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TRAPPING

***** A Tradition *****

PAGE INDEX:

Trapping News

Fur Prices

Trapping Tips

Trapping Seasons

Trapping Videos

Trapper Clubs

Websites For Trappers

Trapper Education Courses

Trappers' Photos

TRAPPING NEWS:

 

  

FUR AUCTIONS:

 

 

March 15, 2020 - Genesee Valley Trappers Association Fur Auction at the Clubhouse, 4462 County Road 32 (3 miles east of Honeoye, south of 20A), Honeoye, NY (6:30 am fur checkin/10:00 am auction) ($10.00 charge for non-members) (For information call Tom Miller, 585-229-4759)

March 22, 2020- Tioga County Trappers Association Fur Sale at the Tioga County Sportsman's Association, 1141 Carmichael Road, Owego, NY. (9:00 am to 12:00 pm.) (For information contact Bill Swagler at 607-222-8554 or Mike Verry 607-427-5589.) 

April 11, 2020 – Fulton - Montgomery Trappers and Foothills Trappers Fur Auction at the VFW, 129 Mohawk Street, Herkimer, NY. (Check in 6:00 am/Sale 8:00 am) (For information call Paul at 312-429-2969.)

 July 10-11, 2020 - Fenner Trappers Rondy and Sportsman Show at Nichols Pond, Canastota, NY. (For information call Bill Swagler 606-222-8554 or Ken Hellijas  518-231-0266.)

 

CALIFORNIA ONE STEP CLOSER TO AN ALL-OUT BAN ON TRAPPING: California Assembly Member Lorena S. Gonzalez’s (D-Sherman Heights) legislation, Assembly Bill 273, seeks to hammer the final nail in the coffin by making it unlawful to sell furs. AB 273 has passed the Senate Natural Resources and Water Committee with a vote of 6 to 2 and will now head to the Senate Appropriations Committee.

AB 273 would prohibit anyone who owns a trapping license or a fur dealing license from being able to sell furs. As a result, taxpayers will foot the bill for contractors and agents to trap nuisance wildlife, as well as work with the California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CFWD) to manage furbearer populations. Currently, trappers pay to trap by purchasing trapping licenses which cost over a $100 in California. This revenue provided by trappers currently goes to the state to help fund wildlife conservation programs.

It is already illegal to use common traps such as conibear, foothold traps and snares in the state as a result of a 1998 ballot initiative. By banning the selling of furs, trappers will have no way to recoup the cost of equipment or their license fees and will be forced to sell their traps.

Additionally, trapping plays an important role in wildlife conservation because it helps the CFWD scientifically monitor the health and size of animal populations while also controlling many unwanted nuisance fur-bearing animals. In fact, the Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies, which is made up of the nation’s wildlife agencies, along with wildlife biologists, the American Association of Wildlife Veterinarians and the American Veterinary Medical Association, all support the use of trapping in wildlife management.

( https://www.sportsmensalliance.org/news/california-moving-toward-a-complete-ban-on-trapping-fur-sales/?bblinkid=162810512&bbemailid=14178755&bbejrid=1083472420 )

 

PUBLIC AND PROFESSIONAL ATTITUDES ABOUT TRAPPING:

This is a summary of two articles by Bob Noonan published in the March/April and May/June 2019 issues of the Trapper’s Post.  Noonan summarized information provided at a seminar about trapping, held in Maine.  Samara Trusso, a Pennsylvania Game Commission Wildlife Management Supervisor who also conducts public education programs, presented some interesting facts on the demographics of the US population:  total population is about 327 million, 81% is urban/suburban, 19% rural.  Average age of urbanites is 36 while the average age of the rural folks is 43.  Results of 2017 research by the International Association of Fish and Game Agencies revealed that the US has 33.1 million fishermen (10%), 13.7 million hunters (4%) and 175,000 trappers (.0005%).  Of trappers 98% are male, average age is 48, typical income is $40,000 - $60,000, annual fur income is $1,000 - $4,000 and 70% do some ADC.  3 – 10 million animals are trapped for fur.  The top four species trapped were raccoon, coyote, muskrat and beaver.  Motivations for trapping were: lifestyle, appreciation of nature and wildlife management, traditions and social relationship.  Money, while listed wasn’t as important as the other reasons.

95% of the public approve of fishing, 80% approve of hunting and 74% were OK with trapping if it was for damage control and population control.  87% said it was fine to wear fur, only 18% said it wasn’t (I realize this totals 105%!)

 The vast majority (of the public) does not share animal rights philosophies.  Even those who oppose trapping don’t hold that attitude strongly.  They do care deeply about wildlife resources and do not take killing lightly.  Research also shows that the public is highly uninformed about wildlife issues.

A troubling survey in 1998 of 1,000 conservation professionals concerned with protection and sustainability of a variety of natural resources (such as air, water, land and wildlife) revealed that 46% felt that trapping should be outlawed.  Of those, 94% felt it caused unnecessary pain and stress, 80% felt it harmed non-target animals and 52% felt it unnecessary for wildlife management.  Only 39% of the 1,000 surveyed were not opposed to trapping:  85% of those felt that an efficient wildlife harvest was needed, 79% agreed that wildlife management was needed and 68% said trapping didn’t hurt populations.  All respondents were concerned about animal welfare and the selectivity of trapping.

Demographics of animal rights groups:  97% are white, 89% own pets, 82% are college educated, 82% have above average income, and 78% are women.

Trusso said that research shows that “trappers are not necessarily sensitive communicators”.

So, who does the public regard as the most credible source for wildlife information in the Northeast?  In descending order:  1) state fish and game agencies, 2) US Fish and Wildlife Service, 3) state game wardens, 4) state environmental agencies,5) university wildlife biologists, 6) the American Society of Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (which deals with domestic animals), 7) local sportsmen’s clubs, 8) the media, 9) veterinarians, 10) animal rights activists, 11) trappers, 12) celebrities.

So, how do we communicate to the public?  Go into the conversation knowing, as precisely as possible, what we want the audience to feel/believe/do.  Know our message and keep it simple.  Several main points are enough.

And, it must be a two-way conversation – we have to listen to the other side even if we disagree.  It cannot be an ideological, take no prisoners battle.  We must show empathy both for the people we are speaking with and the animals we are talking about.

We must stick to key messages:

  • Trapping is humane.
  • Trapped wildlife are abundant, not endangered.  Regulated trapping does not endanger wildlife (populations).
  • Trapping is managed through scientifically based regulations, enforced by game wardens.
  • Regulations and methods are continually reviewed to ensure humaneness.
  • Regulated trapping provides many benefits to both wildlife and people and maintains a balance between them.

We must avoid these messages:

  •  Trapping is recreational, a sport we have a right to.
  • Trapping is a tradition going back to colonial times.
  • Trapping is legal.
  • Trapping benefits the economy.
  • Animals are a renewal resource.  (The public considers solar and wind renewable, but is largely against considering animals or even trees renewable.)
  • Don’t use the word “euthanize” – to the public, this means the animal is sick.

 

FISHER MANAGEMENT PLAN: 

The final Fisher Management Plan addresses population fluctuations in different regions of the state while offering trappers an additional hunting season, the Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) announced with the release of the adaptive management strategy.

DEC biologists developed the plan with input from trapping enthusiasts to manage population declines of fishers in Northern New York and population increases in central and western New York. The plan reduces the trapping season in the north by 16 days while establishing a new six-day season in the central and western parts of the state.

The fisher management plan is a comprehensive set of strategies that will guide the agency's efforts to maintain populations of the species for the next 10 years. The plan advances two primary goals for managing fisher populations in New York: to maintain or enhance fisher populations in all areas of the state where suitable habitat exists and to provide for the sustainable use and enjoyment of fishers by both trappers and the general public.

Fishers, a member of the weasel family, can weigh between 3 and 13 pounds and their diets range from small and medium-sized mammals and birds to acorns, apples and berries. They are also one of the few known predators of porcupines, having been known to consume the entire animal, leaving nothing but a quilled hide and a few bones.

Historically, their numbers experienced a severe decline during the late 1800s and early 1900s due to over-trapping and loss of forested habitat due to unregulated logging and the clearing of land for farms. Restoration programs, re-forestation, and the regulation of trapping have allowed fishers to become well-established and people have enjoyed sustainable harvest opportunities for this species since the 1950s in northern New York and since the 1980s in southeastern New York.

In addition to trapping opportunities, many citizens have enjoyed observing these predators in their natural habitats across the state. Over the past 20 years, populations have expanded into central and western New York, and sightings in these regions are now common. Surveys by DEC staff in collaboration with researchers at Cornell University used trail cameras at more than 600 locations to document that fishers are now well-established throughout the southernmost Wildlife Management Units in central and western New York.

The plan defines specific objectives and strategies for each of the following fisher management zones: Northern; Southeastern; and Central/Western New York. New York City and Long Island are excluded as fisher populations have historically not existed in those regions of the state. The revisions made in the final plan for the Adirondacks and central/western New York will allow managers to accommodate trappers' desires while meeting biological objectives for a sustainable harvest. To meet this objective, the plan proposes the following adjustment to current fisher trapping regulations to begin in the fall of 2016:

  • Reduce the fisher trapping season from 46 days to 30 days in select Wildlife Management Units (WMUs) in northern ew York, with a season start date of November 1 to address population declines in this area;
  • Establish a limited six-day open trapping season in selected WMUs in central/western New York to provide new opportunities for sustainable hunting as populations have expanded.

The proposed changes to trapping regulations will remain in effect for three years to allow for evaluations of these new regulations and to determine if additional changes are warranted. No changes are proposed for southeastern New York at this time because the current regulations provide ample trapping opportunities and populations are stable or increasing.

The management plan, and an Assessment of Public Comment is available on the DEC website. Proposed regulations to implement the plan will soon be released for public comment.

KUDOS: Congratulations to Gordon (Gordy) Berndt of Victor, NY who was inducted into the National Trappers Association Hall of Fame. Gordy Berndt is one of those men who has ALWAYS been involved with trappers and in the trapping community.  Trapping has truly been a lifestyle for him and for his family.  Gordy has lived, breathed, written, and supported trapping virtually every day of his entire life. At 83, he is still trapping, helping other trappers, doing wildlife photography, giving demos, helping at fur sales, and speaking with non-trappers about the positive aspects of trapping as an effective wildlife management tool at any opportunity. One of the founding fathers of the Genesee Valley Trappers Association in Western New York over 50 years ago, he has served as a dedicated and motivated officer of that organization, in various capacities and titles, for almost it's entire existence.  Only recently stepping down from Treasurer to allow some of the “younger guys” an

opportunity. Gordy became the President of the New York State Trappers Association during the 1970s and

served as long in that position as the By Laws would allow.  He then became the NYSTA Director to the National Trappers Association and dedicatedly remained in that position for many, many years.   He remained active on

the NYSTA Board of Directors as an Active Past President with voting privileges until about 3 years ago.

 

INTRODUCING YOUTH TO TRAPPING:

While hunting and fishing have gained popularity in recent years thanks to television shows such as Duck Dynasty, Deadliest Catch and Swamp People, trapping remains the ugly duckling of the trio.

Plagued with constant scrutiny from both the public and anti-hunting organizations such as the Humane Society of the United States, sportsmen could very well see the end of recreational and sustenance trapping in the coming decades.

However, sportsmen can counter these efforts by educating the next generation on the many benefits of trapping. Here are a few suggested ways that you can help introduce youth to our trapping heritage.

Educate Yourself

Before teaching others, make sure that you are up to date on state and national trapping laws and practices. Every year, hundreds, if not thousands, of changes are made to regulations regarding the trapping of furbearers. Contact your local warden or trappers association for more information – they will often have pamphlets, books and other resources to send you free of charge

Mentor a Youth

Passing your knowledge and appreciation of trapping on to a youth is one of the simplest steps any sportsman can take to ensure its future. Kids of all ages can find enjoyment in trapping, so long as you take the right approach.

Make trips to check traps short, fun and informative. Youth in their early teens make great candidates because they have the stamina to last a few hours in the woods, can help carry equipment and are still very inquisitive and impressionable. They are often able to start trapping themselves depending on your state’s age restrictions.

Some states require those wanting to trap to take a special course, quite similar to hunter’s safety, that teaches proper trapping techniques and laws. If this should be the case in your state, volunteer to take the course with your mentee. By doing so, you strengthen the relationship between you and your apprentice – you might also learn something new or meet other trappers!

Share Your Knowledge with Others

Besides mentoring a single individual, you might also elect to share your knowledge of trapping with larger groups of youth through a presentation. Boy Scout and Girl Scout troops, 4-H groups and local sportsmen’s clubs all hold monthly meetings that often include guest speakers on any given topic. You could volunteer to talk about trapping and the many benefits that the practice provides to both wildlife and humans. Showcasing furs of your own makes for a fun and exciting hands-on experience that kids will remember.

(By Cameron Pauli, USSA Digital Media Specialist)

 

AMERICA’S TOP 10 THREATS TO TRAPPING: There are many forces in America working to end trapping and

wise wildlife management. Here are a few of those anti-trapping groups:

Sierra Club—this group’s board of directors has let America know it opposes any and all trapping—period. The

official Sierra Club statement reads: “The Sierra Club considers body-gripping, restraining and killing traps and

snares to be ecologically indiscriminate and unnecessarily inhumane and therefore opposes their use.” This

position earns this group a No. 1 spot.

PETA—best known for being wackos, this group opposes fur, trapping and anything non-vegan. PETA also

wanted to “trap” and euthanize problem hogs in Florida to prevent them from being hunted.

Humane Society of the United States—this radical animal rights group lists trapping as wildlife abuse. This

group is currently being sued for violation of federal racketeering laws.

American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (alias ASPCA)—states openly on its website

that “The ASPCA is against the use of leg-hold or body gripping traps to capture wild animals because of the

pain and distress that they cause.” The group also opposes hunting.

Defenders of Wildlife—this group opposes wolf hunting and trapping, and launched an aggressive on-line

campaign to skew an Idaho wolf trapping survey in its favor. DOW reported it had 39,000 followers overwhelm

the Idaho Game and Fish Commission’s website.

Born Free USA—this radical animal rights group labels trapping as “barbaric” and has a trapping victims fund to

help cover veterinarian costs for animals—including wildlife—caught in traps. It distributes a free “How to

Organize an Anti-Trapping Campaign” booklet through its Animal Protection Institute group.

In Defense of Animals—opposes trapping and has created a “furkills” website to promote the group’s propaganda—and to collect funds. The group also encourages followers to create a display in their local public

library to display leaflets, posters, and books about the cruelty involved in trapping or leg-hold traps.

Animal Welfare Institute: Opposes trapping and is pushing the Refuge from Cruel Trapping Act in Congress to

end trapping on national wildlife refuges. Filed a lawsuit in 2008 to stop coyote and fox trapping in Maine under the

guise of protecting Canada lynx.

Center for Biological Diversity: has campaigns underway to stop wolf trapping and hunting in Montana, Wyom-

ing and Idaho, and another in New Mexico to save Mexican gray wolves. Some of the group’s “urgent letters of

action” also includes requests for donations to end trapping.

Footloose Montana—works to oppose wolf trapping and the management of these large predators in Montana

while other wildlife species, like elk, dwindle in numbers at the hands, or paws, of wolves. Also works to end

trapping on public lands.

Trapping plays an important role in sound wildlife management practices and helps numerous wildlife species, including song birds and waterfowl populations. As you can tell, trappers and hunters need to work together to overcome these radical forces.

Courtesy of the U.S. Sportsmen’s Alliance/ www.ussportsmen.org

The U.S. Sportsmen’s Alliance’s watchdog efforts protect hunters’ rights and the interests of anglers, trappers

and recreational shooters in the courts, legislatures, at the ballot, in Congress, and through many public

education programs. The USSA has more than 170,000 registered Sentries that regularly receive information

about conservation issues, and then they actively work to promote and protect scientific conservation through

calls and contacts. For more information about the U.S. Sportsmen’s Alliance and the Sentry program, call

(614) 888-4868 or visit: www.ussportsmen.org.

 

FUR PRICES:

Genesee Valley Trappers Association's 2017 - 2018 Auction Results:

Species

December 17, 2018

January 21, 2018

   February 18, 2018             

 

#

Low

Ave

High

#

Low

Ave

High

#

Low

Ave

High

Beaver

0.10
9.87
20.00
1.00
9.57
20.50

Beaver Castor (/lb)

2.06
24.00
24.00
24.00
8.15
38.00
39.00
45.50

Coyote

1.00
19.18
59.00
NS
18.30
45.00

Deer

2.00
2.00
2,00
-----
-----
-----

Fox – Gray

8.00
15.00
35.00
8.00
15.70
17.00

Fox – Red

0.50
13.61
37.00
0.25
11.52
31.00

Mink

1
NS
NS
NS
0.50
8.65
14.00

Muskrat

1.50
2.00
3.50 BB
0.10
3.81
6.70

Opossum

-----
-----
-----
NS
0.59
2.50

Raccoon

NS
2.36
11.50
NS
3.19
9.00

Skunk

-----
-----
-----
4
1.00
5.38
8.00

Weasel

-----
-----
-----
-----
-----
-----

Other - Bear

 
-----
-----
-----
2
36.00
58.51
81.00
Other - Bear w/skull
 
-----
-----
-----
1
50.00
50.00
50.00
Other - Bobcat
 
-----
-----
-----
3
39.00 BB
43.67
46.00
Other - Bobcat (Whole)
-----
-----
-----
1
60.00
60.00
60.00
Other - Fisher
-----
-----
-----
2
40.00 BB
51.50
63.00

Other - Martin

-----
-----
-----
1
32.00
32.00
32.00
Other - 'rat Glands
-----
-----
-----
4.5 oz
7.00
7.00
7.00
Other - Gray Squirrel
-----
-----
-----
12
0.10
0.50
0.50
Other - Red Squirrel
-----
-----
-----
11
0.05
0.23
0.30

# of Lots

# of Sellers

# of Buyers(Serious)

# of Furs

0

0

0

0

     

165

13

6

429

     

454

24

5

1449

Average Lots/Seller

Average Furs/Seller

Average Furs/Lot

       

12.7

33

2.6

     

18.9

60.4

3.2

NS – No Sale

BB – Buy Back

 

 

 

 

Species

March 20, 2018

17– 18 Season

 

#

Low

Ave

High

#

Low

Ave

High

Beaver

0.50
3.18
12.25
0.10
7.90
20.50

Beaver Castor (/lb)

2.31
33.00
35.94
38.00
12.52
24.00
35.97
45.50

Coyote

NS
7.02
26.50
NS
16.85
59.00

Deer

-----
-----
-----
2.00
2.00
2.00

Fox – Gray

5.00
9.93
14.50
5.00
14.11
35.00

Fox – Red

NS
4.54
12.50
NS
11.49
37.00

Mink

6.00
8.10
12.00
NS
8.39
14.00

Muskrat

NS
1.51
6.00 BB
NS
3.35
6.70

Opossum

-----
-----
-----
NS
0.59
2.50

Raccoon

0.10
3.20
8.00
NS
2.91
11.50

Skunk

-----
-----
-----
4
1.00
5.38
8.00

Weasel

-----
-----
-----
-----
-----
-----

Other – Bear

-----
-----
-----
2
36.00
58.51
81.00

Other - Bear w/skull

-----
-----
-----
1
50.00
50.00
50.00

Other - Bobcat (Whole)

-----
-----
-----
1
60.00
60.00
60.00

Other –Fisher

-----
-----
-----
2
40.00 BB
51.50
63.00

Other – Martin

-----
-----
-----
1
32.00
32.00
32.00

Other – 'rat Glands

-----
-----
-----
4.5 oz
7.00
7.00
7.00

Other – Gray Squirrel

-----
-----
-----
12
0.10
0.50
0.50

Other – Red Squirrel

-----
-----
-----
11
0.05
0.23
0.30

# of Lots

# of Sellers

# of Buyers(Serious)

# of Furs

92

13

2

252

     

711

50

---

2130

     

Average Lots/Seller

Average Furs/Seller

Average Furs/Lot

7.1

19.4

2.7

     

14.22

42.6

3.0

     

 

GENESEE VALLEY TRAPPERS FUR SALE ANNUAL COMPARISONS:

Species

05 -06

06 - 07

07 - 08

08 - 09

09 - 10

10 - 11

 

Ave

High

Ave

High

Ave

High

Ave

High

Ave

High

Ave

High

Beaver

23.83

46.00

NA

43.00

20.02

53.00

12.61

44.00

16.53

45.50

11.36

50.50

Beaver Castor (/lb)

11.31

15.00

NA

12.00

11.36

17.33

22.11

28.50

31.66

46.00

28.07

50.00

Bobcat

-----

-----

-----

-----

10.50

10.50

37.33

60.00

-----

-----

-----

-----

Coyote

22.92

43.00

NA

42.50

16.65

41.00

14.59

30.00

17.70

40.00

16.49

40.25

Deer

3.78

5.00

2.43

6.50

2.20

3.00

1.89

3.00

2.38

4.00

2.21

5.00

Fisher

34.50

34.50

-----

-----

67.40

80.00

36.50

50.00

43.40

55.00

37.44

54.50

Fox – Gray

23.83

30.00

NA

47.50

34.82

52.00

19.25

35.50

18.68

31.50

20.64

29.00

Fox – Red

19.50

42.00

NA

32.50

16.30

32.00

12.85

28.00

10.77

34.50

13.08

31.00

Martin

40.00

40.00

-----

-----

-----

-----

NS

NS

29.33

34.00

25.34

26.00

Mink

19.86

29.00

NA

29.50

10.59

17.50

8.60

15.00

10.38

15.00

10.68

22.00

Muskrat

5.94

8.10

NA

11.40

3.92

5.60

4.19

6.50

6.81

10.60

6.03

10.10

Opossum

1.51

3.75

NA

6.10

2.00

4.50

1.21

5.00

0.69

8.50

0.99

4.50

Otter

-----

-----

62.00

62.00

26.00

26.00

34.46

48.00

-----

-----

-----

-----

Raccoon

9.63

20.50

NA

25.00

16.29

37.00

9.21

24.50

8.24

24.00

8.14

22.00

Skunk

5.54

11.50

NA

9.00

7.09

14.50

3.89

10.00

4.45

10.00

4.60

10.10

Weasel

1.00

1.00

NA

2.50

5.70

6.97+

1.75

3.00

6.25

10.00

3.31

5.00

# of Lots
2081
2999
2051
1717
2404
1925

# of Furs

NA

 

NA

 

6766

 

7161

 

8954

 

7299+

 

# of Sellers

NA

 

NA

 

195

 

175

 

211

 

185

 

 

Species

  11 - 12

12 - 13

13 - 14

14 - 15

15 - 16

16 - 17      

 

Ave

High

Ave

High

Ave

High

Ave

High

Ave

High

Ave

High

 

Beaver

23.37

67.00

23.78

58.00

21.03

65.00

18.04 

40.00 

11.44 

35.00 

 11.76

30.50 

Beaver Castor (/lb)

40.64

55.00

16.86

26.00

18.13

32.00

 26.29

45.50 

 28.27

30.00 

 42.17

47.00 

Bobcat

-----

-----

66.00

101

92.20

106

 54.00

54.00 

 50.00

50.00 

 51.17

100.00 

Coyote

30.87

100

27.37

93.00

21.03

54.00

 20.41

74.00 

 23.36

62.00 

 17.27

75.00 

Deer

0.96

5.50

3.04

7.00

7.33

9.25

 5.18

10.00 

 2.30

2.75 

 1.73

4.00 

Fisher

68.43

145

81.17

120

80.60

130

 -----

----- 

 105.00

105.00 

 52.13

70.00 

Fox – Gray

30.58

46.00

31.49

46.00

22.73

39.00

 21.61

30.00 

 18.09

29.00 

 17.31

36.00 

Fox – Red

27.54

79.00

42.70

68.00

37.72

73.00

 20.58

41.00 

 11.94

33.00 

 10.58

29.50 

Martin

-----

-----

40.60

70.00

-----

70.00

BB

 -----

----- 

 -----

----- 

 22.17

26.00 

Mink

19.22

31.00

24.23

35.00

14.99

27.00

 10.70

20.00 

 7.50

14.00 

 9.03

13.50 

Muskrat

10.57

19.00

12.37

18.75

11.66

16.75

 6.49

13.30 

 3.36

6.20 

 4.46

8.10 

Opossum

1.60

5.40

4.31

20.00

2.07

6.25

 0.52

1.25 

0.79 

3.00 

 1.21

4.00 

Otter

89.00

89.00

-----

-----

100

100

 15.00

15.00 

 56.00

56.00 

 -----

----- 

Raccoon

9.00

23.00

14.22

39.00

11.83

29.50

 7.08

25.00 

 2.81

10.00 

 3.94

25.50 

Skunk

6.53

8.50

8.19

25.00

4.47

8.50

 4.85

11.00 

 6.23

15.50 

 6.53

17.50 

Weasel

3.67

5.00

2.88

4.50

0.85

1.50

 2.00

3.00 

 -----

----- 

 0.58

2.00 

# of Lots

1840

 

1755

 

1741

 

 1245

 

 949

 

 820

 

# of Furs

7080

 

5009

 

5636

 

5721 

 

 5803

 

5026 

 

# of Sellers

172

 

165

 

141

 

114 

 

79 

 

61 

 

 

 

Species  17-18 18 - 19 19 - 20
Ave
High
Ave
High
Ave
High
Ave
High
Ave
High
Ave
High
Beaver
7.90
20.50
Beaver Castor (lb)
35.97
45.50
Bobcat
43.67
46.00
Coyote
16.85
59.00
Deer
2.00
2.00
Fisher
51.50
63.00
Fox - Gray
14.11
35.00
Fox - Red
11.49
37.00
Martin
32.00
32.00
Mink
8.39
14.00
                   
Muskrat
3.35
6.70
Opossum
0.59
2.50
Otter
-----
-----
Raccoon
2.91
11.50
Skunk
5.38
8.00
Weasel
-----
-----
# of Lots
711
# of Furs
2130
# of Sellers
50

 

NA - Not Available

BB - Buy Back

Season results are figured from four auctions per season.

For direct reports via email use our Contact Page and ask to

be added to the Fur Report List

 

FROM THE GOOD OLD YEARS:

Fur Prices at the Broome County Trapper Association Fur Auctions 1977-1986
(Prices converted to 2014)

Year         1977                       1978                       1979                        1980                        1982                        1986

Muskrat   $5.94 ($23.20)     $5.55 ($20.15)      $5.45 ($17.77)      $7.57 ($21.75)       $4.89 ($12.00)       $3.27 ($7.06)

Mink         $16.49 ($64.43)   $9.81 ($35.62)      $17.53 ($57.17)   $23.20 ($66.65)     $17.61 ($43.20)    $17.03 ($36.78)

Raccoon   $18.59 ($72.63)   $14.38 ($52.21)   $25.20 ($81.69)   $16.24 ($46.66)     $22.28 ($54.65)    $10.91 ($23.57)

Beaver     $21.50 ($84.00)    $11.33 ($41.14)   $14.58 ($47.54)   $25.33 ($72.77)     $13.00 ($31.89)    $13.95 ($30.13)

Red Fox   $37.25 ($145.54)  $45.21 ($164.16) $58.04 ($189.27) $43.80 ($125.84)  $45.35 ($111.24)  $15.65 ($33.80)

Gray Fox  $34.11 ($133.27) $32.82 ($119.17) $58.51 ($190.80) $52.17 ($149.88)  $29.80 ($73.10)     $18.32 ($39.57)

Coyote     $29.00 ($113.30) $25.80 ($93.68)   $44.12 ($143.88) $35.83 ($103.94)   $27.00 ($66.23)     -----


TRAPPING TIPS:

Skunk Smell Removal

Mix the following ingredients and wash your pet (or you) making sure you don't get it in eyes, nose or mouth.

Follow with a though tap water rinse. May have to repeat if smell lingers.

1 quart of 3% hydrogen peroxide (from pharmacy)

1/4 cup baking soda

1 tea spoon of liquid soap

For clothes and inside vehicles, I've found Fabreze Air Freshener effective.

Animal Bites and Scratches

Animal bites and scratches can cause serious injuries. Wash wounds thoroughly with soap and water, apply bandages, and seek medical assistance. Keep the animal confined for observation if possible. If you can’t

confine the animal,kill it without damaging the head so that health authorities can test it for rabies.If bitten, report

the incident immediately to your local County Health Department.

Trap Tags

Trap tags must be durable and easy to read. They must be firmly attached to the trap so they will not come off.

In New York, every trap must have a tag that legibly bears the name and address or the license ID number of the trapper.

Tips From Tomahawk

Tips From Tomahawk Before setting a trap always consider Where, When and What you are trapping. Considering these questions before setting out a trap can save you a lot of time, hassle and lessen the chances of unsafe or illegal practices. Where you set your trap can affect how you set your trap, what type of trap to use and most importantly the safety of people passing by and the safety of the trapped animal. Avoid setting traps in high traffic areas or where passing children may have ac-cess to the trap. Children may be tempted to touch the trapped animal leading to injury. When it is absolutely necessary to trap in these areas use a covered or enclosed trap and have a spotter check on the trap often. Where the animal is easiest to catch can also determine the types of equipment needed. A hole in a soffit may require a soffit cone to set a trap directly over the entry/exit point. Another "where" that you should ask yourself is, "Where will the captured animal go after it has been caught?" This is often overlooked and can cause a lot of stress if not planned out. Check your local laws for animal regulations on transportation and relocation. When you trap may not only determine success or failure but could also jeopardize the safety of trapped animals. Think about the time of year, time of day and when the animal is most active. These criteria will affect your capture rate, survival rate and even determine if it is legal to trap the specific target animal in your area at the time. Some species are protected and require permits to move during birthing times. What you are trapping is of course the most important factor of all. It determines most of the above "where" and "when" you trap. It should also determine what type of trap you are going to use and what type of bait or attractant you will use if setting a baited trap. Some animals are easier to catch with a bait-less runway trap and others usually require some type of food in the trap. An armadillo for example requires no bait but a double door trap should be used along with funnels on both ends to guide the ani-mal into the trap. Do some research on your target animal to find information that will help you in your trapping endeavors. Simply setting a trap out in the middle of the yard during the middle of the day rarely works.

(Tomahawk Live Trap, PO Box 155, Hazelhurst, WI 54531  800-272-8727  trapem@livetrap.com  www.livetrap.com)                               

DEC Regulations for Body-grip Traps Set on Land

Trail set trapBody-gripping traps set on land shall not be within

100 feet of a public trail except on Wildlife Management Areas.

A body-gripping trap measuring less than 5 1/2 inches may be set in any manner with or without the

use of bait.

Body-gripping traps measuring 5 1/2 inches to 6 inches, set without the use of bait, must be set so

that no part of the trap is 8 inches or more above the ground.

Body-gripping traps 5 1/2 to 7 1/2 inches set with the use of bait, lure, or other attractants may

only be used as follows:

  • Four or more feet off the ground.
    Leaning pole trap set

Bucket cubby trap set

  • Box cubby trap set side view
  • In a container of the following design:
    • opening height 6 inches or less
    • 8 inch minimum spring notches
    • trap recessed minimum of 4 inches
  • Box cubby trap set angled-view
  • In a container of the following design:
    • trap recessed 18 inches
    • opening height and width 10 inches or less
  • Vertical cubby trap set
  • In a container of the following design:
    • only one entrance, facing the ground
    • container set so entrance is no more than 6 inches from ground
    • trap recessed minimum of 4 inches

NOTE:

You may also build an enclosure of natural materials (e.g., logs or rocks). The opening

height must be 6 inches or less and the trap must be recessed a minimum of 8 inches.

 

TRAPPING SEASONS (CENTRAL/WESTERN NEW YORK):

Beaver:  2017/18 Annual Seasons New York State map showing beaver trapping season for different areas

Bobcat 2017/18 Annual Seasons:

New York State map showing trapping season for different areas for bobcats

Fisher: 2017/18 Annual Seasons

Season Dates for Fisher and Marten Trapping

Coyote:  October 25 - February 15

Fox - Gray:  October 25 - February 15

Fox - Red:   October 25 - February 15

Mink:  November 25 - February 15

Muskrat:   November 25 - February 15

Opossum:  October 25 - February 15

Raccoon:  October 25 - February 15

Skunk:   October 25 - February 15

Weasel:  October 25 - February 15

 

TRAPPING VIDEOS:

***Trap Triggers Primitive Sets

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YGe65pV84mk&list=PLD75DA63DD1F83C4E&index=2

*** Spring Engine Dead-fall Trap

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BbvIgeG_WeE&index=4&list=PLD75DA63DD1F83C4E

*** Winter Coyote Control (Go to 9 minutes)

http://www.growingdeer.tv/?ep=hunting-whitetails-and-trapping-coyotes-step-by-step-for-a-flat-set&utm_source=OutdoorWire&utm_medium=PressRelease&utm_campaign=270#/hunting-

whitetails-and-trapping-coyotes-step-by-step-for-a-flat-set

*** Problem Coyote Control - Kentucky (Part 1 of Series)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jn5HHrCG9pg

*** Problem Coyote Control - Kentucky (Part 2 of Series)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xc2F6Jt4jb0

*** Problem Coyote Control - Kentucky (Part 3 of Series)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3lbUC6B2FqY&list=PLF2D5112A8449CD24

*** Problem Coyote Control - Kentucky (Part 4 of Series)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wrd4QLNDpTg&list=PLF2D5112A8449CD24

*** Problem Coyote Control - Kentucky (Part 5 of Series)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=67pVgK6cXUk&list=PLF2D5112A8449CD24

*** Problem Coyote Control - Kentucky (Part 6 of Series)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=csCgcI8dbj0

*** Problem Coyote Control - Kentucky (Part 7 of Series)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7eB2GsCxC5U

*** Air Skinning a Coyote

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DJr5wkfmbvM

TRAPPER CLUBS:

Cattaraugus County Trappers Association             County Cooperative Extention, Ellicottville, NY

          Contact: Brian Davis, Treasurer 3853 Bear Hollow Road Great Valley, NY 14741 Phone (716) 945-4223

           e-mail: briandavis47@hotmail.com

          Meet: 4th Monday of each month, except no meeting in December

Cortland County Trappers Association             McGraw Sportsman's Club, McGraw, NY

          Contact: Les Wedge 607-749-3292

          Meet: 3rd Sunday of each month

Erie County Trappers Association            Hamburg Rod & Gun Club, 3434 Hickox Road, Hamburg, NY

          Contact: ECTA, 12580 Jennings Road, Lawtons, NY 14091  /    Rick Wattengel (President)  716-337-2556.

          Meet: 2nd Tuesday

Genesee Valley Trappers Association      GVTA Clubhouse, 4462 Ct. Rt. 32, Honeoye, NY

          Contact: Tom Miller  585-229-4759         

          Meet: 2nd Wednesday of each month     Fur Auctions in December, January, February & March

Independent Fur Harvesters of CNY          Pratts Falls County Park, Manlius, NY

          Contact: Mike Kraus 315-672-3717

          Meet: 2nd Thursday of each month

Niagara County Trappers Association       The Dale Association, 33 Ontario St, Lockport, NY

          Contact: Wayne Snell 716-795-9157 or Kevin Teeter 716-439-5862

          Meet: 1st Thursday

NYST Franklinville Furbearers Trapping Association    Franklinville Conservation Club, Franklinville, NY

          Contact: Dick Duffy  716-353-2781 or Victoria Pixley 716-242-9790

          Meet: 3rd Thursday (except July and August)

Oswego County Trappers                          Leatherstocking Club, Route 104, New Haven, NY

          Contact: Bruce Hyde  315-342-6357 or 315-591-3525

          Meet: 1st Tuesday of each month except July & November

Tioga County Trappers Association           The Sportsmen's Club, Owego, NY

          Contact: Bob Vergason  607-687-2196  or Bill Swagler 607-642-3336  

          Meet: 1st Sunday

New York State Trappers Association       Meeting Location: Varies

          Contact: Wayne Jones at Iluvny2@rochester.rr.com   Webpage: http://www.nystrappers.org

 

WEBSITES FOR TRAPPERS:

1. A general New York trappers site - http://nytrappers.proboards.com/

2. A national trappers site - http://trapperman.com/

3. National Trappers Association - www.national.trappers.com

4. New York State Trappers Assoc. - http://www.nystrappers.org

5. FTA Education Website - http://furbearereducation.org/

 

TRAPPER EDUCATION COURSES:

Register for a Trapper Education Course

The Trapper Education course is only offered as a "Home Study" option, which requires homework to be completed prior to

attending a field session led by an instructor.

Course Type

Online Registration Link

Course Information

Home Study Course

Register for a Trapper Education Home Study Course

Both parts of a home study course listed below must be completed. Students

should sign up and register for this type of course prior to starting the homework

  • Part 1 - Complete a portion of the course on your own
    (will take at least 8 hours to complete).
    Refer to the Trapper Education Manual (PDF) (5mb) and complete the Trapper Education Homework Worksheet (PDF) (235KB). If you prefer a hard copy, the manual and worksheet can usually be picked up at the address noted on the
  • course schedule listing.
  • Part 2 - Attend a field session led by an instructor.
    You must attend the entire field session on the date(s) and at the location
  • indicated on the course schedule listing. The completed homework worksheet
  • must be brought to the field session.

General Course Details and Requirements

Course Topics Covered

           Trapping safety and techniques

  • Techniques to avoid catching non-targeted species
  • Prepare pelts to produce marketable furs
  • Laws and regulations of trapping

Age Restrictions/Requirements

None. (Note: When purchasing a trapping licenses, non-residents must be at least 16-years old. There is no age restriction for New York State residents).

Course Length

Minimum of 8 hours.

Trapper Education Certificate

Students must attend all sessions of the course, demonstrate proper attitude and safety, and pass a final exam of 40

questions. After successful completion of the course, students will receive a Trapper Education Certificate of

Qualification, which is required for purchasing a first-time trapping license in New York State.

 

 

TRAPPERS' PHOTOS:

KUDOS: Congratulations go out to Dillon Steed and Sean McDermott on their first beaver catch – a monster 65 pounder. The animal was trapped on the East Branch of the Tioughnioga River, near the Village of Truxton. They are apprentices of Bob Gotie, a retired DEC Wildlife Biologist. The last two years were mink and muskrat. This year they’re moving up to beaver and they are off to a good start.

 

Joe Spayer with "Catch & Release" (closed season) Fisher from Chautauqua County. (October 2013)

DP traps are very effective on 'coon.

White Foot

Ben's First pine marten-Moose River Plains                              Photo by Paul Czapranski

 

Albino Raccoon Trapped in Indiana

Stephen Roberts' Fisher - Olean 10-26-16