People can also take part in ongoing Python Patrol trainings to learn more about how to identify and capture Burmese pythons in the wild. Learn more at MyFWC.com/Python.

The public can also help control invasive species by reporting nonnative fish and wildlife to the FWC’s Invasive Species Hotline at 888-IVE-GOT1 (888-483-4681), by reporting sightings online at IveGot1.org or by downloading the IveGot1 smartphone app.

For more information about the Python Challenge™ 2020 Python Bowl visit FLPythonChallenge.org.

 

PA’S 2019 BEAR HARVEST STATE’S BEST ALL-TIME: Pennsylvania hunters took 4,653 black bears this past fall, setting a new state record bear harvest.

In 2018, the bear harvest was 3,153, 11th best all-time, but also the lowest bear harvest in the past 11 years. So, the overall bear harvest increased by a third from 2018 to 2019.

With a statewide bear population of about 20,000 bears over the past several years, it was a harvest increase sought by the Game Commission, which had employed the largest suite of bear-season changes ever approved in a single license year.

Pennsylvania’s previous top bear seasons occurred in 2011, when 4,350 bears were harvested, and in 2005, when 4,164 were taken.

In recent years, bad breaks with weather, particularly on opening days, when hunter participation is typically at its highest, have kept the bear harvest down.

But in the four years prior to 2019, hunters still took more than 13,850 bears, which exemplifies the bear population’s resiliency to remain around 20,000.

Over the course of bear hunting’s three major season segments hunters took 1,629 bears in the general season; 1,340 in the muzzleloader and special firearms seasons; 1,117 in extended firearms seasons and 561 in the bear archery season. The muzzleloader, extended and archery harvests are all new record harvests, too.

The largest bear through all 2019 seasons is the 813-pound male taken with a rifle on the opening day of the general season in Smithfield Township, Monroe County, by Victor M. Vassalluzzo, of Kintnersville.

 

THIS WEEK’S EVENTS: (For complete future listings go to the Calendar Page - http://www.huntfishnyoutdoors.com/events.php)

 

FEBRUARY 2020

7-9 – 13th Annual Coyote Hunt Contest! sponsored by the Federation of Sportsmen’s Clubs of Sullivan County, Inc. The Grand Prize of $2,000 will be awarded for the overall heaviest coyote, $200 Daily Prize for the heaviest coyote each day, an extra $100 prize for the Junior Hunter age 12 to 15 years old and an extra $100 for the Female Hunter weighing in the heaviest coyote. $80 each will be awarded for all the other coyotes weighed in during the 3-day Hunt Contest. This contest is for coyotes hunted or trapped & taken only in New York State. The early registration entry fee is $35.00. Besides the cash prizes, the entry fee includes a free banquet dinner and a free $5.00 three gun raffle ticket. Everyone wishing to participate in the hunt or attend the dinner pays the same price at time of registration. The cost for those who just attend the banquet will be $25. For registration and all the rules of the 3-day Coyote Hunt Contest call Linda 845-482-4985 or Jack 845-482-4987. (For any further information and application download go to www.sullivancountysportsmensfederationny.com)

8 - Elbridge Rod and Gun Club Sportsman Swap Meet at 6275 Laird Road, Jordan, NY (9:00 am to 3:00 pm) (For information call 315-857-4663 or 315-689-7339.)

8 - Outfitter Fair at the Southtowns Walleye Club, 5895 Southwestern Blvd., Hamburg, NY (11:00 am – 3:00 pm) New and used fishing and hunting equipment. No guns or ammunition. (For information call 716-796-5372 or 716-864-2938.)  

8 – Sportsman Auction at Hessney Auction Center, 2741 Lyons Road (Route 14N), Geneva, NY (9:30 am) Over 300 Guns • Shotguns • Rifles • Handguns • Knives • Ammo • Scopes • Bear Traps • Decoys • Hunting & Fishing Items • '04 Yamaha Sx Venom 600 Smowmobile • 10 Day South African Hunt. (For more information call 315-789-9349 or 585-734-6082 or go to www.hessney.com)

8 - Fly Tying 101 at The Orvis Shop, 4545 Transit Road, Williamsville, NY. (10:00 am – Noon) (Free.) (Call the store at 716-276-7200 information/register go to www.orvis.com/buffalo.)

8 - Family Outdoor Time: Mysteries of Ice at the Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savannah, NY (2:00 – 4:00 pm) Winter is a great time to explore wetlands and the wildlife that live there.  Families will discover how wildlife survive in these delicate areas by exploring the frozen marshes and swamps and conducting scientific experiments.  If there is snow on the ground, plan on snowshoeing. (Fee w/ snowshoe rental:  $7/person, $20/family Fee: w/o snowshoe rental:  $5/person, $15/family.) Pre-registration is required as snowshoes are limited. (For information or register call 315-365-3588 or e-mail montezuma@audubon.org)

8 - Winter Raptor Birding Van Tour meet at the Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savannah, NY (2:30 – 5:30 pm) The Finger Lakes Region is home to many migratory raptors, including Short-eared Owls, Snowy Owls, Gyrfalcons, Rough-legged Hawks, and Norther Harriers. Join us for a trip around the Finger Lakes Regional Airport and nearby grasslands to search for these visitors from the Great White North. Binoculars and bird guides will be provided. (Fee: $8/child; $15/adult, $40/Family. PRE-PAID RESERVATIONS REQUIRED.) (For information/register call 315-365-3588 or e-mail montezuma@audubon.org)

8-9 - Niagara Frontier – Clarence Gun Show at the Event Building, 11177 Main St Clarence, NY (9:00 am – 4:00 pm/9:00 am - 3:00pm) 100 tables. NICS background checks available. (Cost: $5.00/children under 12 free when accompanied by a paid adult) (For information call Bruce Johnston at 716-542-9929 or email http://nfgshows.com) 

8-9 - New York Southern Tier Gun Show a t  the  Sanitaria Springs Fire Company, 811 NY Route 7, Port Crane, NY. (Sat 9:00 am-5:00 pm/Sun 9:00 am-3:00 pm) This Port Crane gun show is hosted by Mid Atlantic Arms Collectors. All federal, state and local firearm ordinances and laws must be obeyed. (Cost: $7.00) (For information call 570-280-5450 or email: maacpsse@echoes.net)

9 – Niagara Region Winter 3D Shoot at Allied Sportsmen, 12846 Clinton Street, Alden, NY. (Registration from 7:30 a.m. to noon.) Walk-on shooters welcome. For a complete 12-week schedule, contact John Floriano at 716-725-5822.

13 - Bringing Nature Home Pfeiffer Nature Center, at The Portville Free Library, 2 North Main Street, Portville, NY (6:30 pm) We humans are always being told “You are what you eat”. Simple enough, right? To be healthy you must eat healthy. The thing is, humans have been able to create or manufacture foods which are super tasty but unfortunately not always good for us. Trying to find a healthy and happy balance can be a challenge, but the good news is that humans have lots and lots of choices as we have the ability to eat many different types of food. This is not the case for lots of other living beings on the planet. For many animals, finding nutritious foods which they are able to eat can sometimes be quite difficult. Life is especially rough if you are talking about an insect that is surrounded by foreign plants when it will only eat native plants with which it has shared an evolutionary history. When we remove our native plants and flowers and replace them with non-native ornamentals, we are creating an environment that is void of food for the animals which make up the foundation of our food web. Entomologist and Wildlife Ecologist Doug Tallamy brilliantly discusses why this is a problem for all of nature in his book Bringing Nature Home- How You Can Sustain Wildlife with Native Plants. (For information/register go to  www.pfeiffernaturecenter.org or call 716-933-0187)

14 - Ten X Shooting Club Youth Rifle Shooting Program at the club, 853 Ransom Road, Lancaster NY. (6:00 pm) This program is for ages 9 through 20. New and first-time shooters should arrive at 6 p.m for safety and orientation training. Shooting begins at 6:30 p.m. Membership is not required. (Cost is $3 per night but no shooter is turned away.) (For information call Matt Giansante at 716-622-0705.)
14-15 – Birds on the Niagara Festival at the New York Power Authority Niagara Power Vista, 5777 Lewiston Road, Lewiston, NY. (For information Contact Buffalo Audubon at 585-457-3228/For event schedule go to www.birdsontheniagara.org.)

15 - End of Hunting & Trapping Seasons for Weasel, Skunk, Opossum, Raccoon & Fox.

15 - End of Trapping Seasons for Coyote, Mink and Muskrat.

15 - End of Trapping Seasons for Beaver in most of Western New York

15 - Scouts BSA Merit Badge: Plant Science at the Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savannah, NY (12:00 – 3:00 pm)  Scouts are invited to complete the requirements for the Plant Science Merit Badge during a fun and interactive program. Scouts will need to complete a few requirements prior to the program. As always, please be prepared to go outside. All scouts must be accompanied by a parent, leader, or chaperone.  Fee: $8/Scout. Pre-paid reservations required. (For information/register call 315-365-3588 or e-mail montezuma@audubon.org) 

15 - Walking in a Winter Wineryland at the Buttonwood Grove Winery, 5986 State Route 89, Romulus, NY (12:00 – 4:00 pm) Join us for this fun and delicious event. Enjoy a guided snowshoe hike along the gorge trail, award-winning wine and food pairings, and a live bird of prey presentation featuring Daena Ford from Braddock Bay Raptor Research and her hawks, owls and falcons. Must be 21+ to taste. If there is no snow, participants will explore the grounds on a guided nature hike. (Fee: w/ snowshoe rental: $30/adult, $20/child. Fee: w/o snowshoe rental: $25/adult, $15/child. Pre-paid reservations required.) (For information/register call 315-365-3588 or e-mail montezuma@audubon.org)

15-16 - FREE FISHING WEEKEND in New York State. No license required.

15-16 - Westons Mills Fire Dept Gun Show at Kinney Hose Co Inc, 1300 Olean-Portville Road, Olean, NY (Sat 9:00 am – 4:00 pm/Sun 9:00 am – 3:00 pm) Hosted by Kinney Hose Co. All federal, state and local firearm ordinances and laws must be obeyed. (Cost: $5.00) (For information call Tony Everetts 716-258-8145 or Dan Jenkins 716-790-1906 djenks_14788@yahoo.com)

15-16 - Niagara Frontier - Medina Gun Show at the Ridgeway VFW, 11392 Ridge Road, Rte 104, Medina, NY (Sat. 9:00 am – 4:00 pm/Sun. 9:00am – 3:00 pm) (Cost: $5.00/12 and under free) (65 Tables) (For information call 716-542-9929, email guns@nfgshows.com or go to http://nfgshows.com)

15-16 – 8th Annual Twin Tiers Outdoor Expo  at the Grand Central Plaza, 1020 Center Street, Horseheads, NY (Sat 9:00 am – 5:00 pm/Sun 10:00 am – 4:00 pm) (Admission: $5.00/Military Discount $1 off/ 12 Years and Under Free) (For information call 607-937-5000 or go to http://www.twintiersoutdoorexpo.com/)

16 – Niagara Region Winter 3D Shoot at Alden Rod and Gun, County Road (south of Broadway), Alden, NY. (Registration from 7:30 a.m. to noon.) Walk on shooters welcome. For a complete 12-week schedule, contact John Floriano at 716-725-5822.

15-23 - Animal Week - Animals as Superheroes at the Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. Rochester NY. (11:00 am – 3:00 pm) Explore and discover the amazing world of the animal kingdom. From insects to mammals and beyond, join us to learn about how creatures have many ways and "superpowers" that help them survive in different environments. Get hands-on while learning about amazing animals big and small and how their adaptations have helped inspire technical innovations. Come back each day to meet different live animals from the Wildlife Rockstars, the Seneca Park Zoo, and more! There will be a variety of different animals visiting the museum each day of the week, including: Coypus; ring tailed lemurs; Red eared slider turtles; porcupines; bearded dragons; geckos; toads; stick bugs; Russian tortoises; silver foxes; Eastern kangaroos; and plenty of other interesting creatures! (The animals listed may not be at the museum every day of the week, and appearances will vary. Animals need a break too!)(Cost: $16.00 - $18.00 depending on age.) (For information call 585-271-4320)

16 - Genesee Valley Trappers Association Fur Auction at the Clubhouse, 4462 County Road 32 (3 miles east of Honeoye, south of 20A), Honeoye, NY (6:30 am fur checkin/10:00 am auction) ($10.00 charge for non-members) (For information call Tom Miller, 585-229-4759)

 

Until our next meeting in the Corner, have a great time in the outdoors. This is Ron Schroder for – “Your In on The Outdoors for Western New York.”

What Do You Think? Have something for other sportspeople? Let us know HERE.

 

 

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1 - 31 – 20

 

Welcome to this week’s Conservation Chatter Corner – little bits of happenings concerning our outdoors and you, the sportspeople who enjoy being part of that outdoors.

 

DON”T WAIT – REGISTER TODAY: DEC SUMMER CAMPS REGISTRATION IS CLOSE TO 90 PERCENT FILLED: New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) urged families and sponsors to register campers as soon as possible for the 2020 Summer Camp season. Online registration opened Sunday, January 26, at 1 p.m. and within less than 24 hours, 90 percent of spaces were filled, with 22 weeks for boys and 13 for girls totally booked.

Applications should be submitted through the online registration program available on DEC's Summer Camps website. Parents and guardians can view the complete schedule of camp weeks and ages on this page, and find camp weeks that still have spaces available.

 

WINTER WONDERLAND AT REINSTEIN WOODS:  New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC), in partnership with Friends of Reinstein Woods, invites the public to celebrate "Winter Wonderland in the Woods" on Saturday, February 8 from 12 p.m. to 4 p.m. at Reinstein Woods Nature Preserve  in the town of Cheektowaga, Erie County.

Visitors can discover a variety of outdoor pursuits during the event. Ice-fishing demonstrations will take place throughout the afternoon and visitors will be able to try cross-county skiing in a demonstration area (weather permitting). Snowshoe rentals will also be available for those who wish to explore the trails.

Children will be able to try snowshoeing regardless of the weather and enjoy winter challenges including a snowball target toss, Bird Spotting Challenge trail, and a snowflake investigation station. Kids can also express their creative side in the nature art area and make crafts indoors.

The Niagara Frontier Search and Rescue Team will be on hand to talk about winter rescue and will provide a compass navigation course for participants looking to test their navigation skills. DEC Forest Rangers will demonstrate flat ice rescue techniques on a frozen lake, and an Erie County Park Ranger will offer brief winter wildlife survival hikes throughout the day.

After enjoying outdoor activities, attendees can warm up inside the education center with hot drinks and snacks sold by Friends of Reinstein Woods. The SPCA Wildlife Department and Project Thruway Turtle Watch will have live animals and be available to discuss wild animal rehabilitation. Visitors are encouraged to bring used alkaline batteries to be recycled in a hands-on demonstration by The Coalition of Positively Charged People. There will also be door prizes, costumed characters, exhibits, and more.

The event will take place regardless of snow conditions, and additional activities featuring nature experiences will be added in case of warm weather. Registration is not required for this event. There is no entry fee, but donations to Friends of Reinstein Woods are always welcome. Reinstein Woods Nature Preserve is located at 93 Honorine Drive, off of Como Park Boulevard in Cheektowaga. For more information, contact Reinstein Woods at 683-5959, or visit the Reinstein Woods Nature Preserve website and search for "Winter Wonderland."

 

WATERFOWL TASK FORCE SEEKING INPUT ON 2020-2021 CANADA GOOSE SEASON DATES: Two canada geese lay in the bed of a truck next to a hunting dog.Due to declines in the Atlantic Population of Canada geese, the Canada goose seasons in the West Central, East Central, Northeast, Lake Champlain, and Hudson Valley were shorted from 50 days in length to 30 days during the 2019-2020 season. Similar to this past year, season length for 2020-2021 is expected to be 30 days long with a two-bird bag limit. As last year was the first year with shortened seasons, DEC and the Waterfowl Hunter Task Forces are seeking input on your preferences for Canada goose season dates. Please provide your feedback to: seasonwaterfowl@dec.ny.gov. Comments will be forwarded to the appropriate task force members. Be sure to include the Canada goose zone that your comments apply to in the e-mail subject line. 

 

ANTICIPATED 2020-2021 DUCK SEASON DATES:  DEC, with the assistance of Cornell University and the Waterfowl Hunter Task Forces, implemented a new process for selecting duck season dates in the four main zones of the state. The process directly incorporated input from a greater number of duck hunters and recent duck migration and abundance trends to maximize opportunity in each zone. With no changes anticipated in the federal frameworks (i.e. season length) for 2020-2021, DEC intends to select the following dates for duck seasons in each zone:

Northeastern Zone
October 3rd - October 25th and October 31st - December 6th

Southeastern Zone
October 17th - November 29th and December 5th - December 20th

Western Zone
October 17th - November 8th and November 28th - January 3rd 

Long Island Zone
November 21st - November 29th and December 12th - January 31st

 

TRACKING WATERFOWL POPULATIONS: A biologist reading a worn band from a recaptured bird.Each year, DEC staff, the United States Fish and Wildlife Service, SUNY Cobleskill, SUNY Environmental Science and Forestry, the University of Missouri, and many volunteers from around the state, set out each summer and winter to band thousands of ducks, geese, brant, and other migratory game birds. Throughout the Atlantic Flyway (Northern Canada through Florida), cooperators band approximately 25,000 ducks and 32,000 Canada geese from July through September each year. New York and state cooperators provide a huge contribution to the international banding effort, marking approximately 2,500 ducks and 3,500 Canada geese; both of which are more than any other state in the Atlantic Flyway. 

DEC and cooperators set out each year with the goal of banding approximately one percent of the breeding population of the four main waterfowl species found in New York State (Canada geese, mallards, wood ducks, and black ducks).  In 2019, staff and cooperators were able to reach the statewide banding goals for all species except black ducks. With the help of the public who report these bands when they are seen from afar, found dead, or harvested by hunters, biologists can learn about migration routes, harvest derivation and distribution (i.e. where birds harvested in a state come from and where birds banded in an area go to), harvest rates, and annual survival.  All of this information is used annually by biologists to ensure populations of harvested species remain abundant over the long-term.

In addition to the standard annual banding efforts for the species listed above, DEC staff and cooperators also participated in several special projects marking Atlantic Brant, American woodcock, and common gallinules.

For more information, visit the DEC Migratory Game Bird Banding and Management page and the 2019 Migratory game Bird Banding Program Update.

 

THE GOOD GUYS AT WORK:

Bald Eagle Rescue - Chemung County: On Jan. 20, a New York State Police (NYSP) Trooper contacted a wildlife rehabilitator after observing an injured eagle on the bank of a pond in Horseheads. Attempts to catch the eagle were unsuccessful, because the bird continued to jump into the pond, evading capture. ECO Travis McNamara was contacted and asked to assist. With the help of Troopers Nathan Lowmaster and Brandon Salyerds, and Elmira Animal Control, ECO McNamara tracked down and cornered the eagle near the pond. The ECO used a landing net to safely capture the eagle and transport it to Cornell Wildlife Health Center.

Two troopers and an ECO pose for a photo with the injured bald eagle they rescued
Trooper Lowmaster, Trooper Salyerds, and ECO McNamara with injured eagle

 

$930,000 PROJECT WILL IMPROVE ACCESS AND SAFETY FOR ANGLERS AND BOATERS: The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) announced that a major restoration and rehabilitation of the historic Cleveland Dock Fishing Access Site is expected to begin this winter. Cleveland Dock, located at 69 State Route 49 in the village of Cleveland, Oswego County, provides unique access to the excellent fishing on Oneida Lake and also helps connect boaters to the Erie Canal system.

Cleveland Dock was a significant historic maritime landing place on the Erie Canalway, originally acquired by New York State in 1916. The dock was so well-constructed that the last major renovations took place in the 1930s. Cleveland Dock provides convenient access to Oneida Lake and the Erie Canal and draws visitors for open water fishing, ice fishing, and boat docking and provides emergency services access to the Central New York canal system. Oneida Lake, located 10 miles north of Syracuse in Oneida and Oswego counties, is the largest lake lying wholly within New York State and is best known for its walleye and yellow perch fishery.

During the open water season, the outflow from Black Creek combines with the deep water along the dock to attract a variety of fish species. Most notably, the dock provides access to post-spawn walleye in May and is also a great place to catch cruising walleye in the fall. The lake is also is a fantastic bass fishing location and popular tournament stop for professional bass fishing organizations. There are few publicly accessible locations on Oneida Lake that rival the high-quality shoreline fishing opportunity provided by Cleveland Dock.

Due to age-related deterioration of its waterfront structures, including two protective breakwater walls, Cleveland Dock is in danger of total collapse. Weather permitting, DEC expects to begin the full rehabilitation of the dock later this winter to ensure safe public access. Work includes but is not limited to removal and replacement of an existing concrete and timber sea wall with a steel sheet pile wall system. Site improvements include site grading, timber guide railing, railings, sidewalk, concrete wall cap, benches, picnic table, site electric, lamp posts, parking lot improvements, accessible concrete parking pad, approximately 2,060 square yards of asphalt parking lot, and striping.

DEC will fund $788,310 of the restoration and stabilization activities through NY Works; the New York State Office of Parks, Recreation, and Historic Preservation will fund $150,000 through the Environmental Protection Fund for a total of $938,310. DEC will maintain the site in partnership with the New York State Canal Corporation, the site owner. Other partners supporting restoration of this community asset include:

 

 

THIS WEEK’S EVENTS: (For complete future listings go to the Calendar Page - http://www.huntfishnyoutdoors.com/events.php)

JANUARY 2020

31 - End of Hunting Season for Varying Hare (Snowshoe Rabbit) in the Southern Tier portion of Western New York

31 - Ducks Unlimited Sodus Point Chapter Dinner at Marlin's, Sodus Point, NY (6:00 – 10:00 pm) Plenty of raffles, a live auction and a silent--- not to mention the wonderful beef and lobster dinner that we have all come to look forward to.  (Cost: Single $80/Couple $125/Youth $50) (For information call Joe Nicosia 315-573-1939 or go to www.ducks.org/new-york/events)

FEBUARY 2020

1 - Superb Owl IV at the Beaver Meadow Nature Center, North Java, NY. (1:00 – 4:00 pm) (Cost: $7.00)(For information/pre-register call 585-457-3228.) 

1 - Fly Tying 101 at The Orvis Shop, 4545 Transit Road, Williamsville, NY. (10:00 am – Noon) (Free.) (Call the store at 716-276-7200 information/register go to www.orvis.com/buffalo.)

1 - Girl Scout Snow Adventure Badge at the Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savannah, NY (10:00 am – 12:00 pm)  Girl Scouts of all ages are welcome to snowshoe while completing some of the requirements for the Girl Scout Snow Adventure Badge series.  Scouts will learn how to prepare for snow adventures, plan for the level of difficultly, and play winter games. All scouts must be accompanied by a parent, leader, or chaperone.  If there is no snow, Scouts will explore the forest and grassland with a nature hike. Fee: w/ snowshoe rental: $10/Scout, $5/adult. Fee: w/o snowshoe rental: $7/Scout, free for adults. Pre-registration is required as snowshoes are limited. (For information/register call 315-365-3588 or e-mail montezuma@audubon.org)

1-2 - S-VE Sportsman’s Club Sportsman Days at the Spencer-Van Etten High School, S-VE High School, 16 Darts Cross Road, Spencer, NY (10:00 am – 5:00 pm) Sponsored by the Spencer-Van Etten High School Sportsman’s Club. From hunting with dogs to hunting with guides. Artists, taxidermists, wood carvers, archery shops, fishing experts and guides. Archery range and fly casting area for kids. Free venison samples. Youth 3D archery tournament. Youth game calling contest. National Guard, seminars, Book Signing, DEC officers and Cornell deer researchers. Bring your deer mounts to hang in our “hall of Horns”. Food and drinks available for sale by our student council. Free! (For information call Doug 607-589-6512 or email @ cheveefann@aol.com)

1-9 - National Rifle Association’s Great American Outdoor Show at the State Farm Show Complex, 2300 North Cameron Street, Harrisburg, PA. This is a nine day event celebrating hunting, fishing and outdoor traditions that are treasured by millions of Americans and their families. The show features over 1,100 exhibitors ranging from shooting manufacturers to outfitters to fishing boats and RV’s, and archery to art covering 650,000 square feet of exhibit hall space! Not to mention a jam packed schedule including country concerts, fundraising dinners, speaking events, archery competitions, celebrity appearances, seminars, demonstrations and much more! (Admission to the 2016 Great American Outdoor Show is as follows: • Adult: $13.00, • Child (6-12): $6.00, • Senior (65 or older): $11.00 and • 2-Day Pass: $22.00.) The show’s website, www.greatamericanoutdoorshow.org, features an interactive floor plan and exhibitors list.

2 - Niagara Frontier - Alexander Gun Show at the Alexander Fireman’s Rec Hall, 10708 Alexander Road (Route 98) Alexander, NY (8:00 am – 3:00pm) 100 tables. NICS background checks available. (Cost: $5.00/children under 12 free when accompanied by a paid adult) (For information call 716-542-9929 or email guns@nfgshows.com)

2 – Niagara Region Winter 3D Shoot at Erie County Conservation Society, Holland, NY. Registration from 7:30 a.m. to noon. Walk-on shooters welcome. For a complete 12-week schedule, contact John Florian at 725-5822 or Dan Fisher at 716-860-2519.

3 - Speaking of Nature Talk - Honeoye Lake Fishery Update at the FLCC Muller Field Station, 6455 County Road 36, Honeoye, NY. (4:30 – 6:00 pm) New York State Department of Environmental Conservation biologist Pete Austerman will discuss the current status of sport fish populations in Honeoye Lake. The presentation will include discussion of recent fingerling walleye stocking and future fishery management options for bass and panfish. Seating is limited and reservations are required! (For information/reservation contact Nancy Lawson at 585-785-1257 or Nancy.Lawson@flcc.edu.)

4 – Buffalo Harbor Telemetry Study Update from DEC’s Chris Driscoll at the Niagara Musky Association monthly meeting, at the Eldredge Club, 17 Broad Street, Tonawanda, NY. (7:00 pm)

4 - Indoor Tree ID Workshop at Knox Farm State Park, 437 Buffalo Rd East Aurora, NY. (12:30 – 1:30 pm) Learn tree ID based on twigs and buds. Led by NY State Parks. (FREE) (For  information/register call 716-549-1050.)

7-9 - Becoming an Outdoors-Woman (BOW) in the Snow Winter Workshop at Allegany State Park. Winter in New York can last up to six months. Why not learn to enjoy it to the fullest? Training sessions will include: Snowshoeing, Cross Country Skiing, Winter Camping & Survival, Fat Tire Biking, Trapping, Dutch Oven Cooking, Wild Game Cooking, Ice Fishing, K-9 First Aid, Firearm Safety and more! Registration will be open from November 19 through December 3, 2019, and DEC will choose registrants via lottery. Limited spaces available! Registration form, course descriptions and scholarship information will become available on November 19th. (For information e-mail BOW for more information.)

7-9 – 13th Annual Coyote Hunt Contest! sponsored by the Federation of Sportsmen’s Clubs of Sullivan County, Inc. The Grand Prize of $2,000 will be awarded for the overall heaviest coyote, $200 Daily Prize for the heaviest coyote each day, an extra $100 prize for the Junior Hunter age 12 to 15 years old and an extra $100 for the Female Hunter weighing in the heaviest coyote. $80 each will be awarded for all the other coyotes weighed in during the 3-day Hunt Contest. This contest is for coyotes hunted or trapped & taken only in New York State. The early registration entry fee is $35.00. Besides the cash prizes, the entry fee includes a free banquet dinner and a free $5.00 three gun raffle ticket. Everyone wishing to participate in the hunt or attend the dinner pays the same price at time of registration. The cost for those who just attend the banquet will be $25. For registration and all the rules of the 3-day Coyote Hunt Contest call Linda 845-482-4985 or Jack 845-482-4987. (For any further information and application download go to www.sullivancountysportsmensfederationny.com)

8 - Elbridge Rod and Gun Club Sportsman Swap Meet at 6275 Laird Road, Jordan, NY (9:00 am to 3:00 pm) (For information call 315-857-4663 or 315-689-7339.)

8 - Outfitter Fair at the Southtowns Walleye Club, 5895 Southwestern Blvd., Hamburg, NY (11:00 am – 3:00 pm) New and used fishing and hunting equipment. No guns or ammunition. (For information call 716-796-5372 or 716-864-2938.)  

8 – Sportsman Auction at Hessney Auction Center, 2741 Lyons Road (Route 14N), Geneva, NY (9:30 am) Over 300 Guns • Shotguns • Rifles • Handguns • Knives • Ammo • Scopes • Bear Traps • Decoys • Hunting & Fishing Items • '04 Yamaha Sx Venom 600 Smowmobile • 10 Day South African Hunt. (For more information call 315-789-9349 or 585-734-6082 or go to www.hessney.com)

8 - Fly Tying 101 at The Orvis Shop, 4545 Transit Road, Williamsville, NY. (10:00 am – Noon) (Free.) (Call the store at 716-276-7200 information/register go to www.orvis.com/buffalo.)

8 - Family Outdoor Time: Mysteries of Ice at the Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savannah, NY (2:00 – 4:00 pm) Winter is a great time to explore wetlands and the wildlife that live there.  Families will discover how wildlife survive in these delicate areas by exploring the frozen marshes and swamps and conducting scientific experiments.  If there is snow on the ground, plan on snowshoeing. (Fee w/ snowshoe rental:  $7/person, $20/family Fee: w/o snowshoe rental:  $5/person, $15/family.) Pre-registration is required as snowshoes are limited. (For information or register call 315-365-3588 or e-mail montezuma@audubon.org)

8 - Winter Raptor Birding Van Tour meet at the Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savannah, NY (2:30 – 5:30 pm) The Finger Lakes Region is home to many migratory raptors, including Short-eared Owls, Snowy Owls, Gyrfalcons, Rough-legged Hawks, and Norther Harriers. Join us for a trip around the Finger Lakes Regional Airport and nearby grasslands to search for these visitors from the Great White North. Binoculars and bird guides will be provided. (Fee: $8/child; $15/adult, $40/Family. PRE-PAID RESERVATIONS REQUIRED.) (For information/register call 315-365-3588 or e-mail montezuma@audubon.org)

8-9 - Niagara Frontier – Clarence Gun Show at the Event Building, 11177 Main St Clarence, NY (9:00 am – 4:00 pm/9:00 am - 3:00pm) 100 tables. NICS background checks available. (Cost: $5.00/children under 12 free when accompanied by a paid adult) (For information call Bruce Johnston at 716-542-9929 or email http://nfgshows.com) 

8-9 - New York Southern Tier Gun Show a t  the  Sanitaria Springs Fire Company, 811 NY Route 7, Port Crane, NY. (Sat 9:00 am-5:00 pm/Sun 9:00 am-3:00 pm) This Port Crane gun show is hosted by Mid Atlantic Arms Collectors. All federal, state and local firearm ordinances and laws must be obeyed. (Cost: $7.00) (For information call 570-280-5450 or email: maacpsse@echoes.net)

9 – Niagara Region Winter 3D Shoot at Allied Sportsmen, 12846 Clinton Street, Alden, NY. (Registration from 7:30 a.m. to noon.) Walk-on shooters welcome. For a complete 12-week schedule, contact John Floriano at 716-725-5822.

 

Until our next meeting in the Corner, have a great time in the outdoors. This is Ron Schroder for – “Your In on The Outdoors for Western New York.”

What Do You Think? Have something for other sportspeople? Let us know HERE.

 

 

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Welcome to this week’s Conservation Chatter Corner – little bits of happenings concerning our outdoors and you, the sportspeople who enjoy being part of that outdoors.

 

DEC ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR PHEASANT RELEASE PROGRAM New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) announced that applications are available for DEC's cooperative Day-Old Pheasant Chick Program. The program provides pheasant hunting opportunities through a partnership among DEC, hunters, 4-H youth, and interested landowners.

The Day-Old Pheasant Chick Program began in the early 1900s. At that time, the state Conservation Department (which became DEC) distributed pheasant eggs and chicks to farmers and rural youth, and DEC continues that tradition to this day. Day-old chicks are available at no cost to participants who can provide a brooding facility, a covered outdoor rearing pen, and an adequate release site. Approved applicants will receive the day-old chicks in April, May, or June. No chicks obtained through the Day-Old Pheasant Chick Program can be released on private shooting preserves and all release sites must be approved in advance by DEC and must be open for public pheasant hunting opportunities. The program is funded through the State Conservation Fund from license fees paid by hunters, trappers, and anglers.

Applicants must provide daily care to the rapidly growing chicks, monitor the birds' health and ensure they have adequate feed and water. The pheasants may be released beginning when they are eight weeks old and must be released no later than Dec. 1. Individuals interested in these programs should contact their nearest DEC regional office (listed below) for applications and additional information.

In 2019, DEC distributed more than 31,500 day-old pheasant chicks to qualified applicants. Applications must be filed with a DEC regional wildlife manager by March 25, 2020; see contact information below for central/western New York. A "Pheasant Rearing Guide" and applications are available on the DEC website.

R7 - Broome, Cayuga, Chenango, Cortland, Madison, Onondaga, Oswego, Tioga, and Tompkins counties:
1285 Fisher Ave.
Cortland, NY 13045
(607) 753-3095 x 247

R8 - Chemung, Genesee, Livingston, Monroe, Ontario, Orleans, Schuyler, Seneca, Steuben, Wayne, and Yates counties:
6274 East Avon-Lima Rd.
Avon, NY 14414
(585) 226-5380

R9 - Allegany, Chautauqua, Cattaraugus, Erie, Niagara, and Wyoming counties:
182 East Union, Suite 3
Allegany, NY 14706-1328
(716) 372-0645

 

TIME FOR THE MIDWINTER VISIT TO THE BOAT - 8 SECRETS FOR A SAFE CHECKUP:

Winter solstice may have been one month ago, but on the boater’s calendar, January is generally considered the middle of a vessel’s long winter nap. It’s time to check up on her in storage. Why? How your boat fares over the long and, in some cases, brutal winter will help ensure a timely spring launch. However, checking up on a boat during winter requires unique seasonal safeguards according to the BoatUS Foundation for Boating Safety and Clean WaterU.S. Coast Guard statistics show that January has the most number of accidents that result in death. Here are eight tips for doing it safely:

> If your boat is stored in the water, consider making a visit with a friend. That’s because there’s a good chance that in the dead of winter no one would hear a potential call for help if you accidentally slipped and fell overboard.

> If there’s ever a reason to wear a life jacket, now may be the time, especially if you’re solo. A simple little slip could have big consequences, and a life jacket could buy you the time for self-rescue, which tees up the next tip:

> Know where the dock ladders are located.

> Fluffy snow can be deceptively slick, so save the smooth-soled boat shoes for the summer and wear something with traction. According to BoatUS Marine Insurance, slip and falls are a common claim occurring in a marina.

> Be extremely careful if using a ladder when boarding a boat stored in the marina yard or on a trailer. Ensure it is firmly planted, secure it with a line at the top to avoid shifting, and if possible, have a friend hold it when you’re ascending/descending. Use bucket and line tied to a cleat to help move tools and supplies to keep your hands free to hold the ladder.

> Heavy snow loads can add tremendous weight. Now is the time to ensure any tarps or coverings haven’t been loosened and enough pitch remains to slough off snow and ice. As during boating season, always “keep one hand on the boat” when adjusting covers or lines that are difficult to reach.

> Check jackstands to ensure they haven’t moved, but don’t ever attempt to move or adjust one by yourself – that’s the marina’s job. Do not tie off tarps to stands as winds could pull them out. > Shoveling or chipping away ice on your boat may cause damage. A stiff broom is best to clear a path. For more tips on winter boat storage, additional information can be found at https://www.boatus.com/expert-advice/how-to-diy/winterization.

 

ICE FISHING TIPS FROM NYSDEC: Ice fishing opportunities abound in New York State. Winter anglers catch a variety of fish; primarily perch, sunfish, pickerel, northern pike and walleye. In addition, many waters throughout New York State are open to fishing for trout, lake trout and landlocked salmon. Check the "Special Regulations By County" sections of the Fishing Regulations Guide.

Fishing through the ice requires skill and knowledge as does open water angling. But, anyone can ice fish successfully if he/she does the homework. Learning about the water to be fished, the equipment and its capabilities, proper clothing and safety precautions are all part of a successful, enjoyable winter fishing experience. Perhaps the best way to get started is to accompany a friend or neighbor on a half-day ice fishing outing. If you are unable to locate anyone to go with, the next best alternative is to visit a tackle shop in a popular ice fishing area. The proprietors are interested in seeing that you have a successful and enjoyable trip and will provide you with all of the necessary equipment. You may also watch for announcements of local ice fishing contests or tournaments run by local sportsmen's clubs -- ice fishermen tend to be a highly social group, eager to share tips, techniques and stories.

For a first trip, try to pick an opportune weather day -- remember those blustery January days will soon fade into mild February and spring-like March days which often provide some of the most productive ice fishing of the season. Whatever the day you decide to go ice fishing, be sure to check the ice for safety.

The Waters . . .

Most all ponds and lakes offer ice fishing potential. Their characteristics define the kinds of fish that may be caught. Large, shallower ponds and lakes favor species such as chain pickerel, northern pike, yellow perch and sunfish. Deepwater lakes need to be fished selectively to get good catches of northern pike, walleye or lake trout. Brown trout, rainbow trout and landlocked salmon, where they may legally be taken, are often found in deep lakes, which provide necessary cool temperatures in the summertime. However, when these lakes are ice-covered, trout are frequently caught while cruising just a few feet under the ice. The local tackle shop where you purchase your bait should be able to advise you on where fish are currently being caught.

Regardless of the fish species that you are seeking, concentrations of anglers or the presence of many old holes will provide an indication of areas where good catches have recently occurred.

Cutting the Ice...

Getting through the ice is not as hard as it might seem. There are a variety of tools available that make this "essential task" fairly simple. Perhaps the simplest is an old-fashioned "spud" bar which your grandfather may have used on his ice fishing trips. Spuds are often the cheapest way to cut a hole in the ice and work reasonably well on ice up to about a foot thick. Hand-powered augers, which are slightly more expensive than spud bars, are easy to operate and offer the best all-around compromise for moderate ice conditions. Try to purchase an auger appropriate to the species of fish that you are seeking. Anglers who fish for yellow perch, sunfish and other pan fish frequently favor ice augers 4", 5" or 6" in diameter because of their light weight and the speed that they bore through the ice. Anglers who fish for larger fish, such as trout, lake trout, landlocked salmon and northern pike, frequently prefer an ice auger which will make a larger hole -- an appreciated feature during the often-tricky landing of these large fish. But remember, cutting an 8" hole requires the removal of almost twice as much ice as a 6" hole, so don't buy an ice auger much bigger than you will need. For the avid ice angler or for thicker, more extreme ice conditions, more expensive, gas-powered augers provide the ultimate in speed and convenience, albeit at a sacrifice in weight and portability. Power augers come in diameters up to 10" and the size of the hole makes little difference in the speed or difficulty of cutting the hole.

Ice Fishing Methods 

Ice fishing methods include "jigging" with short, light fishing rods and using tip-ups. There are many different kinds of jigging poles and tip-ups. Much of the equipment is easy to make.

Jigging involves the use of a jigging rod or hand line and a small jigging spoon or lure which is often "sweetened" with a piece of bait. The jig is designed to dart around in different directions when it is jerked up and down by the angler.

The tip-up is basically a spool on a stick holding a baited line suspended through a hole in the ice. When the bait - usually a minnow - is taken by a fish, the pull on the line releases a signal, such as a red flag.

Clothing...

For safe ice fishing outings, anglers need to be well prepared. Proper clothing is critical because most people do not move around much while ice fishing. Dress warmly, paying extra attention to your head, feet and hands - dressing in layers is essential.

Ice safety...

Safe ice is the number one consideration. A minimum of three to four inches of solid ice is the general rule for safety. Ice thickness, however, is not uniform on any body of water. The guidelines presented here (based on Minnesota Department of Natural Resources) are based on new clear ice on non-running waters. Remember, your own good judgment is essential! Since ice thickness can vary on a lake, check the ice periodically to stay safe.

Ice Thickness Table for new, clear ice only:

Ice Thickness                            Permissible Load

2 inches or less                           Stay Off

4 inches                                         Ice Fishing or other Activities on foot

5 inches                                         Snowmobile or ATV

8-12 inches                                   Car or small pickup

12-15 inches                                 Medium Truck

Note: This guide is based on new, clear ice on non-running waters. Slush ice is about 50 percent weaker. Clear, ice over running water is about 20 percent weaker. Double the recommendations for white ice. Many ice anglers do not like to fish on less than five inches of ice, and do not like to drive a pick-up truck on less than 15 inches of ice. Use common sense!

Be cautious in areas where "bubblers" are used to protect docks. They can produce thin, unsafe ice some distance away. Be especially alert in areas near shore, over moving bodies of water and on lakes and ponds where streams enter or exit.

Remember, use the buddy system while ice fishing - it saves lives.

And, last but not least, the fishing regulations...

Review the ice fishing regulations to let you know where you can ice fish, how many lines you are permitted, and information about the use of ice shanties.

Region 7 Ice Fishing

Ice Fishing in Broome County

Ice Fishing in Cayuga County

Ice Fishing in Chenango County

Ice Fishing in Cortland County

Ice Fishing in Madison County

Ice Fishing in Onondaga County

Ice Fishing in Oswego County

Ice Fishing in Tioga County

Ice Fishing in Tompkins County

For more information on ice fishing in Region 7, call 607-753-3095.

Region 8 Ice Fishing

Ice Fishing in Chemung County

Ice Fishing in Livingston County

Ice Fishing in Monroe County

Ice Fishing in Ontario County

Ice Fishing in Orleans County

Ice Fishing in Schuyler County

Ice Fishing in Seneca County

Ice Fishing in Steuben County

Ice Fishing in Wayne County

Ice Fishing in Yates County

For more information on ice fishing in Region 8, call 585-226-2466.

Region 9 Ice Fishing

Ice Fishing in Allegany County

Ice Fishing in Cattaraugus County

Ice Fishing in Chautauqua County

Ice Fishing in Erie County

Ice Fishing in Niagara County

Ice Fishing in Wyoming County

For more information on ice fishing in Region 9, call 716-372-0645.

 

WHITE-TAILED DEER: WINTER WEAKLINGS OR GLACIAL GOLIATHS?: As temperatures drop and snow deepens, you may notice a group of white-tailed deer digging around in an open field or wandering through your yard in search of food. While you may be tempted to feed the deer, in reality, deer are well adapted to our winter conditions and, along with being illegal, feeding deer may actually do more harm than good.

White-tailed deer go through both physical and behavioral changes that improve their survival odds during winter. Deer spend much of the fall season building up fat stores that will provide them with warmth and energy throughout winter. Externally, deer develop a thick winter coat of fur that helps them absorb more sunlight and traps in more body heat. They have special glands that secrete oils that make their hairs water repellent, keeping them warm and dry. Behaviorally, deer often move less during winter to reduce energy consumption. During periods with deep snow, deer may temporarily migrate to areas of dense conifer stands which provide thermal protection. This behavior is commonly known as ‘yarding’.

Although providing deer with additional food in winter may seem like a good idea, there are negative consequences of doing so. The natural winter diet of a deer consists of leaves and twigs, but when deer are introduced to large amounts of grains (i.e. wheat, oats, rye) or corn, the influx of carbohydrates can result in acidosis, which can be fatal. Another concern is that by feeding deer in winter, you habituate them to your presence and make them less reliant on natural forage. Artificially congregating deer at feed sites can also increase disease transmission among deer or between deer and other animals, and it can quickly make deer become a nuisance.

The best way to help deer, or other wildlife, survive through tough winters is to make sure they have enough natural forage during all seasons.  You can do this by keeping deer numbers in balance with the habitat and improving the quality of existing natural foods.  See Winter Deer Foods and Cutting Browse for Deer Feeding for more information.  

 

SIBLEY BIRDS WALL POSTERS:  Considered the modern day Roger Tory Peterson, master birder and illustrator David Sibley is renowned for his series of field guides, beginning with The Sibley Guide to Birds. Now, for the first time, a selection of his beautiful paintings are presented as giant high-quality collages of birds printed on 100 pound matte paper as a wall posters. Published and distributed by Scott & Nix, the six Sibley wall posters include Sibley’s Backyard Birds of Eastern North America, which features 98 common species in 144 illustrations. Other wall posters include Sibley’s Western Backyard Birds, Owls, Hummingbirds, Raptors, and Waterfowl.

Selected from his best-selling field guides by Sibley himself, David stated: “I wanted a way to display the wonderful diversity of our birds ‘at a glance.’ I hope it will encourage people to learn more about our birds and to help protect their habitats in our neighborhoods and across the continent.” The bird illustrations are reproduced in relative scale to show differences in sizes, and species are arranged by bird families. Illustrations of males and females, breeding and nonbreeding, and juvenile birds are included to help you to identify birds you see.

Available as unframed posters or you can choose from two styles of custom high-quality black matte or matte silver anodized aluminum frames. Sturdy, lightweight, and handsome. (Final frame size for 24 x 36 inch poster is 26¼ x 38¼ inches.) Each framed poster is backed with acid-free foamcore for maximum archival protection. Each framed poster has a special Framers Brand UV filtering protective lens cover, an archival-quality cover that’s better than glass and prevents sunlight from damaging the artwork; it’s also scratch-resistant and will not show fingerprints.

Posters are shipped fully framed with wire hanging hardware, bumper stickers to protect your wall, and nails. All shipments are sent via Federal Express Ground in a specially designed shipping container to arrive in perfect condition.

To view each of the wall posters and learn more about David Sibley’s illustrations, visit https://scottandnix.com/.

 

THIS WEEK’S EVENTS: (For complete future listings go to the Calendar Page - http://www.huntfishnyoutdoors.com/events.php)

 

JANUARY 2020

24 - Ten X Shooting Club Youth Rifle Shooting Program at the club, 853 Ransom Road, Lancaster NY. (6:00 pm) This program is for ages 9 through 20. New and first-time shooters should arrive at 6 p.m for safety and orientation training. Shooting begins at 6:30 p.m. Membership is not required. (Cost is $3 per night but no shooter is turned away.) (For information call Matt Giansante at 716-622-0705.)

24-26 - New York Sportsman’s Expo at the New York State Fairgrounds, 581 State Fair Blvd., Syracuse, NY (Fri - Noon to 7:00 pm/Sat – 9:00 am to 7:00 pm/Sun – 9:00 am to 5:00 pm) This year's show will include more than 40 new exhibits, including outfitters from across the globe . The schedule also includes seminars, a kids' trout pond and more. (Admission: $10 ages 13-64; $5 for children 6 – 12; 5 and under no charge. Seniors are $7 and Military/Fire and Police are $7 with ID) (For information go to http://www.newyorksportsmansexpo.com/)

25 – Free Fly Tying Class sponsored by the Lakewood Rod & Gun Club at the Club, 433 E Terrace Avenue, Lakewood, NY. (9:00 am – 12:00 pm) Free pizzas and beverages will also be provided. Instruction will be provided by the mentors from Kids On the Fly. You are invited. (For information call 716-763-3955.)

25 - Whitetails Unlimited - Canandaigua, NY/Wine Country Chapter Banquet Deer Camp at the Kings Banquet Center, 4031 Routes 5 & 20, Canandaigua, NY. (5:00 pm) The deadline ticket date is January 19, 2019. Tickets may be ordered online at www.whitetailsunlimited.com or by phone - 1-800-274-5471. (Cost $45.00/$35.00 spouse/youth) Everyone goes home with a Deer Camp Tour 2018 Shirt! (For information contact Bill Bailey  413-244-2304)

25 - Birds, Binocs, and Beers at the Fleur de Lis Brew Works 3630 NY-414, Seneca Falls, NY (12:30 pm – 4:00 pm) Enjoy a guided snowshoe hike through the brewery grounds, then warm up inside the brewery with beer tastings and light snacks. Don’t forget a camera. Must be 21+ to taste.  Krittr Kris and Feathered Friends will wrap up the event with a live bird of prey program. (Fee: w/ snowshoe rental: $30/adult, $20/child. Fee: w/o snowshoe rental: $25/adult, $15/child.  PRE-PAID RESERVATIONS REQUIRED.) (For information or register call 315-365-3588 or e-mail montezuma@audubon.org)

25 - Birding at Fort Niagara State Park with naturalist Tom Kerr (10:00 am - noon.) (For information/pre-registration (required) call 585-457-3228.)

25 – Fly Tying 101 at Orvis Buffalo, 4545 Transit Road, Williamsville, NY. (10:00 am – noon) (For information/register contact Adam Slavinski at 716-276-7200 or go on line at www.orvis.com/buffalo.)

25 - Reptile and Amphibian Lecture by Dr. Peter Ducey, distinguished teaching professor at SUNY Cortland, at the Milton J. Rubenstein Museum of Science & Technology (MOST), 500 S. Franklin St. Syracuse, NY. (10:00 – 11:00 am) The Onondaga Lake Conservation Corps sponsors this presentation about the biology of the many amphibian and reptile species found in the Onondaga Lake ecosystem and how the recent restoration efforts have influenced these populations. (For information/register email montezuma@audubon.org with the subject line "Onondaga Lake" or call 315.365.3588 by January 24. Space is limited and registration is required.)

26 – Niagara Region 3D Winter Archery League Shoot at the Wood and Brook in Alden. (7:30 am to noon.) Walk ons are welcome. (For information contact Marty at 716-870-2653.)

26 - The Start Of Online Registration For The DEC's 2018 Summer Camps Program. (10:00 am) Applications should be submitted through the online registration program available through a link from the Summer Camps website. Parents and guardians are encouraged to register early since some of the weeks fill up quickly. Camps for children are: Camp Colby in Saranac Lake (Franklin County); Camp DeBruce in Livingston Manor (Sullivan County); Camp Rushford in Caneadea (Allegany County), and Pack Forest in Warrensburg (Warren County). Campers will have the opportunity to participate in a wide variety of outdoor adventures and are encouraged to try new things. Activities may include fishing, bird watching, fly-tying, archery, canoeing, hiking, camping, orienteering, and hunter safety education. (For more information visit the DEC's website at www.dec.ny.gov, or call 518-402-8014.)

31 - End of Hunting Season for Varying Hare (Snowshoe Rabbit) in the Southern Tier portion of Western New York